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Mark Tatum

Sports executive Mark Tatum was born on October 22, 1969 in Brooklyn, New York to Kim and Charlie Tatum. Tatum grew up in New York’s East Flatbush neighborhood. In 1987, Tatum graduated from Brooklyn Technical High School, where he led the baseball team to the New York City public school championship at Yankee Stadium in 1984. In 1991, he received his B.S. degree in business management and marketing from Cornell University. Tatum went on to receive his M.B.A. degree in 1998 from Harvard Business School.

In 1991, Tatum was hired by Procter & Gamble as a corporate account executive and was later promoted to corporate account executive. In 1995, he joined the Clorox Company, where he served as a regional sales manager and oversaw the company's $100 million northeast sales territory. After graduating from Harvard Business School Tatum joined Major League Baseball’s department of corporate sponsorships in 1998. A year later, Tatum was hired by the National Basketball Association (NBA) as senior vice president of marketing partnerships. In 2009, Tatum served as executive vice president of global marketing partnerships at the National Basketball Association, where he managed corporate sponsorships for companies such as American Express, Anheuser-Bush Inc., and Kia Motors. In 2014, he was appointed deputy commissioner and chief operating officer of the National Basketball Association and became the highest-ranking executive of color in a professional sports league. As deputy commissioner, Tatum is responsible for the NBA’s technology advancements, launched the Basketball Africa League, and developed programs in China and India.

Tatum is a member of the Executive Leadership Council, and sits on the boards of USA Basketball, the International Basketball Federation (FIBA), the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, LA 2028 Summer Olympics, and the Harvard Business School Board of Dean’s Advisors. He is chair of the Harvard Business School Club of New York and member of the board of directors for The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

In 2006, 2007, and 2008, Tatum received the Forty Under 40 Award from Sports Business Journal, making him a member of the publication’s Forty Under 40 Hall of Fame. In 2014 and 2015, Tatum was named to the list of the 50 Most Influential People in Sports Business by Sports Business Journal. In 2016, Tatum was named to Forbes’ list of the Top 25 Most Influential Minorities in Sports.

Tatum and his wife, Lisa Skeete Tatum, have two sons: Tai and Kylan.

Mark Tatum was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 16, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.072

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/16/2019

Last Name

Tatum

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Alrick

Occupation
Schools

PS 181

IS 227

Brooklyn Technical High School

Cornell University

Harvard Business School

First Name

Mark

Birth City, State, Country

Vung Tau

HM ID

TAT07

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Find your passion and pursue your dreams.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/22/1969

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Vietnam

Favorite Food

Oxtail with Rice and Peas

Employment

National Basketball Association

Major League Baseball

Clorox Company

Proctor & Gamble

Favorite Color

Red

Earl Francis Lloyd

Earl Francis “Big Cat” Lloyd, the first African American to play in a National Basketball Association game, was born on April 3, 1928 in Alexandria, Virginia. Lloyd was raised by his father, Theodore Benjamin Lloyd, and mother, Daisy Mitchell Lloyd, in the Berg area of Alexandria. Lloyd’s mother’s wisdom influenced him to become a good student and an outstanding athlete at Lyles-Crouch Elementary School and Parker-Gray High School. His coach, Louis Randolph Johnson, helped Lloyd to enroll at West Virginia State University (WVSU) after his 1946 high school graduation. The speedy defensive-minded Lloyd, at 6’7” tall, led WVSU to two CIAA Conference and Tournament Championships in 1948 and 1949. Lloyd was named All-Conference three times and was All-American twice, as highlighted by the Pittsburgh Courier in 1949 and 1950. Lloyd graduated from WVSU with his B.S. degree in physical education in 1950.

In 1950, Lloyd was among the first three black players drafted by an NBA team when he was signed by the Washington Capitols, and became the first black to play in an NBA game on October 31, 1950 as part of Washington coach Horace “Bones” McKinney’s starting five. Drafted by the U.S. Army in 1951, Lloyd captured four U.S. Army basketball titles. Returning to the NBA in 1952, Lloyd and teammate Jim Tucker became the first African Americans to win an NBA title in 1955 with Dolph Schayes and the Syracuse Nationals. That year, Lloyd averaged 10.2 points and 7.7 rebounds for Syracuse, beating the Fort Wayne Pistons four games to three in a seven game series for the NBA title. Lloyd closed out his playing career with the Detroit Pistons from 1958 to 1960. Over his professional career, Lloyd played in over 560 games in nine seasons and averaged 8.4 points and 6.4 rebounds per game.

In 1960, Lloyd served as assistant coach and scout for the Detroit Pistons. As a scout, he helped draft Bailey Howell, but failed to interest Detroit in future legends Earl “the Pearl” Monroe and Willis Reed. Lloyd served as the NBA’s first non-playing coach with the Pistons from 1971 to 1973. After basketball, he worked for Chrysler and as a job-placement administrator with the Detroit Public Schools. Further recognition of Lloyd began when his name appeared as the answer to a question on television’s Jeopardy quiz show in 1988. In the 1990s, Lloyd worked for the steel and auto parts company of former Piston, Dave Bing, who had played for Lloyd during his years at the helm of the Pistons.

Now retired and living in Tennessee, Lloyd and his wife, Ginny, have one grown child.

Lloyd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 16, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.093

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/16/2007

Last Name

Lloyd

Maker Category
Middle Name

Francis

Occupation
Schools

Parker-Gray High School

Lyles-Crouch Traditional Academy

West Virginia State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Earl

Birth City, State, Country

Alexandria

HM ID

LLO01

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

National Basketball Association

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

It Gets No Better Than That.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

4/3/1928

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Crossville

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Smothered Pork Chops

Death Date

2/26/2015

Short Description

Basketball player Earl Francis Lloyd (1928 - 2015 ) was the first African American to play in a game in the National Basketball Association.

Employment

U.S. Army

National Basketball Association

Detroit Pistons

Detroit Public Schools

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Earl Francis Lloyd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his older brothers

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his family's impact on his basketball career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers his schooling in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing sports at Parker-Gray High School in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers Coach Louis Randolph Johnson

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the community of Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his high school basketball championship game

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing basketball at Parker-Gray High School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers his high school teammate, Oliver Ellis, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his high school teammate, Oliver Ellis, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his decision to attend West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing basketball at West Virginia State College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about historically black college basketball programs

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his basketball playing style

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about his basketball training routine

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls the status of black sports stars during his college years

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls barnstorming black basketball teams

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his community at West Virginia State College

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his social life at West Virginia State College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls being selected in the NBA Draft

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about the culture of professional basketball

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his experience of discrimination at NBA training camp

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his African American heroes

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls being drafted by the Washington Capitols

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the racial discrimination in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing for Coach Horace "Bones" McKinney

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls joining the Syracuse Nationals

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing for the Syracuse Nationals

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls winning an NBA championship with the Syracuse Nationals

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers being traded to the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his career with the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls Coach Dick McGuire's departure from the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about scouting for the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about Detroit Pistons center Reggie Harding

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls scouting Dave Bing and Cazzie Russell

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the Detroit Pistons star player, Bob Lanier

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers his tenure as head coach of the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the challenges of coaching in the NBA

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his career after leaving the NBA

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers serving as a job training program administrator

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls counseling young, African American job applicants

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about his friendship with Dave Bing

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes Dave Bing's community programs in Detroit, Michigan, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes Dave Bing's community programs in Detroit, Michigan, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd reflects upon the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Earl Francis Lloyd narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$5

DAStory

8$7

DATitle
Earl Francis Lloyd describes his family's impact on his basketball career
Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing for the Syracuse Nationals
Transcript
Now are your other family members tall? Now you're 6'5" (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, I'm 6'7", just about.$$6'7", okay. All right.$$Well from what I understand in my immediate family, I'm the only tall person. But I understand that that my father's father, my grandfather, was a hulk. You know he was that big 6'6" black dude that everybody was afraid of. That's the only recollection I have of him.$$Okay.$$And that's where I got the genes that made me this size. But my mother [Daisy Mitchell Lloyd], she's a short lady man but it didn't matter. I mean she had tremendous presence, tremendous presence man. And, and what I really appreciate about her the most, she had a tremendous affinity for young people. I mean a lot of old folks, "Man these young kids, this, that and the other," you know, and to the day she died man, she would tell you that most young people who are messed up were messed up by some messed up adults. That was her mantra, you know, I mean and the young kids that I grew up with playing ball with man they--I mean man this lady was like the Holy Grail, man. So when people ask me what person had the single most effect on me, and they expect you to say--'cause you an athlete, they expect you to say my coach--high school coach, tremendous influence. Man, that lady at home man, and just to give you an example, when you play three sports, I mentioned this earlier, you're going to different places a lot and she would tell me, "You know, you going someplace where people don't know us and they will invariably judge us by how you conduct yourself." And her last word was, "Do not embarrass this family." And she wasn't talking about winning or losing. I mean she was talking about you know in a gentlemanly fashion you know how you were trained to conduct yourself, don't forget that. So I--you know it's--I had a decent upbringing. My father [Theodore Lloyd] was there for us, you know, I mean he was a breadwinner, and my mother was--I called her killer Joe sometimes man (laughter), you know.$Things are different now in pro sports.$$Oh yeah.$$Black athletes often live far away from the black community--$$Very much so (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) the community doesn't see them anymore.$$Well, that's what high visibility will do to you now. You know it--and then guys, you know, they feel like you know like the guys that say, man I'm not, you know, I'm not a role model, and I understand it what they're saying because--and I always said that if you can't find a role model under your own roof, you got a problem. And I--man, I had enough role models man I could have started an--I could have started an agency, counting my parents [Daisy Mitchell Lloyd and Theodore Lloyd] and my teachers, my coaches right down the line man you know and people in the neighborhood who cared about you, you know it's--$$So who was on the Syracuse [Syracuse Nationals; Philadelphia 76ers] team and how did you all do?$$You mean how we do--$$Yeah in the league [National Basketball Association] and who was on your squad with you?$$Oh we played, we had a good team. We had one main player. We had one big name player, Dolph Schayes, but we had a supporting cast to him man that was second to none really. We won the world's championship in 1954, '55 [1955] and it's--the thing that amazes me is that other folks were amazed at us winning. But man, we had attitude, you know, our attitude was before we left the locker room every night to play, and defensively, we would say, you know, eighty or under, we gonna win and we held a lot of folks under eighty points so we won a lot of ballgames but what they don't understand is, it's very important, it's really, really important to know your role. But knowing is not enough. You got to accept your role. My job, rebound, run the floor, and I had to guard the top scorer on every team. And you were in for it man, look, I got a lot of rest 'cause man you chasing George Yardley and Paul Arizin and Elgin Baylor, man that's enough to run you crazy. But somebody had to do it, and on my team, I was better equipped to do it than most of the other guys. I mean first of all you're not gonna play Dolph, who was our top scorer, on their top scorer, you're wasting him, you know. So I--it was a challenge to me.