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Lisa Price

Beauty products entrepreneur Lisa Price was born on May 18, 1962 in Brooklyn, New York. She is the founder of Carol’s Daughter, one of the first African American-owned product lines with a flagship store. During her childhood, she remembers the smell of the soap her grandmother made at their Brooklyn brownstone. Price attended public schools in New York, where she received her high school diploma.

In 1990, Price began making creams and lotions based on natural materials in her kitchen. Encouraged by family members and friends, she began Carol’s Daughter from her home in 1993. Her customers soon multiplied. By 1999, Price added mail-order, website and walk-in customers and her business moved from the parlor floor of her brownstone to a formal store in Brooklyn’s upscale Fort Greene area.

Supported by a staff of twenty-three, the Carol’s Daughter line boasts more than 300 aromatic products for the face, hair, body and home. Her clientele include celebrities like Jada Pinkett Smith, Will Smith, Halle Berry, Chaka Khan and Oprah Winfrey. In 2002, Carol’s Daughter grossed more than $2.25 million in sales. In 2004, Price along with Hillary Beard wrote her memoir, entitled Success Never Smelled So Sweet: How I Followed My Nose and Found My Passion. In 2005, a group of investors assisted her in opening a flagship store in Harlem on 125th Street.

Price makes time to give back to the community. Carol’s Daughter donates monies, goods and services to not-for-profit organizations including the Arthur Ashe Foundation, Hale House, and the September 11th Fund. Her college speaking engagements and seminars encourage others to become entrepreneurs. Carol’s Daughter’s products are distributed nationwide.

Price lives in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn with her husband, Gordon, and sons Forrest and Ennis.

Accession Number

A2006.134

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/8/2006

6/17/2019

Last Name

Price

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

P.S. 262 El Hajj Malik El Shabazz Elementary School

Calvary and Saint Cyprian's Church

Saint Augustine's School

Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts

City College of New York

First Name

Lisa

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

PRI06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Miami, Florida

Favorite Quote

This Too Shall Pass

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

5/18/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Pasta With Ground Turkey

Short Description

Personal care entrepreneur Lisa Price (1962 - ) founded Carol’s Daughter, which grew from its homespun beginnings to a line of over 300 aromatic products and a flagship store in Harlem, New York.

Employment

Carol's Daughter

American Express and America One

United Nations

'The Cosby Show'

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372234">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Lisa Price's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372235">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Lisa Price lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372236">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Lisa Price describes her mother's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372237">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Lisa Price describes her mother's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372238">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Lisa Price describes her maternal grandmother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372239">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Lisa Price describes her father's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372240">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Lisa Price describes his father's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372241">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Lisa Price describes her earliest childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/372242">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Lisa Price remembers her childhood in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371918">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Lisa Price remembers her father's Christmas celebrations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371919">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Lisa Price recalls what she knew of the Civil Rights Movement as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371920">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Lisa Price describes her family's beauty products</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371921">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Lisa Price describes her neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371922">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Lisa Price describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371923">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Lisa Price describes her elementary schools in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371924">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Lisa Price describes her decision to attend the High School of Music and Art</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371925">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Lisa Price remembers African American television shows from her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371926">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Lisa Price recalls entertainers and civil rights leaders from her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371927">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Lisa Price describes her experiences of racial discrimination in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371928">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Lisa Price remembers her role model at the High School of Music and Art</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371929">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Lisa Price describes her appearance in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371930">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Lisa Price recalls her extracurricular activities at the High School of Music and Art</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371931">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Lisa Price describes her experience at the City College of New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371932">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Lisa Price describes her experiences in the Ausar Auset Society</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371933">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Lisa Price describes her first marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371934">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Lisa Price reflects upon her time with the Ausar Auset Society</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371935">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Lisa Price talks about the perceptions of her and her beauty products</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371936">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Lisa Price remembers creating her first fragrance</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371937">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Lisa Price explains how Prince inspired on her first fragrance</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371938">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Lisa Price recalls her early years of making beauty products</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371939">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Lisa Price describes her work as a writer's assistant on 'The Cosby Show'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371940">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Lisa Price describes her decision to start a beauty products company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371941">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Lisa Price remembers making her first body butter lotion</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371942">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Lisa Price describes the early years of her business, Carol's Daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371943">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Lisa Price describes the first Carol's Daughter store</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371944">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Lisa Price describes the growth of Carol's Daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371945">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Lisa Price recalls her business being featured in Essence magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371946">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Lisa Price recalls her business' need for a commercial storefront</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371947">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Lisa Price remembers her first commercial storefront for Carol's Daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371948">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Lisa Price describes how she met her husband, Gordon Price</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371949">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Lisa Price recalls raising the funds to lease her first commercial storefront</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371950">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Lisa Price recalls the grand opening of the first Carol's Daughter store</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371951">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Lisa Price talks about her customers at Carol's Daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371952">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Lisa Price talks about appearing on 'The Oprah Winfrey Show'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371953">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Lisa Price remembers meeting her business partner, Steve Stoute, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371954">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Lisa Price remembers meeting her business partner, Steve Stoute, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371955">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Lisa Price describes the grand opening of the Carol's Daughter flagship store</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371956">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Lisa Price describes the celebrity endorsements of Carol's Daughter, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371957">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Lisa Price reflects upon Carol's Daughter's African American brand identity</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371958">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Lisa Price describes her hopes for Carol's Daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371959">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Lisa Price reflects upon the success of Carol's Daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371960">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Lisa Price describes her mother's thoughts about Carol's Daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371961">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Lisa Price talks about Carol's Daughter as a lifestyle brand</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371962">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Lisa Price describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371963">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Lisa Price reflects upon the importance of history</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371964">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Lisa Price reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371965">Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Lisa Price describes the celebrity endorsements of Carol's Daughter, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/371966">Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Lisa Price talks about her book, 'Success Never Smelled So Sweet'</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

3$4

DATitle
Lisa Price describes her family's beauty products
Lisa Price remembers making her first body butter lotion
Transcript
What did you mother [Carol Warwell Hutson] use on your hair to comb it, to style it? Do you remember what products she used? How did you wear did you hair as a child?$$It was in pigtails and braids. My hair was, was kind of thick so I couldn't really wear it out. If it was out, it was because someone was getting married or, you know, there were school pictures being take. I remember DuSharme. It was a product that my [maternal] grandmother [Marguerite King Warwell] used that my mom would use. It was this white cream in a white jar with a pink lid. And, there was another one called Vitapointe. It wasn't until I was about thirteen that, you know, we used things like Ultra Sheen. Like eleven, thirteen that's when Ultra Sheen came into the house.$$Do you remember what your mother used on her hair? What did her hair look like? Did she straighten it? Did she wear it natural?$$She didn't straighten it, well, no, I shouldn't say that. She did straighten it sometimes with, there, there's a product called Curl Free which was actual a relaxer that Jewish women used that had very thick hair. So, it was a bit milder than, you know, like a Revlon relaxer which would tend to make our hair a bit too straight. So, my family would use Curl Free. So, you could really tell when someone put one in their hair or not because their hair wasn't as kinky. But, that was, that was what they used. So, whenever my mom use, used it, I'm not sure. But, then she went through a period in the '70s [1970s] when she and my dad [Robert Hairston, Jr.] separate where she was wearing her fro, her curly fro and she didn't use the Curl Free anymore.$$So, do you remember what your mother smelled like? What, what did she--or, did she inspire you in anyway?$$No. She really wasn't a perfume person. I think my mom wore more fragrances when I act- when I started to make them then she did before that. Again, she kind of smelled like Pond's cold cream. She wasn't a makeup person. She put makeup on when she was going out, not when she was going to work, you know, she was going out. So, you know, the same bottle of foundation and the same lipstick were in the medicine cabinet, just to give you a clue, the makeup was in the medicine cabinet (laughter), and it fit (laughter). That, that's all that she used--$Back to that first flea market and making and the body butter, where did the concept of body butter come from?$$Well, I had been trying to make a moisturizer when I had first gotten that book on essential oils. There were basic recipes in that book for lotions and pomades and things. And, I was trying to follow this recipe but wasn't able to get it to come out right. Every time I tried to make it, it would separate. But, I would write down what I did each time so that I could tweak it and try to get it right. And, I was watching television one night and there was a commercial for Duncan Hines and the person was whipping the batter with the hand mixer. And, I looked at the mixer and looked at the batter and I thought, what if I whip it until it cools, then maybe it won't separate. Because I was putting it in the refrigerator as per the instructions for it to cool and that's where the whole thing would fall apart. So, I did that, and it worked. And, I ran up and down my apartment like yelling and screaming, "I figured out how to make the butter, I figured out how to make the butter." And, I called it body butter because it looked like the batter from my [maternal] grandmother's [Marguerite King Warwell] butter cake. And, you know, I thought of it as food for your skin. So, I didn't realize at the time that The Body Shop was calling their stuff body butter 'cause I didn't go to The Body Shop because it was so new, you know. So, you know, I didn't do anything original. I thought it was original at the time. But, that's, that's where I go the name from.$$So, you made up this, the body butter. What containers did you put it in to take to the first flea market?$$Baby food jars--$$So, you--$$Like my grandmother did. My, my, it was my mother's [Carol Warwell Hutson] suggestions because I was like, "What am I gonna put it in?" And, she said, "Well, what don't you use baby food jars?" And, my mom had just adopted one of my sisters at that time, and she was baby. And, New York City [New York, New York] had just started the recycling thing. So, she had all of these jars in her recycling bin that, you know, she had already washed and, you know. So, she said, "I won't throw 'em out. You know, you could take them and sterilize them like Nana did and put her creams in there." So, I did that, and I handmade the labels with magic markets and like white file folder labels and I drew flowers on them and wrote the name on it.$$Are any of those still around?$$No.$$(Laughter).$$Had I known then (laughter), that it could be, you know, in a museum somewhere, I would've saved one (laughter).$$So, you said you, so the first one you sold out, you sold out of all of the body butters?$$Um-hm.$$And, that's was, inspired you to get all the boxes--how did you go from just that to having a room full of boxes?$$Well, I kept finding out more things and I kept being more fascinated by it. And, then I would, I would read. Like, I would find a product that I liked and then I would turn it around and read the ingredients and pick out all the things that I knew I could get my hands on. So, then I'd go get them and sort of figure out, okay, how do I, how do I make this work? When I tried to make shampoo, I knew all of the herbs and oils that would be good in a shampoo but I didn't know how to make shampoo, and how to get the herbs into the shampoo. And, reading a bottle of Dr. Bronner's Castile Soap [Dr. Bronner's Pure-Castile Liquid Soap] with, you know, you have like one bottle of soap can do forty-seven things. So, I'm reading about diluting it and it can be a shampoo, and it could be a floor cleaner, and it could be this, and it could be that. So, instead of just diluting it with water I thought, well, why don't I make a tea with all of the herbs that I know are good for hair, and dilute it with that tea. And, I did that but it was very runny. It didn't have viscosity that people are accustom to with shampoo. So, I tried to make it thick and that never worked. And, the shampoo worked so I just said, "Forget it, it'll be runny. I don't care (laughter), I'm making shampoo." But, just, just experimenting like that, you know. I read about some bath salts. I looked at the ingredients. I knew I could get all of those and I just started to mix them.