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C. Bernard Fulp

Bank executive C. Bernard Fulp was born on October 9, 1935 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina to Amanda Murray Fulp and Cyrus Fulp. Fulp graduated from Atkins High School in Winston-Salem in 1953, and received his B.S. degree in elementary education from Winston-Salem State University in 1957. Fulp then served in the U.S. Air Force until 1962, and went on to earn his M.A. degree in education from the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut in 1963. He also completed a program in management development at the Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration in 1978.

Fulp began his career in banking as a loan manager at the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company branch in Winston-Salem in 1964. He also worked at State Street Bank and Trust Company and Unity Bank and Trust Company before joining the New England Merchants National Bank in 1970, where he eventually worked his way up to the position of senior vice president. In this role, he was responsible for the bank’s emerging middle market group. When New England Merchants National Bank merged with The CBT Corporation in 1983, creating the Bank of New England – then the second largest bank in New England – Fulp was promoted to executive vice president in charge of the bank’s private banking division, making him the first African American to assume the role. Fulp left the Bank of New England after it was acquired by FleetBoston Financial in 1991. He then worked for the accounting and advisory firm of Grant Thornton LLP until 1994 when he co-founded Middlesex Bank and Trust in Newton, Massachusetts. Fulp led Middlesex Bank until 2002, when it was acquired by Connecticut’s Westport National Bank. In 2004, Fulp became the president of GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Fulp received numerous awards, including the 2005 Mary Hudson Onley Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Hall of Black Achievement. He served on the Small Business Administration Boston Advisory Council from 1972 to 1982. Fulp was named by Governor Deval L. Patrick to the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education, and chaired its Fiscal and Administrative Affairs Committee. He served as a member of the Lesley University Board of Trustees, and on the board of directors for the American Red Cross of Massachusetts Bay, the Massachusetts Technology Leadership Council, and The Ron Burton Foundation.

Fulp is married to Carol Fulp, and has three children: Deanna, Rachael, and Cyrus.

C. Bernard Fulp was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.076

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/21/2016

Last Name

Fulp

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Bernard

Occupation
Schools

Harvard Business School

University of Connecticut

Winston-Salem State University

Atkins Academic and Technology High School

14th Street School

First Name

Cyrus

Birth City, State, Country

Winston-Salem

HM ID

FUL01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

North Carolina

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/9/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Bank executive C. Bernard Fulp (1935 - ) was the executive vice president of private banking for the Bank of New England, as well as the founding president of Middlesex Bank and Trust and GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Employment

GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Middlesex Bank & Trust Co.

Grant Thornton

New England Mercantile/Bank of New England

Unity Bank and Trust Company

State Street Bank & Trust

Wachovia Bank & Trust

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of C. Bernard Fulp's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his mother's career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his relatives' service in the U.S. military

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his likeness to his father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the black community in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the black business district in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his teachers at the 14th Street School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers the 14th Street Community Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his family's emphasis on work ethic

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers playing sports

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his experiences of academic tracking

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers his mentors at Atkins High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the State of North Carolina's influence on the Winston-Salem Teachers College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers the student unrest at the Winston-Salem Teachers College

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his graduation from Atkins High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the alumni of the Winston-Salem Teachers College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the alumni of the Winston-Salem Teachers College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his aspiration to become an educator

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers his mentors at the Winston-Salem Teachers College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his social life at Winston-Salem Teachers College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers Coach Clarence E. Gaines

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls the influence of Simon Green Atkins and Francis Atkins

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the student sit-ins in North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his service in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his master's degree from the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers applying for the management training program at Wachovia Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the history of black banking in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his loan management training

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers providing loans to African Americans in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the impact of redlining on the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his promotion to assistant treasurer of State Street Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls the founding of the Unity Bank and Trust Company in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the history African American banking

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his experiences at New England Merchants National Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his mentors at New England Merchants National Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his decision to attend Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his start at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his education at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about Donald Trump's business strategy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers returning to the New England Merchants National Bank

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the consolidation of the banking industry around 1990

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls the founding of the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers the acquisition of the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his accomplishments at the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the mission of the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his involvement with GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the competitors of GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his civic activities

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his service on the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the impact of massive open online courses

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp shares his concerns about for-profit universities

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his position on charter schools

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the future of banking in the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - C. Bernard Fulp reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$1

DAStory

8$12

DATitle
C. Bernard Fulp describes his accomplishments at the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company
C. Bernard Fulp describes the black community in Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Transcript
I don't want to minimize the accomplishment of it. But founding a bank is a big accomplishment and just want to ask you like what were, what were you able to do as a founder of this bank [Middlesex Bank and Trust Company; Eastern Bank], you know, that, you know, you're proud of and that's part of your legacy today?$$Well, as you've said, I mean, one of the local newspapers, the Herald [Boston Herald] said, "You know, there are a lot of things easier to do than start a bank." And Newton Graphic [The Newton Graphic] called it adventures in banking which I wasn't too happy about thinking (laughter) about, investing my life savings and they're calling it adventure. But we were able to provide services, we had talked earlier about small businesses, small companies and families. Here I was actually able to do that full time. So there were companies, both owned by people of color and of Caucasians that we financed that we helped grow. We had some impact, you know, in a smaller neighborhood within a wealthy suburban community of Newton [Massachusetts]. I mean, it was a big deal. It received a lot of newspaper coverage. We actually were covered on a couple TV stations, Channel 5 [WCVB-TV, Boston, Massachusetts] and Channel 68 [WBPX-TV, Boston, Massachusetts]. We were able to finance some real estate companies. We financed an automobile operation. We financed a summer camp. We did, you know, a number of buildings for small businesses and a number of homeless families around Newton. So, you know, it accomplished its mission and it's--it is still there. It, you know, did not do any bad or crazy things. It was owned by people who wanted to sell it.$The community in east Winston-Salem [East Winston, Winston-Salem, North Carolina] was a very tight black community in terms of business and of the, I mean, the relationships of the people there. From what I understand from--we interviewed Togo West [HistoryMaker Togo D. West, Jr.] years ago, and I forgot what town he grew up in, but he spoke really, he spoke a lot about growing up and the kind of bonds that people had in Winston-Salem.$$Well, you know, again, the professional community there cooperated and worked together in a very unique way at that time. I mean, there was a community of teachers. There were several physicians and dentists who--most of us knew who the players were. Togo's mother [Evelyn Carter West] was the music director in my elementary school, at 14th Street elementary school [14th Street School, Winston-Salem, North Carolina]. Togo's father [Togo D. West, Sr.] was a math teacher and assistant principal at Atkins High School [Atkins Academic and Technology High School, Winston-Salem, North Carolina]. He, in fact, was my geometry teacher. In addition to Safe Bus Company [Winston-Salem, North Carolina] that we talked about earlier, there was Winston Mutual Life Insurance Company [Winston-Salem, North Carolina] run by the Hills brothers. The--there were several funeral homes that--where the owners did pretty well and got involved in real estate matters. Also of significance around Winston-Salem was the fact that in 1947, Winston-Salem elected its first black alderman, Kenneth R. Williams. Williams went on to become, in addition to an alderman, to become president of Winston-Salem State University [Winston-Salem, North Carolina] at a longer time. But as far back as 1947, Winston-Salem elected black people to the board of aldermen. A few years ago, I, as I recall, four out of eight aldermen were African Americans.$$Okay. So, and Winston-Salem--now, you know, when you, when I hear stories about the South, you know, we--I grew up, you know, watching te- television and hearing about the voting right struggles in the South. But they seem to be mo- mostly in the smaller communities, not in the larger ci- cities, like black people could vote in Memphis [Tennessee], they could vote in Atlanta [Georgia] and they could vote in Winston-Salem. Right?$$That's true. And as I said earlier, they actually voted in a black person. The stories around the South or life around the South--in the larger cities, at the time I grew up, Winston-Salem was a city of around 120, 125,000 people. And I believe the percentage of people, of African Americans was around 38 percent, so it was a fairly high representation there. As we understood it, life in the rural areas, life in the mountains could be quite different. But within the cities, R.J. Reynolds didn't want disturbances. He wanted his tobacco factories to run smooth. The (unclear) wanted their tobacco factories to run on time. Piedmont Airlines [Piedmont Airlines, Inc.] didn't look for disruptions. And Western Electric [Western Electric Company] was mak- wanted people that make telephones and spend money. So the city was segregated, but the kinds of stories you hear about some parts of the rural South, Mississippi and other places, you know, were not part of the daily life around Winston-Salem. It was a manufacturing driven town with the, some of the companies I named earlier, several very large banks, so the corporate community wanted things to remains stable.

Marita Rivero

Media and nonprofit executive Marita Rivero was born on November 25, 1943 in West Grove, Pennsylvania to Grace Beresford Hughes Rivero and Manuel Rivero. Her parents worked at Lincoln University in Chester County, Pennsylvania, where her mother taught English and Latin, and her father was the founding chairman of the university’s physical education department, as well as a coach for nearly four decades. Rivero attended Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, earning her B.S. degree in psychology in 1964.

In 1970, Rivero became a producer at WGBH, a National Public Radio member station in Boston, Massachusetts. She moved to Washington, D.C. in 1976 to work as a consultant for PBS, the National Science Foundation, and the Communications Task Force of the United States Congressional Black Caucus. Rivero returned to radio production in 1981 as general manager of WPFW Pacifica in Washington, D.C., where she was later promoted to vice president. She remained there until 1988, when she returned to Boston as general manager of WGBH Radio. In 1998, Rivero was hired as executive-in-charge of Africans in America: America’s Journey Through Slavery. She then served as executive-in-charge of This Far By Faith, which aired in 2003. Rivero was promoted to general manager of radio and television at WGBH in 2005, a position she held until 2013. In 2015, Rivero was named executive director of the Museum of African American History, Boston and Nantucket, where she had volunteered since the late 1980s.

Rivero was honored with several awards including a 2007 Pinnacle Award for Achievement in Arts & Education from the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce; the first Image Award for Vision and Excellence from Women in Film and Video/New England; and induction into the YWCA's Academy of Women Achievers. She served as board chair of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, chair of the National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC), and chair of the National Association of Community Broadcasters. She also served on the boards of NPR, The Partnership, the Kokrobitey School of Ghana, and the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts, as well as the boards of the Dimock Community Health Center, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Partners Healthcare and the YWCA.

Marita Rivero was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 19, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.072

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/19/2016

Last Name

Rivero

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Schools

Oxford Area Hgh School

Lincoln University

Tufts University

Harvard Graduate School of Education

First Name

Marita

Birth City, State, Country

Lincoln University

HM ID

RIV02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Quote

Review.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/25/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Media and nonprofit executive Marita Rivero (1943 - ) served as general manager for radio and television for WGBH for nearly a decade. She became the executive director of the Museum of African American History, Boston and Nantucket in 2015.

Employment

Museum of African American History

WGBH

WDFW-FM DC

Fletcher "Flash" Wiley

Lawyer and civic leader Fletcher “Flash” Wiley was born on November 29, 1942 in Chicago, Illinois. Four years after his birth, Wiley’s family moved to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he was raised. In 1953, Wiley was selected as a charter member of the “Gifted Child Program” by the Indianapolis Public Schools, in which he was the only African American in his class. Upon graduation from Shortridge High School in 1960, Wiley was recruited by the United States Air Force Academy and became the first African American from the State of Indiana appointed to a military academy, as well as the school’s first African American football player. As an athlete, he gained the nickname “Flash,” and in 1965, became the fifth African American graduate of the Air Force Academy and the Academy’s first black Fulbright Scholar. Wiley continued his studies at L’Institut Des Etudes Politiques at the University of Paris in France; and, in 1974, following his service as a captain in the U.S. Air Force, he received his M.P.P. degree from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School.

For almost four decades, Wiley has worked as a practicing attorney concentrating in the areas of corporate and commercial law, small business development, entertainment law and real estate. He helped form the Boston, Massachusetts-based law firm of Budd, Reilly and Wiley, the largest minority-dominant firm in New England. In 1996, Wiley joined PRWT Services, Inc., as vice president and general counsel; and before he retired from employment with PRWT in 2008, he helped build the company into one of the nation’s largest minority-owned businesses and Black Enterprise Magazine’s 2009 “Company of the Year”. He remains a member of the PRWT Advisory Board.

Wiley has served as a Director of several for-profit business organizations, including three public companies. He retired in 2011, after two decades as a Director of The TJX Companies, Inc. (NYSE). He is a director of the privately-held sports enterprise, Haymon Boxing, LLC. He is also of counsel to the law firm Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, LLP (formerly Bingham McCutchen LLP), where he specializes in corporate and commercial law. He is also chairman and chief executive officer of the Centaurus Group, LLC, where he serves as an investor and principal in several commercial, real estate development, and management consulting ventures.

Wiley has been involved in many civic and charitable activities. In 1984, he founded and chaired the Governor’s Commission on Minority Business Development. He also served for seven years, first as president and later as national chairman, of the Black Entertainment and Sports Lawyers Association, Inc.; and he later served for two years as chairman of the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce. Wiley is also a founding member of the Black Alumni Associations of both the Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School. He is a benefactor of Crispus Attucks Children's Center, Inc.; a founding member of the Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School Black Alumni Organizations; a former Director of the New England Legal Foundation; Overseer of the New England Region Anti-Defamation League; and Chairman of the Board of The Dimock Center, Inc. He has also received numerous civic and professional awards, including induction into the 2010 “Academy of Distinguished Bostonians.” In 2011, he was named by U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates to the Board of Visitors of The Air University; and in 2012, President Barack Obama appointed him to the Board of Visitors of the U.S. Air Force Academy. In 2012, he received Honorary Doctorates from Cambridge College and New England School of Law.

Wiley is a member of the Bars of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and District of Columbia, and belongs to the American, National, and Massachusetts Bar Associations.

He and his wife, Benaree Pratt Wiley, live in Brookline, Massachusetts. They have two children: a son, Pratt, and a daughter, B.J.

Fletcher “Flash” Wiley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 15, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.206

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/15/2004

10/15/2004 |and| 9/11/2019

9/11/2019

Last Name

Wiley

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Houston

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Flanner House Elem Sch (Charter)

Shortridge High School

U.S. Naval Academy Preparatory School

United States Air Force Academy

Harvard Law School

Harvard Kennedy School

James Whitcomb Riley School 43

P.S. 23

P.S. 40

P.S. 45

First Name

Fletcher

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

WIL19

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches, Casinos

Favorite Quote

I Am The World's Greatest Over Sixty Year-Old Basketball Player.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/29/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Lawyer Fletcher "Flash" Wiley (1942 - ) , CEO of the Centaurus Group, LLC and of counsel to the law firm of Morgan Lewis & Bockius, LLP, co-founded the law firm of Budd, Reilly and Wiley, and was vice president and general counsel of PRWT Services, Inc.

Employment

Budd, Reilly and Wiley

PRWT Holdings

Bingham McCutchen LLP - Boston

U.S. Air Force

Abt Associates Inc.

Fine & Ambrogne

Fitch, Wiley, Richlin & Tourse, P.C.

Bingham McCutchen LLP

PWRT Services, Inc.

Schnader Harrison Goldstein & Manello

Unity Bank & Trust Company

Snyder, Tepper & Berlin

Shearman & Sterling

Democratic National Platform Committee

U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare

Office of the Massachusetts Attorney General

Mark Battle Associates, Inc.

Congressman Andrew Jacobs, Jr. (D-IN)

Favorite Color

Black, Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:5456,88:6276,126:13328,309:13984,321:16854,368:17428,375:17838,384:18166,389:18494,394:18822,413:19396,421:19888,492:20216,497:24972,600:25710,610:31760,634:35072,691:36084,707:36728,715:41052,789:50896,908:52568,993:52920,998:59960,1187:77070,1402:77630,1411:77980,1417:78610,1428:79030,1435:80850,1474:81340,1483:82950,1518:93030,1751:94570,1844:100150,1885$0,0:216,2:1296,16:7018,76:7552,83:9510,106:28597,354:29083,364:35625,404:36210,414:53720,666:54170,673:54545,679:56345,705:56945,713:59270,755:61145,803:64576,833:68608,881:69448,892:73312,947:77596,1014:78268,1030:84400,1142:95165,1237:95513,1242:97775,1267:98123,1272:99950,1292:100298,1297:104039,1359:111274,1460:116238,1554:131080,1758
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Fletcher "Flash" Wiley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley recounts his mother's tumultuous background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his mother and his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes his mother's personality and the places she lived

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his father and his brother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley recalls his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes his childhood in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about basketball player Oscar Robertson

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley recalls attending Flanner House for kindergarten

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes being placed in a gifted child's program in the Indianapolis Public School district

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes his experience in the gifted child program through the Indianapolis Public School district

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley recalls attending Shortridge High School in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his extracurricular activities during his time at Shortridge High School in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes the process of being accepted into the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley recalls attending the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his Fulbright Scholarship

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about joining the Office of Special Investigation of the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes meeting and marrying his wife, HistoryMaker Benaree P. Wiley

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about attending Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes the atmosphere of Boston, Massachusetts in the 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about organizing the Harvard Law School Black Alumni Association

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his involvement in different law associations

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley recalls attending the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes forming his law practice, Budd, Reilly and Wiley, in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his work at Abt Associaties, Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts and at Fine & Ambrogne in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes his role within Budd, Reilly and Wiley in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his civic activities in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes the evolution of the law firm Budd, Reilly and Wiley in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes the history of PRWT Services, Inc. in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his work at PRWT Services, Inc. in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his family

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about the Crispus Attucks Children's Center in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley sings a rendition of 'Save the Last Dance for Me' by The Drifters

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about his love and appreciation for his wife, HistoryMaker Benaree P. Wiley

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley reflects upon his life and his future plans

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley talks about the U.S. military's role in desegregation and its continuing efforts at inclusion

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley narrates his photographs

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Fletcher "Flash" Wiley explains how he got the nickname 'Flash'

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$1

DAStory

2$12

DATitle
Fletcher "Flash" Wiley recalls attending the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Fletcher "Flash" Wiley describes being placed in a gifted child's program in the Indianapolis Public School district
Transcript
I wasn't certain I even was gonna be a practicing attorney when I went to [Harvard] Law School [Cambridge, Massachusetts]. I just didn't know what else to do with my life. I knew I didn't wanna be a doctor which is something I thought about. I knew I didn't wanna be an astronaut, so I kind of went to law school as a holding place. And after my first year of law school three or four guys from the [John F.] Kennedy School [of Government at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts] came over to Harvard Law School and they were recruiting because they were trying to find people that had a technical background, mathematics background, to join a new program that they were putting together at the Kennedy School called the public policy program that used quantitative methods to analyze and political matters and so forth. And they with the all-star group, guys that I had, had heard about in, in college [U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado] and, and, and indeed in high school [Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, Indiana]. Guys like Richard Neustadt, and Tom [Thomas] Schelling, and Howard (unclear), and Bob [Robert P.] Mosteller, all of whom were, were fantastic known scholars and so forth. So after a year of law I went to the Kennedy School, ended up doing the joint program with, with law and, and public policy. So I didn't get out of school until 1974 and was thinking about becoming a public servant. And the only thing I had not done was really work in private sector in a sustained way. And I thought you know that to be a good public servant you really needed to have some private sector experience. And that's what finally persuaded me to go into the practice of law. I said look you got the degree, you're a member of the [Massachusetts] Bar [Association], why not try it out for a couple of years and learn something about business.$I started grade school at five; I would be six in November. And the public school education was a--I had some adjustment problems because I always use to talk out in class and fool around while other people were trying to get their work done. And so I, I got in a lot, a lot of hot water as a, as a young kid trying to learn the ropes. Played hooky a couple of times and--so I guess when I was in the fourth or fifth grade--well, actually they give it earlier, they give you an IQ test just to see if there's something wrong with me. And I guess I did pretty well on the test so they just said well you know, this guy is just not being challenged enough. And a couple years later I got involved as a charter member of a thing the Indianapolis Public Schools were putting together called the gifted child program. And I was the first black child involved in that program in a segregated city, 1952. I was transferred from going to all black schools, which I loved and so forth into, into the white community where I was the only black kid. And having to wrestle with that was sort of an adjustment for me. They would already had more money than I did, they wore clothes differently, they talked about different things and it was only then that I begin to see from their eyes how poor both financially and otherwise that they, they viewed me and other black people. So it took me a little while to deal with that. For a while I told everybody that my father [Fletcher Wiley] was a doctor (laughter). And my mother [Mildred Berg] went to school with me one day and, and she was talking to the teacher and the teacher said, "Well, how's Dr. Wiley doing?" she said, "Dr. Wiley, who's that?" (Laughter) But you cope you know; you cope as best you can.