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Terri Lyne Carrington

Jazz musician Terri Lyne Carrington was born on August 4, 1965 in Malden, Massachusetts, to Solomon Carrington and Judith Carrington. She graduated from Medford High School in 1981 and enrolled in the Berklee College of Music for three semesters.

In 1974, at age nine, her father put her into drum lessons with legendary jazz musicians Keith Copeland, Clark Terry and Dizzy Gillespie. When she was only eleven years old, then-president of Berklee College of Music Lawrence Berk awarded her a full scholarship to the school after seeing her performing with Oscar Peterson in Boston. Carrington was the youngest person to ever receive a full scholarship from Berklee College of Music at the time. She gained notoriety as a child prodigy, becoming the youngest ever endorser of the Avedis Zildjian Company cymbals and of Slingerland Drum Company. She recorded her first album, TLC and Friends, with Kenny Barron, George Coleman, Buster Williams, and her father, in 1981, at sixteen years old. At the suggestion of her mentor, Jack DeJohnette, Carrington moved to New York and played with various artists, eventually landing her first major touring job with Clark Terry in 1983. In 1986, Carrington won an audition to join Wayne Shorter’s band. Shorter became another mentor to Carrington, and they performed together for many years touring the world. Carrington moved to Los Angeles in 1989, joining the house band for The Arsenio Hall Show for four months before departing to promote her debut album, Real Life Story, for which she received a Grammy nomination for Best Jazz Fusion Performance. In 1991, Carrington played drums for Herbie Hancock for a summer, and the two formed a relationship that led to Hancock inviting Carrington to perform with Joni Mitchell and Stevie Wonder on his George Gershwin tribute record Gershwin’s World in 1998. Carrington then toured with Hancock for the next decade. Carrington has released eight albums, with Grammy Award winning works including The Mosaic Project in 2011, and Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue.

Carrington serves as the Founder and Artistic Director of the Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice and is artistic director of the Berklee Beantown Jazz Festival in Boston. She has received numerous honors, including a Grammy for producing Dianne Reeve’s album Beautiful Life. Carrington also received an honorary doctorate degree from Berklee College of Music in 2003.

Carrington has one son.

Terri Lynne Carrington was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 26, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.010

Sex

Female

Interview Date

01/26/2017

Last Name

Carrington

Maker Category
Middle Name

Lyne

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Terri

Birth City, State, Country

Malden

HM ID

CAR37

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

I'm not what I do, I do what I am.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/4/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chielean sea bass, bibb lettuce etc. depends on the type of food, can't name an overarching one.

Short Description

Jazz musician Terri Lyne Carrington (1965- ) a three-time, Grammy Award-winning instrumentalist, vocalist, composer, producer, bandleader, and musical director that played with Clark Terry, Dizzy Gillespie and Herbie Hancock.

Favorite Color

Green

Doris Jones

Artistic director and dance instructor Doris Winnefred Jones was born in Malden, Massachusetts on June 3, 1913, to Maddie Lightfoot Jones and Walter James Jones. She grew up with aspirations of being a ballet dancer, but found it difficult to find dance schools that would accept her as a student because of the paucity of African Americans involved in classical dance. At a young age, Jones was already a formidable tap dancer and was offered an opportunity to tour with Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, but her parents would not allow her to go. As a teenager, she traded tap dancing lessons for ballet lessons at a classical dance school in Boston, Massachusetts.

In 1941, Jones and another young dance teacher, Claire Haywood, founded the Jones-Haywood School for Ballet in order to provide young African American students with the opportunity to learn classical dance. Jones and Haywood later formed the Capitol Ballet Company as an integrated performing troupe. Jones served as the company's artistic director until 1982. Today, the Capitol Ballet Company holds the distinction of being the oldest predominately African American ballet company in the United States. In 1980, Jones also formed the Jones-Haywood Youth Dancers in order to provide more opportunities for younger dancers.

During her long career, Jones both trained and studied under some of the biggest names in classical dance including Chita Rivera, Hinton Battle, Sylvester Campbell and Sandra Fortune-Green. She also served as director of the Washington, D.C. Public Schools Dance Program. Over the years, she has choreographed for the Washington Opera Society and the Washington Civic Opera. She has been the recipient of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Medal for Outstanding Service in Human Rights and the Metropolitan Theatrical Society's Mainline to Stardom Award.

Doris Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 25, 2003.

Doris Jones died of pneumonia on March 21, 2006, in Washington, D.C.

Accession Number

A2003.169

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/25/2003

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Middle Name

W.

Organizations
Schools

Practical Arts High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Doris

Birth City, State, Country

Malden

HM ID

JON05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

Let's Get On With It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/3/1913

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Death Date

3/21/2006

Short Description

Artistic director and dance instructor Doris Jones (1913 - 2006 ) co-founded the Capitol Ballet Company, the oldest predominantly African American ballet company in the United States. Jones formed the Jones-Haywood Youth Dancers in 1980.

Employment

Jones-Haywood School of Dance

Capitol Ballet Company

Jones-Haywood Youth Dancers

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Doris Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Doris Jones lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Doris Jones describes her family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Doris Jones talks about her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Doris Jones describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Doris Jones speculates on how her parents might have met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Doris Jones talks about going to see shows every Monday with her mother as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Doris Jones talks about her childhood personality and interests

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Doris Jones talks about her family's records and phonograph

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Doris Jones talks about her father's profession and musical talent

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Doris Jones talks about her schooling

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Doris Jones talks about schoolteachers she remembers

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Doris Jones talks about taking formal dance classes

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Doris Jones describes being refused dance lessons because of race

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Doris Jones describes her early career as a dance teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Doris Jones describes moving to Washington, D.C. to teach dance

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Doris Jones describes the growth of her dance school in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Doris Jones talks about her dance company and various dancers including HistoryMaker Sandra Fortune-Green

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Doris Jones talks about some of her dancers

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Doris Jones talks about Chita Rivera and HistoryMaker Louis Johnson

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Doris Jones talks about difficulties in purchasing a house for the Jones-Haywood School of Ballet

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Doris Jones talks about differences in teaching styles between her and Claire Haywood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Doris Jones talks about the highlights of her career in dance

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Doris Jones talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Doris Jones talks about the need for the arts in schools and African dance

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Doris Jones talks about her trip to Russia for the Second International Ballet Competition in 1973

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Doris Jones talks about HistoryMaker Sandra Fortune-Green's performance in Russia in 1973

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Doris Jones reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Doris Jones reflects upon her life

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Doris Jones reflects upon how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Doris Jones narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Doris Jones narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
Doris Jones describes her early career as a dance teacher
Doris Jones describes the growth of her dance school in Washington, D.C.
Transcript
Now, tell us about how you started teaching dance.$$Well, you know I told you how I was asked by the Deltas [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority] to do something on their program, and I had three paying students at fifty cents a week (laughter) and--$$You started--I mean well tell us the whole story 'cause, you know when we were talking I--the tape wasn't rolling, so.$$No.$$(Unclear) tell us.$$Well I, I was teaching three little students, and--$$And you were still a teenager, right?$$Oh, yes. And my sister's [Celestine Bayne] friend said, "Oh, Doris [HistoryMaker Doris Jones]," it was a (unclear), "we need to have you on the program; we're having a annual program, and we'd like to put you on the program." I said, "I don't want to dance, but I would love for my children to dance." So I got seven of them together, three of them were relatives. Two were my nieces and one was my cousin, and then I got four other little people; and I gave them a little dance routine, my mother [Mattie Lightfoot Jones] made costumes for them. And they danced; and they were so wonderful that, starting the following September, I had a registration of thirty people who called who wanted their children to come--still fifty cents a lesson. That was--they came once a week, and I taught some ballet, but I wasn't really up on it yet. So I stuck with the tap and every year the class--every year the class grew. And I taught about ten--let me see about thirteen years in Boston [Massachusetts] before I came here. And I went to--I used to go to Camp Atwater in East Brookfield, Massachusetts [sic. North Brookfield, Massachusetts]. (Unclear) De Berry [William De Berry] had a summer camp there. He had the girls--the boys in July and the girls in August; and he--I went there as a camper and when I grew up and he found that I was teaching dancing, he asked me to come up and teach the month of July--month of August, when the girls were there. So you had to be a counselor and do an activity, teach art or swimming or something. So I said to him, "No, I don't want to come, 'cause I don't want to be a counselor." I said, "I just want to teach dance." So he said, "All right Miss Jones, you come up and you'll teach just dance," which I did. And I used to do a program--I was up there for four weeks, at the end of two weeks, I'd do a program with the children, and the other two weeks I'd do another program. He would invite rich people who had money and they'd come up and they'd be so fascinated with the, you know, what was accomplished in the dance, they'd make donations. So after that, he said, "Well you don't ever have to be a counselor, all you do is put on this program twice a season."$So then we [Jones and Claire Haywood] bought--we rented this place on U Street [Washington, D.C.], which was a very fine--it's coming back, it was very--anything on U Street was really top notch. So then we got our school on U Street, we rented this building, had two stories and three little studios--not particularly big. And then we started our school there, and it grew and grew and grew. So finally we got--decided, well now if we're gonna make these ballet dancers, they can't come once a week; they have to come twice a week. That went all right. And the next year, they had to come three times a week; then the next year, they had to come four times a week. And that's when the people said, "Oh, no, my child can't be--no four times a week. I can't afford it and I can't afford to get them there; it's too much coming back and forth." So we said, "Okay, well we'll take three children who--," you know. And they began to see that the difference between the child who came twice a week, and the child that came four times a week was a big difference. Then they began to realize that if they wanted their children really to dance, they had to be in the studio. So then, now the children take four times a week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday--(unclear) Friday, we never worked on Fridays; we always had Fridays and Sundays off. And that's when the school grew, and we began to make dancers. And then we realized we had to have a small company because there's no--these people were dancing so well, there was no place for them to dance. So then we had an, assemble professional company and it just grew.$$Now when did you establish the company?$$Nineteen forty-one [1941].$$So that--so--and what's the name of the company?$$Capitol Ballet Company.$$Okay.$$Capitol with an O.