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Wayne Budd

Attorney Wayne Anthony Budd was born on November 18, 1941 in Springfield, Massachusetts. Educated in Springfield public schools, Budd graduated from Cathedral High School in 1959. In 1963, he received an A.B. degree cum laude in economics from Boston College. Between 1963 and 1967, he worked in the Industrial Relations Department at Ford Motor Company while attending law school at night. He attended Wayne State University School of Law in Detroit and received a J.D. degree in 1967.

Following his law school graduation, Budd served as Assistant Corporation Counsel for the City of Boston from 1968 to 1969. During that same time period, he developed a private law practice.

Budd also served as president of the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. In 1979, he became the first African American to head the Massachusetts Bar as President and at that time he was the youngest (at age 38) president of any state bar association.

Appointed by President George H.W. Bush in 1992, Budd served as Associate Attorney General of the United States. He oversaw the Civil Rights, Environmental, Tax, Civil and Anti-Trust Divisions at the Department of Justice, as well as the Bureau of Prisons. From 1989 to 1992, he worked as the United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts, serving as the state’s chief federal prosecutor and representing the federal government in all matters involving civil litigation. During this time, he was recognized for his efforts in combating drugs, street crime and gang violence. Budd also served as a member of the U.S. Sentencing Commission, appointed to that position in 1994 by President Bill Clinton.

Budd is currently senior counsel in the law firm Goodwin Proctor in Boston, Massachusetts, where he specializes in business and commercial litigation. Budd had previ¬ously been a senior partner at Goodwin Proctor from 1993 to 1996.

Prior to rejoining Goodwin Proctor in 2004, Budd served as Senior Executive Vice President and General Counsel at John Hancock Financial Services, where he was responsible for directing all of the company’s legal activities as well as over¬seeing the compliance, human resources, governmental affairs and community relations. Before joining Hancock, Budd was Group President-New England at Bell Atlantic Corporation (now Verizon Communications) where he was respon¬sible for policy, regulatory and legislative functions for the New England states served by Bell Atlantic.

Budd has served numerous government, public service, educa¬tional and business entities including serving as Commissioner and Chairman of the Massachusetts Civil Service Commission (1972 – 1989); as a Trustee of Boston College (1980 - 1997); as Director (former Vice—Chair) of the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce; and as a member of the National Board of the American Automobile Association.

Budd is the father of three daughters--Kim, a lawyer, born in 1966; Kristi, a teacher, born in 1968; and Kern, a nurse, born in 1970.

Budd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 5, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.064

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/5/2006

Last Name

Budd

Maker Category
Schools

William N. Deberry

Cathedral High School

Myrtle Street Junior High School

Boston College

Wayne State University School of Law

First Name

Wayne

Birth City, State, Country

Springfield

HM ID

BUD01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

Always Be On The Look Out For Opportunity. Don't Turn A Deft Ear Or A Blind Eye To It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/18/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Clam Strips Lobster, Pasta

Short Description

Commercial lawyer and presidential appointee Wayne Budd (1941 - ) was senior counsel at Goodwin Proctor, and the first African American to head the Massachusetts Bar Association as president, and at that time, the youngest president of any state bar association, at age thirty-eight. He was also appointed as Associate Attorney General of the United States.

Employment

State of Massachusetts

Goodwin Procter LLP

John Hancock Financial

Bell Atlantic Corporation

United States Department of Justice

Ford Motor Company

General Electric

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Wayne Budd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd describes his father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Wayne Budd describes his maternal family's involvement in the Underground Railroad

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Wayne Budd recalls his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Wayne Budd lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Wayne Budd describes his wife and children

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Wayne Budd describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Wayne Budd remembers his childhood neighborhood in Springfield, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd describes his early education in African American history

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd describes his family life during childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd recalls the smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd remembers DeBerry Elementary School in Springfield, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd recalls Springfield's Myrtle Street Junior High School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Wayne Budd recalls his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Wayne Budd remembers Springfield's Cathedral High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Wayne Budd recalls his summer employment in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Wayne Budd remembers his decision to attend Boston College

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Wayne Budd recalls his experience at Boston College

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Wayne Budd recalls being recruited to work at Ford Motor Company

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Wayne Budd describes his experiences at Wayne State University Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Wayne Budd recalls a professor at Wayne State University Law School, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd recalls a professor at Wayne State University Law School, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd remembers working at Ford Motor Company while studying law

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd describes his decision to return to Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd remembers his early law career in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd recalls joining the law firm of Hamilton and Lampson

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Wayne Budd remembers establishing a law firm with Tom Reilly

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Wayne Budd recalls his organizational involvements

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Wayne Budd recalls serving as the U.S. attorney for Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Wayne Budd recalls becoming an associate attorney general of the United States

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Wayne Budd remembers directing the Rodney King investigation

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Wayne Budd recalls serving as the United States associate attorney general

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd recalls serving on the United States Sentencing Commission

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd recalls working for Goodwin, Procter and Hoar LLP

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd recalls working for NYNEX Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd describes his community involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd describes his hobbies

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Wayne Budd talks about his oldest daughter's law career

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Wayne Budd recalls working as general counsel to John Hancock Financial Services Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Wayne Budd describes his accomplishments at John Hancock Financial Services Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Wayne Budd describes his responsibilities at Goodwin Procter LLP

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Wayne Budd describes his hobbies

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Wayne Budd lists his board memberships

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Wayne Budd describes his hopes for Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Wayne Budd reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd talks about the importance of history

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd shares his advice for African Americans interested in law careers

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Wayne Budd recalls his organizational involvements
Wayne Budd recalls serving as the United States associate attorney general
Transcript
While you had this law practice, Budd, Wiley and Richlin, what other community and citywide involvements did you have in business or legal work?$$Very, very active counsel for the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] at one time. I was a lawyer assigned to restart an Urban League chapter in Boston [Massachusetts], which I did and was active with for a number of years. We represented a number, and mainly pro bono, a number of entities in the community; Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health Center [Boston, Massachusetts], Harvard Street Health Center [Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Boston, Massachusetts], Whittier Street Health Center [Boston, Massachusetts]. So we did a fair number of health centers, as I think about it. But other community groups, we got involved a little bit in politics. I became the president of the Massachusetts Bar Association, kind of working my way up through the chairs. And when I was elected, I was the first African American to be elected to any state bar association.$$In the country.$$In the country, yeah. And I was elected in 1979, and it's a one-year term, so that was a great--$$What were your responsibilities as president of--$$Oh, oversee the state bar. You know, you had a full-time staff, but you were the bar leader. You were the designated lawyers of the lawyers statewide. It was a career changer. It was one of those things that, at least, for my own career, kind of took me a little bit apart from other lawyers of whatever color or stripe. You know, because if you're the state bar president, you're seen to be different. Not that you are, but you're seen that way. And that opened me up to opportunities to serve on boards, to, to, to get in line for other things. To work on task forces, for this governor, or that mayor, and, you know, and on, and on, and on.$Tell me about the process of becoming the associate attorney general of the United States. What was that process for you?$$Actually, it was interesting because, but for Bill Barr [William P. Barr], the then attorney general, I never would have gotten through the process. Apparently, when I went to the White House [Washington, D.C.] for my interviews--I never met with President Bush [President George Herbert Walker Bush], but the personnel people and the staff people who vet these things--I was deemed not to be conservative enough. So I was rejected. And they said, "Look for somebody else," to Barr. And Barr came back with, "Look, you gave me--you told me this was going to be my department, and I could pick my own people, and I want this guy." So, they yielded to him, and as a result of that, I became the associate attorney general.$$What was the highlight of that experience? You served there three years; is that correct?$$No, no actually, I was only there a year. I was there for the last year of the first Bush administration, '92 [1992], '93 [1993]. And so as--the moment the new administration, the new president raises his hand to take the oath, you're gone. You're fired. Your resignation--well, you don't even resign. You're terminated. So I got out--if the inauguration was on Tuesday, I was out on Friday, and finished up and came back home.$$What was the highlight of your tenure in this position?$$Well, actually, there was a couple, one of which was to oversee the prosecution and the prosecution team for the Rodney King case, the prosecution of four police officers in the federal court system. Although technically, the case wasn't completed by the time I left office. And the other was to revive the office of the associate. It had been, kind of, put on hold for a few years. And this attorney general decided it was important to have the position activated again. It's established by law, but to have it activated again. And so to organize that, to put together the team, and to make it work was a great experience.