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Adrienne Bailey

Educational consultant Adrienne Yvonne Bailey was born on November 24, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois to Julia Spalding Bailey and Leroy Bailey. Bailey received her B.A. degree from Mundelein College in 1966 and her M.A. degree in education from Wayne State University in 1969. Bailey received her Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1973.

In Chicago, Bailey taught social studies, English, French and mathematics at Deneen Elementary School and was the neighborhood youth corps supervisor at the South Shore YMCA and the program coordinator for the Circle Maxwell YMCA in the late 1960s. Bailey then worked as the education coordinator at the Government Office of Human Resources from 1969 to 1971 and as the university coordinator of the Northwestern Community Education Project at Northwestern University from 1972 to 1973. In 1973, Bailey was appointed to a six-year term on the State Board of Education, and from 1973 to 1981, Bailey was a senior staff associate at Chicago Community Trust. She has also served as vice president of the National Association of State Boards of Education. Bailey was the Vice President of Academic Affairs for the College Board of New York in 1981 and on the Education and Career Development Advisory Committee of the Urban League in 1982. Bailey then served on the Government Educational Advancement Committee from 1983 through 1987, while also serving on the National Committee on Secondary Schooling for Hispanics from 1983 to 1985.

Bailey is currently serving as an ExEL (Executive Leadership Program for Urban Education) at Harvard University.

Bailey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 4, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.121

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/4/2008

Last Name

Bailey

Maker Category
Schools

Holy Cross Elementary School

St Dorothy Elementary School

Mercy High School

Northwestern University

Central State University

Wayne State University

Mundelein College

First Name

Adrienne

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

BAI07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

It Is What You Get To Know, That's Where It Is At.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/24/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Education consultant Adrienne Bailey (1944 - ) dedicated her career to education, served as a teacher, education coordinator at the Government Office of Human Resources, and as the university coordinator of the Northwestern Community Education Project. Bailey also served a six-year appointment on State Board of Education, and served on the Government Educational Advancement Committee.

Employment

South Shore YMCA

Circle Maxwell YMCA

Detroit Board of Education

Illinois Board of Education

Governor's Office of Human Resources

The Chicago Community Trust

The College Board

Board of Education of the City of Chicago

Stupski Foundation

Strategic Philanthropy, Ltd.

Harvard University Graduate School of Education

Chicago Public Schools

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:564,10:1034,16:1410,21:3745,39:4013,44:4415,52:7229,103:8301,126:8904,138:9239,144:10579,178:11517,193:17561,253:17845,258:18910,276:19762,289:20472,303:20756,308:22034,338:22815,351:23170,357:26365,427:27430,446:27927,454:29347,469:30980,494:31335,500:33181,533:33820,544:34317,552:36021,586:36731,598:37086,604:37583,613:38648,631:39287,641:48338,708:48626,713:50498,753:53234,811:54818,843:55826,866:56258,877:56690,884:57626,903:58058,910:58778,924:74059,1087:74929,1101:76147,1118:79366,1165:85673,1213:89980,1276:92973,1316:93557,1326:94068,1335:94871,1348:95163,1353:96112,1364:97134,1382:97718,1392:98010,1397:104318,1462:106478,1491:107486,1508:108062,1517:112741,1563:115009,1603:115414,1609:115819,1615:117115,1639:118573,1662:119788,1686:120112,1691:120760,1702:121732,1717:126434,1734:128436,1764:129129,1774:130669,1800:132363,1819:132748,1825:134981,1866:137291,1909:138523,1926:139062,1934:139601,1943:139986,1949:140833,1959:141372,1967:145432,1982:166567,2254:167257,2263:170293,2343:170569,2348:170845,2353:171328,2362:171880,2371:172156,2376:173053,2391:173329,2396:174157,2412:175054,2434:176640,2444$0,0:2418,47:2808,53:4680,81:9594,157:12860,181:19139,318:22589,377:23624,394:23900,399:28592,470:37130,647:38235,675:43630,785:44410,801:46230,844:46555,850:51430,971:58038,1013:58486,1036:59382,1070:60534,1097:61750,1120:62390,1132:62966,1143:64694,1179:65270,1190:68150,1253:70774,1321:71606,1336:72502,1352:79264,1397:80744,1420:81780,1434:83260,1449:84814,1472:87404,1534:96542,1634:97060,1643:99132,1677:100168,1693:101204,1710:101722,1719:102018,1724:104312,1779:108752,1880:111194,1907:111564,1913:112526,1928:112970,1935:117916,1946:118148,1951:119192,1980:119424,1985:119830,1993:120642,2012:122208,2059:122962,2081:123542,2098:124238,2106:125456,2139:125804,2147:132850,2244
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Adrienne Bailey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Adrienne Bailey lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Adrienne Bailey describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Adrienne Bailey describes her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Adrienne Bailey describes her mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Adrienne Bailey describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Adrienne Bailey describes her father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Adrienne Bailey describes her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Adrienne Bailey describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Adrienne Bailey recalls the neighborhood of Woodlawn in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her move to Park Manor in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Adrienne Bailey describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Adrienne Bailey remembers Mercy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Adrienne Bailey recalls entertainment of her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Adrienne Bailey remembers her summers in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Adrienne Bailey remembers Sister Mary Leonette

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Adrienne Bailey remembers studying the French language

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Adrienne Bailey recalls studying abroad in France, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Adrienne Bailey recalls studying abroad in France, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Adrienne Bailey describes her first teaching position

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Adrienne Bailey reflects upon her travels in France

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her work at the Circle Maxwell YMCA in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Adrienne Bailey describes her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Adrienne Bailey talks about the West Side and South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Adrienne Bailey remembers the riots after Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Adrienne Bailey remembers Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Adrienne Bailey describes her experiences in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her Ph.D. program at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Adrienne Bailey describes her experiences at Northwestern University

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Adrienne Bailey remembers being hired at the Chicago Community Trust

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her appointment to the Illinois State Board of Education

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Adrienne Bailey remembers leading a delegation to Japan

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her presidency of the National Association of State Boards of Education

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Adrienne Bailey talks about the national standards of education

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her trip to China

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Adrienne Bailey describes her multicultural education policy

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her position at the College Board

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Adrienne Bailey reflects upon her achievements at the College Board

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Adrienne Bailey describes her involvement on education advisory boards

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her appointment as Chicago Public Schools deputy superintendent

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Adrienne Bailey talks about the Chicago School Reform Act of 1988

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Adrienne Bailey describes her work as an education consultant

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Adrienne Bailey describes her education initiatives in Mississippi, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Adrienne Bailey describes her education initiatives in Mississippi, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Adrienne Bailey describes her work with the U.S. Department of Education

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Adrienne Bailey recalls her work for the United States Agency for International Development

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Adrienne Bailey describes her work for the Harvard University Graduate School of Education

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Adrienne Bailey talks about notable activists in education

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Adrienne Bailey describes her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Adrienne Bailey describes her hopes and concerns for education in the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Adrienne Bailey talks about the challenges in public education

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Adrienne Bailey talks about the future of public education in the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Adrienne Bailey describes her philosophy of education

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Adrienne Bailey reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Adrienne Bailey reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Adrienne Bailey talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Adrienne Bailey describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Adrienne Bailey narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

11$11

DATitle
Adrienne Bailey recalls her appointment to the Illinois State Board of Education
Adrienne Bailey describes her education initiatives in Mississippi, pt. 1
Transcript
The other thing that came to me during that time is that we were moving away from, in Illinois from an elected constitutional officer and state superintendent. There had been a constitutional convention, none of like what's on the ballet today, to get away from that elected position and there was, at that time, Governor Dan Walker was creating the first appointed Illinois State Board of Education. It's interesting enough because it was the private sector and the legislation assigned the state board responsibilities over both public and private education. So, unbeknownst to me there was a group that had promoted my name, primarily because of my experience in private education, as a representative they wanted to advance to the government for appointment. Now part of the appointment criteria is you cannot be, you see, an employed educator, so you can't work for a school system, so I had a unique background in that I was trained as an educator, had a strong educational set of experiences, but I was, I fit the criteria so I was appointed then as one of, let's see, two or three African Americans to the first appointed Illinois Board of Education in about 1973 or 1974. I served on that board for eight years, leaving it in 1980 as its vice president. During that time my career also jettisoned. I would say that was probably the time that I was just on the move, thanks to many great advocates and supporters of me, but my career just kind of took off. I then became the president of the National Association of State Boards of Education, and became well acquainted, therefore, with state board members and chief state school officers in all fifty states and at the same time I was invited by the governor to be a commissioner, a member of the Education Commission of the States, which involves the fifty states but in each state it involves the governor, the heads of the two legislative parties, usually someone from the state board and someone from the state education leader side.$$Let us go back and get some dates. I don't want to mess up here.$$Okay.$$So you were appointed to the Illinois State Board of Education?$$Right, and probably in about 1973 or 1974.$$Seventy-four [1974], okay. And then you became president of the national state board of education.$$Probably about '78 [1978] or '79 [1979], because I'm just back from the fiftieth year anniversary of that organization in Washington [D.C.] two weeks ago.$I worked in Mississippi for a period of two or three years around the grassroots community initiative for, you know, focusing on academic rigor and training parents about you know, about what it meant to be able to look at quality and, as I recall, that was just so touching because we actually trained people who had never spoken in front of groups. They developed you know, preparations and note cards and they would begin their opening about, so we had decided that because we are doing this as a collaboration between this community organization [Mississippi Action for Community Education, Inc., Greenville, Mississippi] and parents and the state education department, that we didn't want the participants to listen to a group of talking heads about the state. Education people couldn't get up first, and so it was parents getting up to greet people in which they, opening comments were, "I want to tell you why quality education is important for your children in Mississippi," and they would use examples that were in their own life about how you judge quality, what is going to a grocery store, and had come to understand, therefore, about how having discernment around quality in their own children's education was an important attribute that they needed to acquire, so we did that in probably about twenty-two communities in preparation for Mississippi's subsequent accountability law, which was going to put pretty strict constraints on testing and eventually graduation requirements. So, I can remember that even though that was several years ago, that adage to the parents was don't worry, that's not going to catch up with you right now but guess what? Today, Mississippi has graduation tests that you must pass, so the whole ideal to parents was that you don't start at the ninth or the tenth grade to figure out that you've got to get over this hurdle, that it really begins back in your early elementary and middle school, to know whether or not there is this high quality instruction in the teaching and the learning that your student is getting, but not only from letting the schools define it for you, but you being able to capture this in terms of your own understanding of the kind of education your child is receiving.

Percy Bates

Educational psychologist Percy Bates was born July 8, 1932 in Pensacola, Florida. Raised by his mother, Gladys Travis Bates, he attended Spencer Bibbs Elementary School and Booker T. Washington High School. After moving to Detroit, Bates ran track and played football at Hamtramack High School, and he graduated from there in 1950. Entering the United States Army in 1952, Bates served at Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas, where he sang with fellow soldier and pianist Earl Grant. After earning his B.S. degree in biology from Central Michigan University in 1958, Bates received his M.A. in vocational rehabilitation in 1961 from Wayne State University and his Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Michigan in 1968.

In 1968, during a strike of black students demanding black faculty at the University of Michigan, Bates was promoted to assistant professor of education. At the University of Michigan’s School of Education, Bates served as assistant division director of curriculum, teaching and psychological studies and as director of programs for educational opportunity. He later became deputy assistant secretary of special education in the United States Department of Education.

Bates is a member of the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of Michigan. He is also very active in University of Michigan’s Student Athlete Advisory Committee. A founding board member and former chairman of the Higher Education Commission of the National Alliance of Black School Educators, Bates has received numerous awards. Bates lives in Ann Arbor with his wife Cheryl.

Accession Number

A2005.020

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/19/2005

Last Name

Bates

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Spencer Bibbs Elementary School

Spencer Bibbs Academy

Hamtramck High School

Central Michigan University

Wayne State University

University of Michigan

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Percy

Birth City, State, Country

Pensacola

HM ID

BAT06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

You Bet.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

7/8/1932

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Banana Cream Pie

Short Description

Education professor Percy Bates (1932 - ) served as assistant division director of curriculum, teaching and psychological studies and as director of programs for educational opportunity at the University of Michigan’s School of Education. Bates was also a member of the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of Michigan, and has served in the United States Department of Education.

Employment

University of Michigan

U.S. Department of Education

Boys Training School

Ypsilanti Public Schools, Program in Educable Mentally Impaired

Detroit Public Schools

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:395,5:892,14:5933,146:7140,183:11536,196:18489,247:19233,252:19698,258:22674,294:23232,305:23976,315:26774,331:28654,362:30158,379:34840,438:35148,443:38004,472:41720,505:42195,515:42955,525:43335,530:47705,618:53718,671:56094,765:56710,775:57326,789:59614,850:101673,1406:106603,1443:113250,1559$0,0:1513,41:7757,111:12716,216:20140,281:37970,509:38270,514:38570,519:41120,573:44237,585:70492,1008:73433,1049:73921,1059:74226,1065:74836,1078:75080,1083:75324,1088:78552,1121:83558,1174:85799,1196:86629,1208:90615,1231:90945,1238:91220,1245:91660,1255:92155,1265:94124,1287:97015,1313:97555,1318:99040,1334:102844,1350:103676,1360:104612,1370:110272,1448:110674,1461:122150,1653:123340,1671:128456,1686:129286,1698:129618,1704:129950,1709:130282,1714:131112,1726:141254,1926:141622,1931:141990,1936:142450,1942:143738,1961:144382,1969:145118,1978:146130,1983
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Percy Bates' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Percy Bates lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Percy Bates describes his maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Percy Bates talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Percy Bates describes his paternal family history, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Percy Bates describes his paternal family history, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Percy Bates talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Percy Bates describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Percy Bates describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Percy Bates talks about his childhood in Pensacola

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Percy Bates describes church and the music of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Percy Bates describes Spencer Bibbs Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Percy Bates describes his experience in segregated schools and reflects on the pitfalls of school integration

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Percy Bates remembers being well-behaved in school from a young age

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Percy Bates talks about moving to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Percy Bates describes his neighborhood in Detroit

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Percy Bates talks about his activities at Hamtramck High School, Hamtramck, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Percy Bates recalls an English teacher who cared about him

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Percy Bates talks about expectations around college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Percy Bates talks about his job in the U.S. Army base in El Paso, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Percy Bates describes starting college

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Percy Bates remembers his friendship with musician Earl Grant

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Percy Bates describes his short-lived singing career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Percy Bates remembers becoming an A student at Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Percy Bates remembers the support of Bernard Meltzer

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Percy Bates describes his decision to get a PhD in psychology

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Percy Bates talks about receiving support from his mother, Gladys Travis Bates

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Percy Bates talks about his Ph.D. dissertation on motivation, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Percy Bates talks about his Ph.D. dissertation on motivation, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Percy Bates talks about the ways black people have been socially conditioned

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Percy Bates talks about the importance of questioning assumptions in learning

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Percy Bates describes his career path from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan to U.S. Department of Education

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Percy Bates describes the demands of the Black Action Movement at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Percy Bates describes the peaceful Black Action Movement negotiations at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Percy Bates talks about his position for the U.S. Department of Education

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Percy Bates describes his position as NCAA representative from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Percy Bates talks about the difficult choices of student athletes

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Percy Bates describes the financial situation of college athletes

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Percy Bates describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Percy Bates talks about his disagreement with Bill Cosby's remarks

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Percy Bates reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Percy Bates talks about being the longest serving African American faculty member at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Percy Bates reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Percy Bates talks about affirmative action at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Percy Bates talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Percy Bates describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Percy Bates narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

6$5

DATitle
Percy Bates remembers his friendship with musician Earl Grant
Percy Bates describes his career path from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan to U.S. Department of Education
Transcript
What kinds of things would you sing? Now these are--you would go in popular venues and you're singing popular songs?$$Popular songs. I actually when I got, when I was in the [U.S.] Army I met a young man who was a musician named Earl Grant, and Earl later became reasonably famous. But Earl played the piano and organ and so he would accompany me and then we would sing duets together and so forth. When I got out of the [U.S.] Army, Earl said that his sister owned a club in Missouri some place, and that if I wanted to come there he could get me a job and I could go. I said well actually I think I wanna go to college, and I'm not sure I wanna do this. And so I came to Central Michigan [College; Central Michigan University] in Mount Pleasant [Michigan], Earl went home, and the next thing I knew Earl was on ['The] Ed Sullivan [Show'] and then he had a couple of hit records there--$$He had a couple. I'm trying to think of his big hits, but he was big in the '50s [1950s].$$He did, he, he--I remember he had one called the number 64 [sic. 54], the house, the house with the bamboo floor [sic. 'House of Bamboo']. I've forgotten the name of the, all of the song. He did, he did quite well for himself--$$Earl Grant was very (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) and then he was killed in an automobile accident. He--it was ironic because when I was in the Army I used to kid him about his, his driving and then he actually stopped driving and got himself a driver and was driving to a gig somewhere and ran off the road and he was, he was killed--$Well tell me about your career now when, when you, now after you got your Ph.D. what did you, where did you go next with your career?$$I was, I got my Ph.D. at the University of Michigan [Ann Arbor, Michigan] and at that time we had a rule that we didn't hire our own Ph.D.'s, but that was in 1968 we were right in the middle of a frantic search for minority persons. In fact, we had just had a student strike here on campus and I had been teaching while I was working on my degree, and the dean said didn't make much sense for him, for me to go someplace else while he's looking for minority professors.$$Let me put this in perspective a bit. This is like '68 [1968], this is right after the or just before the assassination of [Reverend] Dr. [Martin Luther] King [Jr.]. He was assassinated--$$Right.$$-in '68 [1968]. A lot of students are calling for reform on campus and black studies programs.$$Oh, we shut down the, the University of Michigan was shut down. It was called the BAM strike, the Black Action Movement, and the university both black and white students was shut down completely, and we had, they had placed ten demands on the table, one of which was to increase the minority faculty and students on campus and that's when I became an assistant professor here at the university. When I moved from that to I was a program head, I became an assistant dean with a couple of deans, in the end of the [President James Earl "Jimmy"] Carter [Jr.] administration I was appointed as a deputy assistant secretary in the U.S. Office of Education [U.S. Department of Education] and I took a leave of absence from the university and when I left that, then I came back here. In addition to that, I've been involved in athletics here on campus. I'm also the, what's called the faculty athletic representative for the university to the Big Ten [Conference] and the NCAA [National Collegiate Athletic Association]. So, I've been doing that now for about fifteen years as well.

Charles D. Moody, Sr.

Educator and college administrator Charles Moody, Sr. was born August 30, 1932 in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. His mother, Rosetta, came from Woodeville, Mississippi and his father, James N. Moody, came from Belize. Moody attended Scott Street and Perkins Elementary Schools; finished the 8th grade at McKinley High School and graduated from Southern University Lab High School in 1950. Earning his B.S. degree in chemistry from Central State University in 1954, Moody received a commission in the United States Army. After basic training, he married Christella Parks, also an educator and Central State graduate. In 1961, Moody received his master’s of science education degree from Chicago Teachers College. He received his Ph.D. in educational administration from Northwestern University in 1971.

After starting his career as teacher, in 1968 Moody became superintendent of the Harvey, Illinois Public Schools. Joining the education faculty of the University of Michigan in 1970, Moody worked as chairman of the School of Education Specialists, School of Education, director of the Program for Educational Opportunity in 1970, director of the Project for Fair Administration of School Discipline in 1975, director of the Center for Sex Equity in Schools in 1981, vice provost for Minority Affairs in 1987, executive director of the South African Initiative Office and in 1997, he became vice provost emeritus and professor emeritus. Moody worked as superintendent of searches for Hazard Young and Attea from 1987 to 2002.

Moody’s 1970 dissertation on black superintendents resulted in the formation of the National Alliance of Black School Educators, (NABSE.) Today, NABSE has 6,000 members and 125 affiliates across the United States. Honored as NABSE founder, and as a distinguished graduate of Central State University and Northwestern University, Moody lives in retirement with his wife in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Charles D. Moody and Christella D. Moody South African Initiative Fund was established in their honor to actively involve the University of Michigan community with the development of South Africa. The University of Michigan established the Charles D. Moody, Sr. Collegiate Professorship in Psychology and Education in September 2011.

Accession Number

A2004.190

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/1/2004

Last Name

Moody

Maker Category
Middle Name

D.

Schools

Southern University Laboratory School

Perkins Road Elementary School

Scott Street Elementary School

McKinley Senior High School

Northwestern University

Central State University

Chicago State University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Baton Rouge

HM ID

MOO06

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Sponsor

Ray Shepard

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

Hard Times Will Make A Monkey Eat Pepper And Swear It's Sweet.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Nevada

Birth Date

8/30/1932

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Las Vegas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Jambalaya

Death Date

3/2/2019

Short Description

Academic administrator Charles D. Moody, Sr. (1932 - ) founded the National Alliance of Black School Educators, is the vice provost emeritus and professor emeritus at the University of Michigan, and worked as Superintendent of Searches for Hazard Young and Attea.

Employment

Harvey, Illinois Public Schools

University of Michigan

Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates

Evanston School District

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating for Charles D. Moody, Sr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his mother and her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. recalls meeting his father's possible relatives

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. recalls his father's work as a Jeanes Supervisor

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his neighborhood growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. lists the schools he attended as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes himself as a boy

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. explains his mother's lesson on equity

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. recalls his favorite teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers being an outspoken child

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. recalls segregated high school and college sports

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his activities at Baton Rouge's Southern University Laboratory School

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers traveling to the College of Education and Industrial Arts at Wilberforce

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes Central State College in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers professors at Wilberforce's Central State College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers professors at Wilberforce's Central State College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his academics at Wilberforce's Central State College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. speaks about his wife, Christella Moody

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes living in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers working in Chicago area schools

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers attending Evanston's Northwestern University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. recalls starting the National Alliance of Black School Educators

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes trends in hiring school superintendents

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. talks about NABSE mentoring young professionals

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes NABSE's successes

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. reflects upon high expectations and student success

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers famous educators he worked with

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers working at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers becoming the University of Michigan's vice provost for minority affairs

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. explains his approach as vice provost for minority affairs

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes the South African Initiative Office at the University of Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers moving to Las Vegas, Nevada

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. shares his thoughts on affirmative action

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes his parents and how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Charles D. Moody, Sr. narrates his photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Charles D. Moody, Sr. describes NABSE's successes
Charles D. Moody, Sr. remembers becoming the University of Michigan's vice provost for minority affairs
Transcript
What in your estimation would be the highlights of NABSE [National Alliance of Black School Educators], you know, what NABSE has been able to do?$$One thing I think has been--we've developed some programs. And there's a document that was published by NABSE called 'Saving the African-American Child.' And it's just talking about academic and cultural excellence, and having the high expectations and teaching kids algebra in the fifth grade or third grade, or whatever, so that's there some expectation--that there's some cultural excellence--that, that people get together and talk about and deal with and share information. Programs, effective programs--we have an academy, Ron Edmonds Academy [Ron Edmonds Summer Academy], that's dealing with the principles of Ron Edmonds [Ronald Edmonds], who said every child can learn. But the problem is, is that education of interest to us? And do we really want kids to learn? You know, education for a long time has been, what? Sorting and sifting, and saying, "Hey, you're going to be something. But we need some folks to do the menial tasks. We need somebody to do some--but you folks, y'all going to be it." And so, we sort and we sift, and we weed out. We nurture some people to go and do some things. You know, flowers are not going to grow if I don't put no fertilizer on them, if I don't nurture those flowers, if I don't tend to the flowers. But if I tend to the flowers, they're gonna grow. And they can't grow by themselves. And I think, you know--just friendship. What--I tell you, people will tell you NABSE has workshops and great sessions at the annual conference. We have regional affairs. We have some people who've been fighting in the vineyard for a long time, and it's time that we try to--and we are beginning to get the young people coming along and taking a leadership role.$You were talking about this meeting in 1987--$$Yeah.$$--with your wife [Christella Moody] and [HistoryMaker] Ruth Love, and other people were there.$$Yeah. And we were just sitting down, just the three of us. And she said, "Well, I'm going back and start packing, because we have to be back in Ann Arbor [Michigan]." I said, "We're going by Baton Rouge [Louisiana], I thought." She said, "Oh, we're going to have to go back." I said, "Well, okay, if you want to go back, okay." And so, she went to the room. And while she was in the room packing, she got a call from the University of Michigan [Ann Arbor, Michigan]. And the students were protesting, and about to close the place down. And Jesse Jackson [HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson] was coming there to meet with them. And they said, well, Jesse and them said, "We're not going to do anything until you come. Can you come back?" So my wife said, "Well, you know, it's going to take some time and trouble trying to get--." So, she made the arrangements and we came, I came back. And I picked up Wade [H.] McCree. I don't know--Wade McCree used to be the solicitor general of the United States. He was a law professor, he's passed now, Wade McCree. And we rode to this meeting together. And these students were saying that they wanted an office of vice provost, or vice president for minority affairs. And they wanted me to be the vice provost. And after the big rally and stuff, we went to the Hill Auditorium. And Jesse got up and made a comment about you're looking for a vice, you're looking for a vice provost, and he's got the best person right here. And he called my name out there in front of an auditorium full of--but, anyway, I talked with the president, Harold [T.] Shapiro, who was president then about it, and I accepted the position. And I always felt it was the students who made them create this position. These folks didn't do this out the goodness of their hearts, that they wanted to be good fellows. I say if those students hadn't been there with that pressure, they never would have created that position. And so, I was appointed. And we came up with some things. That's why that thing on the wall back there is good for you to see. I'll see if she has one, and maybe we can take a picture of it and use--but anyway, we talked about trying to do something.