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Regina Jollivette Frazier

Pharmacist Regina Jollivette Frazier was born on September 30, 1943, in Miami, Florida to pharmacist Cyrus Martin Jollivette, who founded Liberty City’s Community Drug Store in 1948, and teacher Frances Reeves Jollivette Chambers, the youngest daughter of The Miami Times founder Henry E. S. Reeves. Frazier graduated valedictorian from Northwestern Senior High School in 1961, Frazier received her B.S. degree in pharmacy from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in 1966, and her M.B.A. degree from the University of Miami in 1983.

In 1968, Frazier accepted a pharmacist position at Peoples Drug and the National Association of Retired Teachers & American Association of Retired Persons Drug Service. In 1970, she returned to Miami as senior pharmacist for the University of Miami Hospital and Clinics. Three years later, Frazier was promoted to Director of Pharmacy, a position she held until she retired in 2007. As Director of Pharmacy, Frazier also served as a Preceptor for the University of Florida’s College of Pharmacy as well as a Clinical Field Instructor for Florida A&M University’s College of Pharmacy.

Frazier served on numerous boards, including the United Way of Miami-Dade, New World School of the Arts, National Coalition on Black Voter Participation, the Commonwealth Institute, YWCA of Greater Miami-Dade, of which she is a life member, Miami-Dade County Addiction Services, University of Miami Medical Sciences Subcommittee for the Protection of Human Subjects, and Breakthrough Miami. She was also chairperson of the Girl Scout Council of Tropical Florida, which awarded her the Thanks Badge, and the Miami-Dade County Zoning Appeals Board.

She joined The Links, Incorporated, in 1970, and served as National President from 1986 until 1990, and is the youngest person to hold the position. While National President, she chartered the organization’s first international chapter in Nassau, Bahamas. Frazier also holds membership in Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., the Orange Bowl Committee, and the International Woman’s Forum.

Frazier was also active with the Association of Black Health-Systems Pharmacists, from which she received the Pharmacist of the Year award in 1990, the American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists, and the National Pharmaceutical Association.

Frazier received numerous recognitions, including Florida Memorial College’s Sarah A. Blocker Meritorious Community Service Award; Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Beta Beta Lambda Chapter’s Distinguished Community Service Award; Women’s Committee of 100 Trail Blazer Award; Women in Communication’s Community Headliner Award; Bronze Medallion of The National Conference of Christians and Jews; Anti-Defamation League’s Woman of Achievement Award; In the Company of Women Award; United Way Starfish Award; Association of Black Health-System Pharmacists’ Meritorious Service Award; and Red Cross’s Sara Hopkins Woodruff Spectrum Award in Community Service.

She was also cited as one of Ebony magazine’s One Hundred Most Influential Black Americans from 1987 to 1990, and in 1988, as one of Dollars and Sense magazine’s selection of America’s Top 100 Black Business and Professional Women.

Frazier and her husband have three children: Ronald Eugene II, Robert Christophe, and Rozalynn Suzanne.

Regina Jollivette Frazier was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 8, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.049

Sex

Female

Interview Date

03/08/2017

Last Name

Frazier

Maker Category
Middle Name

Jollivette

Occupation
Schools

Paul Laurence Dunbar Elementary School

Holy Redeemer Catholic School

Miami Northwestern Senior High School

University of Miami

Howard University

First Name

Regina

Birth City, State, Country

Miami

HM ID

FRA13

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere International

Favorite Quote

Service Is The Price You Pay For The Space You Occupy.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

9/30/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Pharmacist Regina Jollivette Frazier (1943 - ) worked at the University of Miami Hospitals and Clinics in the pharmacy department for thirty-seven years.

Employment

University of Miami Hospitals and Clinics

Peoples Drug

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Regina Jollivette Frazier's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Regina Jollivette Frazier lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her likeness to her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Regina Jollivette Frazier lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her earliest memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about the National Conference of Christians and Jews

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her communities in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers her parents' protectiveness

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes the Holy Redeemer Catholic School in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers Miami Northwestern Senior High School in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers travelling through the segregated South

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Regina Jollivette Frazier recalls her teachers at Miami Northwestern Senior High School in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Regina Jollivette Frazier recalls her interest in journalism

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers her maternal grandfather, Henry E.S. Reeves

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers her family's famous guests

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her decision to attend Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about the activism on campus at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers the riots in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers her classmates at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her pharmacy internships

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers her professors at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her graduation from Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Regina Jollivette Frazier remembers joining the staff of the University of Miami Hospitals and Clinics

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her role as the pharmacy director of the University of Miami Hospital and Clinics

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about drug theft prevention

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes the problems with pharmaceutical branding

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about the development of robotic prescriptions dispensary systems

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her responsibilities and colleagues

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her membership in The Links

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her national presidency of The Links, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes 'Linkages and Legacies'

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her volunteer work

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her efforts to improve relations between police and the community

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about the gentrification of Miami, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her current volunteer activities

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Regina Jollivette Frazier reflects upon her career

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Regina Jollivette Frazier reflects upon the challenges of a pharmacy career

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Regina Jollivette Frazier reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her children

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Regina Jollivette Frazier describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Regina Jollivette Frazier narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

1$7

DATitle
Regina Jollivette Frazier describes her role as the pharmacy director of the University of Miami Hospital and Clinics
Regina Jollivette Frazier talks about her national presidency of The Links, Incorporated
Transcript
Okay, now what was your position when you came on in 1970?$$I was a staff pharmacist, I think. I'm saying I think because the university [University of Miami Hospital and Clinics, Miami, Florida] was terrific with titles you know. I think I went from staff pharmacist to senior pharmacist, from senior pharmacist to director of pharmacy and I guess I just wasn't creative enough over the years because at one time I opined to someone, I said, "Maybe if I change my title to grand exulted director of pharmacy, I could get more money."$$So you became--I have here that you became the director in '73 [1973], is that true?$$Yes.$$Okay.$$Right. I mean it was a big deal you know. The Miami Herald covered it. I was in my twenties and so.$$Okay. Okay. Well what were--what was the nature of what you had to do and, and--$$As director?$$Yeah, and the conditions that you worked in.$$Well, what I had to do was make sure the pharmacy [at National Children's Cardiac Hospital; UM Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida] ran smoothly and that it met all of the legal requirements and that the drugs were there when they needed them. So it was, make it work.$$Okay so, so many people who are gonna be watching this have never been a pharmacist, can you just walk us through a typical day as a director of a big pharmacy like this for a hospital (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Well you know the thing is that every day is different. It was, when I started I was filling prescriptions when I--or drug orders. When I ended I hadn't been near filling an order in, in years so when I started the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations [Joint Commission] was just a joint commission on accreditation of hospitals and they had one sheet of paper, I think eight and a half by eleven, that wasn't even covered with writing and those were the requirements for hospital pharmacies. When I left there was a book about this thick okay, on the requirements so that's why there was something different every day. I also had the opportunity to serve on the IRB, which is the board, it's the investigational review board [institutional review board] that reviews proposed protocols for the institution that are testing drugs for possible entry into the market. There were just all kinds of things that you did. You know there was designing the pharmacy, there was hiring the staff, monitoring the staff, just whatever, whatever it took.$$So this is a hospital pharmacy--$$Yes.$$--and so the people--$$It had a hospital and it had clinics and it was, it concentrated on cancer therapy after, after a few years.$$Okay. And so how do you best design that, you said part of your job is designing the facility right?$$Well, one of the ways you do that is by attending the mid-year clinical which is held every December. When I went to my first mid-year clinical, I think it was maybe the seventh one they had. There were about maybe twenty five hundred people there. Now, this year was the fifty-first. I stopped going after, after I retired and they probably had twenty, twenty-five thousand people there. So it's the largest meeting in the world and so you get to hear all these speakers. You get to see all these exhibits you know and you get to one of the most important thing for me was the review of the joint commission new requirements so that I was right there knowing exactly what they were going to, to be reviewing when they came by and I never had a problem ever.$Tell us about what are the activities of The Links [The Links, Incorporated] and, and, you know what, what, what did you do, what was your agenda during your term?$$My agenda was to make the, the chain of friendship that encircled the globe not only figurative but literal, and to that end I charted the first international chapter in Nassau, the Bahamas. Subsequently I charted a second international chapter in Frankfurt [Germany]. That did not survive because it was related to the [U.S.] military people who were stationed in Germany and when that ended, people started coming back to the United States and we could not sustain the chap- not we, they could not sustain the chapter there because it was, it was operative for I would say 1990, 2000 at least twenty years I think. And then I had the great pleasure of inducting Leontyne Price as an honorary member. And during my presidency we had four program facets. We now have five, but we had the arts, services to you, national transcend services and international transcend services and our programs are built around those. So we had a program called Project L.E.A.D. High Expectations in which we collaborated with other organizations, national organizations like Sigma Pi Phi, Boule, like Jack and Jill of America [Jack and Jill of America, Inc.] for example and this was to stop--encourage kids not to take drugs you know it was a, it had a just say no component to it and we ran a pilot in, I forget how many cities, and at the time that was the largest grant we had. It would--ended up being about three quarters of a million dollars so those were big programming funds in those days.$$So where did the grant money come from?$$I knew you were gonna ask me that. I wanna think it was NIDA, which is the National Institute for Drug Abuse [sic. National Institute on Drug Abuse] under NIH.$$Okay, National Institute of Health [sic. National Institutes of Health], right okay--$$Um-hm.$$--okay.$$And that program is still going today.$$Okay.$$We call it one of our signature programs.$$Okay. So, now you were--you're president from '86 [1986] until when?$$Ninety [1990].$$Okay. So it's a four year term?$$Yes. Well actually at that--things change, you know the more things change, the more they remain the same, at that time it was a two year term and then I was reelected.$$Okay so it's two, two year terms, okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Um-hm.

Albert Dotson, Jr.

Attorney Albert E. Dotson, Jr. was born on June 9, 1960 in Detroit, Michigan. Dotson is the oldest of four siblings. Values of self pride and community development were instilled in Dotson and his siblings at very early ages. Dotson’s father, Albert E. Dotson, Sr., became the first African American store manager for Sears Roebuck & Company. His position required relocation to several Sears’ stores across the country. Thus, the Dotson family lived in Detroit, Chicago, and Atlanta. The family settled in Miami, Florida where Dotson, Sr. and his family formed personal relationships with various African American community leaders.

In 1978, Dotson, Jr. became the first family member to attend a four-year university. He enrolled in Dartmouth University majoring in economics and history. After his third quarter, Dotson took advantage of the foreign exchange programs at Dartmouth traveling to Morocco and Spain. Dotson graduated from Dartmouth in 1984. He then received a full scholarship to attend Vanderbilt University’s Law School in Nashville, Tennessee. During his academic tenure, Dotson was awarded the Bennett Douglas Bell Memorial Prize for academic achievement and high ethical standards. In 1987, Dotson completed his J.D. degree. He works in private practice as an equity partner with the Miami law firm of Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP specializing in land use and zoning, and federal and local government procurement contracts and compliance.

In 1993, Dotson was the second African American to be voted on the Orange Bowl. Dotson’s father was the first African American to serve in this capacity. Dotson served as Vice President of 100 Black Men of America in 1996, later becoming Chairman in 2004. In March 2006, Dotson was sworn in to serve as President of The Orange Bowl Committee for the 2006-2007 Orange Bowl Festival and FedEx Orange Bowl Game.

Accession Number

A2006.020

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/16/2006

Last Name

Dotson

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Schools

Woodward Academy

Winston Churchill School

James Hart School

Mason Elementary School

Dartmouth College

Vanderbilt University

First Name

Albert

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

DOT01

Favorite Season

January in Miami

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere With Family

Favorite Quote

You Make The Difference.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

6/9/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potato Pie

Short Description

Association executive and administrative lawyer Albert Dotson, Jr. (1960 - ) is an equity partner at the Miami law firm of Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP. Dotson is Chairman of 100 Black Men of America, and was president of the Orange Bowl Committee for the 2006-2007 season.

Employment

Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP

State of Florida

Fine Jacobson Schwartz Nash Block and England

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:3781,41:4782,59:5874,74:6511,82:9969,130:15247,239:16521,269:30042,427:30802,439:31258,447:33310,487:35894,527:38478,576:39010,584:39466,593:42962,658:43266,663:45242,713:49746,742:52008,786:54114,894:58014,1102:76790,1218:77750,1234:78070,1239:81030,1296:81830,1307:82150,1312:85514,1321:90218,1417:90638,1424:92066,1466:93326,1486:97694,1589:98282,1603:106415,1733:111355,1818:111735,1823:112210,1829:117591,1845:118137,1854:118774,1867:119229,1873:122664,1928:128124,2061:134988,2189:135846,2201:141774,2291:149065,2341:149965,2362:151540,2407:154090,2454:154540,2462:155065,2471:155440,2477:156040,2490:156490,2498:160690,2588:161290,2598:167740,2650:169090,2673:169690,2684:170515,2701:170890,2707:171490,2727:172915,2741:173665,2752:173965,2757:185127,2917:185419,2922:187901,2958:188193,2963:191697,3062:197810,3174:198230,3181:198860,3193:200260,3226:201100,3239:201380,3244:205090,3332:205370,3337:207330,3370:209150,3411:210340,3446:211390,3465:218280,3510:218580,3515:223830,3645:225630,3678:225930,3683:227430,3720:228255,3733:228555,3738:233880,3838:235905,3892:237030,3927:237330,3932:247610,4029:252490,4123:253450,4139:253850,4145:254170,4150:262010,4337:262730,4351:275386,4525:277993,4582:282022,4661:283286,4691:284629,4713:285577,4737:292638,4801:294112,4856:295385,4879:297663,4939:303030,5001:303595,5006:304273,5014:305403,5024:310520,5068$0,0:7296,134:8448,148:9216,157:10272,170:13152,192:13728,213:16032,245:18060,252:20270,289:21120,302:22480,322:22905,328:23500,337:25200,356:26305,370:26985,379:27920,394:31065,452:31745,461:32340,469:35600,482:42725,578:43250,586:49272,640:50644,658:51526,668:56524,761:60048,772:65618,847:70154,943:73430,1010:79630,1047:80620,1086:82240,1114:82600,1119:90790,1248:91330,1255:92320,1268:100378,1331:100808,1337:102614,1360:105882,1410:106484,1418:114912,1549:116202,1586:121537,1629:121952,1635:123460,1641:124395,1652:124820,1658:125840,1671:130855,1769:131620,1779:132640,1806:138760,1883:139440,1896:139865,1902:145223,1930:150364,2005:151819,2031:154470,2039:155940,2068:156220,2073:159260,2118:160076,2143:161640,2180:164564,2242:166468,2288:171379,2336:173080,2362:174700,2418:175672,2434:179074,2506:179641,2514:180046,2523:180694,2539:181747,2581:183124,2606:184744,2649:186850,2730:187417,2738:197435,2890:203259,2988:203714,2994:204260,3001:205170,3012:210547,3053:211637,3068:212945,3086:217340,3120:217880,3128:221446,3184:222070,3198:224020,3236:227530,3316:233548,3387:238062,3490:238358,3495:240060,3522:244500,3615:252302,3679:252890,3687:253730,3704:254150,3717:268682,3988:269900,4003:273119,4046:273902,4057:279392,4112:281980,4124:287867,4202:291694,4258:292495,4275:292940,4281:295254,4313:309138,4502:309434,4517:309952,4525:310248,4530:313996,4562:314352,4567:314708,4572:315331,4584:316755,4605:318624,4631:319069,4637:322095,4701:322718,4710:323341,4718:323964,4726:335361,4843:336747,4868:337143,4873:338133,4887:338529,4892:345770,4988
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Albert Dotson, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his father's career at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls moving to Chicago, Illinois as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his grade school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Albert Dotson, Jr. reflects upon his family life during his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls befriending the King and the Abernathy families in Atlanta

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers working as a ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his activities as a teenager in Atlanta and Miami

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the political atmosphere of Atlanta in the 1970s, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the political atmosphere of Atlanta in the 1970s, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers moving to Miami, Florida in 1976

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his aspirations during his high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his decision to attend Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his experiences at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his studies at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers studying abroad in Granada, Spain

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes how his legal career began

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his decision to attend law school at Vanderbilt University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his experiences at Nashville's Vanderbilt University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his first summer job as a law student

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers beginning his legal career in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his leadership of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the mission of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his legal career in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his specialty in land use and zoning law

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his presidency of the Orange Bowl Committee

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. talks about managing multiple priorities in his career

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. reflects upon his life

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers working as a ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks
Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his leadership of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.
Transcript
We also got to meet Walt Bellamy, who at that time was the center for the Atlanta Hawks. And we met Walt Bellamy because he knew people who lived in Homewood, Illinois. And when he got traded to Atlanta, I forget what team he got traded from, he didn't know a lot of people. He talked to his friend in Homewood, Illinois, said, why don't you call my father [Albert Dotson, Sr.], he lives there. So he got to know me and my parents and just so happened it was his turn on the Atlanta Hawks to select or recommend someone to ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. And not knowing anybody else, he recommended me. My parents, and again, there are certain things that happen in your life that you remember like it was yesterday. I come home from school and I was playing basketball at that time in Atlanta for Woodward Academy [College Park, Georgia]. I can't tell you I was all that good, but--$$Were you about as tall now? I mean then as you are now?$$I was tall for my age, but I was a little shorter than I am today. The--I came home. My parents said, "Albert [HistoryMaker Albert Dotson, Jr.], we have some good news for you." And I said, "Well what is it?" They said that Walt Bellamy called and they made all this drama, and said that he's recommended you to be ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. At that moment I think, least I remember it, as a pregnant pause 'cause all I'm thinking is he's recommended me, what a great honor. Didn't think I was gonna be selected. And then they said, "And you've been selected." Now I've lost it. I've lost it as a child. I just completely lost it. And then my mother [Earlene Puryear Dotson] tells me, and they're gonna pay you. I said, "Wait a minute. They're gonna pay me to go downtown to be ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks, okay this is clearly a joke." Well a long story short, I did do that for three years, three seasons, ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. It taught me that I did not wanna be a professional basketball player the rest of my life.$$Now, what did you see when you were there?$$Well as a child, what you see on television is just when they play the game. As a person who is behind the scenes, you learn and see the business of basketball. And you learn how difficult it is. As a ball boy, I remember Lou Hudson for example, getting a shot in his knee because of an injury. And you see them going through that. You see people get traded. And how that disrupts their lives and some of them are angry about it and some of them are not. You see the interaction between the inner--the private interaction between coach and player. And sort of how that works. I mean it was great. I met a lot of people. I remember my very first game, interestingly enough, was a exhibition game between the Atlanta Hawks and the Detroit Pistons. Excuse me, Atlanta Hawks and the, the New York Knicks. And the reason I say Detroit was because it was the very first and maybe the only rain--only game that was not played because of rain. And the reason it wasn't played because of rain, Atlanta had just built the Omni [Omni Coliseum, Atlanta, Georgia]. And the Omni had a leak in the roof. And the water was coming down on the court, and the game could not be played. And what happened, because no one--it had not been experienced before, they were determining how they were going to handle this. Were they gone try to fix it, were they gonna play with it, play around it. The players sat in the locker room. So I got to spend time--'cause when you're a ball boy for a team, you're a ball boy for both the visiting team and the home team. And I got a chance to just sit and talk to Dave DeBusschere who was from Detroit. And that's how we made the connection. Bill Bradley, Walt Frazier--$$Senator.$$Senator Bill Bradley. That's right, presidential candidate Bill Bradley. Willis Reed. These are the people I'm just talking to, and they were just the most gracious people. And I really, I mean Walt Frazier, he--every time they came in town, I started collecting shoes, and had them all sign it 'cause if a shoe didn't fit right or--and this was back before the major shoe contracts. But I started--they would throw them away and I'd get them to sign it. My mother was like, "Would you stop bringing these stinky shoes home?" And you know there was--it was before people were really into memorabilia. But--$$Tell me she didn't throw them all out.$$No, I still have them. I still have them to this day. Most of them, anyway. But Walt Frazier used to always bring me stuff signed. And he was just a great human being. And I started developing those same types of relationships with teams that would come in because if you're the ball boy, you're on the bench. For the most part, you get to meet those who don't play much 'cause they're on the bench too. And you're just talking and they wanna talk to you and it's a lot easier for them to converse with people they know and you know, have a relationship with. But that made an indelible mark in me, as well, having that experience.$I wanna jump in here. Can you give a little background on the history of 100 Black Men [100 Black Men of America, Inc.]?$$Okay. 100 Black Men was actually started as a entity in 1963 in New York [New York]. It grew out of naturally the civil rights struggle and movement. But the real focus of the group at that time, which were one hundred men in New York, was the criminal system and the injustice that African Americans were experiencing in the criminal justice system. And there was a desire to focus too on economic equality amongst persons of African descent and the general population. The concept of the one hundred grew as a member moved to a different locale. The second chapter was in New Jersey. And primarily out of the Newark [New Jersey] area. And that person who helped start that chapter then moved to California, to Los Angeles [California] and started a chapter there. A chapter sprung up in Atlanta [Georgia] and Indianapolis [Indiana] and Alton, Illinois, in Suffolk County, New York, and another chapter started in California in the Oakland [California] area. But we ended up with nine organizations, all 100 Black Men of the geographic region. And eventually decided that they should come together, approximately twenty years ago in October of 1996 [sic.], to form 100 Black Men of America. And those chapters then were the beginning of what we know now as 100 Black Men of America that is now as of today 105 chapters and a global organization, having chapters in the African continent, the Caribbean basin, and Europe and in the continental United States.$$Now let's see, you were born just three years before the first organization began.$$That's correct.$$So, but today you are the chairman.$$That's correct.$$Of this nation, or worldwide organization. Now how did that come to be?$$I wasn't in the room when they voted. When we started 100 Black Men of South Florida, I was the founding president. And we did not initially decide whether--that we were going to join the 100 Black Men of America because at that time the New York chapter, the New York organization was not a part of 100 Black Men of America. The--all the organizations except New York joined. New York eventually joined. But the reason I became aware of it, I have a--have a college friend who was a member of the New York organization. I spoke to Roscoe Brown [HistoryMaker Roscoe C. Brown], a--at that time he was the president of the New York chapter, he's a Tuskegee Airman. And we were talking about us starting and he said, "Look, you don't have to follow our model. You know we were around before there was a 100 Black Men of America." And we had people like David Dinkins [HistoryMaker David N. Dinkins], Charlie Rangel [HistoryMaker Charles B. Rangel], you know these were all founders of the 100 Black Men, the New York group. And they said, "You gotta make the decision for yourself whether you wanna join or not." So after we formed, I then traveled to the first annual conference that I attended, I believe it was in New Jersey at that time. And got to meet what I thought were an--they were an amazing group of men. They came, they were about doing business. It wasn't about egos. They were talking about how they were helping kids in their community. And really focused on the business of the 100. And these were men who were very accomplished in their communities. And you know, I was sort of in awe as a, as the young buck in the room, as to what they were doing. And so as the president of our chapter, I then went to the next conference. And I started volunteering to help do things. And eventually there was an election and I was elected secretary of 100 Black Men of America. This was in 1994, in Nashville, Tennessee of all places. In Opryland [Opryland Hotel; Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Nashville, Tennessee], that's where we had the--Opryland Hotel.$$There at Opryland.$$At that time Opryland hadn't moved to its larger current location. And we were--a group of us were elected to office in 1994. And I stayed in that position for two years. And then in--where were we--in 1996, here in Miami [Florida]. Had the convention here in Miami. I convinced them to have the convention here, it was our tenth anniversary of 100 Black Men of America. And I think I said earlier that we started in 1996, if the tape may prove me wrong, but it was 1986.$$Okay.$$That we were formed, in October 1986. In 1996, we had the convention here and I was elected vice president of 100 Black Men. It just hard work in the organization. And I stayed vice president for eight years, or vice chairman, we changed the title to chairman. And then was elected without opposition to chairman of the board of the 100 two years ago.$$And how long does your tenure last?$$It lasts for two years. Well we have two year terms, but no term limits.$$Okay, so you could, you could be reelected.$$No--I guess theoretically that's possible.