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Franklin D. Raines

Corporate executive and lawyer Franklin D. Raines was born on January 14, 1949 in Seattle, Washington to Delno and Ida Raines. A 1967 graduate of Franklin High School in Seattle, he received his B.A. degree, magna cum laude, in government from Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and was awarded a Rhodes scholarship to study at Magdelen College at Oxford University in Oxford, England in 1971. He later obtained his J.D. degree, cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 1976.
Prior to attending law school, Raines was hired as an associate director of the Seattle Model Cities Program from 1972 to 1973.

After law school, he was hired as an associate for the Seattle law firm of Preston, Thorgrimson, Ellis, Holman & Fletcher from 1976 to 1977. Then, he was hired to work in the Carter Administration as assistant director of the White House Domestic Policy Staff and then as associate director for economics and government in the Office of Management and Budget from 1977 to 1979. Raines then joined the investment banking firm Lazard Freres & Company, where he served for eleven years from 1979 to 1991, becoming the first black general partner on Wall Street. In 1991, when he was named vice chairman for the Federal National Mortgage Association “Fannie Mae” in Washington, D.C. and served in this capacity from 1991 to 1996. Raines was then appointed to President Clinton’s Cabinet as the director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, from 1996 to 1998. Here, he served as President Clinton's key negotiator in the talks that led to passage of the bipartisan Balanced Budget Act of 1997. He authored Raines Rules, which specified eight investment criteria for new information technology projects and developed the District of Columbia Revitalization Plan that rescued the Nation’s Capital from financial distress. In 1999, Raines returned to Fannie Mae as its chief executive officer and chairman and Raines served in the role for six years, until his retirement in 2004. He was the first black CEO of a Fortune 100 company.

Raines served on the board of directors of AOL, PepsiCo, Pfizer Boeing, Time Warner and TIAA-CREF. He also was a member of the following organizations: the Alfalfa Club, the Boule, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, The Business Council, Council on Foreign Relations, the Business Roundtable and the Economic Club of Washington, D.C. He also served on the boards of many non-profit organizations such as the Harvard Board of Overseers, Enterprise Community Partners, the Rockefeller Foundation, the German Marshall Fund, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the National Urban League.

Raines is married to Denise Grant and has three daughters.

Franklin D. Raines was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 23, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.055

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/23/2018

Last Name

Raines

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Franklin

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

RAI01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bermuda

Favorite Quote

When You Spot A Turtle On Top Of A Fence Post, The One Thing You Know It Didn't Get There By Itself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/14/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Corporate executive and lawyer Franklin D. Raines (1949- ) served as Federal National Mortgage Association chief executive officer and chairman from 1999 to 2004.

Favorite Color

Green

Brian Stokes Mitchell

Actor Brian Stokes Mitchell was born on October 31, 1957 in Seattle, Washington to Lillian Stokes Mitchell and George Mitchell. Because of his father’s position as a civilian electrical engineer in the U.S. Navy, Mitchell’s family moved frequently during his childhood, living for a time in Guam and the Philippines before settling in San Diego, California in 1971. In high school, Mitchell performed with The Bright Side, a children’s singing group that toured nationally, and acted in his first plays with the San Diego Junior Theater. At the age of sixteen, he made his professional acting debut in a production of Godspell at San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre.

Mitchell moved to Los Angeles in 1976 to pursue a career in acting. He landed his first on-screen role in 1979, as John Dolan in Roots: The Next Generations. Later that same year, Mitchell became a series regular on the MASH spinoff Trapper John, M.D. After seven seasons on Trapper John, M.D., Mitchell turned his focus to stage acting, making his Broadway debut in 1988 in the musical Mail. During the early 1990s, he appeared on stage as the replacement for the original lead, Gregory Hines, in Jelly’s Last Jam, and played the recurring character Trevor Collins-Newsworthy on the television showThe Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. Mitchell starred in the role of Coalhouse Walker in the musical Ragtime on Broadway in 1998, receiving a Tony Award nomination for Best Actor in a Musical. Also, in 1998, Mitchell provided the singing voice for the character Jethro in the animated film The Prince of Egypt. He went on to receive multiple leading man roles on Broadway, including as Don Quixote in Man of La Mancha and as the King in King Hedley II. His performance as Fred Graham in Kiss Me, Kate earned him the 2000 Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical and the 2000 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Actor in a Musical. Mitchell was cast in a recurring role on the USA Network television series Mr. Robot in 2015. In 2016, Mitchell played Flournoy Miller in George C. Wolfe’s revival of the musical Shuffle Along, acting alongside Audra McDonald and Billy Porter. Mitchell’s voice acting credits include James Bond, Jr., The Addams Family and Vampirina.

Mitchell became the chairman of the board of the Actors Fund of America in 2004, and was honored with the 2016 Tony Award Isabelle Stevenson Award. A talented baritone singer, Mitchell released his self-titled album in 2006 and his second album entitled Simply Broadway in 2012.

Mitchell and his wife, Allyson Tucker, have one son, Ellington Mitchell.

Brian Stokes Mitchell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.146

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2016

Last Name

Mitchell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Stokes

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Patrick Henry High School

First Name

Brian

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

MIT15

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

The god you worship is the god you deserve. (Joseph Campbell)

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/31/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Avocados

Short Description

Actor Brian Stokes Mitchell (1957 - ), a Tony Award winning performer, appeared onstage in Ragtime; Kiss Me, Kate; and Man of La Mancha. He also appeared on television shows such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Trapper John, M.D., and Mr. Robot.

Employment

Old Globe Theatre

Twelfth Night Repertory Company

Various

Broadway

Brian Stokes Mitchell

Favorite Color

Purple

Melissa Harris-Perry

Television host and political science professor Melissa Victoria Harris-Perry was born on October 2, 1973 in Seattle, Washington. Her father, William M. Harris, Sr., was the first dean of African American Affairs at the University of Virginia; her mother, Diana Gray, primarily worked for nonprofit organizations, colleges, and state government agencies. Harris-Perry was raised in both Charlottesville and Chesterfield County, Virginia, and attended Thomas Dale High School. She received her B.A. degree in English from Wake Forest University in 1994 and her Ph.D. degree in political science from Duke University in 1999. She also studied theology at Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Harris-Perry first taught at the University of Chicago, and then as an associate professor in the department of Politics at Princeton University. In 2011, she was hired as a professor of political science at Tulane University, where she also founded the Anna Julia Cooper Project on Gender, Race, and Politics in the South. In 2012, she became host of “Melissa Harris-Perry” on MSNBC. In July of 2014, Harris-Perry returned to her alma mater, Wake Forest University, where she was named the presidential chair professor of politics and international affairs. She also directs the Anna Julia Cooper Center at Wake Forest University.

Harris-Perry’s 2004 book, Barbershops, Bibles, and BET: Everyday Talk and Black Political Thought, won the 2005 W. E. B. Du Bois Book Award from the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and 2005 Best Book Award from the Race and Ethnic Politics Section of the American Political Science Association. She released her second book, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America, in 2011. She has also been published in scholarly journals and edited volumes, and authored a monthly column entitled “Sister Citizen” for The Nation magazine.

In 2009, Harris-Perry became the youngest scholar to deliver the W.E.B. Du Bois Lectures at Harvard University. Also, in 2009, she delivered the prestigious Ware Lecture, becoming the youngest woman to ever do so. Harris-Perry served as a trustee of The Century Foundation and sat on the advisory board for Chef's Move!. She has received honorary doctorate degrees from Meadville Lombard Theological School and Eckerd College.

Harris-Perry is married to James Perry, and is the mother of two daughters, Parker and Anna James.

Melissa Harris-Perry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.203

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/12/2014

Last Name

Harris-Perry

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Victoria

Schools

Thomas Dale High School

Wake Forest University

Duke University

Union Theological Seminary

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Melissa

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

HAR47

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Barcelona, Spain

Favorite Quote

The Struggle Continues

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

10/2/1973

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Winston-Salem

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Red Velvet Cake

Short Description

Television host and political science professor Melissa Harris-Perry (1973 - ) is the host of MSNBC’s “Melissa Harris-Perry” and the presidential chair professor of politics and international affairs at Wake Forest University. She founded the Anna Julia Cooper Project on Gender, Race, and Politics in the South and has authored two books: Barbershops, Bibles, and BET: Everyday Talk and Black Political Thought, and Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America.

Employment

University of Chicago

Princeton University

Tulane University

MSNBC

Wake Forest University

The Nation Magazine

Favorite Color

Tiffany Blue

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Melissa Harris-Perry's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Melissa Harris-Perry lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her family's history of polygamy as well as her parents' previous marriages

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her family and godmother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her family's Christmas traditions

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her childhood experience in the Unitarian Universalist Church

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her childhood understanding of her own racial identity

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her current occupation

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about the relationships between her mother, father, and godmother

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about how her white stepsister experienced racism because of Harris-Perry's mixed race

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Melissa Harris-Perry shares the lessons she learned from her father, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Melissa Harris-Perry shares the lessons she learned from her father, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her relationship with her father, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her relationship with her father, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her relationship with her white stepsister

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her teachers, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her teachers, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about what she wanted to be as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her decision to attend Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes what influenced her feminism

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her experience at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes enrolling at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina for graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her doctoral dissertation and her first book

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about establishing the NIA House at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes how her feminism changed her identity as a black nationalist

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her experience as a rape survivor

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her friendship with Blair Kelley and teaching at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her experience as an assistant professor at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes the beginning of her career in the media

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her career as an academic at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois and at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her mother's role in helping to raise her daughter

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her experience at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her experience at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Melissa Harris-Perry describes her experience at Union Theological Seminary in New York City, New York

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

11$5

DATitle
Melissa Harris-Perry talks about her childhood understanding of her own racial identity
Melissa Harris-Perry describes her career as an academic at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois and at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey
Transcript
Now, can you talk a little bit more about that? You grew up in a home with a white mother [Diana Gray] and a white sister [Elizabeth] and African American you in the South [Charlottesville, Virginia]. How did your identity form as a young girl?$$And, I also just don't want to miss that at every point also visiting the black home of my dad [William M. Harris, Sr.], who had this very, very strong, I mean who was college roommates with Stokely Carmichael. They lived on the same hall at Howard [University in Washington, D.C.] and, you know again, who had been at the March on Washington and saw himself as a community organizer and, who also, you know my relationship, my parents' relationship was often marked my race in some really important ways in that my dad constantly was-- had a lot of anxiety about his black child being raised by a white woman and so my mother was very open to--"Okay, so what do I need to do?"--and my dad was very open to telling her-"this is what you need to do." The most important things that my mom did, I think, around my racial identity, or both of my parents, is there was not, in the 1970s, a notion of biracial identity. There is now. It took me a long time to understand that because race is socially constructed that I have to accept other interracial young people. They really do experience themselves as biracial. I do not. I experience myself as a black person with a white parent, and that is because from the beginning that is always how I was described to myself, how my family described me; just, the notion, "biracial" was not a word that was used. But also, my mother was very concerned that we live in a community that had many African Americans; again, I went to Jackson Via [Elementary School in Charlottesville, Virginia], named after two black women, and it was a predominantly black elementary school, as well as my middle school; maybe not predominantly black, but certainly more than 1/3. I had black child care providers all through my baby years, who helped to teach my mom how to do my hair and my mom was extraordinary. She could corn row my hair in extremely fancy styles and beads on the ends, and you know even the little, like, you put the tin foil on the end to keep the beads, my mom did all of that. And those were very self-conscious decisions made by my parents, sometimes thought out by my parents, about making sure that I was constantly understanding myself as a little black girl, and so I did. And, there was never, whether that was bad or good, it certainly was very straight forward. There wasn't a space for a crisis of identity there.$So, what are you doing academically as you are building this media profile for yourself?$$Oh, working on the next book. So, the first book ["Barbershops, Bibles, and BET"] is, you know, out of the dissertation and it's about, you know, black folks disagreeing. I am writing articles along because, you know, you just, just trying to tenure (laughter). That's what that goal is. So, tenure is always, you know, you must get the second book. So, I mentioned I went through a very painful divorce, my daughter not even two years old when my husband [Dennis Lacewell] left. The financial circumstances of suddenly becoming a single parent and, so I decided to write a book about black women this time and, at this point, I have really much more clearly solidified my identity as a feminist. I am working very closely with Cathy Cohen. She has at that point, taken over leadership of the Race Center [Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois]. I am on the Board of the Race Center at Chicago. We are pushing the administration to give us a building and postdocs. I am running that workshop. I am also running a workshop on race and religion. I am running another workshop on political psychology. I am engaging across fields. I am giving tons of lectures around the country--although not nearly as many as I give now--but it felt like a lot, especially as a single parent at the time, and I am working on this book about black women and the idea of the strong, black woman and the challenges around the notion of the strong black woman, collecting tons of data, I am doing experiments. I am teaching that high school class with the Kenwood Academy [High School in Chicago, Illinois] kids, and I am very much trying to build a life as a Chicago intellectual, and then I have lunch with one of my white male senior colleagues in the political science department and I tell him about my new book project, which I am really excited about, and he says, "Well, that's not very interesting. I'm not sure that you'll be able to get tenure with that." And I thought, okay, okay, I'm okay. I'm just going to go to Cathy and we'll go to Michael [Dawson] and they're going to tell me that they got me. It's going to be all right. So, I go to Cathy and I go to Michael and I was like, "Okay, this is what the senior colleague told me, but you got me right?" And they were like "Well....I don't know, maybe, it's really hard to just have you. We are sort of governed by consensus and I think a lot of people are going to think that" and I was like (gasp) Oh my God! I might not get tenure. I might not get tenure and I'm divorced and I have a baby, and I am working my butt off and I don't know what to do and I, I freaked out. So, I did what all people who freak out do. I went to Princeton [Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey]. (laughter). And, I spent a semester as a visiting professor at Princeton and built my relationships there. I was offered tenure in both the politics department there, and I never came up for tenure in Chicago, so I don't know whether I would have gotten tenure in Chicago or not. I was too freaked out after that. Found another route, and headed off to New Jersey.

Carver Gayton

Academic administrator, corporate executive, and museum chief executive, Carver Clark Gayton was born on October 18, 1938 in the Madrona District of Seattle, Washington to John Jacob and Virginia Clark Gayton. Born to a rich heritage, Gayton was raised in a family of ten and attended Madrona Grade School and Meany Junior High School as a youth. Afterwards, he attended Seattle’s Garfield High School where he excelled academically and athletically. He was a member of the school’s football team and was named to the All-City and All-State teams for his talents as a running back. In his senior year, he was elected Class President and was recruited by the University of Washington Head Football Coach Darrel Royal with a four year scholarship. In 1959, Gayton started as a freshman on the University of Washington football team, but was injured and unable to play after his second game, when he tore ligaments and cartilage in his knee. By the following season, Gayton recovered from his injuries, and he was allowed to play in the 1960 Rose Bowl, helping the Huskies defeat the University of Wisconsin forty-four to seven. That spring, he graduated from the University of Washington with his B.A. degree in history and a minor in English.

In 1961, under the leadership of Coach Jim Owens, Gayton served as an Assistant Coach for the University of Washington and was instrumental in the team winning the Rose Bowl for a consecutive year. Afterwards, he was hired as a teacher at his alma mater Garfield High School. In January of 1964, Gayton became the first black Federal Bureau of Investigation agent from the state of Washington when he received a letter signed by the bureau’s director J. Edgar Hoover. While serving in that capacity, he conducted thorough background checks on appointed government officials and alleged members of the Italian mafia. Subsequently, Gayton returned to his career in education and pursued his M.A. degree in educational administration at Temple University. In 1967, he went on to work as a special security representative for the Lockheed Missiles and Space Company in Sunnyvale, California.

In 1968, Gayton became the first full-time black coach for the University of Washington. He was also assigned to the Department of University Relations and served an assistant to the department’s vice president. During his tenure as an assistant football coach, Gayton recruited fourteen black players, the most in the University of Washington's history. In 1969, in protest of the suspension of four black players by Coach Jim Owens for threatening to boycott the team, Gayton resigned as head coach and was appointed to the new position of Director of Affirmative Action Programs. As the director, he established the first affirmative action program by an institution of higher learning in the state, and instituted the first comprehensive staff training program at the University of Washington. In 1972, Gayton earned his M.A. degree in public administration, and in 1976, he received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington. Shortly after, he was hired as a full-time assistant professor in the Department of Public Administration at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida.

After serving two years as Assistant Professor, Gayton was recruited by the Boeing Company as Corporate Manager of Education Relations, and was responsible for supervising a contract with Cogswell College. Under his leadership, Boeing helped its employees in furthering their education by promoting night classes at Cogswell College. In the mid-1980s, Gayton was promoted to Director of Education Relations and Training, and in 1991, he became Boeing’s Corporate Director of College and University Relations. From 1997 until 2001, Gayton served under Governor Gary Locke as the Commissioner of Washington State Department of Employment Security. Prior to becoming the Executive Director of the Northwest African American Museum in 2005, Gayton was a lecturer and consultant for the University of Washington. He serves on several boards, including the U.S. Department of Education National Advisory Panel/National Center for Post Secondary Governance and Finance and The Association of Governing Boards. Gayton retired as Executive Director June 25, 2008 and lives in Seattle, Washington with his wife Carmen and their son Chandler.

Carver Gayton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 4, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.080

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/4/2008 |and| 10/09/2017

Last Name

Gayton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Madrona Grade School

Meany Junior High School

James A. Garfield High School

University of Washington

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Carver

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

GAY04

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Education reform, workforce development, Afro-American History, organizational development, and management development.

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Education reform, workforce development, Afro-American History, organizational development, and management development.

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

10/18/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chili

Short Description

Corporate executive, academic administrator, and museum chief executive Carver Gayton (1938 - ) became the first black F.B.I. agent from the State of Washington. Gayton also became the first full-time black coach for the University of Washington in 1968. When appointed as Director of Affirmative Action programs, he established the first affirmative action program by an institution of higher learning in the state.

Employment

Northwest African American Museum

University of Washington

State of Washington

Boeing Company

Florida State University

Lockheed Martin

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)

Seattle Public Schools

Garfield High School

Favorite Color

Blue

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carver Gayton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton talks about his maternal great-grandfather, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton talks about his maternal great-grandfather, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton talks about his mother's relationship with her family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton describes his family's relationship with Horace R. Cayton, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton describes his paternal family's roots in Africa

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton describes his paternal grandfather

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton describes his paternal family's organizational affiliations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton remembers Homer Harris

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton describes his father's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton describes his father's education

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton describes how his parents met

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton talks about his father's interest in classical music

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton describes his parents' personalities, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton describes his parents' personalities, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton lists his siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton describes the Central District of Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton remembers segregation in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton talks about his namesake

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Slating of Carver Gayton's interview, session 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton lists his junior and senior high schools in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton remembers playing football at James A. Garfield High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton recalls his high school English teacher, Miriam Eskanazi

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton talks about Quincy Jones

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton recalls earning a football scholarship to the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton recalls playing football at the University of Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton talks about being recognized by the black press

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton talks about the impact of racism on his football career

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton talks about the football program at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton describes the long-term impact of his football injuries

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton reflects upon the changing attitudes toward football injuries

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton remembers his history professor, Thomas J. Pressly

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton talks about the field of African American studies

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton remembers historian and actor Edward L. Jones

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton recalls Professor Thomas J. Pressly's rejection of his great-grandfather's slave narrative

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton talks about the institution of slavery

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton talks about the importance of learning African American history

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton recalls his teaching experiences at James A. Garfield High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton recalls the visit of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton remembers his brother's career advice

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton describes early representation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton recalls becoming an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton remembers the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton describes the start of his career at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton describes the representation of African Americans in the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton remembers meeting J. Edgar Hoover

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton talks about his introduction to Kansas City

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton describes the start of his career at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton talks about his experiences in the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton remembers James P. Hosty

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton recalls the investigations into the murders of the civil rights workers in Philadelphia, Mississippi

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton talks about being recognized for his civil rights work in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton talks about FBI infiltration of the Ku Klux Klan and the Communist Party

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton talks about his transfer to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton talks about his experiences as an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton talks about his relationships with informants

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton remembers meeting Alex Haley

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton reflects upon the leadership of J. Edgar Hoover

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton recalls encountering threats from white supremacists at the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton describes his experiences as an FBI agent in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton remembers a notable informant

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton talks about his decision to leave the Federal Bureau of Investigation

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$2

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Carver Gayton remembers segregation in Seattle, Washington
Carver Gayton describes his family's relationship with Horace R. Cayton, Jr.
Transcript
--The whites stayed on the other end, and so you would--there'd be this big, you know, you were really brave if you went on the side where the whites were 'cause, you know, they'd look at you funny and all that sort of stuff but there were no--again it wasn't like the South, where you had signs saying whites only and blacks only.$$No enforced segregation (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) No, but you knew that you were, you know, you just knew that you were supposed to stay on your side and--there's a certain--you had these rafts out there in the water and, you know, the black kids wouldn't be with the whites at the other--sometimes a little bit of intermingling, but those were the kinds of things that--you 'member it was, you know, you didn't think of it as that offensive, not necessarily, I mean as a kid, you know, that was just part of growing up but, you know. I always like to push the envelope and be on the other side and all that sort of stuff and see what people say, "Oh God you were over there," (laughter) and, you know, old days at the beach [Madrona Beach, Seattle, Washington], summertime as a kid and then, you know, just hiking through those vacant lots and building forts and those images, and all of us had paper routes, and interesting combination. We lived right on the border of the, you, know, of the Gold Coast, you know, very wealthy. On one end, it's almost like a Mason-Dixon Line, you know, you had the Madison Valley [Seattle, Washington] where we were, 32nd Avenue, and then you'd go into, you know, where, you know, the--where the Tennis Club [Seattle Tennis Club, Seattle, Washington] was and Broadmoor [Seattle, Washington], all these sort of special gated communities and all those kids interestingly enough, the majority of kids did not go to private school back in those days. The white kids they went to Garfield [James A. Garfield High School, Seattle, Washington] so you had this really, really interesting dichotomy of wealth and poverty going to the same school. All the kids for the most part, very few went to private schools--nowadays, you know, you still have those gated communities, 90 percent of those kids go to private schools now. But back in those days, it was, it was an interesting mix of folks, and Garfield was guarded, you know probably--not really the case, but they always considered that kind of a nirvana or, you know a microscope or microscopic, you know, United Nations. And Quincy, he all--but he continues to talk about--[HistoryMaker] Quincy Jones, about his wonderful experiences there. I had good experiences there too, if you just push aside all that other stuff and look at the positive of it. Quincy, his primary mentor was a white gentlemen, Mr. Cook, Parker Cook, who encouraged Quincy to do everything, did the same thing with Jimi Hendrix and, you know, lot of it. So those were wonderful, wonderful experience at that, at that school, not to say that it was a perfect situation. There were limitations socially and all that sort of stuff that you knew about. Most of 'em, you know, unspoken, unwritten, you know, kinds of things, you just knew, rather than forced upon you, but it was a pleasant growing up experience for me. I can't speak for others, but I enjoyed it, with the blacks and whites--and there's a large Sephardic Jewish population too, in that Madrona [Seattle, Washington] neighborhood too, that I probably--my first swear words were Yiddish (laughter) back in the day and, and those kids they wanted to take me, what they called Talmud Torah, you know, where they, where they would--after school. Yeah, they were--Hebrew classes, you know, so the kids would try--then a guy got stopped at the door, you know, by the headmaster, you know, no you can't come in here 'cause you're not Jewish, but--and still--and it's great being in this museum [Northwest African American Museum, Seattle, Washington] because a lot of those kids I grew up with are Jewish and otherwise blacks, you know, coming through here and talking about gosh back in the day, you know, reminiscing and all that sort of thing. I mean the fact that I've been here for so long and that and--folks are still--they might be coming from Bellevue [Washington], you know, Mercer Island [Washington], all over the place, they may not live in the area anymore, but they're coming back, you know, this is a kind of a gathering place for the, whole, you know, the community. And a lot of those folks back in the '50s [1950s] and '60s [1960s] are coming back here to, you know, to check out this place because a lot 'em went to school here and--so it brings back, you know, a lot of, you know, pleasant, pleasant memories and pleasant stories that kids have had. And then there were some times to, but you know, you really didn't get into those things often, really until you became an adults and what adults tend to do to each other. But the kids--wasn't that, you know, it was, it was enjoyable, you know certainly in my experiences.$(Simultaneous) Okay, so we were talking about off camera--$$Yes.$$--the relationship between your family and the family of Hiram--$$Revels [Hiram Rhodes Revels], right.$$Revels, that the Caytons and the Woodsons--well the Caytons, yeah, Caytons and the Revels yeah.$$Right.$$So Susie Revels Cayton, Horace Cayton's [Horace R. Cayton, Sr.]--?$$I'm not quite sure if that was his wife or his daughter.$$Yeah, right.$$But if I recall, there was a daughter of Horace Cayton and his wife, was close to my mother [Virginia Clark Gayton] and father [John J. Gayton]. In fact, I have a letter, I was just reading it a couple of weeks ago. Susan--Susie Revels Cayton wrote to my mother saying she was gonna be in play. Langston Hughes asked her to be in a play 'cause you know, he was moving around different places trying to, you know make a living and then he had this wonderful musical, it's in his autobiography, I can't remember the name of it and she said she was flattered that Langston Hughes in this letter she wrote to my mother, she was flattered (laughter) that Langston Hughes wanted her, you know, to be in that play, but she said didn't--that wasn't her interest to move in that direction. But she was back there talking to Horace Cayton, Jr. [Horace R. Cayton, Jr.] with her brother. Horace Cayton, Jr., who was very prominent in his own right.$$Sociologist?$$Sociologist, yeah, and he wrote the 'Long Old Road' ['Long Old Road: An Autobiography,' Horace R. Cayton, Jr.], and he wrote that--the 'Black Metropolis' ['Black Metropolis: A Study of Negro Life in a Northern City,' St. Clair Drake and Horace R. Cayton, Jr.], co-wrote that with St. Clair (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) With St. Clair Drake, right.$$St. Clair, yeah St. Clair Drake. And so Horace Cayton, Jr. and my father were basically the same age, who grew up together and played together. In fact, in Horace Cayton, Jr.'s book 'Long Old Road,' there's an account of a--you know, of a picnic, you know, wonderful picnic that they had over--my grandfather had out in the country, which is only a matter of a couple of blocks away (laughter) a farm over there and so the black kids in the community would go together, you know, to the--my grandfather's farm, and, and this is--that's J.T. Gayton, John Thomas Gayton, Sr. [John T. Gayton].$$I have to apologize, whoever is watching this video in the future who wonders why I can't make the--all the right connections here, but that is the connection. If you look at Susan Woodson's [HistoryMaker Susan Cayton Woodson] interview with The HistoryMakers, and the first part when she describes her family, and then somebody watches what you just described, they could put all that history together.$$Oh isn't that something, yeah.$$But then they can put it all together. But, you know, I just can't remember all of it to be able to admit it myself right now but that's how you do it.$$Well, it's such a small world when you start talking about the so called black intelligentsia or what Langston Hughes called the Negro elite, he didn't say Negro (laughter). But you know, it is a small world particularly going back in those early years in the 1900, you know, the Talented Tenth kind of thing, you know.$$Yeah, that's right. Well, Susan Woodson I think is still alive in Chicago [Illinois], has a gallery. She was active in the WPA [Works Progress Administration; Work Projects Administration] arts projects, and the creation of the South Side Community Art Center [Chicago, Illinois], and sponsored a lot of the artist, and she runs a gallery out of her home in Hyde Park, in Chicago [Illinois].$$She--I'm sure she worked with Hor- 'cause Horace Cayton had a, you know, kind of a center, community center, one of the first of its kind in the country as I understand, that he was running back there, and I think while he was still, you know, teaching at the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois].$$That's right, I can't think of the exact name of it (laughter).$$Yeah I (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So, anybody watching this can go refer back to the other one.$$Exactly.$$And put it together 'cause it was an interesting history. Paul Robeson. There's an activist history, there's an arts history here. So migration, migration history that goes all over the place.$$That's right. Yeah.$$From Kentucky, to Mississippi, to Vancouver [Canada], you know.$$Well, as I recall in the 'Long Old Road,' Horace Cayton, Jr., you know, talks about them meeting up here in Seattle [Washington]. Booker T. Washington, and Horace Cayton, Sr., and Hiram Revels may have been up here himself, you know, but, but, you know, just, you know, talking about the issues of the day. And the thing is there's a--Horace Cayton was reflected in our exhibit, and the thing is the newspaper he had, had the largest--second largest circulation of any newspaper black or white in the Seattle area in the late 1800s. The Republican [Seattle Republican].$$Okay, the Republican, that's right.$$Right, right, and so--I mean that was--Horace Cayton and his wife, regarded as a pretty, pretty elite, you know, family, couple here in Seattle back in those days, because they, they represented the best of what, you know, African American intelligentsia is, you know, is all about, and anywhere in the country really, if you stop and think about it.

Cheryl Mayberry McKissack

Founder, CEO and president of Nia Enterprises L.L.C., Cheryl Mayberry McKissack was born on June 24, 1955, in Seattle, Washington. Born the middle child and only girl to Thelma and Donald Mayberry, McKissack attended Seattle’s Dunlap Elementary School and graduated from Franklin High School. She went on to earn her B.S. degree in political science in two and a half years from Seattle University in 1976.

After graduating from Seattle University, McKissack began a career with the IBM Corporation as a sales and marketing executive. While fulfilling her duties at IBM, McKissack decided to continue her education by enrolling at the Northwestern Kellogg School of Management. After graduating with her M.B.A in 1989, McKissack became the Western Area Branch Manager for the IBM Corporation in San Francisco, California, where she served until 1992. Afterwards, McKissack became Vice President of Sales and a founding member of the Network Systems Division at 3Com. In 1997, she served as the Senior Vice President and General Manager of Worldwide Sales and Marketing for Open Port Technologies, Inc.

In 2000, McKissack founded Nia Enterprises L.L.C., a Chicago based marketing data solutions firm designed to provide companies with direct access to the consumer habits of African American families, particularly focusing on African American women. Nia Enterprises L.L.C. functions through various outlets including NiaOnline and Nia Access. McKissack has been featured in several publications and is the co-editor of a series of books including The Nia Guide For Black Women: Balancing Work and Life and The Nia Guide For Black Women: Achieving Career Success On Your Terms. McKissack has been recognized for her entrepreneurial achievements and has received many honors including the Marketing Opportunities in Business and Entertainment’s (MOBE) “Influencers and Innovators of the Internet and Technology” Award and the Chicago United People of Color Leadership Award. In 2006, she was named by The Network Journal as one of the 25 Influential Top Women, and in 2007, McKissack was awarded the State Farm Phenomenal Woman Award-Business Entrepreneur.

McKissack and her husband, Eric, live in Chicago, Illinois.

Photo courtesy of Victor Powell

Accession Number

A2008.015

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/7/2008 |and| 12/17/2008

Last Name

McKissack

Maker Category
Middle Name

Mayberry

Occupation
Schools

Franklin High School

Dunlap Elementary School

Seattle University

University of Washington

Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Business

Rainier Beach High School

First Name

Cheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

MCK13

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

We Have To Do What We Need To Do Now So That We Can Do What We Want To Do In The Future.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

6/24/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Entrepreneur and marketing executive Cheryl Mayberry McKissack (1955 - ) founded Nia Enterprises L.L.C., a Chicago based marketing data solutions firm designed to provide companies with direct access to the consumer habits of African American families, particularly focusing on African American women.

Employment

International Business Machines (IBM)

One Moment in Time

U.S. Robotics Corporation

Open Port Technology, Inc.

Nia Enterpresises

Kellogg School of Management

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Cheryl Mayberry McKissack's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack lists her favorites, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her parents' move to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her childhood in Coffeyville, Kansas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her paternal grandfather's church, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her paternal grandfather's church, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her neighborhood in Wichita, Kansas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers celebrating Christmas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about segregation in Wichita, Kansas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers moving from Kansas to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls the Central neighborhood in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers the Rainier Beach neighborhood of Seattle, Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon her family's move to a majority-white neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her school environment in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers Rainier Beach Junior Senior High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her experiences of bullying at Rainier Beach Junior Senior High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers how she coped with bullying

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls transferring to Franklin High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the racial atmosphere of Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the racial demographics of Franklin High School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her experiences at Franklin High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the political activism at Franklin High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls Seattle University in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her parents' divorce

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the demographic changes in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers graduating from Seattle University in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls political activism at Seattle colleges

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her college coursework

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her trip to Europe

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her career at IBM

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the workplace culture at IBM

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes lessons from her time at IBM

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about diversity at IBM

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls how she came to study at the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls becoming a branch manager at IBM

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her M.B.A. degree program

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her personal life during her career at IBM

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the technological advancements at IBM

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her formalwear rental business, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her formalwear rental business, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Cheryl Mayberry McKissack's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack lists her favorites, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her father's upbringing

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her early experiences in Alabama

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her mother's move to New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls attending a Baptist church in Wichita, Kansas

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her mother's move to Seattle, Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers returning with her family to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her mother's move to Seattle, Washington, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls moving to Rainier Beach in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about Dunlap Elementary School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers the holidays

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her experiences of school integration

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her transition to Franklin High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her parents' divorce

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her aspiration to attend college

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her college education

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers backpacking in Europe

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her backpacking experiences in Europe

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls lessons from her trip to Europe

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the discrimination against black women at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the training programs at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the products of IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the office environment at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her career at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the lack of black executives at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her interest in sales

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her decision to attend the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her program at the Kellogg School of Management

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her decision to leave IBM

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls the early personal computing market

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls the opposition to affinity groups at IBM

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her first entrepreneurial venture

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her early success as an entrepreneur

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers joining the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her interview at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the mission of the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her role at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the growth of the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her colleagues at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her experiences at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her daily activities at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the national expansion of the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers the sale of the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls lessons from her time at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls leaving the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her lack of corporate role models

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes Open Port Technology, Inc.

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls the closure of Open Port Technology, Inc.

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers founding Nia Enterprises, LLC

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes Nia Enterprises, LLC

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the changes at Nia Enterprises, LLC

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her corporate board memberships, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her corporate board memberships, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her civic activities

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about teaching at Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack shares her advice to future businesspeople

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon contemporary racism in the United States, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon contemporary racism in the United States, pt. 2

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon her generation's legacy

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her hopes and concerns for young African Americans

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her husband

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon her legacy

DASession

2$2

DATape

11$9

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes Nia Enterprises, LLC
Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers joining the U.S. Robotics Corporation
Transcript
And what we decided to do was that we would, we would take--first of all, we'd build a community. This was back before Facebook [Facebook, Inc.] and all of these other kinds of things. And, and we wanted to take the African American people that were online and bring them together. And, and our primary focus was African American women. We wanted to have African American women kind of be our, our gateway, if you will, into the African American family. And so we, we started out by building a, a community site where we would provide them information that would help them with their families. And after a period of time, we would then go to them and ask them if they'd like to be a part of our consumer advisory panel. And the whole objective was to build this, build the largest consumer advisory panel, which we did, where we could have easy access to get into the minds and insights of African American families, and be able to provide that information in a research format to corporations so that they would have better information in the products that they were putting into our communities. And we were especially interested in areas like healthcare, because we ultimately wrote a book on, on choosing health and wellness. And the book was really all about African Americans really choosing to live healthier lives because we found out that we index at the top levels of every major disease, you know, you name it. Whether it's cancer or heart disease, African Americans lead the chart in every one of those disease and, and primarily African American women, and men also. So we, we could see by that there was this really--you know, a lot of disparities in the healthcare. So our thought was, well, you know, if corporations could have a better understanding of what African Americans thought they needed in these areas, they could put some of these things into products, or have us be involved more in the testing phases before it gets into, you know, your local, you know, drugstore, 'cause by that time it's a little late. And as we did some of our research, we found that African Americans had, had some, you know, had some issues with research. You know, they, they still--you know, even though some of them had an experience, that they had heard stories about the, you know, Tuskegee days [Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male] and you know, being used kind of as guinea pigs or whatever, and they just, they didn't have a, a trust level as to what were you gonna do with that information? How are you gonna use it? How is it gonna impact our community? How is it gonna better my life or the life of my family? And so we found that we had to, to build this whole what we call trusted dialogue first before they would give up the information.$$Okay. Now what were the steps along the way? Because I remember you starting--really, you wanted to be--look at Essence and being, you know, somewhere--$$No.$$--not, not at--$$No.$$--Essence online?$$No, because Essence wasn't--Essence didn't have an online--$$They were thinking--$$--at that time.$$--about an on--$$Yeah.$$--but they didn't want you to start. Was that it?$$Yeah, they, they--well, no, they, they--we, we just--they were print, and they were definitely print, and, and that was their business. And, but they were gonna get into the online business. And we met early on with one of the founders. He had actually summoned us to New York [New York] to meet with him, with the idea that we might be able to do something together. But, you know, that just didn't work out because of what our objectives were and, and what, you know, he expressed as their objectives. But, but their primary business was always, you know, to--$$Right.$$--to do print. And certainly they've expanded and evolved into online now, because, you know, that's just the way of the world. I mean you, you can't--$$That's right. That's right.$$--really have a business today without having an online component. But, but our focus really was to build the community first, get people comfortable that we were gonna offer them something of value, and then once they were comfortable, ask them if they would be a part of our, our panel so that we could do this research on a, on a regular basis.$$So (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That was really kind of it.$$So--$So what happened to U.S. Robotics [U.S. Robotics Corporation] then? How did (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well--$$--that come about?$$Well, what happened was, is that we were, we [Mayberry McKissack and Bonita Coleman Stewart]--I--we had both left IBM [International Business Machines Corporation].$$IBM.$$And we were both working in the business [One Moment in Time] full time. And we really had come to the conclusion that for us, we had objectives about what we wanted to do. And we--it was very clear to us that for us to meet the objectives that we wanted to do, instead of having three stores, we would need a hundred. You know, literally, we would need to have stores in just about every state, you know, in order to be able to, to get the economies and scales to achieve the kind of objectives that we have. And we found that something my mother [Thelma Roberson Arnold] told me very early on, that, you know, just because you like clothes and, and, and like fashion, doesn't mean you own--need to own a retail store. And so we, we, you know, we found that out and decided, actually decided pretty much at the same time that we wanted to both get back into, to business. We--it was a great, you know, opportunity, and we were able to sell off, you know, the assets of the business, but we decided that it wasn't something that we probably wanted to do long term. And right about that time, right before that, a good friend of mine here in Chicago [Illinois] was talking to a, a search firm, a friend of hers who was heading up a search firm. And they were looking for someone with a strong sales management background to, to work in this very entrepreneurial high, high, you know, growth entrepreneurial company here in Chicago called U.S. Robotics, which was really responsible for modem technology with the PC [personal computer] environment. But, but really what was prompting this business and made it just go crazy was the, was the advent of the Internet. And so she called me, 'cause, you know, I think I had been out with her a few weeks before and probably was commiserating about, you know, all of my, you know, money that I had earned at IBM was now, you know, being poured into this entrepreneurial business and, and how I wanted to, you know, get back to making money again. And so she said to me, she said to me, you know, "Would you ever be interested in doing that?" And I said, "Oh, I don't think so," but, but I, I, I, I had a little bit of interest. And I went home and, and actually--I wasn't married at the time, but my, my husband [Eric McKissack], who was my boyfriend at the time, told him about it. And he says, "Well, you might want to think about that. You know, that sounds like something would be right up your alley," and so I went up and, and interviewed with them. And, and the reason why I decided to do it is because it was really the perfect merger of, of what I wanted to do in my life. It was very entrepreneurial, had huge growth, was back in my core business, which was technology, and they were, they had lots of plans and ideas of new, creative things that they wanted to do. And I could use all of the, the training and skills and experience that I had, both from my entrepreneurial background and my corporate background, and apply those to some new ideas that, that were very exciting. And so that's why I decided to do it.$$What was the company you found, though? What was the U.S. Robotics you found when you joined it? How large was it?$$Well, U.S. Robotics when, when I joined it was about $80 million sales. Five years later, when it was sold to 3Com [3Com Corporation], it was about $2.2 billion in sales. And it was sold for just a little bit over 7 billion. It was one of the largest technology sales, company sales at that time in the industry.

Gary Gayton

Civil rights attorney Gary David Gayton was born on February 25, 1933 in Seattle, Washington to Virginia Clark and John Jacob Gayton, the fourth of eight children. When Gayton was five years old, his family moved to the all-white neighborhood of Madrona, and although they dealt with regular harassment, refused to leave. Gayton earned his diploma from Garfield High School in 1951 and attended the University of Washington where he was a four year varsity track man and became captain of the team.

In 1955, Gayton graduated with his B.A. degree in political science at the University of Washington. After serving honorably for two years in the United States Army, Gayton was admitted to Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington. He earned his L.L.B. degree in 1962, and was immediately appointed by Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to the post of Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington, the first African American to hold this position. Under the supervision of Assistant United States Attorney General Ramsey Clark, Gayton sued the State of Washington to allow Native Americans to sell fish caught on the reservations off the reservations.

Gayton left his position in the U.S. Attorney’s Office under Brock Adams in 1965, and, along with three associates, formed the law firm of Stern, Gayton, Neubauer & Brucker, whose clients included anti-war activists and Black Panthers. In 1966, Gayton was one of five delegates invited from the State of Washington to attend “To Fulfill These Rights,” President Johnson’s first Civil Rights Conference. Gayton continued working as an attorney, filing a successful suit on behalf of female tennis player, Trish Bostrom, demanding a women’s tennis program and the right to try out for the men’s team until such a program existed. This suit anticipated 1972’s Title IX, which prohibited sex discrimination against students and employees of educational institutions.

Gayton assisted in the organization of the black caucus at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago in 1968, where Channing Phillips was nominated as the first black Presidential contender. In 1969, Gayton represented several black football players who had been suspended for failing to take a loyalty oath for their coach, Jim Owens, at the University of Washington. Gayton was invited to become a part of Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox’s staff in 1973, but he declined for personal reasons. Gayton also served as an arbiter for the City of Seattle during the construction of Interstate 90.

Gayton became the U.S. Secretary of Transportation Brock Adams’ Special Assistant in 1977, in which he developed an affirmative action program for the U.S. Department of Transportation which was asked to be adopted by all departments by President Jimmy Carter in his 1978 domestic policy speech. In 1980, Gayton returned to Seattle as of counsel for the law firm, Diamond & Sylvester. In 1985, Gayton became an investment banker, working as Senior Vice President for Siebert, Brandford, Shank & Company, the largest minority and female bond-underwriting firm in the nation. Gayton continues in the private practice of law. He recently served as chairman of the senior advisory board of the ninth federal judicial circuit. Gayton has served on the boards of more than sixty cultural and professional organizations. He recently was named to the Hall of Fame of Garfield High School. In 2006, the Seattle Metropolitan magazine named Gayton one of the 277 people who shaped Seattle since its founding. In 2005, Gayton received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Washington in political science.

Gayton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 26, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.307

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/26/2007 |and| 6/6/2008

Last Name

Gayton

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

James A. Garfield High School

Meany Middle School

Madrona K-8 School

University of Washington

Washington University School of Law

Gonzaga University School of Law

First Name

Gary

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

GAY03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

What a difference a day makes.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

2/25/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Short Description

Civil rights lawyer Gary Gayton (1933 - ) represented Black Panther Party members and other civil rights cases in Seattle, Washington. He also served as a high ranking official in the U.S. Department of Transportation under President Jimmy Carter.

Employment

U.S. Attorney's Office

Stern Gayton Neubauer & Brucker

U.S. Department of Transportation

Urban Mass Transportation Administration

Smothers Douple Gayton & Long

Diamond & Sylvester

Grigsby Brandford & Co.

Cusack Knowles Ferguson

Siebert Brandford Shank

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Gary Gayton describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gary Gayton reflects upon his life, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gary Gayton reflects upon his legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gary Gayton talks about his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gary Gayton describes his community involvement

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gary Gayton narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gary Gayton narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Gary Gayton's interview, session 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gary Gayton lists his favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gary Gayton describes his mother's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gary Gayton describes his father's family background

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gary Gayton describes his paternal grandfather, J.T. Gayton

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gary Gayton describes his father's musical talent

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gary Gayton describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gary Gayton remembers moving to the Madrona neighborhood in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gary Gayton remembers his first work experience

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gary Gayton talks about his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gary Gayton recalls his decision to attend the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gary Gayton remembers trying out for the track team at the University of Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gary Gayton remembers his athletic activities at the University of Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gary Gayton describes his studies at the University of Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gary Gayton describes his experiences at the University of Washington School of Law in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gary Gayton recalls his decision to attend the Gonzaga University School of Law in Spokane, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gary Gayton remembers his U.S. Army Service

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gary Gayton talks about race relations in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gary Gayton remembers founding the Loren Miller Bar Association

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gary Gayton recalls his hiring as an assistant U.S. attorney

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gary Gayton remembers his colleagues in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gary Gayton recalls his first cases at the U.S. attorney's office

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gary Gayton remembers the push to hire African American assistant U.S. attorneys

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gary Gayton recalls his time as an assistant U.S. attorney

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gary Gayton recalls representing black football players from the University of Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gary Gayton recalls representing black football players from the University of Washington, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gary Gayton remembers defending a Black Student Union protestor

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gary Gayton remembers representing the Black Panthers

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Gary Gayton remembers representing a white supremacist organization

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gary Gayton remembers representing Trish Bostrom

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gary Gayton remembers his involvement with the Seattle SuperSonics

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Gary Gayton remembers joining the U.S. Department of Transportation

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gary Gayton describes his duties in the U.S. Department of Transportation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gary Gayton remembers his decision to leave the U.S. Department of Transportation

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gary Gayton reflects upon President James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr.'s administration

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gary Gayton remembers his resignation from the U.S. Department of Transportation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Gary Gayton talks about the role of political loyalty

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Gary Gayton remembers becoming a legal consultant in the public finance sector, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Gary Gayton remembers becoming a legal consultant in the public finance sector, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Gary Gayton recalls the investment firm of Siebert Brandford Shank and Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Gary Gayton reflects upon his career

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Gary Gayton reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Gary Gayton describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Gary Gayton talks about the importance of work life balance

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Gary Gayton describes his friends and family

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Gary Gayton talks about the Institute for Black American Music

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Gary Gayton reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Gary Gayton recalls his mentorship of Judge Richard A. Jones

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Gary Gayton describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Gary Gayton narrates his photographs, pt. 3

DASession

2$2

DATape

5$3

DAStory

9$1

DATitle
Gary Gayton remembers representing a white supremacist organization
Gary Gayton describes his paternal grandfather, J.T. Gayton
Transcript
But they knew that I had--I mean, you know, at one time I had--I don't know if it was Aaron [HistoryMaker Aaron Dixon] or Elmer [Elmer Dixon III] in my office on something, and I had the head of the Minutemen in my office. See, the, the marshal's office [U.S. Marshals Service] was still referring cases to me. And the head Minuteman was in here--$$Now, the Minutemen, for the sake of history, tell us who they were (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) The Minutemen, they were very conservative. They were, you know, right of the Ku Klux Klan [KKK]. These were people who had, you know, they hated their mothers, Catholics, blacks, everybody (laughter).$$(Laughter) The government.$$The government, you know. They were stashing (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) The activists, everybody.$$--they were stashing weapons and all that.$$So were they a militia.$$Militia type, yeah.$$Okay, all right.$$And they were out of--primarily out of east Washington, which is the conservative portion of this state. And so anyway, they, they asked the marshal's office, one of the guys, who should we get to represent us. And he said, "Well, I'd get [HistoryMaker] Gary Gayton, one of the marshals." And so they came in. And I charged 'em double what I normally would charge everyone else 'cause I didn't really wanna represent 'em. And anyway, we went to, to court and they were found guilty. And so in their paper, in east Washington, came out, "Nigger Attorney Turns Against" (laughter). But what was so funny, prior to that was that it was either Elmer or Eleano- or some other, one of the Black Panthers [Black Panther Party] sitting in the office, saw the guy. And, and he came in the office. He said, "Hey, Gayton, you know that guy's the head of the Minutemen. How do, how come you, how can you represent him?" I said, "He pays better than you guys" (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$But those were exciting and fun times really (laughter), you know.$$It seems like that, that could only happen in Washington for some reason. I don't know. I've been around the country and I'd be hard pressed to figure out another place where something like that could happen.$$(Laughter).$$You have the Minutemen sitting in an office of a black attorney (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) (Laughter) Black man (laughter). But that was something when I saw that headline, "Nigger Attorney Turns Against." And, and what was so funny, one of the women on the jury came to me and said, "Mr. Gayton, you seem like such a nice young man. How can you represent such a terrible person?" Yeah, (laughter) and I said, "Ma'am, we- that's what we're supposed to. We're supposed to represent 'em, the best of our ability. We don't agree with what they're doing, but--."$Okay, we're talking about your [paternal] grandfather, J.T. Gayton [John T. Gayton].$$Yeah, he, he started work--some time, I figure before the 1900s, for the Rainier Club [Seattle, Washington] as the chief steward. And I didn't realize--I'm a member of the Rainier Club, and I didn't realize that it was such a responsible position. I found out later, after talking to the historian of the club, and I later, when asked, served on the board of the Rainier Club so I could find out more about my grandfather. I just thought chief steward was like head waiter or something, but chief steward was managing, like the operating officer of the club. And what the historian of the Rainier Club told me that my grandfather made more money than about 60 percent of the members of the club at the time. And I didn't--the reason I was interested in finding out more about it is that Eddie Carlson [Edward Carlson], who was the president of United Airlines and also president of Western International Hotels, had been the chief steward there. That's where he started. And I said, well, gee, that position must have been an important position. That's when I checked with the historian, and I found out it was a very important position in the club. And my grandfather had great stature in the community because of that, especially in the, in the black community. And he was asked by the federal judge [Cornelius Holgate Hanford] who had just been appointed in 1904 to come with him to the federal courthouse and said, "Well, you're not gonna make as much money working for the federal government. But you'll have pension and you've gotta watch out for your family." So my father--grandfather went and went to work for him and stayed in that position from 1904 until he retired in about 1952. And he is mentioned in all the history books of the federal court in the Northwest because he not only became the bailiff for the first federal judge, but he became the librarian for the Ninth Circuit [U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit] that would--judges who would be here in town, the Ninth Circuit library at the federal courthouse.$$I heard he had a phenomenal memory from--$$Pardon?$$He had a phenomenal, phenomenal memory for cases. That's what I heard.$$Yes, he had a phenomenal memory for cases, and that's one reason, I mean he was so appreciated by so many of the lawyers, and made it much easier for me when I became a, a lawyer. The only thing, we would--my father [John J. Gayton] and grandfather talked about all the time was lawyers. They--and I, I think I was somewhat political as a child and when my one brother said he was gonna be an engineer and so I said I was gonna (laughter) be a lawyer. I was treated very well by my grandfather (laughter). And, and they, the history--there's a history book of the first 100 years of the federal court in Seattle [Washington]. And they mention that I was like J.T. Gayton, that they mentioned that his, his grandson, [HistoryMaker] Gary Gayton is a prominent attorney in Seattle. So I--I have a lot of pride in my connection with my grandfather--$$Okay.$$--and father because my father was such a wonderful man.

Larry Gossett

Political activist Larry Gossett was born Lawrence Edward Gossett on February 21, 1945, in Seattle, Washington. The son of Johnnie Evelyn Carter Gossett and Nelman Gossett, he grew up in Seattle’s southern and central areas. Gossett attended High Point and Horace Mann Elementary Schools and graduated from Franklin High School, where he was point guard on the basketball team. In 1963, Gossett was one of the few black males to attend the University of Washington.

In 1966, Gossett spent a year with Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA). Through VISTA, he received community organizing training with Harlem Youth, Inc. Gossett came back to Seattle as “Oba” and went on to become the school’s first student to graduate with a degree in African American Studies. Gossett was a member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and a founder of the Seattle chapter of the Black Panther Party. He was a co-founder of the University of Washington’s Black Student Union (UWBSU) and used the organization to leverage the University of Washington’s Black Studies Program. Gossett attended the Black Youth Conference in Los Angeles, California in 1967 that featured James Forman, Harry Edwards, Tommie Smith and John Carlos. He was the organizer of the Seattle Alliance of Black Student Unions and helped organize nearly a dozen high school, middle school and collegiate black student unions throughout the Seattle area. On March 29, 1968, Gossett was arrested, but was later exonerated after leading a sit-in to protest the treatment of black students at Franklin High School.

In 1982, Gossett founded the Minority Executive Directors Coalition (MEDC). He served as the Executive Director for the Central Area Motivation Program (CAMP) from 1979 to 1993 and helped to provide job assistance, a food bank and programs for at-risk youth. In the mid-1980s, Gossett was involved in the presidential campaign of Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. and was an organizer for the Rainbow Coalition. As president of the Rainbow Push Coalition, Gossett supported Norman B. Rice’s mayoral candidacy in 1989. In 1991, Washington’s King County Council was expanded from nine to thirteen members, and in 1993, Gossett won a seat representing Washington’s District 10, an area stretching from the Montlake Cut to Beacon Hill. As a councilman, Gossett has dedicated his time to the reformation of the criminal justice system, better public transportation and job opportunities for the poor and minorities.

Gossett serves as a member and chair of the King County Council. Gossett, a high profile black activist with strong ties to the Hispanic, Asian and Native American communities, was a prime mover in 1996 for changing the symbol of King County (Seattle) from 19th century slaveholder, Rufus Devane King to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The county’s official logo was changed to an image of Dr. King. There is a fifty-eight minute documentary produced by University of Washington television that features Gossett’s BSU activism. The film is called In Pursuit of Justice.

Accession Number

A2007.305

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/25/2007

Last Name

Gossett

Maker Category
Schools

Franklin High School

West Seattle Elementary School

Horace Mann Elementary School

George Washington Middle School

James A. Garfield High School

University of Washington

First Name

Larry

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

GOS02

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Santa Barbara, California

Favorite Quote

I Am Proud To Serve You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

2/21/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pork Chops

Short Description

Civil rights activist and county council member Larry Gossett (1945 - ) represented the State of Washington's District 10. He was involved in the presidential campaign of Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. and was an organizer for the Rainbow Coalition.

Employment

Harlem Youth Opportunities Unlimited

Central Area Motivation Program

King County Council

Office of Minority Affairs and Diversity, University of Washington

Favorite Color

Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Larry Gossett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Larry Gossett lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Larry Gossett talks about the history of Nigton, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Larry Gossett describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Larry Gossett talks about his parents' education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Larry Gossett describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Larry Gossett describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Larry Gossett talks about his father's profession

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Larry Gossett recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Larry Gossett describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Larry Gossett describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Larry Gossett talks about his elementary school education in Seattle, Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Larry Gossett describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Larry Gossett remembers his favorite music and television shows

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Larry Gossett recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s visit to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Larry Gossett talks about his elementary school education in Seattle, Washington, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Larry Gossett remembers Washington's notable African American athletes

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Larry Gossett recalls playing basketball in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Larry Gossett describes his decision to attend the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Larry Gossett talks about the racial demographics of the University of Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Larry Gossett recalls the racial climate at the University of Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Larry Gossett describes his early perceptions of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Larry Gossett remembers joining the Volunteers in Service to America

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Larry Gossett recalls his work with Volunteers in Service to America in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Larry Gossett talks about joining the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Larry Gossett describes the Harlem Youth Opportunities Unlimited programs

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Larry Gossett talks about his civil rights activities in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Larry Gossett remembers the 1967 Black Youth Conference

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Larry Gossett recalls the agendas of the University of Washington's Black Student Union

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Larry Gossett describes the Black Student Union's sit-in at the University of Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Larry Gossett describes the Black Student Union's sit-in at the University of Washington, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Larry Gossett recalls his arrest in 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Larry Gossett talks about his early political aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Larry Gossett remembers his time in jail during the Seattle riots

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Larry Gossett describes his trial in 1968

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Larry Gossett describes his role as a student recruiter for the University of Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Larry Gossett talks about the founding of Seattle's Black Panther Party

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Larry Gossett describes the Central Area Motivation Program

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Larry Gossett talks about the Rites of Passage Experience program at the Central Area Motivation Program

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Larry Gossett recalls his election to the King County Council

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Larry Gossett talks about the renaming of King County, Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Larry Gossett talks about the renaming of King County, Washington, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Larry Gossett talks about the original namesake of King County

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Larry Gossett describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Larry Gossett reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Larry Gossett reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Larry Gossett talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Larry Gossett describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Larry Gossett narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Larry Gossett narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Susan Cayton Woodson

Art enthusiast Susan Cayton Woodson helped collect and preserve several works from the Chicago Renaissance. Born on October 16, 1918, in Seattle, Washington, Woodson was raised by her maternal grandparents after her mother died when she was just a year old.

From an early age, Woodson was conscious of her heritage, and expected to live up to the reputations of her ancestors. Her great-grandfather, Hiram R. Revels, became the first African American senator in 1870 when he won election from Mississippi during Reconstruction. At home, Woodson was influenced by the accomplishments of her grandparents. Grandmother Susie Revels Cayton was a suffragette and union activist, and Woodson's grandfather, Horace Roscoe Cayton, published the Seattle Republican, the city's first black newspaper.

Woodson attended Washington State College until her grandfather's death in 1940; at that time her grandmother decided it would be best to send Woodson some place where she could get married, and chose to move her to Chicago. Paul Robeson, a friend of Woodson's siblings, flew out to chaperone Woodson on the drive to Chicago. In Chicago, Woodson lived in the Rosenwald; home to many of the city's black intellectuals and artists.

After working at the Supreme Liberty Life Insurance Company and the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union, Woodson volunteered at the Parkway Community House where her uncle, Horace Cayton, Jr., became director; she herself became a board member in 1973. Over the years, Woodson befriended Eldzier Cortor, Langston Hughes, Ted Ward, Richard Wright, and many other artists and activists from the eras of the WPA and Chicago Renaissance. Woodson also formed relationships with Chicago's great artists, and began collecting art commemorating these important movements. The Susan Woodson Gallery houses the preeminent collection of the Chicago Renaissance and has attracted an international clientele.

Woodson served on the board of the South Side Community Art Center, and was a member of the Vivian G. Harsh Collection at the Carter G. Woodson Regional Library.

Woodson passed away on January 31, 2013.

Accession Number

A2003.105

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/14/2003

Last Name

Woodson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Cayton

Occupation
Schools

Washington State University

James A. Garfield High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Susan

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

WOO03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Sponsor

Willie Leftwich

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Seattle, Washington

Favorite Quote

The kitchen is closed.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/16/1918

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cobbler (Apple)

Death Date

1/31/2013

Short Description

Art collector Susan Cayton Woodson (1918 - 2013 ) is a collector and preservationist of Chicago Rennaissance art. The Susan Woodson Gallery houses the preeminent collection of the Chicago Renaissance and has attracted an international clientele.

Employment

Supreme Liberty Life Insurance

Parkway Community House

Susan Woodson Gallery

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Susan Woodson interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Susan Woodson's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Susan Woodson talks about her family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Susan Woodson remembers her mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Susan Woodson recalls her father's background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Susan Woodson recalls problems traveling to her father's funeral

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Susan Woodson remembers her early reaction to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Susan Woodson talks about growing up in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Susan Woodson discusses childhood interests

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Susan Woodson describes family life during her childhood in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Susan Woodson talks about her brothers' wives

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Susan Woodson remembers elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Susan Woodson explains hardships during junior college

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Susan Woodson details her years at the Rosenwald Building

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Susan Woodson describes Chicago's racial and social climates

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Susan Woodson talks about experiences with Paul Robeson

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Susan Woodson recalls her attempts at finding work in Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Susan Woodson remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Susan Woodson explains various family problems

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Susan Woodson talks about her husband's professional career

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Susan Woodson remembers opening her gallery

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Susan Woodson discusses experiences with Charles Sebree and his art

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Susan Woodson recalls the Woodson family's business successes

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Susan Woodson names artists she's worked with

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Susan Woodson explains how she got involved in showing WPA artwork

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Susan Woodson talks about various ways she's obtained artwork

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Susan Woodson discusses William McBride's art collection

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Susan Woodson talks about how Margaret Burroughs helped artists

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Susan Woodson recalls rewarding moments in gallery ownership

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Susan Woodson comments on her hopes for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Susan Woodson considers her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Susan Woodson shares her regrets

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Susan Woodson looks back on her career

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

2$2

DATitle
Susan Woodson remembers her early reaction to Chicago, Illinois
Susan Woodson remembers opening her gallery
Transcript
Paul Robeson was closing out a concert that was at 43rd and Ashland, some large building there. And it was something to do--it was an all-black affair. There must have been thousands there, must have been. So he flew out and drove to where we were and from there, drove into Chicago [Illinois].$$Paul Robeson drove you to--$$No, the driver, but he was with--I was with two men, Gene Coleman and Paul Robeson and myself. And this was--Madge [Cayton] felt that was secure. She was the matriarch of the family at that period. So we drove into Chicago, and the first thing that--I was looking at all these black people. So he had Gene stop at 47th and Michigan, and we just stood on that corner. I had--it was a new world, complete new world. Black people dressed up. We walked up 47th Street, businesses, black businesses. And they had on these red suits and hats and red shoes. And they were just--I had never seen such a city that was awake with people walking up and down the streets, going into stores, drug stores. And I used the word, I used the word to Paul, "Look at these niggers". Now, this is what, you know, we were talking like that in those days. And "Look at these niggers. I've never seen anything like it." And he says, just wait until tonight. And so we slowly walked up 47th Street to the Rosenwald, a new, brand new world. And walking into the gates of the, front gate, it was paradise. And so we took pictures and then I took a picture of Gene and Paul in front of where we were going to be living. And that's what this picture on my wall comes from. It was a new world.$I know you met a lot of artists and a lot of activists along the way, now, but you--how did the idea for gallery come up?$$Sitting home with your husband [Harold Woodson] wondering, now, what can I talk about now. And, and Harold would read and tell, want to discuss his books. I didn't want to talk about the books. I enjoyed art. I enjoyed it, and I joined the [South Side] Art Center. Vern Gayeton [NOT FOUND] brought me on the board there. And one day there was a woman from Oak Park came into the art center and said that, I have a lot of black art that I'd like to sell. And at the art center, we don't do it like that. We have shows. And she couldn't--and she'd gone to several of the art--Nicole's, several people, and they said, no, we can't do it. So I, I heard about it, and I had the director to drive me out there. And there was all this wonderful black art, Charles (unclear) Sebree. I had some of it on my walls, beautiful art. I said, I'll sell it in my home. I said, just bring it all to me. And Mrs. Woodson had passed so I, I opened that bedroom into a gallery. It's so interesting, you know, the artists did support me. I had two comfortable chairs in the middle of the room and a coffee table for people to come in and just sit down and relax. And Sylvester Britton, who was my main artist, came in. He says, take these things out of here. You don't have to make it comfortable. You're selling art. You're not--this isn't a living room. Take it out. Sell the art and get the, put the best art forward. And that was the beginning of it. And Walter Evans from Detroit [Michigan] has several books out on his collections. He came here one day, and somebody told me about him, and he was checking it out. And I don't know how the conversation came up, but I said, well, where are you gonna take your art? He said, I'm thinking about putting it back here. And I had the best, top art in my small gallery. And people bought and--but I didn't have heavy names to come in. The little names were buying these, this work, putting it in will-call. He stayed with me and kept bringing more work in until he wanted, he decided he wanted to buy that picture, this Charles White. He stayed with me long enough for me to be able to say, no, I'll never sell it. So art, I don't know if he'll come back or not, but he's well wanted. His art collection, I'd love to sell it.$$That's on Evans and--$$Walter Evans.$$Walter Evans, okay.$$He's now down in Atlanta [Georgia].