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EducationMakers include teachers, professors, education administrators, and education consultants, as well as museum and library professionals and historians. These HistoryMakers have each spent a significant portion of their careers advancing educational philosophies, teaching, advising, and mentoring students, breaking new ground in developing curricula, or sharing information through programming and exhibits.

David Wilson

Academic administrator David Wilson was born on November 2, 1954 in McKinley, Alabama to Minnie and Henry Wilson. He graduated from Marengo County Training School in Thomaston, Alabama and went on to attend the Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama where he received his B.S. degree and M.Ed. degree in 1977 and 1979, respectively. He later received another M.Ed. degree and his Ed.D. degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1984 and 1987, respectively.

In 1984, Wilson served as director of the Office of Minority Programs and as a program officer at the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey. He then became a Woodrow Wilson Foundation Administrative Fellow, serving as an executive assistant to the vice president for business affairs and finance at Kentucky State University in Frankfort, Kentucky. After graduate school, Wilson became associate provost at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and was later promoted to assistant provost in 1990. In 1995, Wilson became the first African American vice president for university outreach and associate provost at Auburn University. He was also the first African American to hold a senior administrative appointment at a predominantly white university in the State of Alabama. In 2006, Wilson was hired as the chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Extension and the University of Wisconsin Colleges, as the first person in Wisconsin to serve as chancellor of two statewide institutions simultaneously. In 2010, Wilson was appointed the tenth president of Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland. In 2013, Wilson helped launch Morgan State University’s School of Global Journalism and Communication. He also oversaw the completion of the university’s Earl G. Graves School of Business and Management Building in 2016. In 2018, Wilson announced Morgan State University’s collaboration with The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

In 2010, President Barack Obama appointed Wilson to serve on the President’s Board of Advisors on HBCUs. He also served on the Hall of Records Commission, the Maryland Longitudinal Data System Center Governing Board, Greater Baltimore Committee, United Way of Central Maryland, Inc., the Northeast Maryland Higher Education Advisory Board, the Student Transfer Advisory Committee, the Association of American Colleges and Universities, and in 2018, Wilson was elected to the board of directors for the Lumina Foundation.

Wilson is the recipient of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation National Fellowship and was named one of the nation’s top 100 leaders in higher education by the American Association of Higher Education in 1998. In 2010, the reading room at UW Center for Civic Engagement at UW-Marathon County was named in his honor. He was also selected as one of The Daily Record newspaper’s Influential Marylanders and was honored by the University of Alabama with an award for outstanding leadership in engaged scholarship in 2011. In 2018, Wilson received the First Citizen Award by the Maryland Senate.

Wilson has one son, Nyere.

David Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 18, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.004

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/18/2019

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Schools

Tuskegee University

Harvard Graduate School of Education

First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

McKinley

HM ID

WIL89

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any Beach

Favorite Quote

In the Vernacular

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

11/2/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

Academic administrator David Wilson (1954 - ) was chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Extension and the University of Wisconsin Colleges and became the tenth president of Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Employment

Kentucky State University

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Auburn University

University of Wisconsin-Extension

Morgan State University

Favorite Color

Blue

Sheryll D. Cashin

Professor Sheryll Cashin was born on December 15, 1961 in Huntsville, Alabama to Joan Cashin and John L. Cashin, Jr. She received her B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1984, her M.S.c degree in English Law from Oxford University in Oxford, England in 1986 and her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1989.

In 1989, Cashin served as a law clerk for Judge Abner Mikva for the U.S. Court of Appeal, D.C. Circuit. The following year, she served as a law clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. In 1993, Cashin served as director of community development for The White House during the Clinton administration. She also worked as an advisor on urban and economic policy with a focus on community empowerment programs. As director of community development for the National Economic Council, she oversaw urban policy and community development initiatives and advised on community development in inner-city neighborhoods. As staff director for the Community Empowerment Board in the Office of Vice President Al Gore, Cashin worked on community-based revitalization strategies for urban and rural communities. In 1996, Cashin left public service and joined the faculty at Georgetown University Law Center where she has taught Constitutional Law; Race and American Law; and other subjects. In 2018 she was installed as the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Civil Rights and Social Justice.

Writing and public speaking are her platform for advocacy. In 2004, Cashin published The Failures of Integration: How Race and Class Are Undermining The American Dream. Then, in 2006, Cashin published The Agitator’s Daughter: A Memoir of Four Generations of One Extraordinary African American Family which chronicles her family history from slavery to the post-civil rights era. In 2014, she published Place Not Race: A New Version of Opportunity in America and in 2017, Cashin published Loving: Interracial Intimacy in America and the Threat to White Supremacy. She has also written commentaries for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Salon, The Root, and other media. Additionally, her book, The Descendants, focuses on the role of segregation in subordinating African Americans.

In 2004, her book, The Failures of Integration was an Editors’ Choice in the New York Times Book Review. Cashin is also a three-time nominee for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for non-fiction in 2005, 2009, and 2018. In 2014, her book Place Not Race was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Non-Fiction. She served as vice chair of the board of the National Portrait Gallery and is an active member of the Poverty and Race Research Action Council.

Sheryll Cashin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 21, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.006

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/21/2019

Last Name

Cashin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

D.

Occupation
Schools

Vanderbilt University

University of Oxford

Harvard Law School

First Name

Sheryll

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

CAS04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Morocco

Favorite Quote

Power Concedes Nothing Without a Demand, Never Did Never Will.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/15/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Cuban

Short Description

Professor Sheryll Cashin (1962 - ) served as a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center and published The Failures of Integration, The Agitator’s Daughter, and Loving: Interracial Intimacy in America and the Threat to White Supremacy.

Employment

U.S. Court of Appeals

U.S. Supreme Court

The White House

National Economic Council

Office of the Vice President of the United States

Georgetown University Law Center

Favorite Color

Aqua

Louis E. Wilson

Professor Louis E. Wilson was born on March 1, 1939 in Longview, Texas. Wilson earned his B.A. degree from California State University, and his M.A. degree and Ph.D. degree in 1980 from the University of California, Los Angeles, respectively.

Wilson joined the faculty at University of Colorado Boulder in 1980. During his term, he was also a senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Ghana, Legon. In 1989, he was named chair of the Afro-American and African Studies Department at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. There, he also served as associate professor and later was appointed professor of African and African American history. In 1991, Wilson authored The Krobo People of Ghana to 1892: A Political and Social History and later co-author of the textbooks, America Will Be: Houghton Mifflin Social Studies in 1997 and This Is My Country. In 1999, Wilson served as a senior Fulbright history professor and researcher at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. He then co-authored The Americans: Reconstruction Through the 20th Century and The Americans in 2002. In 2012, Wilson was a co-author for the History Channel History Education and History Classroom programs in partnership with textbook publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. He was also the author of Genealogical and Militia Data on Blacks, Indians, and Mustees from Military American Revolutionary War Records in 2003 and a book entitled Forgotten Patriots: African Americans and Native Americans in the American Revolution from Rhode Island. In 2017, Wilson was named professor and chair of the Africana studies department at Smith College. The following year, The Louis Wilson collection of maps of Africa from 1665 to 1906, were housed in the Five College Archives and Manuscript Collection at Smith College.

Wilson served as a visiting professor of American Studies at the University of Hamburg in Germany, and as a member on the board of trustees of the Museum of African American History in Boston, Massachusetts. Wilson received The Blackwell Fellowship and Prize as Outstanding Black New England Scholar in 1991.

Louis E. Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 7, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.227

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/07/2018

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Edward

Organizations
First Name

Louis

Birth City, State, Country

Long View

HM ID

WIL88

Favorite Season

N/A

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Different Places

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/1/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Favorite Food

BBQ

Short Description

Professor Louis E. Wilson (1939- ) served as professor and chair of the Africana studies department at Smith College and authored The Krobo People of Ghana to 1892.

Favorite Color

Blue

Paula Giddings

Professor Paula Giddings was born on November 16, 1947 in Yonkers, New York. She received her B.A. degree in English from Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1969, where she served as editor of the university’s literary magazine, The Promethean.

In 1969, Giddings worked as an editorial assistant for Random House and later as a copy editor until 1972. She then became an associate book editor for Howard University Press. In 1975, Giddings moved to Paris, France where she served as the Paris bureau chief for Encore America/Worldwide News. In 1977, she was transferred to the New York office and served as an associate editor until 1979. In 1984, Giddings published her first book When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America. The following year, she served as a contributing editor and book review editor for Essence magazine. She then became a distinguished United Negro College Fund (UNCF) scholar at Spelman College. In 1988, she published In Search of Sisterhood and then joined the faculty of Douglass College at Rutgers University where she held the The Blanche, Edith, and Irving Laurie Chair in Women's Studies from 1989 to 1991. Giddings also served as a visiting professor at Princeton University and Duke University. In 2001, Giddings joined Smith College as the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor of Africana Studies. She also served as the editor of Meridians, feminism, race, transnationalism a peer-reviewed feminist, interdisciplinary journal. She then became Smith College department chair and honors thesis advisor for the department of Africana studies. In 2002, she edited Burning All Illusions: Writings from The Nation on Race 1866-2002 and in 2008, she published Ida, A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching. Giddings retired from Smith College in 2017.

Giddings has also written extensively on international and national issues and has been published by the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jeune Afrique (Paris), The Nation, and Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, among other publications.

In 1982, she received a Ford Foundation Grant; and, in 1985, Giddings was the recipient of the Candace Award from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women. That same year, she received the Alumni Award from Howard University and the following year Giddings won the Westchester Black Women’s Political Caucus Award and the Building Brick Award from the New York Urban League. In 1990, she received the Anna Julia Cooper Award from Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, and an honorary doctorate degree in humane letters from Bennett College. In 2008, her book Ida, A Sword Among Lions won The Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Biography and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award.

Paula Giddings was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 8, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.226

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/8/2018

Last Name

Giddings

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Paula

Birth City, State, Country

Yonkers

HM ID

PAU01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/16/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Favorite Food

Breakfast

Short Description

Professor Paula Giddings (1947- ) served as the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor Emerita of Africana Studies at Smith College and authored When and Where I Enter, In Search of Sisterhood, and Ida, A Sword Among Lions.

Favorite Color

Blue

Thomas A. Parham

Academic administrator Thomas A. Parham was born on October 2, 1954 in St. Albans, Queens, New York to William and Sadie Parham. After graduating from Daniel Murphy High School in Los Angeles, California in 1972, he earned his B.A. degree in social ecology in 1977 from the University of California, Irvine, his M.A. degree in counseling psychology in 1978 from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and his Ph.D. degree in counseling psychology from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois in 1982.

Parham served as assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, from 1982 to 1985. He joined the administration at the University of California, Irvine in 1985; and, served as an adjunct faculty member. There, he held several positions over thirty-three years including: assistant vice chancellor for counseling and health services; Counseling Center director; Career and Life Planning Center director; and vice chancellor for student affairs.

In 1986, he was appointed to the City of Irvine’s Human Relations Committee, and helped draft their first human rights ordinance, which was passed by the city council. He also served as chair of UCI’s Martin Luther King Jr. Symposium and worked to expand the university boundaries within the community and the greater Orange County area. Parham was appointed the 11th president of California State University, Dominguez Hills in 2018.

Parham served as a licensed psychologist for over twenty-seven years, and is also recognized as a scholar and practitioner, with a research focus in the area of psychological negrescence, specifically on identity development, African psychology, and multicultural counseling. In addition to writing over forty-five journal articles and/or book chapters, he authored Psychological Storms: The African American Struggle for Identity in 1997 and Counseling Persons of African Descent: Raising the Bar of Practitioner Competence in 2002. He co-authored Culturally Adaptive Counseling Skills: Demonstrations of Evidence-Based Practices in 2011 and The Psychology of Blacks: Centering Our Perspectives in the African Consciousness in 2011.

His works on video are available through the American Psychological Association including; Counseling African Americans, Youth and Violence, and Innovative Approaches to Counseling African Descent People available through Microtraining & Associates, and Working with African American Clients.

An alumnus of the American Psychological Association’s Minority Fellowship Program, Parham has fellow status in divisions seventeen and forty-five of the American Psychological Association and also with the American Counseling Association. He has held the title of distinguished psychologist in the Association of Black Psychologists.

Parham served as president of the National Association of Black Psychologists and the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development. He served on the editorial board for the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development and the Journal of Counseling and Development, and served as an ad hoc reviewer for the Journal of Black Psychology. Parham served as a treating clinician for the NFL program for substance of abuse (NFLPSA). 

He was the recipient of the 2018 Illustrious Leadership Award from the American Psychological Association’s Minority Fellowship Program.

Thomas A. Parham was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 14, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.229

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/14/2018

Last Name

Parham

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Organizations
First Name

Thomas

Birth City, State, Country

St. Albans, Queens

HM ID

PAR13

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Life at it's Best is a Creative Synthesis

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

10/2/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Academic administrator Thomas A. Parham (1954- ) was named president of California State University, Dominguez Hills. He previously served as vice chancellor at University of California, Irvine.

Favorite Color

Blue

Willie L. Hill, Jr.

Professor and musician Willie L. Hill, Jr. was born on July 29, 1946 in Mobile, Alabama to Rennetta and Willie Hill, Sr. After graduating from Williamson High School in Mobile, Alabama, Hill received his B.S. degree in music education from Grambling State College in Grambling, Louisiana in 1968. He went on to receive both his M.M. degree and Ph.D. degree in music education from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 1972 and 1987, respectively.

In 1968, Hill began teaching instrumental music in the Denver Public Schools, where he remained for sixteen years and was an instrumental music supervisor for four years. He then joined the faculty at the University of Colorado, Boulder College of Music, where he served as assistant dean and professor of music for eleven years from 1988 to 1999. During that period, he also served as the director of education for the Thelonious Monk Institute in Los Angeles, California. In 1999, Hill was named professor in music education and director of the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

As a woodwind specialist, he was a faculty member of the Clark Terry Great Plains Jazz Camp. He also founded and served as co-director of the Rich Matteson-Telluride Jazz Academy, and later founded the Mile High Jazz Camp in Boulder, Colorado. In 1984, Hill was a member of The Colorado Clarinet Choir touring organization, which represented the United States in London, England at the International Clarinet Symposium. His experiences as a conductor include numerous citywide honor performances, All-State Jazz Ensembles, All-County Bands, and as musical director at The Schwayder and Bonfils Theaters.

Hill was a former member of the Denver Broncos Jazz Ensemble and a regular performer at the Denver Auditorium Theater, Paramount Theater, and Boettcher Concert Hall. Hill also performed with George Burns, Liza Minnelli, Lena Horne, Lou Rawls, Ben Vereen, Lola Falana, Johnny Mathis, Sammy Davis Jr., Dizzy Gillespie, James Moody, Jon Faddis, and many others.

He served as president of The National Association for Music Education (MENC) and the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE). He was also a member of the writing team for MENC's Vision 2020 program and a member of the national board of directors for Young Audiences, Inc. Hill later served as president of the Colorado Music Educators Association and Pi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society.

In 1998, he was inducted into the Colorado Music Educators Hall of Fame. In 2001, Hill was the recipient of the Lawrence Berk Leadership Award presented by the IAJE. Hill co-authored Learning to Sight-Read Jazz, Rock, Latin, and Classical Styles, and was the author of The Instrumental History of Jazz, Approaching the Standards, and Jazz Pedagogy: The Jazz Educator's Handbook and Resource Guide. Hill is listed in the first edition of Who's Who among Black Americans, Who's Who among International Musicians and was a 2003 Lowell Mason Fellow.

Willie L. Hill, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.221

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/5/2018

Last Name

Hill

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Willie

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

HIL19

Favorite Season

October

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Carribean

Favorite Quote

Never Put Off for Tomorrow What You Can Do Today

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

7/29/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Favorite Food

Fried Fish

Short Description

Professor and musician Willie L. Hill, Jr. (1946- ) served as assistant dean and professor of music at the University of Colorado, Boulder and was named professor in music education and director of the Fine Arts Center at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Favorite Color

Purple

J. Keith Motley

Academic administrator J. Keith Motley was born on January 28, 1956 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to John Jr. and Cornelia Motley. He attended James E. Rogers Elementary School and graduated in 1972 from Peabody High School in Pittsburgh. In 1972, Motley was recruited by legendary hall of fame coach Jim Calhoun and assistant coach and recruiter Mike Jarvis to play Division 1 basketball at Northeastern University in Boston. Named team captain, Motley played four years at Northeastern and received his B.S. degree in education, speech pathology and audiology in 1978; and his M.Ed. degree in higher education administration in 1981, both from Northeastern University. He went on to receive his Ph.D. degree in education administration from Boston College, in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts in 1999.

Upon graduating, Motley was hired as an admissions counselor at Northeastern, and also as a part-time assistant coach for the Huskies basketball team. In 1980, he served as an intern in the Office of Senior Vice President for University Administration. He also became assistant dean of minority affairs in 1982. In 1987, Motley became associate dean and director for the John D. O’Bryant African-American Institute and served as associate head coach where he helped to lead the Huskies to seven appearances in the NCAA Tournament. In 1989, Motley served as founder and director for Concerned Black Men of Massachusetts, Inc. Paul Robeson Institute for Positive Self Development, a Saturday academy-focused on Black males. In 1993, Motley was named Northeastern University dean of student services; and in 1996, Motley helped to establish the Roxbury Preparatory Charter School. In 2003, Motley joined the University of Massachusetts at Boston as vice chancellor for student affairs. He was then named interim chancellor for the university in 2004, and served as vice president for business and public affairs. In 2006, his role was expanded to vice president for business marketing and public affairs. Then, in 2007, Motley was named chancellor for the University of Massachusetts Boston and served in that capacity until 2017. In 2018, the university established the Dr. J. Keith Motley Chair to Head New Sports Leadership and Administration Program in his honor.

Motley was inducted into the Northeastern University Hall of Fame in 1999. He is the recipient of numerous honors and recognition including: Business Journal, Power 50 Most Influential Bostonians, for five consecutive years-2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016; Harvard Club of Boston, Friends of Education Award, in 2014; John D. O’Bryant African American Institute, Vision Award, in 2015; Boston NAACP, WEB Du Bois Distinguished Service Award, in 2016; and Emerson College President’s Award for Civic Engagement in 2017.

Motley and his wife Angela are the parents of three adult children including Keith, Kayla
and Jordan.

J. Keith Motley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 18, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.219

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/18/2018

Last Name

Motley

Maker Category
Middle Name

Keith

Organizations
First Name

J.

Birth City, State, Country

Pittsburgh

HM ID

MOT01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Carribbean

Favorite Quote

It's a small thing to a giant.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

1/28/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bosonton

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Academic Administrator J. Keith Motley (1956- ) was the eighth chancellor of the University of Massachusetts Boston, where he served from 2007 to 2017.

Favorite Color

Blue

William Banfield

Professor and composer William Banfield was born on March 24, 1961 in Detroit, Michigan to William Banfield and Anne Banfield. He attended Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan and graduated in 1979. Banfield enrolled at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated with his B.M. degree in jazz studies in 1983. He later received his Th.M. degree from Boston University in 1988, and his D.M.A. degree from the University of Michigan in 1992.

Banfield accepted his first teaching position at Madison Park High School in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1983, he resigned from his position and founded BMagic Records. Two years later, Banfield founded Young Artists Development, Inc. After he received his D.M.A. degree in 1992, Banfield served as assistant professor of African American Studies/Music at Indiana University. In 1997, Banfield served as the endowed chair of humanities, professor of music, director of American cultural studies/jazz, popular, world music studies at the University of St. Thomas, Minnesota. In 2002, he became the W.E.B. DuBois fellow at Harvard University. The following year, Banfield was the visiting Atelier artist at Princeton University. In 2005, he served as a visiting professor of composition at the University of Minnesota. Banfield then accepted an appointment at the Berklee College of Music as a professor and director of the Africana Studies program. In 2010, he was hired by Quincy Jones’ the QFoundation, to write a national music curriculum for American popular music.

Banfield has also released a number of albums including Extensions of the Tradition in 1996, Striking Balance in 2004, Spring Forward in 2009 and Playing with Other People’s Heads in 2014. He was also the host of National Public Radio’s “Landscapes in Color: Conversations with Black American Composers” and an original program on WCAL at St. Olaf College entitled, “Essays of Note.” Banfield has authored seven books, completed six symphonies and two operas. In 2014, Banfield launched JazzUrbane, a contemporary jazz recording label. He has also served on the Pulitzer Prize composition panel and donated his papers to the Center for Black Music Research at Columbia College of Chicago.

William Banfield was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 17, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.218

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/17/2018

Last Name

Banfield

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

BAN06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

It Don't Mean A Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/24/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Professor and composer William Banfield (1961- ) was director of Africana Studies at the Berklee College of Music.

Favorite Color

Blue

Robert Parris Moses

Civil rights leader and educator Robert Parris Moses was born on January 23, 1935 in New York City to Louise Parris and Gregory Moses. He graduated from Stuyvesant High School in 1952, and enrolled at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, where he received a Rhodes scholarship. After receiving his B.A. degree in philosophy in 1956, Moses later earned his M.A. degree in philosophy from Harvard University.

Moses began teaching mathematics at the Horace Mann School in the Bronx, New York in 1958. In 1960, he became active in the Civil Rights Movement, joining the Southern Christian Leadership Council (SCLC) branch in Harlem. The following summer, Moses traveled to Atlanta where he worked for the SCLC and registered members for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s (SNCC) fall conference. In 1961, Moses resigned from his teaching position at the Horace Mann School and returned to the South, where he worked to register black voters in McComb, Mississippi. Moses then became the co-director of the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO), and helped to launch the freedom vote, a mock gubernatorial election to register black voters in Mississippi.

In 1964, Moses helped to organize the Freedom Summer campaign, recruiting hundreds of student volunteers to conduct a black voter registration drive in Mississippi. That summer, Moses and others organized the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) to challenge the all-white representation of the state at the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Shortly after, Moses was actively recruited by the Vietnam draft board, but fled to Canada to avoid the draft. He spent two years in Canada working odd jobs until moving to Tanzania and working for the Ministry of Education. There, he served as chairperson of the mathematics department at the Same Secondary School. Moses returned to the United States in 1976, under President Jimmy Carter’s amnesty program for draft resisters. Moses settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he resumed his doctoral studies at Harvard University and taught mathematics at a local high school.

In 1982, Moses received a MacArthur Fellowship, and launched the Algebra Project to improve mathematics competency for low-income students and children of color. By 1985, the Algebra Project was officially recognized by the Cambridge School Committee, and was incorporated in 1990. Two years later, Moses launched the Delta Algebra Project in Mississippi. In 1996, The Young People’s Project was founded in Jackson, Mississippi to train, employ and support high school students to become mathematics tutors. Moses also taught algebra and geometry at Lanier High School in Jackson, Mississippi, and published his 2001 book entitled, Radical Equations. In 2006, Moses was named a Frank H.T. Rhodes Class of ’56 Professor at Cornell University. That same year, he was awarded an honorary doctor of science degree from Harvard University.

Moses and his wife, Janet Jemmott, have four children: Maisha, Omowale, Tabasuri and Malaika.

Robert Parris Moses was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 16, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.215

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/16/2018 |and| 11/18/2018

Last Name

Moses

Maker Category
Middle Name

P.

Organizations
First Name

Robert

HM ID

MOS08

Favorite Season

In Boston, Fall.

Favorite Vacation Destination

Friend's island in middle of a lake in Maine.

Favorite Quote

Take Care.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

12/23/1935

Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Cereal, his home baked biscuits. Beans, rice. Ugali (Tanzanian dish)

Short Description

Civil rights leader and educator Robert Parris Moses (1935 - ) launched the Algebra Project in 1982, to improve mathematics competency for low-income students and children of color.

Favorite Color

Blue

Em Claire Knowles

Librarian Em Claire Knowles was born on June 6, 1952 in Sacramento, California to Sidney Stanley Knowles and Almeana Early Knowles. Knowles received her B.A. degree in international relations in 1973 from the University of California, Davis and her M.L.S. degree in 1975 from University of California, Berkeley. She later obtained her M.P.A. degree in public administration in 1986 from California State University, Sacramento, and her D.A. degree in library and information science in 1988 from Simmons College.

In 1975, Knowles worked as coordinator of bibliographic instruction, social sciences and humanities at the University of California, Davis and as a faculty member, she also taught courses in library science there until 1988.

In 1988, Knowles became the first African American to serve as the assistant dean at the Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences in Boston where over the years she was responsible for overseeing student and alumni affairs. In 2001, Knowles was appointed to the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners, being only the second African American to be appointed to the board, and in 2006, Knowles became the first African American to serve as the chair. In 2018, when Simmons College became a university, Knowles was appointed to a position responsible for all of student and alumni engagement for the Simmons University's College of Organizational, Computational and Information Sciences.

During her career, she has served on numerous boards, including the boards of the Massachusetts Library Association, the New England Library Association, the Design Team of the National Association of Black MBA Association (1995-2006). She has also been active in the American Library Association as well as the Black Caucus of the A.L.A., where she served as executive board member and secretary. Knowles was elected to the board of directors of Beta Phi Mu in 2016. She also served as board liaison to the Simmons Library and Information Science Alumni Association Board for over twenty years. She served as chair of the Awards and Scholarships committee and member of the Steering Committee of the 2018 Joint Conference of Librarians of Color.  As a lifetime member of the American Library Association, Knowles became the first legacy member designating a financial gift to the ALA Spectrum Scholarship Initiative. 

A trustee of the Massachusetts State Library Association, Knowles was elected trustee of the Freedom to Read Foundation, and served as an active member the Massachusetts Black Librarians Network, Inc. She was honored with the 2011 BCALA Distinguished Service Award, the 2013 BCALA Professional Development Award, the Sojourner Truth Award by the Boston & Vicinity Club, an affiliate of the National Association of the Negro Business and Professional Women’s Clubs, Inc in 2015, the A.L.A. Spectrum Scholarship Program, the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color, and the Beta Phi Mu Award in 2017.

Knowles was profiled in the book African-American Firsts in Science and Technology, authored by Raymond B. Webster, Gale Group, (University of Michigan, 1999).

Em Claire Knowles was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 16 and 24, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.210

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/16/2018

Last Name

Knowles

Maker Category
Middle Name

Claire

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Em

Birth City, State, Country

Sacramento

HM ID

KNO03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any Place Warm Outside the US

Favorite Quote

People won't remember what you said, people won't remember what you did. They will remember how you made them feel.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

6/6/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Chicken Wings

Short Description

Librarian Em Claire Knowles (1952- ) became the first African American assistant dean of student affairs at the Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences in 1988.

Favorite Color

Purple