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Dr. William Finlayson

Obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. William Edward Finlayson was born on September 1, 1924 in Manatee, Florida. Finlayson served as a 1st Lieutenant in the United States Army from 1943 through 1946 and served in the Army Reserves from 1946 to 1953. He received his B.S. degree from Morehouse College in 1948 and his M.D. from Meharry Medical College in 1953. Finlayson completed his residency at the University of Minnesota in 1958.

After his residency ended, Finlayson established his own private practice in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1958. He continued to practice medicine for nearly the next forty years (from 1958 to 1997). Finlayson also held two fellowships: one at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist in 1963 and the other at the American College of Surgeons in 1964. He also taught at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin Medical School.

In 1971, Finlayson founded the first black-owned bank in Milwaukee: North Milwaukee State Bank. He also serves on the board of directors and is the bank’s chairman. In founding the bank, Finlayson’s mission was not profit based. Rather, he intended to add stature and viability to underserved communities by offering full-service banking to individuals and businesses. North Milwaukee State Bank’s mission is to facilitate community development and economic growth, personal and business advancement, home ownership growth, and financial education.

Finlayson is a member of the Milwaukee Medical Society and a house delegate to the Wisconsin Medical Society. He is a past president of the Milwaukee Gynecological Society and serves on the board of directors of the Southeastern Wisconsin Health System Agency. Finlayson is also a former president of his local YMCA board. He is a member of the Urban League and a lifetime member of the NAACP.

Finlayson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 18, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.135

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/18/2008

Last Name

Finlayson

Maker Category
Schools

Jones High School

Campbell Street High School

Booker T. Washington High School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Morehouse College

Meharry Medical College

University of Minnesota Medical School

First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Manatee

HM ID

FIN02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/1/1924

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Bank chairman and obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. William Finlayson (1924 - ) established his own private practice in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1958, going on to found the first black-owned bank in Milwaukee, North Milwaukee State Bank.

Employment

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad

Wheaton Franciscan St. Joseph Campus

Mt. Sinai Hospital

Medical College of Wisconsin

University of School of Medicine and Public Health

North Milwaukee State Banks

Favorite Color

Brown

DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633546">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. William Finlayson's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633547">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. William Finlayson lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633548">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633549">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about his parents' marriage, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633550">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633551">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about his parents' marriage, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633552">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633553">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. William Finlayson describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633554">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his neighborhood in Orlando, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633555">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. William Finlayson describes the sights and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633556">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about his early involvement in the Baptist church</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633557">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls his early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633558">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers moving to Daytona Beach, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633559">Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls his acquaintance with Mary McLeod Bethune</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633560">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers Eleanor Roosevelt's relationship with the black community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633561">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about his early experiences of segregation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633562">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls his early academic success</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633563">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers Booker T. Washington High School in Miami, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633564">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls his enrollment at the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes in Tallahassee, Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633565">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers enlisting in the U.S. Army</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633566">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls teaching literacy classes in the U.S. Army</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633567">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls serving in Hawaii as a U.S. Army officer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633568">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his experiences at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633569">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers studying accounting under Jesse B. Blayton Sr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633570">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers Benjamin Mays</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633571">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his experiences at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633572">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers working on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633573">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls the importance of historically black medical schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633574">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about his mentors at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633575">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls meeting his wife</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633576">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis, Minnesota</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633577">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his obstetric board examinations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633578">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls his start as a gynecologist</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633579">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. William Finlayson describes the changes in birthing practices</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633580">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about the gynecological health problems in the black community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633581">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers the HIV/AIDS epidemic</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633582">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about the health problems in the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633583">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls his experiences of discrimination as a physician</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633584">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. William Finlayson remembers the housing discrimination in Milwaukee, Wisconsin</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633585">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. William Finlayson recalls the founding of the North Milwaukee State Bank</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633586">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about the North Milwaukee State Bank</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633587">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. William Finlayson reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633588">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his involvement with the W.E.B. Du Bois Club</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633589">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about the financial crisis of 2008</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633590">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about 'The Souls of Black Folk' by W.E.B. Du Bois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633591">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. William Finlayson describes his visit to Ghana with Reverend Leon Sullivan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633592">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. William Finlayson describes the participants in the W.E.B. Du Bois Club</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633593">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. William Finlayson talks about his organizational affiliations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633594">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. William Finlayson reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633595">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. William Finlayson shares his advice to aspiring doctors and bankers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633596">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. William Finlayson describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

Kenneth L. Coleman

Silicon Valley executive Kenneth Louis Coleman was born to Louis Boyd Coleman and Katie Owens Coleman on December 1, 1942 in Centralia, Illinois. Boyd was a factory worker and Katie a maid. Both parents strongly emphasized education. Coleman enjoyed sports at Lincoln Elementary School and at Centralia High School, where he was co-captain of the basketball team in his senior year. Coleman attended and graduated from The Ohio State University in 1965 with a BS in Industrial Management. Coleman’s part time student employment as a key punch and computer operator at the OSU Research Center led to an interest in computers. After graduation Coleman attended Officer’s Training School and was commissioned at Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force. He went on to acquire his M.B.A. degree from The Ohio State University in 1972.

Coleman served in South Korea at the time of the Pueblo Crisis. While in Korea Lieutenant Coleman helped effectively defuse a potential race riot on the base. This led to an assignment to establish an Office for Affirmative Action and Drug Abuse Rehabilitation at Hamilton Air Force Base in Marin County, California. After separating as a Captain in 1972, Coleman was introduced to the Hewlett–Packard Company by Roy Clay (the first and only black mayor of Palo Alto, CA). At HP Coleman held several senior management positions, including a two year assignment in Northern Europe. In 1982, Coleman joined Activision, Inc., where he became Vice President of Product Development. Coleman joined Silicon Graphics (SGI) in 1987. During his fourteen years at Silicon Graphics, Coleman held several executive level positions. His last position at SGI was Executive Vice president of Sales, Services, and Marketing where he managed an organization with 4,000 employees in thirty-seven countries.

In 1999, Coleman was named one of the ten most influential African Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area, and in 2001, one of the top 25 Black executives in technology by Black Enterprise magazine. Retiring that same year, and after consultation with his friend and mentor Dr. Price Cobbs, Coleman founded and became CEO of ITM Software in Mountain View, California. Over the following 5 years Coleman was able to raise venture capital in ITM of a $20 million. It was important to Coleman that he make available the opportunity for African American investors to participate. Five years after its founding ITM was sold to BMC Software.

In 2006 Coleman was appointed chairman of Accelrys, Inc., scientific informatics software and services company for life sciences, chemical and materials R&D. Accelrys enables its customers to both accelerate their research process to more rapidly discover new therapeutics, materials and compounds; and to introduce new efficiencies into the process that drive lower costs.

In the spring of 2010 he was appointed to a special government advisory group on U.S./India Trade Policy. The Private Sector Advisory Group (PSAG) is an adjunct to the United States-India Trade Policy Forum (TPF) that provides strategic counsel to U.S. Trade Representative Ambassador Ron Kirk on enhancing bilateral trade and investment between the two nations.

Coleman is a member of the Boards of Directors of City National Bank, MIPS Technologies, and United Online. Coleman is also the recipient of numerous honors, including the Ohio State University Distinguished Service Award; the National Alliance of Black School Educators Living Legend Award; the American Leadership Forum of Silicon Valley Exemplary Leader Award; the One Hundred Black Men of Silicon Valley Lifetime Achievement Award; and the Silicon Valley Junior Achievement Business Hall of Fame.

Coleman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 13, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.135

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/13/2007

Last Name

Coleman

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Schools

Centralia High School

Lincoln School

The Ohio State University

The Ohio State University Max M. Fisher College of Business

First Name

Kenneth

Birth City, State, Country

Centralia

HM ID

COL14

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Maui, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Leaders Lead.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

12/1/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Altos

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Technology executive Kenneth L. Coleman (1942 - ) held positions at Activision, Inc., Silicon Graphics, Information Technology Management, Accelyrs, City National Bank, MIPS Technologies, and United Online.

Employment

The Hewlett Packard Company

Activision Publishing, Inc.

Silicon Graphics

ITM Software Corporation

Accelrys, Inc.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579084">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Kenneth L. Coleman's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579085">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579086">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579087">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his mother's upbringing in Centralia, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579088">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579089">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers his first experience of southern racism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579090">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his father's upbringing in Centralia, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579091">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his father's occupation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579092">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about how his parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579093">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his parents' personalities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579094">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579095">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers his community in Centralia, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579096">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers his early responsibilities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579097">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes the Lincoln School in Centralia, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579098">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his academic success</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579099">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his transition to the integrated Centralia High School in Centralia, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579100">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about segregation in Centralia, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579101">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers Roland Burris</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579102">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the influence of religion</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579103">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes the entertainment of his youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579104">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman reflects upon his upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579105">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the athletics program at Centralia High School in Centralia, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579106">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his experiences of discrimination at Centralia High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579107">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers his discriminatory history teacher</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579108">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his early aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579109">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his early exposure to African American professionals</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579110">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls transferring to The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579111">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his experiences at The Ohio State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579112">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his activities at The Ohio State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579113">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers the events of the 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579114">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his influences at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579115">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes the African American community in Columbus, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579116">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his decision to attend graduate school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579117">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his program at The Ohio State University College of Administrative Science</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579118">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers being drafted into the U.S. Air Force</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579119">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the racial discrimination in the U.S. military</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579120">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman reflects upon his experiences in the U.S. military</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579121">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his decision to leave the U.S. Air Force</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579122">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls joining the Hewlett-Packard Company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579123">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers Roy L. Clay, Sr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579124">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his experiences at the Hewlett-Packard Company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579125">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls his experiences of discrimination in Europe</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579126">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his work in the commercial computing industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579127">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers the HP 3000 computer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579128">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman reflects upon his parents' view of his success</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579129">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes lessons from his time at the Hewlett-Packard Company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579130">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls joining Activision Publishing, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579131">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers joining Silicon Graphics, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579132">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Kenneth L. Coleman remembers leaving Silicon Graphics, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579133">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls founding the ITM Software Corporation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579134">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his corporate board membership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579135">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the initial investments in the ITM Software Corporation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579136">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his role at Accelrys, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579137">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his charitable work</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579138">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes his concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579139">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Kenneth L. Coleman reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579140">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579141">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Kenneth L. Coleman shares his advice to future generations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579142">Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Kenneth L. Coleman describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/579143">Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Kenneth L. Coleman narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

2$3

DATitle
Kenneth L. Coleman recalls the athletics program at Centralia High School in Centralia, Illinois
Kenneth L. Coleman talks about his work in the commercial computing industry
Transcript
You played basketball for the high school [Centralia High School, Centralia, Illinois], right?$$Yeah, in high school I played basketball, football, I ran track for two years, played baseball for two years. And I was, I went from a town that's famous for basketball in Illinois, and it's historically has had, at least when I was. Prior to me and post me, had very good basketball teams, and I played four years of basketball and was captain my senior year in basketball. Our teams were, were, were not great teams. My junior year we had a good basketball team, but not great. The only other, the time I played, our football teams in Centralia [Illinois] the time I played were, were exceptional. When I was a junior we were ranked sixth in the nation as a high school football team by Parade magazine.$$Really, that's, that's, pretty good.$$Yeah, we were only one score, we're undefeated and the one score I think, in four years in high school football I only played in one losing football game. And so we had very good football, I was a guard in basketball, and I was a point guard in basketball, and I was a wide receiver in football. The year (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So you were on point guard on, on the basketball team, which is interesting.$$Yeah I was point guard in basketball.$$In an integrated basketball team.$$Yes, integrated basketball team, integrated football.$$So they must've really respected you, to--$$Yeah so it's really interesting I thought about this 'cause you see the reason people talk about it and, and I kind of knew this. In, in basketball there was this unwritten rule that now I understand that people kind of talked about it, but you didn't, it wasn't again, it wasn't, this image that was right here in your face. But you kind of knew it, and that was you know on a basketball team on the floor you tend to never have no more than three blacks at any one time. It was just kind of unwritten thing, but you, but you had blacks, but you couldn't win and winning mattered, okay. In football we just didn't have the numbers, so you would never you know have a chance of having more blacks than white on a football team at one time. We just didn't have enough numbers, it's a numbers game, but, but athletics was a very important part of my growing up. The ability to compete, the ability of teamwork, you know operating a team, the relationship with hard work and results really kept you out of trouble. So there were lots of good things happened for me as a kid being, being an athlete.$$I mean (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Highly, I highly recommend that young men and women be involved in sports. There are many lessons in life that are really important in being in--part of a sport and the things you might learn from that experience.$$Now were you close with your coach?$$Well we, it's a, was pretty much impossible in that environment to be close to coach where there was a feeling that coach was like God (laughter) okay. And so, so, so I was not what I consider, or I think any of the kids white or black, would be close to the coach. Now because I was quote, a good kid, that is I worked ca- I mean I was a successful athlete through hard work and through dedication and through a reasonably intelligent athlete, versus super skills, okay. And so I think coaches respect people who work hard, are coachable okay. They, you know they liked great athletes okay, but they respect I think people who kind of approach sports the way I became a good athlete through that. And when--so like I said I was captain of the basketball team and so I was a good athlete, very coachable and coaches liked and respected and would listen to you. But I wasn't close to them when I was in high school, closer after I became an adult actually with some of them. But again it was a very positive experience for me and my, and who I've become, no question.$So how long did you live in Europe?$$Two years.$$Two years, okay, all right. Now, what, what brought you back?$$Yeah I was scheduled to live there another couple years but HP [Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California] decided to create a business around the commercial computing business. And the person who became the general manager called me and said, "Would you come back and be on my management team?" And we help build HP first big billion dollar business the HP 3000 commercial computing business. And it was a, a great opportunity I was the third employee in that division and we built a business from zero to a billion dollars over, over five, six years. And so it, it was very important meaningful opportunity for me and a chance to do something important, and I was involved in that, and enjoyed it a lot.$$Now these are the days before personal computers and small computers and you, you had (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) These, this--$$--people.$$So yes, yes these are the days of the, we were a leader in the mini computer business. And so until that time the computing world had been dominated by two kinds of technology. One was well basically one technology, the mainframe computer, the big computers. And, and people connected terminals to big computers to do work, but all the processing was done in big computers and called mainframe. HP was a leader along with Digital Equipment Corporation and Data General [Data General Corporation] a few other companies were a leader in what was called midsize computers. In those days they were called mini computers, and they were smaller computers that could be used by departments rather than by the corporate headquarters or smaller companies who couldn't afford the big computers. And so the HP 3000 was a, a leader in that sort of computing and we help build that business for HP.