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Vicki Hallman

Vicki Hallman was born in Dallas, Texas on October 20, 1954. She grew up in the Hamilton Park neighborhood in Dallas, attending public schools there. After graduating from Hillcrest High School in 1972, Hallman attended East Texas State University, where she earned her B.A. degree in pre-law and psychology in 1976.

After graduating, Hallman was hired by the Paris Outreach Clinic in Paris, Texas, and in 1977, she joined the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Over the ensuing years, Hallman rose through the ranks, and by 1989 she was a parole supervisor. In 1995, she was named the assistant regional director for Dallas, and on August 1, 2002, she became the region II director of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice/Parole Division. There, she managed the development, implementation and planning of all parole-related functions for thirteen offices. She also instituted programs such as Females, First and Foremost (F3), Cognitive Restructuring, African American Male Survival Skills, Hispanos Survival Skills and anger management courses for parolees, all of which have been highly effective.

Hallman has received numerous honors and recognitions over the years, including the Governor’s Award, Outstanding Woman of the Year and the Dr. Emmett J. Conrad Leadership Award. She is a member of Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, the National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice and serves as a board member of EXODUS Ministries.

Accession Number

A2004.215

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/26/2004

Last Name

Hallman

Maker Category
Schools

Hillcrest H S

Hamilton Park Elementary School

Richardson H S

Texas A&M University - Commerce

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Vicki

Birth City, State, Country

Dallas

HM ID

HAL08

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Would accept honorarium, though not required

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/20/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Barbecue (Ribs)

Short Description

State government appointee Vicki Hallman (1954 - ) has served as the Assistant Regional Director for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice and was later named Region II Director of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice/Parole Division.

Employment

Paris Outreach Clinic - Paris, Texas

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Vicki Hallman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman describes her mother's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman talks about her mother's childhood in Arthur City, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman describes her father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman talks about her father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman describes her mother's work and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman describes her childhood household in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Vicki Hallman describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Vicki Hallman describes the Hamilton Park neighborhood where she grew up in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Vicki Hallman recounts the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman recalls her temperament as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman describes the African American middle-class community of Hamilton Park, Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman remembers Reverend Zan Wesley Holmes, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman recalls transferring to the majority-white Richardson High School in Richardson, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman remembers playing a joke on her classmates

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman explains how she began to feel accepted at Hillcrest High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman remembers a difficult decision to participate in a walkout at Hillcrest High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman describes her role as a mediator during the integration of Hillcrest High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Vicki Hallman talks about her favorite school subjects

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Vicki Hallman remembers influential teachers from her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman describes her younger sister

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman describes the impact of her late sister on her family

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman talks about her decision to attend East Texas State University in Commerce, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman describes the strong African American community at East Texas State University in Commerce, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman talks about her academic interests and habits while attending East Texas State University in Commerce, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman talks about the importance of her sorority advisor

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman talks about her lack of political involvement during her time at East Texas State University in Commerce, Texas at college

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman recalls her first post-college job as an intake officer at Paris Outreach Claim Clinic in Paris, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Vicki Hallman describes her experience at Paris Outreach Claim Clinic at Terrell State Hospital in Paris, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Vicki Hallman describes meeting her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Vicki Hallman recalls her hiring at Texas Department of Criminal Justice in 1977

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman talks about her job as a parole officer with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in 1977

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman describes challenges she faced as a young woman parole officer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman describes her promotion at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman remembers the challenges of being a regional supervisor at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman describes her work as assistant regional director for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman recounts holding a job fair for ex-offenders, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman recounts holding a job fair for ex-offenders, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman talks about opening a Day Resource Center in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman describes implementing changes as Region II director of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, parole division

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman talks about her community outreach as a parole officer for the Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman describes her innovative approach to countering recidivism among ex-offenders

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman talks about her promotion to regional director for Region II of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, parole division

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman talks about the cultural programs she implemented for parolees

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman talks about the support of her staff at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman describes an influential experience with a client, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman describes an influential experience with a client, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman describes the success celebrations for parolees organized by the community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman describes the contributions of her support staff

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Vicki Hallman narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Vicki Hallman narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$4

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Vicki Hallman describes an influential experience with a client, pt. 1
Vicki Hallman describes her promotion at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice
Transcript
And then I get a card like I got today through the mail that says thanks for your support. This is from a female client who I was about to send back to prison a year ago. I was so fed up with her addiction. And I really don't have, most directors [in Texas Department of Criminal Justice, parole division] don't have anything to do with clients one on one. They don't have that time. I can't get away from them because they're, they're in my blood, and they're what keeps me going. And so I do a lot of intervention counseling. When all my staff have done all that they can do before, in a lot of instances I wanna send 'em back to prison. I say send 'em to me. I either do one thing, have my come to Jesus meeting, close the door, or we sit down and we really talk. I'm going to get through a street game, 'cause they're gonna bring the game to, to, to me at first. But even though I wasn't from the streets, I've been educated. I got a Ph.D. in the streets because I spend so much time with my clients, so they teach me. I know the game. And this individual lady, so special to me, because I was about to give up. It was one of those days. It was a Friday evening. I'd been doing intervention counseling all day. Here she comes at 4:00 full of game, all the excuses, wanting to blame everything, the white man, the job situation. Broke it down, wasn't gonna deal with it. I'm real up front. I learned that that same negative connotation that, placed on me as a parole office became my strength. I'm an in-your-face, upfront individual. If I'm wrong I'm the first to apologize. That's what I like about me. And in this case, she and I were battling. I was tired. I was ready to go home. I was about to give up, and my spirit wouldn't let me do it. And so I said look, you're gonna go back to prison. She says I'm (unclear). I said you're gonna go back to prison, or you're gonna die on the streets, 'cause she was doing cocaine really bad. Her attitude was I'm going to die anyway. I'm HIV [human immunodeficiency virus] positive. Wow, diffused all that anger. I had immediately, instantaneously diffused me. I was at a loss for words. I am never at a loss for words. I was at a loss for words. So I said a silent prayer: God, with the words in my mouth, meditation in my heart, be acceptable in your sight, let me say something to this lady that's gonna cause her to think and feel, didn't even ask that he allow me to change her, just allow her to think and feel. And so I shifted, went from one hip to the other, had a whole new wind.$The biggest was believing in a system that I was working for. Man, people were coming out, going right back, because we had nothing. And I really just thought, I'm working; I'm doing a job, but it's not working. It's not impacting recidivism. It's not doing anything. And I will tell everybody around me: one of these days, if I'm an opport- in a, in, in a decision-making position here, if I'm ever--at the time the title was regional supervisor [at Texas Department of Criminal Justice]--if I'm ever regional supervisor, I'm gonna change some things. Everybody laughed at me. It's not gonna happen, [HistoryMaker] Vicki [Hallman]. You're black, girl. Did you look in the mirror? You're black, and you're a female, plus you got a big mouth, and you talk too much. You're so unorthodox, you make people mad; you piss 'em off. You're not, it's not gonna happen and lo and behold. I prayed about it. I kept saying, God, make me the person you'll have me to be. I told you earlier I come from a very spiritual family. And whereas we're not Bible toting evangelists that evangelize to people, this is within, and I know that I can do anything. That's why my favorite saying and scripture is, "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me," [Philippians 4:13] because he took me through a lot. I had a supervisor that could not stand my, the air that I breathe, and he gave me a really hard time. He tried to run me away. And I would have run. My daddy [Curtis McCarty] wouldn't let me (laughter). He was like you don't run away from anybody or anything, you know that. You stand there, and you fight, and you do the best you can. And so I went through several years of really being treated really bad by this guy. And I continued to do my job, and I continued to have trouble. But--(unclear)--things worked out. He was transferred out, and I prama- I applied for a unit supervisor's position probably about twelve times, never could go from this level. And he would tell me in an interview. I'd be one on one. As long as I'm regional supervisor, you're never gonna get promoted. And I'd leave out that interview, and I would cry, big crybaby. And I'd call my daddy, and he'd say shut up that crying, girl. (Unclear) go do better; next one come up, you apply again. And I'd go back in there. So the last time we were gonna be smart. We're take a recorder, a little bitty mini cassette recorder. We're gonna tape this guy telling me that I'm never gonna get promoted. It had nothing to do with my job performance or my abilities. It had to do he just didn't like me. Lo and behold, the one time I was ready, just as tickled pink. Well, the personnel person from Austin [Texas] sat in on the interviews, and so, of course, I didn't get that type of feedback from this guy. He was really sweet. I didn't get the job either, but I didn't that, to get a chance to record him. And so after he was transferred out, I got promoted the first time with the new regional supervisor. So that's my entrance into management, didn't really like it.$$Now what year is this when you finally get promoted?$$In 1987.$$Okay.