The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon

Search Results

Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Charles O. Stewart

Bank executive Charles O. Stewart was born on February 27, 1949 in Sweet Home, Arkansas to Ola Stewart and Frank Stewart. He graduated from Horace Mann High School in Little Rock, Arkansas and received his B.A. degree in sociology and political science from the University of Arkansas, Little Rock in Little Rock, Arkansas, his graduate certificate in business from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 1979, and his certificate in lending from Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, Arkansas.

Stewart worked in accounting for the Teletype Corporation from 1968 to 1971 before being hired at First Commercial Bank as a financial officer. In 1981, he was promoted to senior vice president. In 1997, he left First Commercial Bank and joined Regions Financial Corporation as senior vice president and corporate director of community development and served there for ten years. In 2007, he was promoted to executive vice president of Regions Bank and then he became interim chief executive officer of Heifer International in 2009. In 2014, he founded Stewart Real Estate Development and served as its chief executive officer.

Stewart was a founding board member of Little Rock Preparatory Academy and also served on the board of Heifer International as chair and vice chair as well as on the boards of the Federal Small Business Advisory Council, the Arkansas Interest on Lawyers Trust Accounts (IOLTA) Foundation, Arkansas Repertory Theater, Philander Smith College, the Health Policy Board of the Arkansas Center for Health Improvement, and the Arkansas State Police Commission. He was also an advisory board member of the National Institutes of Health of Washington, D.C, and on the boards for the National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ), the Governor's Blue Ribbon Committee on Higher Education. He also served as the founder and chair of the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame.

Stewart has earned many honors including the NAACP Black Corporate Executive Award, The Empowerment Award from the African Women’s Health Project International, the Mrs. David Terry Humanitarian Award, the Outstanding Young Executive Award from the Greater Little Rock Chamber of Commerce, the President’s Award from the University of Arkansas, Little Rock, the National Conference for Community and Justice Humanitarian Award, and in 2006, the executive conference room at Heifer International was named in his honor.

Charles O. Stewart was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 18, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.171

Sex

Male

Interview Date

09/18/2017

Last Name

Stewart

Maker Category
Middle Name

O.

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Booker T. Washington Elementary School

Dunbar Magnet Middle School

Horace Mann High School

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Louisiana State University

Arkansas State University

First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Sweet Home

HM ID

STE21

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Places near water

Favorite Quote

Trust in the Lord with all thy heart...

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arkansas

Birth Date

2/27/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Little Rock

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Soul food

Short Description

Bank executive Charles O. Stewart (1949 - ) founded the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame and served as executive vice president of Regions Bank.

Employment

Stewart Real Estate Development

Heifer International

Regions Bank

Regions Financial Corporation

First Commercial Bank

Teletype Corporation

Favorite Color

Blue

Vivian R. Jones

Founder and CEO Vivian R. Jones was born on September 3, 1948 in Sweet Home, Arkansas to Annie B. and German Jones. As a child, Jones relocated to Chicago, where she earned her A.A. degree in Social Services from Kennedy-King College. Jones completed her B.A. degree and her M.Ed. degree in Education from Chicago State University, and later received her Honorary Doctorate Degree of Divinity from the International Pentecostal Assemblies Ecumenical College of Bible Theology.

Dr. Jones has overcome many obstacles in life as she has worked toward fulfilling her commitment to improving the lives of others. In 1992 she founded Annie B Jones Community Services, Inc. (ABJ), which is a community based social service agency that provides much needed services to children, families, seniors, and the community at large. ABJ was named in memory of Dr. Jones’ mother Annie B. Jones, Mrs. Jones was a community organizer and a union leader (AFSCME Local 286 President) who died at the young age of 53 years old. Mrs. Jones, and Dr. Jones’, father German Jones, Sr. left a legacy of giving with their children. ABJ Community Services, Inc. (ABJ) offers a variety of services to the Chicago community, those services include: Foster care, behavioral health, employment training, the ABJ computer clubhouse, Teen Reach, ABJ Community Services Sunshine Food Pantry, SPF-SIG, ABJ Community Services, Inc. , The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and C.O.N.N.E.C.T.S, Coalition of Organizational, Neighborhood and Network Empowerment through Culture, Talent and Spirituality. Dr. Jones' parents’ example is the foundation of her commitment of giving to society and those who are often misjudged, misunderstood, and disregarded. ABJ provides comprehensive social services to more than 5000 people every year.

In 1996, Dr. Jones became the Commissioner of the African American Family Commission and served there for five years. She also serves on the Board of Directors for The Illinois African American Coalition for Prevention as one of its founding members, and serves as Vice-President on the Board of Directors for The South Shore Chamber Commerce. As a result of her dedication to service, Dr. Jones has been recognized and honored many times for her work and commitment to the community. Some of the honors include; Honored Professional of Who's Who in Executives in Business. The Chicago Defender Newspaper recognized and awarded her as one of the Women of Excellence in April of 2009 for her benevolent work. Dr. Jones has also been awarded the prestigious Kizzy award in three different categories. She was listed in Today’s Chicago Woman magazine for two years and awarded the Woman at the Top of Her Game Award. Additionally, Dr. Jones has been featured in Essence and N'Digo Magazines. She was most recently recognized for Inspirational Community Service by the Urban Sustainability Association (USA) in May of 2009.

Vivian Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 20, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.079

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/20/2012

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Middle Name

R.

Occupation
Schools

Kennedy–King College

Chicago State University

First Name

Vivian

Birth City, State, Country

Sweet Home

HM ID

JON29

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

It Is Better To Have And Not Need Than To Need And Not Have

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/3/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Community leader Vivian R. Jones (1948 - ) founded Annie B. Jones Community and Family Services, Inc., which provided comprehensive social services to more than 5,000 people each year.

Employment

Annie B Jones Community Services, Inc.

PSI Family Services Inc.

Lifelink International Adoption

Ada S. McKinley Community Services Inc.

Illinois Department of Children and Family Services

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:1853,26:7040,58:7670,63:8210,71:9560,91:13280,174:17030,237:19880,301:20255,307:20705,315:22730,374:23555,386:23855,391:24155,396:28028,413:28383,419:29519,438:31740,456:32380,461:39095,584:41650,700:42161,708:43037,721:43548,734:45957,789:46249,794:46614,801:47855,822:48293,829:53710,927:54590,942:55550,958:56590,973:58750,1008:59310,1016:59630,1021:61150,1045:63550,1098:63870,1103:70380,1151:70870,1159:71570,1218:75350,1277:75910,1286:78920,1348:79200,1353:79690,1362:88836,1409:92157,1442:92562,1448:93129,1457:101232,1631:101688,1639:102448,1652:103132,1662:106704,1736:107236,1747:108072,1762:109516,1798:112404,1868:117460,1893:117856,1900:118186,1906:118978,1920:119506,1930:120364,1950:120892,1959:122014,1996:122410,2003:126510,2059:127278,2073:127534,2081:129134,2121:130606,2152:131566,2172:131822,2177:132078,2182:132462,2191:132782,2202:146670,2464:148618,2482:149347,2493:161638,2650:167270,2706:167620,2712:167900,2717:169020,2775:169930,2791:174550,2990:180920,3077:185890,3223:187430,3259:187710,3264:191350,3398:195644,3434:196604,3457:208500,3653$0,0:1700,37:2040,43:3060,64:3604,73:8568,186:12280,198:13116,211:18740,400:19272,408:19652,414:20108,421:20412,426:20868,433:28826,498:32776,580:33645,592:34119,599:35462,661:38306,689:39570,712:41782,759:42098,764:42493,770:47728,782:51582,830:52242,844:54024,867:54618,877:55410,891:57126,984:57588,992:58116,1003:58446,1009:59106,1022:61086,1052:61482,1059:62604,1077:62868,1082:66684,1095:66996,1100:68166,1119:68790,1128:69492,1148:70038,1157:70584,1165:71364,1176:72690,1221:74016,1244:74484,1251:74796,1256:75576,1267:82340,1311:83150,1321:83600,1327:85850,1361:86480,1372:96267,1515:97545,1535:99320,1579:99959,1589:106420,1684:112695,1772:114120,1797:114570,1805:114945,1811:119445,1896:121170,1931:121545,1937:123720,1976:124170,1983:124470,1988:125295,2006:125595,2015:126120,2024:126870,2040:127170,2056:129195,2095:136974,2160:137370,2167:138624,2200:140934,2261:141198,2266:147338,2338:147748,2344:148732,2360:156440,2472:157080,2481:157800,2492:160440,2553:165700,2625:166246,2633:166714,2640:171784,2783:175216,2841:180752,2905:181154,2912:182159,2969:188390,3108:192450,3133:193250,3145:193650,3154:193970,3159:194530,3168:195490,3187:195970,3195:196450,3203:200530,3286:201090,3295:205258,3313:209191,3374:210709,3397:213676,3463:214021,3469:214435,3476:214711,3481:222083,3530:222438,3536:232236,3779:232733,3788:233940,3819:234366,3826:238530,3850:239358,3866:240393,3888:240807,3895:244160,3962
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635926">Tape: 1 Slating of Vivian R. Jones' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635927">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635928">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635929">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones talks about her family's genealogy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635930">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635931">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones talks about how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635932">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635933">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635934">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones remembers spending time with her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635935">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones talks about where her parents worked</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635936">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones remember her mother's death</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635937">Tape: 1 Vivian R. Jones talks about her parents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635938">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones talks about her mother's work as a union president</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635939">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones describes her parents' personalities and whom she takes after</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635940">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones remembers a lesson from her mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635941">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones lists her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635942">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones describes her schooling</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635943">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones remembers becoming pregnant at fifteen years old</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635944">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones talks about her decision to return to school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635945">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones remembers earning a GED degree</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635946">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones remembers her mentors at Kennedy-King College in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635947">Tape: 2 Vivian R. Jones recalls her early years of motherhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635948">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones remembers earning an associate's degree from Kennedy-King College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635949">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones talks about her first marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635950">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones remembers her mother's hospitalization</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635951">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones talks about her devotion to her children</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635952">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones remembers working at Ada S. McKinley Community Services, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635953">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones remembers her graduate studies at Chicago State University in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635954">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones remembers her second marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635955">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones remembers receiving her master's degree from Chicago State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635956">Tape: 3 Vivian R. Jones remembers working for the Illinois Department of Child and Family Services</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635957">Tape: 4 Vivian R. Jones remembers her graduation from Chicago State University in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635958">Tape: 4 Vivian R. Jones recalls her introduction to private family services</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635959">Tape: 4 Vivian R. Jones remembers founding Annie B. Jones Community Services, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635960">Tape: 4 Vivian R. Jones talks about her firm's name</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635961">Tape: 4 Vivian R. Jones talks about the services offered at Annie B. Jones Community Services Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635962">Tape: 4 Vivian R. Jones talks about her interest in singing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635963">Tape: 4 Vivian R. Jones remembers earning an accreditation for Annie B. Jones Community Services, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635964">Tape: 5 Vivian R. Jones recalls her appointment to the Illinois African-American Family Commission</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635965">Tape: 5 Vivian R. Jones talks about the impact of state budget cuts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635966">Tape: 5 Vivian R. Jones describes the youth programs at Annie B. Jones Community Services, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635967">Tape: 5 Vivian R. Jones talks about the programs offered by Annie B. Jones Community Services Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635968">Tape: 5 Vivian R. Jones remembers hosting a civil rights history tour for black youth, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635969">Tape: 5 Vivian R. Jones remembers hosting a civil rights history tour for black youth, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635970">Tape: 5 Vivian R. Jones recalls the early financial mismanagement of Annie B. Jones Community and Family Services, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635971">Tape: 5 Vivian R. Jones talks about the South Shore community in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635972">Tape: 6 Vivian R. Jones talks about the staff of Annie B. Jones Community Services, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635973">Tape: 6 Vivian R. Jones talks about her awards and honors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635974">Tape: 6 Vivian R. Jones talks about the successes of her foster care program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635975">Tape: 6 Vivian R. Jones talks about her awards and honors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635976">Tape: 6 Vivian R. Jones talks about her faith</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635977">Tape: 6 Vivian R. Jones talks about President Barack Obama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635978">Tape: 6 Vivian R. Jones reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635979">Tape: 6 Vivian R. Jones describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635980">Tape: 7 Vivian R. Jones narrates her photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/635981">Tape: 7 Vivian R. Jones narrates her photographs, pt. 2</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

5$4

DATitle
Vivian R. Jones remembers hosting a civil rights history tour for black youth, pt. 1
Vivian R. Jones talks about the programs offered by Annie B. Jones Community Services Inc.
Transcript
There any program that we haven't touched upon?$$Well, we have what we call the A.G.A.P.E. program [Across Generations Action and Prevention Education], that's, that's a new program, generational where we work with generational family's issues trying to help them to bridge those generational gaps of being able to work together and understand each other and--$$Yes.$$--and communicate with each other. And it's about lifestyle changing really. Yeah, we just started that one.$$And you, you have a lot of, you do a lot of things for teens and children you say, so is there an after school program, can kids come?$$Well, we have a, Ray of Hope [Ray of Hope Center of the Arts, Chicago, Illinois] is another organization that, that's housed in this building.$$Okay.$$We work with them and they have a program called after school matters.$$Yes.$$And ABJ [Annie B. Jones Community Services, Inc., Chicago, Illinois] had an after school matters program, but we decided to, to step out and let Ray of Hope do it because they were, they, they, they, most of their focus is totally on youth.$$Okay.$$And they were, they're an artistic organization and I, I believe that a lot of kids--it's, it's so much easier to reach the kids through the arts--$$That it is.$$--then it is through anything else as far as I can see, and it's been demonstrated to me on more than one occasion. For instance, back in 2002 we got a grant from the state, a $250,000 grant from the state. Senator Emil Jones [HistoryMaker Emil Jones, Jr.] helped us get this grant. And the reason he gave us the grant is we, I went to meet with him and I was telling him that we needed to do something about the kids, you know there was too many of them on the streets, they, they don't have any after school program, they don't have any activities. And he, he was like, "Well they're not gonna do anything anyway." And he was just really upset with the kids because I guess something had happened recently--$$Yeah.$$--and he was just really upset. And I told him, I challenged him. I said I, "I guarantee you that if they get the, if you give these kids an opportunity they will show you that they are about more than what you think they about." He said, "Okay." He said, "I'm gonna try it. I'm going to, I'm going to see if I can help you get a grant, and I'm going to see what you do with it and I want a report."$$Yep.$$I said, "You're gonna get a report." So, he helped us to get the $250,000 grant, and we put together a program, a cultural tour. It was a culture program of the Civil Rights Movement. We took two hundred kids, that's four different bus loads, of kids to the South. We started the tour in Atlanta, in Georgia, and where they went to Dr. King's [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] house, The King Center [Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change]. They went to the, they went all over everywhere in Georgia, in, in, you know that had--$$Yeah.$$--anything to do with the civil rights--$$Yes.$$--the barbershops, everywhere. And then we took them on from there to Alabama. They went to Mobile [Alabama]. They went to Montgomery [Alabama]. They went to Selma [Alabama]. They went to the park where the dogs attacked them. They saw the dogs. They went to the Rosa Park museum [Rosa Parks Library and Museum, Montgomery, Alabama], sat on the bus that, where they saying, "Go to the back of the bus"--$$Yes.$$--and all that. They saw all of that, and we took them to the church where the, the little, four little girls got bombed in the 16th Street Baptist Church [Birmingham, Alabama] and all of those; they went to all of those places.$Tell me now, so what--give me just a brief overview of then the programs that you offer now. 'Cause you had mentioned different things, and so I can get a, a feel for this day and this point, what services are offered by ABJ [Annie B. Jones Community Services, Inc., Chicago, Illinois]?$$Well, you already know about the foster care program.$$Yes, okay.$$We have employment in training and we, that program deals mostly with people that receive food stamps, and the goal is to get them to be self supporting, help them find job--get them job ready, you know teach them some soft skills like resume writing and interviewing techniques and different things like that, and then helping them place them in, in some jobs that they feel comfortable in and getting them ready mentally to work, to become self sufficient. So that's one program. The other program is TANF, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families [sic. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families], which they've changed that to another name and I can't think of the name off hand. But those are people mostly women that have children and they have like a cer- a specific amount of time that they can receive assistance before they will lose those benefits, so our goal is to get them to become self sufficient prior to them losing their benefits. We do substance abuse treatment for adolescents; that's really our specialty--$$Okay.$$--and, and counseling chil- counseling youth. And a lot of the, the police department [Chicago Police Department] and the schools or whatever they send a lot of kids to us when they get community service or any, any kind of restrictions like that they usually send them to us--$$Okay.$$--to work with them.$$Substance abuse and, and other problems too okay.$$Right. And then we have a food and clothing pantry, which really caters a lot to, it's, it's open to everybody, but we get a lot, lot, lots of seniors--$$Okay.$$--that come here every Thursday and for a while we closed the pantry down because we didn't have the money to keep it going. Well, that time that it was closed we got phone calls, people coming by here. They were all saying the same thing they really needed it. Some of them told me about their hor- horror stories. They was eating cat food. They were going in garbages. They was, it was just awful. So we, one of my staff members wrote a proposal to the Chicago Community Trust [Chicago, Illinois] a couple of years ago, and they gave us twenty-five thousand dollars to reopen the pantry--$$The pantry.$$--and we've been making it work ever since then. And we still get, like this past week we had two hundred people that came to our pantry.$$You open up once a week and the people just come and they get what they want.$$Sometimes we open for emergencies, if some real emergency occur we'll help somebody.$$Okay, and then the people just come in and get what they want or you have people there to actually bag it up?$$Oh no we have people there that bag it up--$$Bag it up and--$$--volunteers.$$Volun- okay.$$And now we, that food pantry was named in mem- after, her name was Murtese Brady [ph.]. She is the champion of that, of that program, which is why we're able to keep it open. She, she do a lot of fundraising including hunger walks--$$Okay.$$--and all kinds of things to, to, to make it, you know keep it going. So, I totally credit ABJ's ability to do the food pantry to the commitment and loyalty of Ms. Brady and a couple of other people that work, voluntarily work with her every week.$$And along with that do you have the clothing pantry too?$$Yes.$$So people can get clothing and--$$Yeah people donate clothes to us and we, whatever clothes, furniture they, you know--$$Okay.$$--they donate all that stuff to us and we give it out on the same day that we do the pantry.$$Okay.$$People that come to the pantry they can go and look through the, the things that are available and pick out some things that they need or want.