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Peter Blair Henry

Economist and academic administrator Peter Blair Henry was born on July 30, 1969 in Kingston, Jamaica to George Henry and Caroll Henry. After moving to Wilmette, Illinois with his family at age nine, Henry attended New Trier High School. He earned his B.A. degree with distinction and highest honors in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1991. A Rhodes Scholar, Henry graduated from Oxford University with his B.A. degree in mathematics in 1993, and went on to receive his Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997.

Henry worked as a consultant to the Governor of The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank in 1994. The following year, he worked as a consultant to the Governor of the Bank of Jamaica. In 1997, Henry became an assistant professor of economics at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He was promoted to associate professor of economics with tenure in 2005, becoming the first tenured African American professor at the Graduate School of Business. He obtained a full professorship in 2007, and was named the Konosuke Matsushita Professor of International Economics in 2008. That same year, he led the external economic advisory group for then-Senator Barack Obama’s presidential campaign. After the election, Henry served on President Obama’s transition team as leader of the review of international lending agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and was appointed to the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships the following year. In 2010, Henry became the first African American dean, and the youngest dean, of New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business. He served in the position for eight years, becoming Dean Emeritus in 2018 and continuing as William R. Berkley Professor of Economics and Finance.

In 2013, Henry released his first book, Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth. Henry also published numerous articles on international economics, including “Debt Relief,” with Serkan Arslanalp, in the Journal of Economic Perspectives (2006); “Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation” in the Journal of Economic Literature (2007); and “Institutions vs. Policies: A Tale of Two Islands,” with Conrad Miller, in the American Economic Review (2009). Henry was named to the Citigroup Board of Directors in 2015 and the Board of Directors of Nike in 2018. He also served on the Board of Directors of General Electric from 2016 to 2018.

In 2014, with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Henry established the Ph.D. Excellence Initiative, a post-baccalaureate program designed to address underrepresentation in economics by mentoring exceptional students of color interested in pursuing doctoral studies in the field.

Henry and his wife, Lisa J. Nelson, have four children.

Peter Blair Henry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2016 and January 18, 2017.

Accession Number

A2016.088

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2016

1/18/2017

Last Name

Henry

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Blair

Schools

Avoca West Elementary School

Marie Murphy School

New Trier Township High School

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of Oxford

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

First Name

Peter

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

HEN07

Favorite Season

Christmas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Spain - Andalusia, Ghana

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/30/1969

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Jerk pork

Short Description

Economist and academic administrator Peter Blair Henry (1969 - ) served on President Barack Obama’s 2008 transition team, and on the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships. In 2010, he became the youngest and first African American dean of New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business.

Employment

New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business

Stanford University, Graduate School of Business

Stanford University, School of Humanities and Sciences

Favorite Color

Blue

Ann Dibble Jordan

Corporate executive and social work professor Ann Dibble Jordan was born to a prominent family in Tuskegee, Alabama in 1934. In 1955, Jordan graduated from Vassar College with her B.A. degree, and in 1961, she earned her M.A. degree from the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. From 1970 to 1987, Jordan worked as an Associate Professor at the School of Social Service Administration, and from 1970 to 1985, she served as the Director of Social Services of Chicago Lying-in Hospital, a maternity and women's hospital at the University of Chicago Medical Center. From 1986 to 1987, Jordan served as the Director of the Department of Social Services for the University of Chicago Medical Center. In 1986, she married Vernon Jordan, who made history when he helped organize the integration of the University of Georgia in 1961.

From 1981 to 2007, Jordan served as a director of Johnson & Johnson, and from 1989 to 2007, she served on the board of directors of Citigroup as the Field Work Director. In 1990, Jordan became a director of National Health Laboratories, now called LabCorp, and one year later she became a member of the Board of Trustees of the Brookings Institution, a non-profit public policy organization in Washington, D.C. From 1993 to 2007, Jordan served on the board of directors of Automatic Data Processing (ADP), a global provider of integrated computing and business outsourcing.

In 1994, Jordan and her husband organized a Democratic fundraiser that raised $3 million for the Clinton Campaign; one year later, they were recognized as a power couple by Forbes Magazine. In 1996, Jordan co-chaired President Clinton’s Inauguration, becoming the first African American to chair a Presidential Inaugural. The recipient of a 2004 American Woman Award from the Women’s Research & Education Institute, Jordan became a Director of Revlon in March 2009. Currently Jordan and her husband, Vernon, reside in Washington, D.C. and have four adult children.

Ann Dibble Jordan was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 26, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.068

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

6/26/2010

Last Name

Jordan

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Dibble

Occupation
Schools

Tuskegee Institute High School

Northfield School for Girls

Vassar College

University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

Chambliss Children's House at Tuskegee Institute

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Ann

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

JOR06

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

8/13/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Community leader Ann Dibble Jordan (1934 - ) was an associate professor at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration. She served as a director of many companies, including Johnson & Johnson and Revlon.

Employment

University of Chicago Hospitals

University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

Chicago Lying-in Hospital

University of Chicago Medical Center

Johnson & Johnson

Favorite Color

Purple, Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589182">Tape: 1 Slating of Ann Dibble Jordan's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589183">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589184">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589185">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her maternal grandfather, Robert Robinson Taylor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589186">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her maternal family's legacy in Tuskegee, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589187">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589188">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her father's career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589189">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her parents' relationship</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589190">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan lists her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589191">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589192">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her home in Tuskegee, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589193">Tape: 1 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers her early independence, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589194">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers her early independence, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589195">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her early religious experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589196">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her childhood activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589197">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers visiting relatives during the summers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589198">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her maternal uncles</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589199">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan describes the Chambliss Children's House School in Tuskegee, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589200">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls the differential treatment of boys and girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589201">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers her childhood friends</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589202">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers the Northfield School for Girls in Gill, Massachusetts, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589203">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her activities at the Northfield School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589204">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her academic experiences at the Northfield School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589205">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her social life at the Northfield School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589206">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers her decision to attend Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589207">Tape: 2 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her experiences at Vassar College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589208">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan describes the African American community of Tuskegee, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589209">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about race relations at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589210">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls studying the sociology of race at Vassar College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589211">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan reflects upon her early experiences of racial discrimination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589212">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about the alumnae of Vassar College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589213">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589214">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her field work in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589215">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her experiences on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589216">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her marriage to Mercer Cook</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589217">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her role as a social worker at the University of Chicago Medical Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589218">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her child abuse casework</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589219">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her career at the University of Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589220">Tape: 3 Ann Dibble Jordan reflects upon her experiences at the University of Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589221">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers receiving support from her family in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589222">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan describes her involvement with Operation PUSH</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589223">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589224">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's role in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589225">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan remembers the campaigns of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589226">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her divorce</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589227">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan recalls serving on the board of Johnson and Johnson Products</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589228">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her marriage to Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589229">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her roles on corporate and charitable boards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589230">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her relationship with President Bill Clinton</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589231">Tape: 4 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about President Barack Obama's healthcare proposal</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589232">Tape: 5 Ann Dibble Jordan reflects upon her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589233">Tape: 5 Ann Dibble Jordan reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589234">Tape: 5 Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589235">Tape: 5 Ann Dibble Jordan describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589236">Tape: 6 Ann Dibble Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589237">Tape: 6 Ann Dibble Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/589238">Tape: 7 Ann Dibble Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 3</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

5$12

DATitle
Ann Dibble Jordan describes her maternal family's legacy in Tuskegee, Alabama
Ann Dibble Jordan describes her career at the University of Chicago
Transcript
Your mother's family basically was raised--you know grew up around Tuskegee [Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute; Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama] is that--?$$Yes.$$Okay, did your mother [Helen Taylor Dibble] have any stories in growing up that she shared with you? That you remember?$$No, but I think my mother had great love for Tuskegee because of growing up there and I think they had a very close family and I think she had you know sort of a normal family life where in black families at that time one of the great things that everybody encouraged people to do was to become educated 'cause they saw that a way out or a way to deal with prejudice.$$Okay, did she have any reflections on Booker T. Washington? Did she ever meet him?$$Well, I think she was quite young when he was around and though she had some memories of it. I don't think they were very defined in terms of a relationship.$$Okay.$$Huh?$$(CLARICE DIBBLE WALKER, IV): (Unclear).$$Yeah, her father [Robert Robinson Taylor] worked for him but, yeah.$$(CLARICE DIBBLE WALKER, IV): (Unclear).$$She knew the children and the grandchildren, she knew the next generations.$$Right, right and I--Booker T. Washington lived until 1915, so she was born 1901, about fifteen years ago.$$Yeah.$$Yeah you can see him coming and going, and your grandfather built The Oaks [Tuskegee, Alabama] his residence from what I understand right?$$The what?$$The Oaks?$$The Oaks, yes. He probably was the architect for the most of the buildings in that time period.$$Okay, all right, now, now she didn't--I mean I'm just trying to get you know what she might have shared about growing up in Tuskegee in those days, what it was like for her to grow up on that campus with all that activity?$$I think it was unusual in the sense of here you are in the middle of the South where education for blacks had been very limited and Booker T. Washington had this goal and he achieved his goal in large part of providing a place that people could be, could reach, could be educated and finish college and go onto a better life, and I think that, that idea and that effort was always a big part of the experience of living in Tuskegee, the importance of getting an education, of being able to contribute and work in a society that had not been friendly to blacks, but in fact where blacks were determined to succeed.$$Okay, did she have any stories about meeting any of the celebrities from those days? 'Cause this is not--you may take this for granted but most people don't grow up on a campus where they know Booker T. Washington and the other notables of the--that period of time.$$Well, we did, we had a very interesting life because they of course entertained a lot of people who came to visit Tuskegee, so even though we lived in a small town we heard Marian Anderson sing 'cause she sang at the college campus 'cause they couldn't sing in most places. So we had the great experience of seeing a lot of people from the bigger world who came to Tuskegee to perform, and that was a different experience than most people had in the South living in, in segregated communities.$$Okay now did your mother go to school at Tuskegee herself as a child?$$As a--yeah, she went to school in Tuskegee and then she went to Fisk [Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee] to college.$$Okay, all right and what did she major in at Fisk?$$I think socio [sociology].$$(CLARICE DIBBLE WALKER, IV): (Unclear).$$Music, yeah.$$Okay, so your mother was a music major? Did she play--was she an expert on any particular instrument?$$She's a very good pianist.$$Okay.$$In fact we have her piano, I have it right there.$$Oh you're right--okay (laughter).$$It's in the living room.$$In the living room, okay.$It says that from 1970 to '87 [1987] you worked as a field work associate professor at the School of Social Service Administration [University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration, Chicago, Illinois].$$Um-hm.$$How did that come about?$$Pardon? I did that in conjunction with my job. We had field work students that were placed in our offices.$$Okay, so did you teach? You taught, you were teaching (unclear)?$$Well, I was their advisor there, teaching there. That we--they had--part of their course work was a practicum and they were placed in our offices at the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois], and I was--yeah I was involved in that.$$Okay so they would report to you as?$$Well we were, yeah, we were responsible for supervising their training, practical training.$$Okay you did that for long time.$$Yeah.$$Um, then you came and--the director of social services at Chicago Lying-in Hospital at the University of Chicago Medical Center [Chicago, Illinois]. Now what is the Chicago Lying-in Hospital?$$That's the obstetrical hospital.$$Okay.$$Women's diseases and obstetrics.$$Okay so you provided social services for women--okay. And yeah in the maternity ward there basically?$$Yeah.$$Yeah.$$But we had a big hospital for that.$$Okay so you were--you did that from--is it correct that you did that from 1970 to '85 [1985], is that?$$Um-hm.$$Okay, I'm sorry I didn't get the--I should've asked. What year did you get married?$$To Vernon [HistoryMaker Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.]?$$No, to [HistoryMaker] Mercer Cook before, I didn't ask that question.$$(Laughter).$$I--you know.$$Fifty-six [1956].$$Oh, fity-six [1956]. Okay.