The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Ann Fudge

Chief executive officer Ann M. Fudge was born on April 23, 1951, in Washington, D.C., to Malcolm and Bettye Lewis Brown. In 1973, she graduated from Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts with her B.A. degree in retail management. She earned her M.B.A. degree from Harvard Business School in 1977.

After graduating from Simmons College, Fudge was hired in the human resources department of General Electric. She joined General Mills in Minnesota as a marketing assistant after she earned her M.B.A. degree, and was part of the marketing team around Honey Nut Cheerios cereal. In 1986, after being promoted to marketing director at General Mills, Fudge accepted a position with Kraft Foods. Then, in 1994, Kraft Foods appointed Fudge the president of the Maxwell House coffee brand, making her the first African American woman to head a major corporate division. As president, she went on to run a successful campaign to rebrand Maxwell House. In 2001, one year after becoming president of Kraft’s Beverages, Desserts, and Post division, Fudge retired from the company. After a two-year sabbatical, during which she became involved with the Boys and Girls Club of America and the United Way, Fudge returned to the corporate world as the chairman and C.E.O. of Young & Rubicam Brands in 2003, and the head of its advertising network. She remained in this role until 2007.

Throughout her career, Fudge served on several organization’s board of directors. She was a trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation, museum council member of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, director of Novartis, chair of the advisory panel of the Gate Foundation, vice-chairman of Unilever, a trustee of WGBH Public Media, and a director of Northrup Grumman. In 2008, Fudge joined President Barack Obama’s presidential campaign finance committee; and, in 2010, she became a member of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform. In 2011, she was inducted into the National Association of Corporate Directors Hall of Fame. Fudge has received achievement awards from Ebony, the Executive Leadership Council, and the Harvard Alumni Association. She was also named Glamour magazine’s Woman of the Year in 1995.

Fudge and her husband, Richard Fudge, Sr., live in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. They have two sons and five grandchildren.

Ann M. Fudge was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 18, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.040

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/18/2019

Last Name

Fudge

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Marie

Schools

Harvard Business School

Simmons College

First Name

Ann

Birth City, State, Country

Washington DC

HM ID

FUD02

Favorite Season

Fall

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris

Favorite Quote

You Are A Child Of The Universe

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

4/23/1951

Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Chocolate chip cookies

Short Description

Chief executive officer Ann M. Fudge (1951 - ) was part of the marketing team for Honey Nut Cheerios cereal and later served as president of Kraft Foods’ Maxwell House coffee brand, becoming the first African American woman to head a major corporate division.

Employment

Young & Rubicam

General Foods (Kraft Foods)

General Mills

General Electric

Kraft Foods, Maxwell House Coffee

Kraft Foods; Beverages, Desserts and Post Division

Favorite Color

Blue

Peter Blair Henry

Economist and academic administrator Peter Blair Henry was born on July 30, 1969 in Kingston, Jamaica to George Henry and Caroll Henry. After moving to Wilmette, Illinois with his family at age nine, Henry attended New Trier High School. He earned his B.A. degree with distinction and highest honors in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1991. A Rhodes Scholar, Henry graduated from Oxford University with his B.A. degree in mathematics in 1993, and went on to receive his Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997.

Henry worked as a consultant to the Governor of The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank in 1994. The following year, he worked as a consultant to the Governor of the Bank of Jamaica. In 1997, Henry became an assistant professor of economics at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He was promoted to associate professor of economics with tenure in 2005, becoming the first tenured African American professor at the Graduate School of Business. He obtained a full professorship in 2007, and was named the Konosuke Matsushita Professor of International Economics in 2008. That same year, he led the external economic advisory group for then-Senator Barack Obama’s presidential campaign. After the election, Henry served on President Obama’s transition team as leader of the review of international lending agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and was appointed to the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships the following year. In 2010, Henry became the first African American dean, and the youngest dean, of New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business. He served in the position for eight years, becoming Dean Emeritus in 2018 and continuing as William R. Berkley Professor of Economics and Finance.

In 2013, Henry released his first book, Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth. Henry also published numerous articles on international economics, including “Debt Relief,” with Serkan Arslanalp, in the Journal of Economic Perspectives (2006); “Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation” in the Journal of Economic Literature (2007); and “Institutions vs. Policies: A Tale of Two Islands,” with Conrad Miller, in the American Economic Review (2009). Henry was named to the Citigroup Board of Directors in 2015 and the Board of Directors of Nike in 2018. He also served on the Board of Directors of General Electric from 2016 to 2018.

In 2014, with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Henry established the Ph.D. Excellence Initiative, a post-baccalaureate program designed to address underrepresentation in economics by mentoring exceptional students of color interested in pursuing doctoral studies in the field.

Henry and his wife, Lisa J. Nelson, have four children.

Peter Blair Henry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2016 and January 18, 2017.

Accession Number

A2016.088

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2016 |and| 1/18/2017

Last Name

Henry

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Blair

Schools

Avoca West Elementary School

Marie Murphy School

New Trier Township High School

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of Oxford

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

First Name

Peter

Birth City, State, Country

Kingston

HM ID

HEN07

Favorite Season

Christmas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Spain - Andalusia, Ghana

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/30/1969

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Jerk pork

Short Description

Economist and academic administrator Peter Blair Henry (1969 - ) served on President Barack Obama’s 2008 transition team, and on the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships. In 2010, he became the youngest and first African American dean of New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business.

Employment

New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business

Stanford University, Graduate School of Business

Stanford University, School of Humanities and Sciences

Favorite Color

Blue