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Andrea Frazier

Civic leader Andrea Frazier was born on September 21, 1956, in Harlem, New York to Wilhelmina Young and James Wilkerson. Frazier attended John H. Finley Elementary School and Manhattanville Junior High School before graduating from Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts in 1974, where she participated in the youth symphony orchestra. She then attended Tufts University and graduated from there in 1978 with her B.A. degree in political science with a concentration in international studies. Frazier subsequently received her M.A. degree from The City University of New York in 1980.

In 1978, Frazier was hired as a researcher at the Ralph Bunche Institute before attending graduate school. After graduation, Frazier briefly worked in the human resources department at the Bronx Lebanon Hospital recruiting and hiring various personnel. She was subsequently employed at New York University School of Law from 1981 to 1985, first as a coordinator of recruitment, pairing students with various law firms and offices, before being promoted to placement director in 1983. In 1986, Frazier was briefly employed with the law firm of Fox Rothschild as a recruitment administrator for new hires, and was later hired by Cigna Insurance to work as a program manager. In 1988, she and her husband, Kenneth Frazier, partnered with Jim Sweet to found the Cornerstone Christian Academy in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she also served on the board of directors. In 1991, Frazier started her own interior design firm called “Frazier Design,” where she specialized in custom made pieces for local historical houses, including the home of Betsy Ross.

In 2012, Frazier joined the board of directors of the Vickie and Jack Farber Institute for Neuroscience at Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and, the following year, she joined the board of directors of the American Heart Association to bring awareness to prevalent heart conditions in women. Frazier has also served on the advisory board for the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music located in the Musician’s Village in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Frazier and her husband have two children, Lauren and James, and reside in Newton, Pennsylvania.

Andrea Frazier was interviewed by The History Makers on June 20, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.042

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/20/2019

Last Name

Frazier

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

P.S. 129 John H. Finley School

Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts

The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy

City University of New York

Manhattanville Junior High School 43

First Name

Andrea

Birth City, State, Country

New York City

HM ID

FRA19

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Nice, France

Favorite Quote

Never give up.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

9/21/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Whitehouse Station

Favorite Food

Lasagna

Short Description

Civic leader Andrea Frazier (1956- ) co-founded Cornerstone Christian Academy in Philadelphia in 1988 and launched an interior design firm called Frazier Designs in 1991.

Employment

Saks Fifth Avenue

St. Luke's Hospital

New York University Law School

Fox, Rothschild

Cigna Insurance

Frazier Design

Favorite Color

Red

Roy F. Eaton

Music producer Roy Eaton was born on May 14, 1930, in Harlem, New York, to Felix and Bernice Eaton, who were of Jamaican descent. Eaton graduated from the Music and Art High School in 1946 and simultaneously enrolled in two schools - the Manhattan School of Music, where he studied piano and musicology, and the City College of New York, where he studied history - graduating from both institutions in 1950. From 1950 to 1952, Eaton attended Yale University, earning his M.A. degree in musicology.

In 1951, Eaton made his debut with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, performing Chopin. He then performed Beethoven in his debut at the Town Hall in New York in 1952. That same year, Eaton began working with the Manhattan School of Music as a concert pianist, performer, and lecturer. He was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1953, serving at a hospital radio station at Fort Dix in New Jersey, where he wrote and produced radio programs for two years. In 1955, Eaton left the Army and was hired at the advertising agency, Young & Rubicam, as a copywriter and composer, where over a two year period, he produced seventy-five percent of all of the agency’s music for products like Chef Boyardee’s Beefaroni, Gulf Oil, and Kent Cigarettes. In 1959, Eaton joined another advertising agency, Benton & Bowles, as its music director. There, he helped to sign the Jackson Five to their first advertising contract deal with Post Cereal. He also helped produce advertisements for Texaco, Yuban’s Coffee, and Hardees. Eaton was then promoted to vice president of the agency in 1968. In 1980, Eaton left Benton & Bowles to launch his own company, Roy Eaton Music Inc., where he helped coordinate music production for various advertising agencies, worked with Michael Jackson, and produced advertisements for companies like Coca-Cola and the Ad Council. Eaton returned to the concert stage in 1986, performing Chopin at the Lincoln Center, and went on to perform there two more times. He also toured to other countries and released five albums, one being an international success.

In 2010, Eaton was inducted into the American Advertising Federation’s Advertising Hall of Fame. Eaton has five sons, and lives on Roosevelt Island in New York with his wife and twin boys, Ari and Ravi.

Roy Eaton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 17, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.045

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/17/2019

Last Name

Eaton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Manhattan School of Music

City College of New York

Yale University

First Name

Roy

Birth City, State, Country

New York City

HM ID

EAT02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Your Life Is A Drama In Which You Are The Star And Director, But Not The Writer.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/14/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Favorite Food

Jamaican

Short Description

Music producer Roy Eaton (1930 - ) produced seventy five percent of all of Young & Rubicam’s music for products like Chef Boyardee’s Beefaroni, Gulf Oil, and Kent Cigarettes in the 1950s. He became vice president of Benton & Bowles before founding Roy Eaton Music, Inc. in 1980.

Employment

Manhattan School of Music

US Army

Young & Rubicam

Benton & Bowles

Roy Eaton Music, Inc.

Favorite Color

Yellow and Purple

Diane B. Patrick

Lawyer Diane Patrick was born on December 17, 1951 in Brooklyn, New York to John Charles Bemus and Lilian Bemus. At a young age, Patrick and her family moved to the Hollis neighborhood in Queens. In 1972, she received her B.A. degree in education from Queens College of the City University of New York. Patrick went on to receive her J.D. degree from Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, California in 1980.

Between college and law school, Patrick worked as an elementary school teacher in the New York public school system. After graduating from Loyola Law School, Patrick joined O’Melveny & Myers as an attorney. In 1983, as a third-year associate, Patrick was asked to move to New York City along with three other associates and two partners to open the firm's New York office. Three years later, Patrick and her family moved to Boston, Massachusetts, where she served as university attorney for Harvard University before being promoted in 1992 to director and associate vice president of human resources. Patrick worked as an attorney at Hogan & Harston in Washington, D.C. for one year before returning to Boston in 1995 to join Ropes & Gray as a labor attorney. From 2006 to 2015, she served as First Lady of Massachusetts during her husband Deval Patrick’s two terms as Governor. In 2010, Patrick was appointed chair of the diversity committee at Ropes & Gray; and, in 2013, she was promoted to co-managing partner at the firm. Patrick retired from Ropes & Gray in 2016.

Patrick served on the boards of the Epiphany School, the Posse Foundation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Partners Healthcare, United Way of Massachusetts Bay, and Jane Doe, Inc. She has volunteered with the Commonwealth’s Foster Care Review Unit, the Boston Bar Association’s Lawyer for a Day program, and the Boston Women Build in the Bayou project. Patrick served as a trustee for ArtsBoston, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Cambridge College, and the Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

While in law school, Patrick received the American Jurisprudence Award, Best Appellant Brief in Statewide Moot Court Competition, and Outstanding Graduate Award for outstanding academic performance and citizenship. In 2015, she was inducted into the Academy of Distinguished Bostonians and received the Cushing-Gavin Management Attorney Award for Excellence from the Labor Guild. She received the Champion of Justice Award from Discovering Justice in 2017, and the Boston Bar Foundation’s Public Service Award in 2019.
Patrick and her husband, Deval Patrick, have two children: Sarah and Katherine.

Diane Patrick was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.099

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/12/2019

Last Name

Patrick

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

B.

Occupation
Schools

Queens College, City University of New York

Loyola Law School

First Name

Diane

Birth City, State, Country

New York City

HM ID

PAT12

Favorite Season

Thanksgiving

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Nevis

Favorite Quote

The Will Of God Will Not Take You Where The Grace Of God Will Not Protect You

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

12/17/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Tomatoes, Hamburgers, and Tuna Fish

Short Description

Lawyer Diane Patrick (1951- ) served as managing partner at Ropes & Gray law firm, and as First Lady of Massachusetts from 2006 to 2015.

Employment

New York Public School System

O'Melveny & Myers

Harvard University

Hogan & Harston

Ropes & Gray

Governor Deval Patrick Administration

Favorite Color

Blue

Andre Harrell

Producer and record executive Andre Harrell was born on September 26, 1960 in Harlem, New York. At the age of sixteen, Harrell and high school friend, Alonzo Brown, formed the hip hop duo, Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde; and in 1980, they signed with Tayster and Rojac Records in Harlem. They released several hit songs including “Genius Rap,” “Fast Life,” and “AM/PM” as well as the 1984 album, The Champagne of Rap. Harrell attended Lehman College, where he majored in communications and business management, but left after three years to work for a local news station, WINS.

In 1983, Harrell began working for Russell Simmons at RUSH Management. Within two years, he became the vice president and general manager of Def Jam Records, where he helped launch the careers of Run-DMC, LL Cool J, and Whodini. In 1986, Harrell founded his own record label, Uptown Records, where he worked with Heavy D. & The Boyz, Al B. Sure, Notorious B.I.G., Guy, Jodeci, McGruff, Sean Combs, Lost Boyz, and The Gyrlz. He also worked with Mary J. Blige, releasing her debut album, What’s the 411?, with Uptown in 1992. That same year, Harrell accepted a multimedia deal with MCA Music Entertainment Group. He was also the executive producer of Fox’s hit crime television show, New York Undercover, which aired from 1994 to 1998. Harrell was also the executive producer of several films, including Strictly Business in 1991, and Honey in 2003. Harrell became the chief executive officer of Motown Records in 1995, where he oversaw the careers of Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross, and Queen Latifah. Harrell also founded Nu Records, and served as an executive producer on Robin Thicke’s and Pharrell William’s 2013 hit song “Blurred Lines.” In 2013, Harrell became the vice chairman of Sean Combs’ multimedia company, Revolt TV Network. He played an instrumental role in launching the Revolt Music Conference in Miami, Florida, which was attended by Guy Oseary, Russell Simmons and L.A. Reid.

In 2009, Harrell received a Cultural Excellence Award from the National Action Network. He was also the recipient of BET’s Culture Creators Award in 2016.

Andre Harrell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 23, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.029

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/28/2018

Last Name

Harrell

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Andre

Birth City, State, Country

New York City

HM ID

HAR53

Favorite Season

Spring - May In New York

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Barts

Favorite Quote

Whatever

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

9/26/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Producer and record executive Andre Harrell (1960 - ) founded Uptown Records, and served as the president and chief executive officer of Motown Records, and executive producer of New York Undercover before becoming the vice chairman of Revolt TV Network.

Favorite Color

Blue

Renee Poussaint

Journalist Renee Poussaint was born on August 12, 1944. Poussaint received her B.A. degree in English literature from Sarah Lawrence College in 1964; and, in 1970, she graduated with her M.A. degree in African studies from the University of California, Los Angeles. She has also studied at Yale Law School and the Sorbonne in Paris, France.

In 1970, Poussaint began her career in television broadcasting working as a news correspondent at WBBM-TV in Chicago, Illinois. She went on to anchor the ABC Evening News, substituting for Peter Jennings, as well as news segments on Good Morning America. She was a national correspondent for the CBS network, and ABC’s news magazine show Prime Time Live. Poussaint also anchored the local ABC evening news in Washington, D.C. for more than a decade. She has reported from locations around the world including Haiti, South Africa and Uganda, and has interviewed many historic movers and shakers, as well as everyday people whose problems shape our world.

In 2001, Poussaint and Camille Cosby, educator and producer, founded the National Visionary Leadership Project. The project utilizes various educational media to record, preserve, and distribute the stories and wisdom of older generations of African Americans. The entirety of the NVLP collection is archived at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. as a component of the broader “National Visionary Leadership Project Collection.” In 2004, Poussaint and Cosby co-authored a book titled, A Wealth of Wisdom: Legendary African American Elders Speak, which appeared on the New York Times best-seller list.

Poussaint is also founder of Wisdom Works, a documentary production company. The company’s highly-acclaimed documentary, “Tutu and Franklin: A Journey towards Peace,” aired nationally on PBS in 2001, and was filmed at the infamous slave port Goree, Senegal. Her work as a documentary filmmaker has also appeared on Discovery, A&E, and Lifetime. In addition, she taught journalism at the University of Maryland.

Poussaint is the recipient of three national and seven local Emmy awards. As an independent consultant and community activist, Poussaint has worked with nonprofit and community organizations to help them better define their message for a larger audience. Her volunteer activities have included tutoring, mentoring, and reading newspapers for the blind. Poussaint has received honorary doctorates from Georgetown University and Mount Vernon College.

Renee Poussaint was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 17, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.036

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/16/2013

Last Name

Poussaint

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Sarah Lawrence College

University of California, Los Angeles

Yale Law School

Indiana University

Andrew Jackson High School

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Renee

Birth City, State, Country

New York City

HM ID

POU03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/12/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Journalist Renee Poussaint (1944 - ) is co-founder of the The National Visionary Leadership Project and founder of Wisdom Works.

Employment

WBBM TV

CBS News

Prime Time Live

National Visionary Leadership Project

Wisdom Works

WJLA TV

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Renee Poussaint's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Renee Poussaint lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Renee Poussaint talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Renee Poussaint talks about her maternal grandparents' arranged marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Renee Poussaint talks about her mother's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Renee Poussaint shares a story from her mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Renee Poussaint talks about her mother's aspirations and her parents' disapproval of her father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Renee Poussaint talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Renee Poussaint talks about visiting Mali and her resemblance to Mali's Fulani tribe

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Renee Poussaint talks about her uncle, HistoryMaker Alvin Poussaint, a well-known psychiatrist

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Renee Poussaint talks about her father's upbringing in Harlem, New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Renee Poussaint talks about her father's aspiration to be a graphic artist

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Renee Poussaint describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Renee Poussaint talks about her mother's involvement with the Communist Party and her parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Renee Poussaint describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Renee Poussaint describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Renee Poussaint describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in Harlem

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Renee Poussaint talks about her parents' divorce when she was ten years old

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Renee Poussaint talks about going to Catholic school

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Renee Poussaint talks about her childhood love of school and reading

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Renee Poussaint talks about her mother's reaction to her anti-Communist teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Renee Poussaint talks about her mother's involvement with the Communist Party and the NAACP

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Renee Poussaint talks about black identity and her love of dance

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Renee Poussaint describes her childhood neighborhood in Queens, New York City, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Renee Poussaint talks about Andrew Jackson High School and her interest in studying French

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Renee Poussaint describes her lack of interest in the media as a youth

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Renee Poussaint talks about being the salutatorian of Andrew Jackson High School Class of 1962, and being accepted into Sarah Lawrence College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Renee Poussaint talks about her relationship with her father following her parents' divorce

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Renee Poussaint describes attending Andrew Jackson High School in Queens, New York City, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Renee Poussaint describes attending Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Renee Poussaint talks about studying abroad in Paris during her junior year at Sarah Lawrence College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Renee Poussaint talks about her favorite writers in college

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Renee Poussaint shares a story about her uncle's visit to Paris, France

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Renee Poussaint recalls wanting to be a civil rights lawyer

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Renee Poussaint talks about attending the March on Washington in 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Renee Poussaint talks about being accepted into Yale Law School and dropping out

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Renee Poussaint talks about meeting her husband, moving and living in Malawi as an African American

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Renee Poussaint talks about the snakes and wildlife in Malawi

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Renee Poussaint talks about her high school trip to West Africa through the Operation Crossroads Africa program

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Renee Poussaint talks about what she learned from African and French women

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Renee Poussaint describes what influenced her to pursue a Master's degree in African Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Renee Poussaint talks about attending the University of California, Los Angeles, and adjusting to life in Los Angeles

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Renee Poussaint talks about her experience as a Master's student in the African Studies program at the University of California, Los Angeles

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Renee Poussaint talks about her experience in the Ph.D. program in Comparative Literature at Indiana University

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Renee Poussaint talks about meeting HistoryMaker Jonathan Rodgers in the Michele Clark Fellowship Program for Minorities

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Renee Poussaint describes how she became a news reporter at WBBM Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Renee Poussaint talks about her experiences as a correspondent for CBS News pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Renee Poussaint talks about her experiences as a correspondent for CBS News pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Renee Poussaint talks about her work as a news correspondent in the CBS Midwest Bureau

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Renee Poussaint talks about her marriage and becoming an anchor for WJLA in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Renee Poussaint describes anchoring for WJLA in Washington, D.C. and viewers' scrutiny of her appearance, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Renee Poussaint describes anchoring for WJLA in Washington, D.C. and viewers' scrutiny of her appearance, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Renee Poussaint talks about the representation of African Americans in television news

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Renee Poussaint describes her dislike of the celebrity of a TV anchor

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Renee Poussaint talks about her job offer from 'Prime Time Live' and winning three Emmy Awards

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Renee Poussaint describes stories she covered for 'Prime Time Live' and the lack of cultural understanding she faced as a correspondent

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Renee Poussaint talks about her production company, Wisdom Works, and her documentary, "Tutu and Franklin: A Journey Towards Peace"

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Renee Poussaint talks about being unable to attend Archbishop Desmond Tutu's installation as Archbishop in South Africa, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Renee Poussaint talks about being unable to attend Archbishop Desmond Tutu's installation as Archbishop in South Africa, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Renee Poussaint talks about covering South Africa around the time of Nelson Mandela's release

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Renee Poussaint talks about her television projects, including "Tutu and Franklin: A Journey Towards Peace" and "Malcom X"

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Renee Poussaint talks about Camille Cosby's contribution toward the documentary "Tutu and Franklin: A Journey Towards Peace"

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Renee Poussaint talks about Dorothy Height, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Renee Poussaint talks about Dorothy Height, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Renee Poussaint describes her admiration for John Hope Franklin

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Renee Poussaint talks about founding the National Leadership Visionary Project

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Renee Poussaint talks about performing oral history interviews for the National Leadership Visionary Project

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Renee Poussaint talks about leaving the National Leadership Visionary Project, and the book of interview excerpts the project inspired

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Renee Poussaint talks about interviewing the first black admiral

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Renee Poussaint shares a story from her interview with Coretta Scott King

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Renee Poussaint talks about Bill and Camille Cosby, and the couple's commitment to advancing the welfare of blacks

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Renee Poussaint talks about the National Leadership Visionary Project's impact on students

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Renee Poussaint describes the National Leadership Visionary Project's criteria for selecting interviewees and performing interviews

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Renee Poussaint describes how the National Leadership Visionary Project and The HistoryMakers complement one another

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Renee Poussaint talks about the current state National Leadership Visionary Project

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Renee Poussaint talks about her love of mentoring youth

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Renee Poussaint reflects upon her life and projects she would like to work on in the future

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Renee Poussaint talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community and reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Renee Poussaint talks about her family

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Renee Poussaint considers how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$6

DAStory

9$7

DATitle
Renee Poussaint talks about visiting Mali and her resemblance to Mali's Fulani tribe
Renee Poussaint describes stories she covered for 'Prime Time Live' and the lack of cultural understanding she faced as a correspondent
Transcript
And supposedly when whatever ancestor of ours came to the United States, the immigration officer put a "P" on the front of the name instead of a "T" That in point of fact, our name is--should be Toussaint with a "T" but instead it's Poussaint with a "P." And everybody always asks, well what does that mean? It doesn't mean anything. It's just a mistake. The handy thing is, is that anybody named Poussaint is automatically a member of the family. One interesting thing that has to do with the physical resemblance thing: years ago, when I was in Africa for the first time. And I was visiting a, a friend of mine in, in Mali. And she, she was a--she was actually the ambassador at the time. And we were walking down the street in Bamako, Mali. And as we walked along, people would sta--would point at me at various times and say, "Fula." And after it happened several times, I asked my friend what, what does that mean. And she said, they were identifying you as a member of a particular tribe, the Fulani. And I became so intrigued that I asked her to track down the closest Fulani village and went there. And it was the strangest thing because when I got there and I looked around, it was like my family. I mean, everybody looked like me. And it just made that kind of bond, you know, over hundreds and hundreds of years seem very real and, and, and tangible because of that link, the physical link, you know. So it's, it's, it's one of the things that, that is frustrating about African-American history very often, you don't have a written record, but you have physical kinds of things that, that identify you and your--and your ancestors. And there is that, particularly on the Poussaint side.$$Okay. Okay, now can you go back to your great grandparents on your--(simultaneous)--$$On my father's side, no, not really. My grandfather did not talk about his family at all. So I don't--I don't really know much--much of anything about them.$And I did some fun things too. I interviewed Charles Barkley; did a profile on him; did a profile on Sammy--Samuel Jackson. Again, I realized at a certain point that I might not have a permanent home there when I was out in the field and Toni Morrison--word came that she had gotten the Nobel. And I called the executive producer and I said, "The next profile I do has gotta be Toni Morrison. I've met her. She's wonderful. It's gonna be great." And there was this pause, a silence. And the executive producer said, "But we've already done Alice Walker." And I said (laughter), "What does that have to do with anything?" And it was at that point she realized kind of what she'd said. And I said, "Look, clearly, we need to have a discussion about this." And we did, in fact, when I got back to the--to--a few days later when I got back to the studio. We had a meeting of some of the staff at my request to talk about certain kinds of racial sensitivity. And everybody was very pleasant. And I realized that it was like going over their heads or going behind their heads, or whatever; it wasn't really penetrating. And I realized that I was tired, that I didn't feel like taking on the burden of educating a new group of white people about black people. And the stories that I was interested in covering, which had to do with black people and women, were not the stories that they were particularly interested in. One of the last stories I did for them was a story about how to get bacteria out of your kitchen sponge. And it was--because it was 'Prime Time,' they made a big deal out of it. And they got these five young families in Suburban New Jersey to allow them to follow them around with cameras for days taking shots of them in their kitchens and handling their babies and this, that, and the other thing with a special black light to show where bacteria was. And she--you know, she picked up the pork chop, and the bacteria from the pork chop was on her hand. And then she picked up her baby, and she moved her baby. And so the bacteria from the pork chop is now on her baby. And then the, the culmination was, they sent data out to these testing stations. And it came back there was one particular homemaker who had the most bacteria on her baby or something like that. I mean, it was just insane. And I, I wanted to say (laughter) to all of these--these couples is, you must be crazy. Why in the world would you let, you know, camera crews into your home that--and, and allow yourself to be humiliated in front of millions of people? And a few days later, the executive producer called me in and said, oh, you--oh, the reaction to that report, it's been fantastic; I mean, really, people just love that. We--we're thinking about doing like a series of those kind of, you know, how to things and, you know, news you can use kind of thing, you know. And so I basically was saying to myself, I gotta get outta here. And I did and started my own documentary production company.$$This is in '93 [1993] then?$$Yeah, yeah.