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Louis Dodd

Insurance executive Louis Price Dodd was born on February 15, 1944, in Winona, Mississippi, to Willie and Corene Dodd. Dodd graduated valedictorian from Chicago’s Dunbar Vocational High School in 1959. He received his B.A. degree in education from Chicago State University in 1963 and has also taken advanced courses at Northeastern Illinois University.

Dodd worked as a Language Arts teacher for the Chicago Board of Education from 1966 to 1971 and was the Director of General Education for Chicago Youth Centers from 1969 to 1971. During this same time period, he was also the Co-Owner and Vice President of Marketing for Bailey’s Stamp Works. Since 1971, Dodd has been in the insurance business as an independent agency affiliate of Allstate Insurance. Throughout this time, he has been president and CEO of Dodd’s Insurance Agency. Dodd has received numerous awards for his work in the insurance industry and has been Allstate’s leading sales agent for the Chicago Metro Region for over fifteen years. From 1977 through 2003, Dodd was the director of Highland Community Bank in Chicago. Building on his success in the insurance industry, Dodd entered the hotel business and is co-owner of three Chicago hotels, The Amber Inn, The Dew Central Motel, and the South Parkway Inn. He is also a partner in two other enterprises, the Rolls Royce Car Wash and Kermit Coleman Medical Center.

Dodd is married to fellow insurance agent Alma Dodd. They have three children: Robert Dodd, Kimberly Yelverton, and Courtney Dodd.

Accession Number

A2008.140

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/21/2008

Last Name

Dodd

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Price

Occupation
Schools

Dunbar Vocational Career Academy High School

Chicago State University

Edmund Burke Elementary School

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Winona High School

First Name

Louis

Birth City, State, Country

Winona

HM ID

DOD03

Favorite Season

Birthday

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Miami, Florida

Favorite Quote

It Is Not Easy.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

2/15/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Sole

Short Description

Insurance executive Louis Dodd (1944 - ) was president and CEO of Dodd’s Insurance Agency since 1971. A former teacher, Dodd was also co-owner in three Chicago hotels, and was the director of Highland Community Bank in Chicago from 1977 through 2003.

Employment

Allstate Corporation

Louis Dodd Insurance Agency

Bailey's Stamp Works

Forrestville Upper Grade Center

Montgomery Ward

Esquire Lounge

Rolls Royce Car Wash

The Amber Inn

Dew Central Motel

Chicago South Loop Hotel

Kermit Coleman Medical Center

Dodd's Insurance Agency

Highland Community Bank

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Louis Dodd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd talks about his maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd talks about his maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd describes his siblings and maternal aunt and uncle

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd remembers his father's car

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd describes his childhood home in Winona, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Louis Dodd talks about his maternal grandfather's role as a pastor

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Louis Dodd recalls his family's move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Louis Dodd remembers his first impressions of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Louis Dodd describes his mother's career

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd describes his father's occupation in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd talks about his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd remembers the death of his father

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd recalls his return to Winona, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd remembers Winona High School in Winona, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd describes Edmund Burke Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd remembers Dunbar Vocational High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd describes his mother's education

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd describes his activities in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Louis Dodd remembers his neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Louis Dodd recalls his guidance counselor at Dunbar Vocational High School

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Louis Dodd describes his activities at Dunbar Vocational High School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd recalls his interest in athletics

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd remembers his scholarship to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd remembers the Chicago Teachers College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd describes the founding of Bailey's Stamp Works

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd talks about the Chicago Board of Education examinations

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd remembers the Forrestville Upper Grade Center in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd describes his students at the Forrestville Upper Grade Center

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd recalls the uprisings on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd talks about his rubber stamp business

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd remembers his introduction to the insurance industry

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd describes his position at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd recalls his experiences of discrimination at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd describes his work at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd remembers moving to Matteson, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd describes the changes in the insurance industry

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd talks about his role at the Highland Community Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd talks about the practice of redlining

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd talks about the role of African American banks

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Louis Dodd describes his Rolls Royce Car Wash business

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd describes his business partners

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd describes his mentorship at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd describes his advice to aspiring insurance agents

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd recalls his first venture in the hospitality industry

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd remembers the Kermit Coleman Medical Center

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd talks about the Michigan Plaza Hotel investment group, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd recalls his first investment in the hotel industry

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd talks about the Michigan Plaza Hotel investment group, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd describes his land acquisitions

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Louis Dodd talks about the Amber Inn in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Louis Dodd talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Louis Dodd describes his activities in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Louis Dodd remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Louis Dodd talks about St. Ailbe Catholic Church in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Louis Dodd describes the South Loop Hotel in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Louis Dodd reflects upon his business philosophy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Louis Dodd reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Louis Dodd describes his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Louis Dodd describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Louis Dodd describes his decision to share his story

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

8$8

DATitle
Louis Dodd recalls the uprisings on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois
Louis Dodd talks about the practice of redlining
Transcript
Now, this is a pretty exciting period, or a changing period in Chicago's [Chicago, Illinois] history during that time. You had--$$The riots.$$--the riots.$$Sure.$$Tell me what, what are your remembrances of that and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well--$$--if you had any involvement?$$The riots in '68 [1968] I remember vividly, I had just left the teaching situation, I had gone to Wards [Montgomery Ward] to work. And they made that announcement of what was taking place and the streets were, particularly downtown were shut down. The areas particularly on the immediate West Side were just being looted like you wouldn't believe and smoke and fire was everywhere and people were frightened and almost like panic throughout. And, and that had really certainly been fueled a lot by the frustrations of the inequities at the time and a, a numb realization of society of what was brewing as far as people being held back and the issues of what was impending in their minds and in their bodies.$$Now, when you say the inequities can you elaborate a little on that?$$Well, keep in mind even at that time in Chicago there was still areas that you could not live in, Bridgeport [Chicago, Illinois] was one and you knew not to go over there and that was where the mayor [Richard J. Daley] lived. There were other areas too by which you know you would not welcomed. Keep in mind too that during the time that I graduated from high school [Dunbar Vocational High School; Dunbar Vocational Career Academy High School, Chicago, Illinois], it was only a few years before that that you could not have a prom in the Loop [Chicago, Illinois]. So those things were such that the disparities, the inequities, the prejudicial situations were such, were still perpetuated.$$Where was your prom?$$The prom that we had was on the North Side in a hotel that I, I, I can't recall but right on the lake [Lake Michigan].$$But it wasn't down, it was (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) It was not downtown.$$--it was in an acceptable area?$$Yeah, right, on the Near North Side, right, uh-huh.$$So I'm sorry go ahead.$$No. But again, the riots were certainly a intimidating time and a time by which, you know, you recognized what was going on and you somewhat stayed close to home but the issue of the time though, I guess no one would ever condone that type of thing and certainly I wouldn't, but immediately afterwards there was change and you could see it. Not that it was a, a thing by which one could say tremendous progress was made but change was in the process of being made. In other words opportunities by Corporate America, you could see differences in terms of how they viewed the situation as far as opportunities were concerned and they were taking on minorities as a project to integrate the system.$Tell me about, if you don't mind, the situation with Highland Bank [Highland Community Bank, Chicago, Illinois] and Allstate [Allstate Corporation] with the redlining? Wasn't there a problem--$$Well--$$At--$$--insurance companies have been accused of redlining for a lot, a long number of years. And what that really means is that the companies have what has been described as unfair rules that not allows certain segments of the community to be insured. And that historically has been a problem. And the reconcilement of the problem today has been that they don't have these rules that you quote unquote, are out there, but they price you out. In other words, rather than to say there is a rule that will not allow a community to be insured, they will raise the price in that zip code by which you cannot afford or you will not pay, so indirectly they force you to make a decision as to whether you want to pay that price and stay with them or to get a, a better price and go to another suitor.$$And during this period though when there was a issue with Englewood [Chicago, Illinois], with the Englewood communities specifically, you were with Allstate as well as with the bank, so how did you, how did that, tell us a little bit about that?$$Well, with the bank that's the easy part in the sense that Highland is a black bank from the standpoint of ownership from the posture of Allstate, you don't make the rules, you interpret the rules and you work within the rules. So consequently one had to market the product that they put out there. The companies don't ask your opinion as to what you think about any situation. They explicitly describe what they have and under what circumstance they want to market this product. So, you know, you have two different hats. And when I'm in the banking industry have one hat, I'm in the insurance industry have on a different hat, so it, you, you separate the two and you move forward. And the issue is that you look for progress and accomplishments depending on what hat you have on.

Paul Carter Harrison

Playwright, professor and African American theatre expert, Paul Carter Harrison was born March 1, 1936 in New York City, New York. His parents, Thelma Inez Harrison and Paul Randolph Harrison were from North and South Carolina, respectively, with backgrounds rooted in the Garvey Movement, the A.M.E. Church and Gullah culture. Harrison’s brother, Kenneth, was the first black basketball player at Villanova University. Harrison attended P.S. 113 and graduated from Commerce High School in 1952. At New York University in Greenwich Village, sixteen-year-old Harrison met cutting edge artists, writers and musicians including Billy Dee Williams, Leroi Jones (Amiri Baraka), Ted Joans and Thelonius Monk. He transferred to Indiana University in 1953, where he met “Sweet” Charlie Brown, Freddie Hubbard, and David Baker. He was awarded a B.A. in psychology in 1957. Returning to New York, Harrison earned an M.A. in psychology and phenomenology from the New School for Social Research in 1962.

Shelving his plans for a Ph.D. in 1962, Harrison spent seven years in Spain and the Netherlands, honing his writing and experimenting in theatre. In Amsterdam he met students from Surinam with whom he dialogued about the drama of African ritual. Harrison wrote a film script, Stranger On The Square, and two plays: The Experimental Leader and Dialogue from the Opposition.
From 1968 to 1970, Harrison taught theater at Howard University, where his students included: Phylicia Rashad, Debbie Allen, Linda Goss, Petronia Bailey, Clinton T. Davis and Pearl Cleage. At the State University of California at Sacramento, 1970-72, he wrote and directed Tabernacle and directed Melvin Van Peebles’ Ain’t Supposed To Die A Natural Death. In 1973, his play, The Great McDaddy, produced by the Negro Ensemble Company, won an Obie Award. From 1972 to 1976, he taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he is now professor emeritus and wrote movie scripts for Lord Shango (1975) and Youngblood (1978). In 1976, Harrison was hired as professor and writer in residence at the Theatre Center of Chicago’s Columbia College and served until his retirement in 2002. While in Chicago, Harrison directed ETA’s acclaimed production of Marsha Leslie’s The Trial of One Short Sighted Black Woman (1996) and Columbia’s Doxology (2002).

Harrison’s books include: The Drama of Nommo and Totem Voices: Plays From the Black World Repertory (1972), Kuntu Drama: Plays From the African Continuum (1974), In The Shadow of the Great White Way (intro 1989), Classic Plays from the Negro Ensemble Company (1995), and Black Theatre: Ritual Performance in the African Diaspora (2003). Harrison lives in New York City and looks forward to annual vacations in Spain with his daughter.

Accession Number

A2004.160

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/14/2004

Last Name

Harrison

Maker Category
Middle Name

Carter

Schools

Commerce High School

P.S. 113 Anthony J. Pranzo

New York University

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Paul

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

HAR13

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Ibiza, Spain

Favorite Quote

Like That!

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/1/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Playwright and theater professor Paul Carter Harrison (1936 - ) is an expert on African American theatre and has published books including Classic Plays from the Negro Ensemble Company (1995), and Black Theatre: Ritual Performance in the African Diaspora (2003).

Employment

Howard University

Columbia College Chicago

University of Massachusetts

Favorite Color

Oxford Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:255,12:5950,166:10455,246:12240,283:14705,347:24860,490:36716,615:40852,714:41220,788:53410,933:54050,943:56290,1000:62594,1092:64802,1135:67468,1161:73383,1278:99432,1660:109376,1964:109904,1971:111928,2001:121413,2140:122326,2149:123820,2172:126393,2235:126891,2242:127804,2267:130626,2349:131705,2370:132037,2375:146550,2585$0,0:252,6:6972,182:7812,195:11256,272:12936,305:34330,616:35190,631:41674,704:61261,1036:62423,1057:65328,1173:98934,1618:99278,1623:103161,1657:109714,1739:110282,1748:115968,1839:118282,1881:126737,2016:132396,2056:138376,2151:154201,2449:154615,2456:154960,2463:155236,2468:163130,2605:166328,2634:167084,2645:172040,2723:181820,2857:183042,2869:183700,2878:190504,3027:195155,3103:199745,3198:200170,3226:204505,3312:209670,3345:212550,3397:213190,3405:215320,3422
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Paul Carter Harrison's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Paul Carter Harrison lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls his grandfather's burial ceremony in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls his paternal grandmother's apartment rental business in Harlem, New York, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his mother's personality and her career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about his mother's second marriage at the age of seventy-seven

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his childhood memories of his father

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls traveling to the South to visit his mother's family in Wilmington, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about his and his brother's early experiences with discrimination as teenagers

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls encountering prejudice at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about his early educational experiences and cultural influences in New York, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls the artists that he befriended at New York University in New York, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Paul Carter Harrison shares a story about a youthful romance derailed by his lack of career plans

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about an influential music teacher at Public School 113 in New York, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Paul Carter Harrison reflects on the importance of embedding teachers within a larger community

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Paul Carter Harrison describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in New York, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about playing the trumpet in a drum and bugle corps during his childhood in New York, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls playing basketball on the playgrounds as a teenager in Harlem, New York, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his brother's experiences on the basketball team at Villanova University in Villanova, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about the decorum for entering new territory that he learned in New York, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Paul Carter Harrison describes the musical prodigies he encountered while living in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls a racist incident in his physiology class at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls confronting a physiology professor at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana for her racist language

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about experiencing racial discrimination while living in Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about his reason for attending Commerce High School in New York, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his social life and influences at Commerce High School in New York, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Paul Carter Harrison explains how his interest in theater began in New York, New York during the 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about what he learned studying psychology at the New School for Social Research in New York, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about how living in Amsterdam, the Netherlands for a year changed his philosophy and writing style

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Paul Carter Harrison explains why he chose to return to the United States to teach at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about the inspiration for his documentary film 'Stranger on the Square'

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about being exposed to new ideas as a professor of theatre at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about how African roots influence the black community in America

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Paul Carter Harrison offers his perspective on the history of the Afro-Surinamese people

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about how African rhythms and traditions are manifested in African American culture

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Paul Carter Harrison gives his perspective on what makes ritual powerful in the African tradition

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about what he means by the term Nommo

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls learning about the culture of the South while teaching at Howard University in Washington, D.C. in the late 1960s

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Paul Carter Harrison describes the plays he wrote while working at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Paul Carter Harrison explains his decision to leave Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about his directing work while teaching at Sacramento State College in Sacramento, California

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls the creation and production of his play 'The Great MacDaddy'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his tenure as chairman of the theatre department at Columbia College Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his current theatrical and literary projects

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Paul Carter Harrison offers his perspective on what defines black theatre

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Paul Carter Harrison describes the Yoruban influences in August Wilson's play 'King Hedley II,' pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Paul Carter Harrison describes the Yoruban influences in August Wilson's play 'King Hedley II,' pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Paul Carter Harrison names important African American theatre figures

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Paul Carter Harrison offers examples of plays that define black theatre, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Paul Carter Harrison offers examples of plays that define black theatre, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about the lack of support for the African American theater community today

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about addressing the concerns of African American youth

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Paul Carter Harrison explains how the theater has the potential to create positive social change in the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Paul Carter Harrison recalls collaborating on the premiere production of 'The Trial of One Short-Sighted Black Woman vs. Mammy Louise and Safreeta Mae'

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Paul Carter Harrison elaborates on his preference for spare, open designs in theatrical productions

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Paul Carter Harrison describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Paul Carter Harrison reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Paul Carter Harrison reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Paul Carter Harrison talks about his daughter, wife, and brother-in-law

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Paul Carter Harrison describes how he wants to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Paul Carter Harrison narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

7$2

DATitle
Paul Carter Harrison shares a story about a youthful romance derailed by his lack of career plans
Paul Carter Harrison talks about being exposed to new ideas as a professor of theatre at Howard University in Washington, D.C.
Transcript
I remember, when I was nineteen years old and I was going out with a woman who had been married. And she was twenty-one, and she was now no longer married. She was back home--West Indian woman from Jamaica. And I was going out with this woman briefly 'cause I mean I met her, and after seeing her the second time, she said, you must come to my house and pick me up, up in Harlem [New York, New York]. And I get there. Her father sat me down. As soon as I get there, he says, "You sit down, sir, have a seat." And I sat down while waiting for her. And he came and said, "What's up? What are you studying in school [New York University, New York, New York]?" I said, "Liberal arts." He said, "Now what is that?" I said, "What, you know, it's liberal arts." He said, "Yeah, but what do you want to do?" I said, "I don't know." I mean, this man took me around the horn about how am I preparing a life, and I understood it after the fact. What he wants to know is, you're going to date my daughter, what are you doing with your life? So, second time, I went up to pick her up the following week, and he took me through the same drill. He wanted to know how was I preparing my life. And I could not tell him. He said, well, I mean, I mean after, and at the end of that, well, he didn't have to tell me anything else. I even told myself something. I knew I could not go out with this woman. I could not go out with her any longer 'cause I was not going to go through this drill. She was looking for--he was looking for a husband for her. She had just finished one relationship. She's twenty-one years old. He wanted her to have a husband. That was not going to be me, particularly, I was only nineteen years old. I mean, I'm just, you know, a kid. But the--but I understood it after, way after the fact what he was doing. First, it was a nuisance factor--this kind of interrogation. But you understood in terms of the, in the terms of the family values, particularly of these people from the Caribbean, and what they know. Their kind of--guarded sense of, you know, in this very protective sense, how to get their children involved in the United States and, you know, you just don't let them have any kind of random kind of contact with the world. You want to make sure you guide them a certain kind of way. I understood that way, way, much, much later on. It was much--it was just a nuisance factor for me at that time. And a very lovely girl. But I had to let it go. I could not respond to those questions. I had no idea what I was going to be doing.$Those forces lined themselves up in such a way that I get back into the United States, and I--then [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther] King [Jr.] is killed. I'm very, very moved by it and moved by the next day--the presence of the troops in the streets of Washington, D.C., the soldiers, and the fires that are still settling. And I, this is 1967, right, or '68 [1968] rather?$$Sixty-eight [1968], yeah.$$Sixty-eight [1968]. And then I realize this is happening. I meet--I go to, it's very strange. I go up to the, I get in a cab, I go up to the gate of Howard University [Washington, D.C.]. It's closed, locked down because of the riots. And I--the door, the man is meeting me outside, going to meet me outside, come to the gate, open up the gate. The man who comes and to meet me is a white man. He opens up the gate. He says, "You're [HistoryMaker] Paul Carter Harrison?" Yes. He lets me in and closes the gate. He--I follow him and he go inside, and we sit down in his office. It turns out he is not a white man, but he is a black man who is the chairman of the department, "Beanie" Butcher [James W. Butcher, Jr.] (laughter). Now, my first reaction is, I'm on this plantation, the gate opens up (laughter). I'm directed by a white guy who leads me into the office, and the irony is he's not a black guy--a white guy after all--but he's really a black guy who's the head of the--chair, he's the chairman of the theatre. And this guy induces me to come to Howard. And I said, "Absolutely, I'll come here," you know. And that was the beginning of my new transformation. I came to Howard. I encountered this incredible, vital, group of young people who were in the midst of the Black Arts Movement, a new consciousness. My students included, you know, Phylicia Rashad; her sister, Debbie [Allen]; Clinton Turner Davis, the director, who's now a major director. It included [HistoryMaker] Pearl Cleage who's a major writer. These are my students--they inspired me. I--they tell me I gave them some inspiration, but they were the ones who compelled me to stay and to look deeper. They, for example, Petronia Paley, an actress in New York [New York], she and her, her friend who's Linda Goss, who is now, who's the wife of Clay Goss, the playwright, who was one of my students--they're both my students.$$Yeah, she's a storyteller, yeah, storyteller, yeah.$$She's a storyteller. So Linda Goss and Petronia Paley used to come to my office once a week with new albums from John Coltrane (laughter). And they would just simply say, have you heard this, have you heard this, have you heard this? It was a kind of this thing they would to pull my head around a certain kind of way, you know (laughter). And that meant, it was, it was done like, "Oh, hello, how are you today, Mr. Harrison? Have you heard this?" Then I began to invite the local poets into the classroom with them, with them, and then began to and, at a certain moment, then I began to--of course, I was reading, introducing into my lectures, some of the African philosophy. So I said, the way to do this, to get this down properly, I need to just write a book. And that's when I began to draft and begin to the book, 'The Drama of Nomno,' which has become 'The Drama of Nommo,' [Paul Carter Harrison] N-O-M-N-O, M-M-O, which began to set the whole aesthetic approach to the new approaches to the aesthetics of African American theatre.