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Phoebe A. Haddon

Academic administrator Phoebe A. Haddon was born on August 29, 1950 in Washington, D.C. to Ida Bassette Haddon, a public school teacher, and Dr. Wallace J. Haddon, a dentist. Haddon was raised in Passaic, New Jersey and graduated from Passaic High School in 1968. She attended Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. Haddon was a founding member of the college’s Black Students’ Alliance in 1969 and majored in government. She graduated from Smith College in 1972 and earned her J.D. degree from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1977. Haddon received her LL.M. degree from Yale University.

Haddon practiced law at Wilmer, Cutler and Pickering in Washington, D.C. from 1979 until 1981. During this period, she also clerked for the Honorable Joseph F. Weis, Jr., a justice on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. In 1981, Haddon joined the faculty of Temple University’s Beasley School of Law, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she taught courses on constitutional law, torts and product liability, equality, and the jury. In 2009, Haddon joined the University of Maryland School of Law and became the first African American dean of the school. While dean of Maryland’s law school, she was responsible for the allocation of the W.P. Carey Foundation’s $30 million gift to the school.

In 2014, Haddon was named as chancellor of Rutgers University-Camden in New Jersey and has led the growth of that public urban research university. Under her leadership, Rutgers University-Camden launched Bridging the Gap, a national model for college access, affordability, and completion that supports New Jersey families by greatly reducing (and even eliminating) tuition costs. Through this program and other initiatives, the campus grew significantly on all fronts. For example, Rutgers University-Camden enrolled approximately three times more first-time undergraduate African American students over a four-year period.

Haddon was named the recipient of the 2019 Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of American Law Schools and the 2019 Smith College Medal. She was named among the “Women of Distinction” by Philadelphia Business Journal; as one of the “25 Most Influential People in Legal Education” by National Jurist; and as one of the “Top 100 Women in Maryland” by the Daily Recorder, which is located in Baltimore, Maryland.

In addition to her career in law and education, Haddon served in advisory and leadership roles for numerous organizations, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, HERS (Higher Education Resource Services), Cooper University Health System, William Penn Foundation, the Samuel S. Fels Fund, the Delaware Valley Community Reinvestment Fund, and the Philadelphia Education Fund. Haddon also served as deputy chair of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, and as vice chair on the board of trustees for Smith College. Haddon authored the article, “Rethinking the Jury”, which was published in the William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal in 1994.

Haddon and her husband, Frank M. McClellan, have three children.

Phoebe A. Haddon was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 21, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.137

Sex

Female

Interview Date

08/21/2017

Last Name

Haddon

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Schools

Yale Law School

Duquesne University School of Law

Smith College

Passaic High School

Lincoln Middle School

First Name

Phoebe

Birth City, State, Country

Washington, DC

HM ID

HAD01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

I'll Get Around To It Tomorrow.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

8/29/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Camden

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Academic administrator Phoebe A. Haddon (1950 - ) taught law courses at Temple University before becoming the first African American dean of the University of Maryland School of Law. In 2014, she was named the chancellor of Rutgers University - Camden.

Employment

Rutgers University

University of Maryland - Baltimore County

Temple University School of Law

Congressman John Conyers

National Labor Relations Board

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Phoebe A. Haddon's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Phoebe A. Haddon lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Phoebe A. Haddon recalls her father's move to Passaic, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about her father's civil rights and political involvement[TW1]

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her father's ideology

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers her paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about her Rachel Noel's involvement in the desegregation of Denver Public Schools

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her mother's career at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her mother's career at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about her maternal aunt Rachel Noel

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about her parents' values

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers her mother's civic involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her parents' early years of marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Phoebe A. Haddon recalls her childhood home in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers visiting her great-aunts and uncles in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers her chores

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Phoebe A. Haddon recalls her father's affiliation with the National Dental Association

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers her experiences of segregation

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her experiences of discrimination in Passaic, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers her peers and teachers at Passaic High School in Passaic, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her experiences at Passaic High School in Passaic, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Phoebe A. Haddon recalls the diversity of her schools and neighborhood in Passaic, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her decision to attend Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her high school aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers her experiences at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Phoebe A. Haddon recalls her internship with Congressman John Conyers, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her civil rights involvement at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about the relationships she created at Smith College

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Phoebe A. Haddon recalls her decision to attend Duquesne University School of Law in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers the law firm of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Phoebe A. Haddon recalls how she came to teach at the Temple University Law School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her role at the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about her decision to become a university administrator

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her article, 'Rethinking the Jury'

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers meeting William P. Carey

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about the American Bar Association's Commission on Multidisciplinary Practice, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about the American Bar Association's Commission on Multidisciplinary Practice, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about the American Bar Association's Commission on Multidisciplinary Practice, pt. 3

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Phoebe A. Haddon talks about her chancellorship at Rutgers University-Camden in Camden, New Jersey

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Phoebe A. Haddon reflects upon the dichotomy between civic engagement and private enterprise

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Phoebe A. Haddon remembers teaching at Temple University's Japan Campus

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her experiences at the Yale Law School in New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Phoebe A. Haddon reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Phoebe A. Haddon describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Phoebe A. Haddon reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Phoebe A. Haddon reflects upon her values

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

6$3

DATitle
Phoebe A. Haddon remembers meeting William P. Carey
Phoebe A. Haddon talks about her chancellorship at Rutgers University-Camden in Camden, New Jersey
Transcript
You go to the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law [Baltimore, Maryland] in 2009.$$So, I went to the University of Maryland [University of Maryland School of Law] and I'm making that distinction because the name Francis King Carey was brought in as a result of a gift that I got as dean, yeah.$$Oh. Tell me about that.$$So, the Carey Foundation, W.P. Carey Foundation in New York City [New York, New York]--$$Is that an investment firm?$$They do all kinds of different things, huge though. Huge corporation. That's a corporation that stems from the Carey family that actually came from Maryland. And the W.P. part of Carey wanted to leave something to Maryland and I didn't know him, but he knew one of my faculty members, Joe Tydings [Joseph Tydings]. You know that name, Senator Tydings?$$Yeah. Millard Tydings was a senator, right?$$Yeah, yep. And--$$That would have been his father or grandfather (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) That's right, yeah. And so--$$There's a bridge [Millard E. Tydings Memorial Bridge]--$$Yeah. So, Tydings called me and said that he wanted me to meet W.P. Carey [William P. Carey] and that this would be a really great opportunity. And so, we made the arrangements for that meeting and then he was not able to go. So, this is Joe Tydings and he says, he, he was not able to go but I should go anyway because we're going to have lunch, Bill Carey and I, and it's going to be a wonderful opportunity. I said, "You mean he's going to give me a gift?" And he said, "Yeah." He said--I said, "Ten thousand dollars?" And he said, "Think big." And I said, "Twenty thousand dollars?" And he said, "Think big." I said, "A hundred thousand dollars?" And he said, "Think big," click. So, I went to this lunch and we started talking at thirty million, yeah. Yeah. It was just an unbelievable, unbelievable (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And you'd never met him before?$$No. I had lunch with him. I visited him after that clearly and you know, continued to visit him until he died. I was--$$If you had another child you'd have named--$$He was very, he was very, very ill the last time I saw him. I went to his funeral, spoke at his funeral. That was just an amazing, amazing thing. I spoke at his funeral and his brother, Frank [Francis J. Carey], and I became really good friends. His, his brother Frank just died.$$Oh.$$So, yeah. Yeah, last year.$$Were they related to the, the Governor Carey [Hugh Carey] of New York?$$No, I don't think so.$$Different Careys?$$Yeah. So, so Francis King Carey is their great-grandfather [sic. grandfather], yeah.$$So, of all of the places--$$He had gone to--so, the connection is he had gone to, to Maryland.$$Okay. So, so all the--so the, they wanted it to go to the university or it could have gone anywhere?$$Yeah, it could have gone any--no, they wanted it to go to, to the university because their, their great-grandfather had gone there, Francis King Carey.$$And they elected to put it in the law school. Was, was their great-grandfather an attorney?$$Um-hm, yeah he had gone to the school (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Oh, he went to the law school?$$Um-hm.$$Okay. And so how long had you been--$$Gone to the, let's see, yeah I--well, he had gone to the school, the University of Maryland.$$And so how long had you been dean when, when this fortuitous event occurred?$$Not long.$$So you, so, so--$$So, maybe third year maybe, um-hm.$$And, and--but--so let's back up.$$'Cause I, I was dean five years there.$$How did you go about applying for the deanship at that school or why did you apply to Maryland as opposed to I don't know some other law school?$$At that point people were calling me about would I be interested in deans.$$So, more than one school was calling you about deanships?$$Yeah, and I really didn't want to be a dean, but I also had begun to understand that I wasn't going to be (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) You would never get to president.$$Right, unless I was a dean. So, I, I went ahead and put my name in for that. I went for Rutgers [Rutgers University - Camden, Camden, New Jersey] actually and I went to the finalist for both of them and decided to go to, to Maryland.$$And, and your former colleague, that was someone from Temple [Temple University Law School; Temple University Beasley School of Law, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania]?$$My former colleague?$$The, the colleague who put you in touch with Tydings?$$No, no, this was, this was somebody in the law school.$$At University of Maryland?$$Um-hm.$So, you retired from the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law [Baltimore, Maryland] in 2014?$$No, I didn't retire, I left.$$You left?$$Yeah. Yeah, I, I--my term was up, so I didn't go for a second term.$$Oh. And, and had you applied for the job of chancellor at Rutgers University?$$Actually it happened within the same month or so. It's kind of interesting. I was planning to come back to Philadelphia [Pennsylvania]. My husband [Frank M. McClellan] did the commuting. You know we had a house (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) While you were in Maryland?$$--in Philadelphia but I lived in Maryland and, and he commuted. And so, you know five years was enough of that. So, I was returning to Phila- Philadelphia and thinking about what I was going to do next and the--there, there were a couple of other things but this offer came through and I really thought this was the best place for me.$$It was what you wanted.$$Yes. Yeah. Now I'm the, the chancellor or president and I get to do the kinds of things that I was in training for all these many years.$$Sixty-five hundred students you have?$$Yes.$$How many faculty (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Sixty-seven hundred now. We're actually in growth mode, uh-huh.$$Okay. How many faculty?$$Sixty, yeah. Sixty-five.$$And what are your goals and objectives as the chancellor of Rutgers University - Camden [Camden, New Jersey]?$$Well, to grow and we are part of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, but there are actually three campuses, Newark [Rutgers University - Newark, Newark, New Jersey], Camden and New Brunswick [Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey]. And it's evolved into a system since I've been there so it really it is a situation where I am the president in, in terms of being the CEO, the chief CEO, but we interact with the other universities. And so, we now have a--one law school that is in Newark as well as Camden and so it's a new innovation of bringing them together (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) When did the law school open in Camden?$$I'm sorry?$$When did the law school open in--so there wasn't always a law school in Camden?$$Yeah, yeah.$$Oh. But now it's the same law school?$$Yes. Yes.$$Okay.$$There were two separate law schools, one in Newark and one in, in Camden. So, now it's the Rutgers Law School. So, I helped finish that reorganization 'cause I think it makes sense to have one Rutgers Law School. And we also have opened a nursing program and have a brand new nursing and science building that is up and running and--$$So, so, so there are two nursing schools then, one in Newark--?$$There is, yes, um-hm.$$At the University of Maryland--$$Yeah.$$--University of--$$Yes.$$--of Rutgers.$$New Jersey.$$Rutgers University.$$Yeah, yeah.$$So, Rutgers University has several different campuses, some of which have multiple schools. And so, the--some of which have the same school. So, in some case we're talking about merging like the law school, which I am a big proponent of. I think that that makes sense. In other situations the need to preserve the locality is important. So, for example in nursing, the profession is very local focused as to some, some people would say in business. So, understanding the culture, the local culture, understanding the, the clients and constituencies are much more localized than in law perhaps. And so, we have a separate business school, we have a separate nursing school and, and we have a separate arts and science school in Camden. So, my aim is to grow those schools.$$Do you--if--so, you have been a law school dean. You're now university president. You have been a professor. You have been an attorney.$$Um-hm.$$You've been--$$Public official.$$Public official.$$Um-hm.$$What do you call yourself?$$I believe essentially I am higher education focused. I believe in the importance of education. I am civically engaged in all of those entities that I have been involved in. I believe that our cities can't thrive without having good leadership and so for me, both Maryland and Rutgers have--has been a place where I can participate in increasing the civic engagement of our students and our faculty and staff in much same way as I did at the redevelopment authority [Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority] or quite frankly in the law firms that I participated in.

Beverly Parker

Entrepreneur Beverly Parker was born on December 26, 1954 in Washington, D.C. to Bernard Kemp and Virginia Kemp. Parker attended Randolph Elementary School and Coolidge High School, where she graduated from in 1972. She earned her B.S. degree in education from Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland in 1976, and her M.B.A degree in finance from Southeastern University in Washington, D.C. and completed post-graduate M.B.A. programs at the Dartmouth University Tuck School of Business in Hanover, New Hampshire and Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Business in Evanston, Illinois.

In 1976, Parker began her career working as a customer service representative for the Potomac Electric Power Company, where she remained until 1980, when she joined the Xerox Corporation as an operations manager in the finance division. Parker then co-founded Washington Cable Supply with her husband, William Parker, in 1984. As executive vice president for Washington Cable Supply, Parker was responsible for supply chain operations management, for Fortune 500 company clients such as AT&T, Bell South, Verizon, and Lucent. Her company, Washington Cable Supply became the seventh largest African American owned company in the United States, before Parker and her husband, retired in 2003.

Parker has received many awards and recognitions for her work with Washington Cable Supply. She was named “Entrepreneur of the Year” by the Virginia Regional Minority Development Council, “Business Woman of the Year” by the Coral Gables Chamber of Commerce in 2002, and was named one of Maryland’s Top 100 Women of 2002, and earned a place on the list of “Who’s Who In Corporate America.”

Parker was an active participant in her community and resided on several boards, including the YMCA of Metropolitan Washington, the Prince Georges County Chamber of Commerce, and The Chimes, a charitable organization that trained and supported people with developmental disabilities. She was also a member of the board of directors for the Miami-Dade Foundation, United Way, Miami Children’s Museum, and the Arscht Performing Arts Center. In 2004, she and her husband founded the Kemp-Parker Charitable Foundation to provide scholarships to minority students.

Beverly Parker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 8, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.048

Sex

Female

Interview Date

03/08/2017

Last Name

Parker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Rudolph Elementary School

Calvin Coolidge Senior High School

Morgan State University

Southeastern University

First Name

Beverly

Birth City, State, Country

Washington, DC

HM ID

PAR11

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Egypt

Favorite Quote

Be Good, Be Quick, Be Gone

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

12/26/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Soft shell crab

Short Description

Entrepreneur Beverly Parker (1954 - ) co-founded Washington Cable Supply, Inc. and served as its executive vice president, an electrical and telecommunications equipment distributor.

Employment

Potomac Electric Company

Xerox Corporation

Washington Cable Supply

Favorite Color

Green