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Kofi Appenteng

Lawyer Kofi Appenteng was born on June 14, 1957 in Accra, Ghana to Felicia and Samuel Appenteng. He attended Gateway School and Aldenham School in England and later immigrated to the United States in 1977, where he attended Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. There, he was a member of the men’s soccer team and participated in track and field. Appenteng received his B.A. degree from Wesleyan University in 1981 and his J.D. degree from Columbia University School of Law in New York City in 1984.

After graduation, Appenteng was hired by the law firm of Webster & Sheffield as an associate. In 1991, he joined Thacher Proffitt & Wood LLP, where he specialized in merger and acquisitions, private placements, corporate governance, mortgage finance transactions, and not-for-profit law. Appenteng was promoted to partner in 1994, where he advised foreign and domestic individuals and companies on matters related to corporate governance, securities law compliance, acquisitions, corporate finance, regulatory compliance and crisis management. He then became CEO and director of Constant Capital Ghana Limited from 2008 to 2014. In 2014, Appenteng served as senior counsel at Dentons and became chair of the board of directors for the Ford Foundation. In 2016, he became president of the Africa-America Institute.

He served on Wesleyan University’s Board of Trustees from 1990 to 2006, and chaired the presidential search committee that recommended Michael S. Roth as the sixteenth president of Wesleyan University in 2007. He also served as non-executive director at Intravenous Infusions Limited and joined the board of directors of the Ford Foundation in 2007. He was later appointed to the board of directors at the International Center for Transitional Justice in 2015. He also served on the International Advisory Board of IE University, Spain and on the board of Instituto de Empresa Fund, Inc., Panbros Salt Industries Limited, the University of Cape Town Fund and the World Scout Fund.

Appenteng received the Baldwin Medal in 2007, the highest honor bestowed by the Wesleyan Alumni Association for service to the university and to society, and was inducted into the Wesleyan Athletics Hall of Fame in 2009. In 2013, Appenteng was named a “Great American Immigrant” by the Carnegie Corporation.

Kofi Appenteng was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 25, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.019

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/25/2019

Last Name

Appenteng

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

John Boakye

Occupation
Schools

The Gateway School

Little Hamden Manor Preparatory School

Aldenham School

Wesleyan University

Columbia Law School

First Name

Kofi

Birth City, State, Country

Accra

HM ID

APP01

Favorite Season

Fall

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean, Jamaica

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

6/14/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Ghana

Favorite Food

FuFu and Goat Soup

Short Description

Lawyer Kofi Appenteng (1957 - ) served as partner at Thacher Proffitt & Wood LLP, senior counsel at Dentons, chairman of the Ford Foundation’s board, and president of the Africa-America Institute.

Employment

Webster & Sheffield

Thatcher, Profitt & Wood LLP

Constant Capital Limited

Dentons

Africa-America Institute

Favorite Color

Blue

Wilfred D. Samuels

Distinguished professor Wilfred D. Samuels was born in 1947 in Puerto Limon, Costa Rica, to Lena and Noel Samuels. Samuels earned his B.A. degree in English and Black Studies at the University of California, Riverside. In 1974, he went on to earn his M.A. degree in American Studies and African American Studies from the University of Iowa. He continued his education by receiving his Ph.D. in American Studies and African American Studies.

In 1978, Samuels was hired at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colorado, where he served until 1985. Then, in 1985, Samuels served as an assistant professor at the University of Colorado and the Benjamin Banneker Honors College at Prairie View A&M in Texas. In 1987, Samuels joined the faculty of the University of Utah, where he is Associate Professor of English and Ethnic Studies, Director of the African American Studies Program, and Acting Coordinator of the Ethnic Studies Program.

In 1993, during the annual conference of the American Literature Association (ALA), Samuels founded the African American Literature and Culture Society (AALCS) in order to encourage the contextual research of African American Studies. The AALCS has presented several conferences including showcases introducing new poets and writers. Samuels has lectured in England, Africa, Japan and throughout Southeast Asia and has received many awards and recognitions including: the Ramona Cannon Award; the Students Choice Award and the University of Utah’s Distinguished Teaching Award.

Samuels passed away on February 3, 2020.

Wilfred D. Samuels was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 17, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.055

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/17/2008

Last Name

Samuels

Maker Category
Middle Name

D.

Organizations
Schools

Abraham Lincoln Elementary School

Washington STEAM Magnet Academy

John Muir High School

Pasadena City College

University of California, Riverside

University of Iowa

University of Pennsylvania

First Name

Wilfred

Birth City, State, Country

Puerto Limon

HM ID

SAM03

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Utah

Interview Description
Birth Date

2/7/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Salt Lake City

Country

Costa Rica

Death Date

2/3/2020

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive and african american studies professor Wilfred D. Samuels (1947 - 2020) founded the African American Literature and Culture Society (AALCS). Samuels was Associate Professor and Director of the African American Studies Program at the University of Utah. He lectured in England, Africa, Japan and throughout Southeast Asia.

Employment

University of Iowa

Coe College

Iowa Wesleyan College

University of Northern Iowa

University of Colorado Boulder

Prairie View A & M University

University of Utah

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Wilfred D. Samuels describes his elementary school experiences in Pasadena, California

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Wilfred D. Samuels recalls his early athletic interests

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Wilfred D. Samuels remembers his early education teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Wilfred D. Samuels describes his decision to attend Pasadena City College in Pasadena, California

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Wilfred D. Samuels recalls his professors at the University of California, Riverside

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Wilfred D. Samuels talks about the Black Arts Movement in Riverside, California

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Wilfred D. Samuels remembers early African American literature and publications

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Wilfred D. Samuels talks about California's Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Wilfred D. Samuels remembers the Afro Caribbean writers of the Harlem Renaissance

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Wilfred D. Samuels describes his relationship with Amy Jacques Garvey

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Wilfred D. Samuels recalls his dissertation at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Wilfred D. Samuels talks about Claude McKay's poem, 'If We Must Die'

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Wilfred D. Samuels describes the different interpretations of Claude McKay's 'If We Must Die'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Wilfred D. Samuels talks about his teaching career and mentors, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Wilfred D. Samuels talks about his teaching career and mentors, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Wilfred D. Samuels describes his recruitment to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Wilfred D. Samuels remembers Wallace Thurman

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Wilfred D. Samuels talks about Wallace Thurman's critique of the Harlem Renaissance

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Wilfred D. Samuels describes productions of Wallace Thurman's works

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Wilfred D. Samuels talks about his conference, Looking Back with Pleasure II: A Celebration

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Wilfred D. Samuels reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Wilfred D. Samuels describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Wilfred D. Samuels describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Wilfred D. Samuels talks about Claude McKay's poem, 'If We Must Die'
Wilfred D. Samuels remembers Wallace Thurman
Transcript
We should do this for whoever watches this. Tell the story of McKay's [Claude McKay] poem 'We Must Die' ['If We Must Die'].$$Oh, absolutely, absolutely. Again, this is one reason I want to make the argument that the West Indian voice was so very, very strong. As you know, following World War I [WWI], lynchings increased in, in the United States of America. And part of the reason for the increase was the arrogance, at least the perceived arrogance, of the returning black military men who had fought, you know, as the line goes, "To make the world safe for democracy." So they were gonna come back home and make certain that they were not denied the same privileges that they had fought for so. This didn't stand well with, as you know, some of, some of the Europeans. Right there in Chicago [Illinois], you are from, in 1919, you had the largest race riot when, when a black kid [Eugene Williams]--the, the beaches, as you know, was, were sep- segregated. And the story goes that a black kid dove off of a raft, and when he came up, he came up on the white side. And the whites on the, on the beach stoned him, and he died. That's how the, the 1919 riot in Chicago started. You know, by the time that news got back to the ghetto--and by the way, this is post-World War I, which means that the soldiers were not only coming back, they were trying to get those jobs that, you know, they had left behind or perhaps that they never even had. And they were now finding racism raising its, its ugly head, after they had fought to defend democracy. And they were not having it. As, as well as they also found that the, the, the dream of the urban North was now, as Langston Hughes would say, you know, having to be deferred ['Harlem']. You know, they couldn't get jobs. The housing was a problem. Education was a problem. So there was a lot of anger festering, you know, beneath the surface of all of these things. And so, when the, the young boy was killed, you know, it just all erupted. But it had all, already erupted in St. Louis [Missouri] and East St. Louis [Illinois] and the whole nine yards. And one of the ways, as you know, historically the whites were as, as--and let's just call it supremacists--tried to subjugate blacks was, was through lynching. So the story goes that McKay, who at the time had an apartment in like 135th [Street] and Lenox [Lenox Avenue; Malcolm X Boulevard], where the Schomburg [Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York, New York] now is, the Y, YMCA [Harlem YMCA, New York, New York], comes downstairs to get a coffee right there at the corner. And he sees the cover of The Crisis magazine, which is a picture of a lynching, a very, very famous picture of the, you know, the strange fruit, as Billie Holliday calls it in her song ['Strange Fruit']. And he is so angered. He is so moved that he goes right back to his apartment, and he writes this sonnet. "If we must die, let it not be like hogs," you know, hunted and, and, and killed. And then he ends the poem like that we shouldn't be like cowards; "You should not cowardly face the murderous crowd." I'm blocking on, on, on, on, on the words.$$Oh, "Like men we'll face the cowardly pack" (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) "Like men we'll face the cowardly pack / Pressed to the wall dying but fighting back." You know, I'm talking about powerful words. I'm talking about militancy, you know. I mean, even today, you know, when I read this, when I studied this, this poem, you know, my students, you know, you know, shrug, shrug backward with, you know, just disgust. You know, "He's saying kill people," he said. No, he's saying die with dignity, you know. If somebody's, you know--you're, you're, you don't, you're not protected against them. They're just taking you, lynchings, and you know, don't be a coward, you know, fight back, you know. If you're a human being and they're treating you less than a human being, then you know, where's your human dignity? You know, oh, "Oh, kinsmen! We must meet the common foe." And yeah--$$Though we're outnumbered--$$Let us far--let's--though far outnumbers, let us something or another.$$Let show us brave and--$$Show us brave, yes. I know his poem well, I used to. But then he--it becomes a sort of manifesto, that 'If We Must Die' poem. It's taken up by--of course, you know these are all young radical writers and you know, the whole nine yards. And this poem, which by the way was not published initially in a black journal. It was published in The Liberator, you know. And so it beca- it became a sort of like mantra for not only Locke [Alain LeRoy Locke], you know, the, the, the, the distinguished dean of humanities at Howard University [Washington, D.C.] who edited the, the, the, the volume of 'The New Negro' ['The New Negro: An Interpretation'], you know, but certain the younger people like Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, you know, Bruce Nugent [Richard Bruce Nugent], you know, all of these, all of these young radical voices, you know, saw in Claude McKay's poem a sort of statement about the direction of the New Negro.$Well, here in Salt Lake City, Utah, I had a big surprise when I read the material. You've hosted a number of conferences and, and gatherings of black (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh yes.$$--writers over the years.$$Oh yes.$$But, but one that really caught my eye was a conference on the works of Wallace Thurman [Looking Back with Pleasure II: A Celebration]--$$Yes.$$--who is actually famous for his, his poetry, his plays, his--$$His plays, his novels--$$--novels and--$$--'The Blacker the Berry' ['The Blacker the Berry: A Novel of Negro Life,' Wallace Thurman].$$Um-hm, 'Blacker the Berry' is the most (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah.$$--famous one. You're right.$$Yeah, 'Infants of the Spring' [Wallace Thurman], yeah. I mean this--he, this guy, had Broadway plays, as you know.$$Yeah, 'Harlem' [Wallace Thurman] was--$$Har- yeah, 'Harlem,' yeah.$$--reviewed by Hubert Harrison--$$Yes (laughter).$$--in the Negro World.$$Good for you.$$So--$$Yeah, good for you.$$--so we're, we're talking about a major black writer--$$Yeah.$$--who looked like our videographer [Matthew Hickey] (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) And he actually--$$Yeah.$$--worked for Garvey [Marcus Garvey] too.$$That's right.$$He did work for the Negro World. He worked for the Negro World.$$Well, most of the big writers ended up working for (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Work--yeah, sure.$$--for at least one part of their career as--in the beginning.$$Yeah, they, they moved on though. I mean they moved on. But, but the big secret that most people do not know is that Wallace Thurman was born right here in Salt Lake City, Utah.$$I know I'm flabbergasted, yeah. So, tell us about this and--$$(Laughter) Well, my understanding is that his parents--his grandparents came from the Midwest to settle here. They were--actually, this another migration pattern. They were moving from the Midwest to California and never got any further. His grandma, Ma Jackson [Thurman's maternal grandmother, Emma Jackson], never got any further than, than Utah. And then--$$This is like in the 1890s or something, right, we're talking about?$$It, it was in the 1890s. It was in the late--$$Yeah.$$--nineteenth century. I mean, Wallace Thurman graduated from West High [West High School, Salt Lake City, Utah], which is still the largest high school here, in about 1919, you know. But his mother [Beulah Thurman]--I think it's his--the, the woman that is most famous here is his maternal grandmother, Mother Jackson. But because--again, it's, it's a, it's a story almost like mine. Because, because of his mother's domestic situation, the grandmother, Ma Jackson, ended up raising Wallace Thurman as the boy. And my understanding is that they would move from Salt Lake City, Utah, to Boise, Idaho. But they settled, you know, permanently in Salt Lake City, which allowed him to go to high school, to work at the Hotel Utah [Joseph Smith Memorial Building, Salt Lake City, Utah], which is famous for not letting Marian Anderson come through the, the front door (laughter). Again, it's so funny. We can laugh about stuff now because we've got a black man running for president [HistoryMaker President Barack Obama]. But people don't understand what black people went through back in the days, man. And I think--I, I could be wrong on this--that it is a result of her denial, her being denied entrance to the u- Hotel Utah through the front gates, that Mrs. Roosevelt [Eleanor Roosevelt] had that major conferen- I mean concert in Washington [D.C.] where Marian Anderson went and sang. So, something good came out of it. But at any rate, we went to West, worked at the Hotel Utah, went to the University of Utah [Salt Lake City, Utah], you know, yeah.$$Okay. So he actually was a student at the University--$$He we- (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) of Utah--$$--he grew up here.$$--where you teach now?$$Yes.$$So he's a--$$That's the irony, you know. And he was a, a, a biology major. He was not a literary man--literature major. He was a biology major. And he left--Wallace Thurman was a very, very dark skinned man. And I could imagine that, particularly given the way blacks were perceived as not being worthy of the priesthood, particularly black men by the Mormon church [The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints], that his life must have been a living hell in, in many, many ways. And so he left the University of Utah and went to USC [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California], you know, in the early 1920s where he met Arna Bontemps, another major architect of the Black Arts Movement. They were both working in L.A. They were working for a black newspaper that's still around. And right now the name just went straight out of my head.$$In, in--$$In Los Angeles [California].$$Los Angeles (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) The Sentinel [Los Angeles Sentinel].$$Oh, the Sentinel, okay.$$Yeah, you know. And then the--$$So Bontemps and, and Thurman worked for the Sentinel?$$Ex- exactly. And, and they also worked--they first met at the post office [U.S. Post Office Department; U.S. Postal Service]. They worked at the post office in Los Angeles (laughter).$$That's where you find a lot of (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) For, for that--$$--black college graduates--$$Yeah.$$--and intellectuals--$$Yep.$$--the post office, right.$$Yeah, they were work--they--$$Yeah.$$Exactly right. Then they found their common interest and love for literature. And you know what? I don't want to, you know, misspeak, but I think they founded their first journal or magazine together there in Los Angeles. Then, of course, Harlem [New York, New York] caught fire. Bontemps went to Harlem, and Wallace Thurman followed, and the rest is history.

The Honorable Deval L. Patrick

Deval Patrick was born in Chicago, Illinois on July 31, 1956. His father, a musician, left the family while Patrick was young. Patrick was raised by his mother near the Robert Taylor Homes on Chicago's South Side. While in the eighth grade, Patrick was recruited into a program called A Better Chance, which provided scholarships to inner city students. After attending an elite private school, Milton Academy outside of Boston, Massachusetts, Patrick was accepted to Harvard University, where he earned his A.B. degree in English and American literature in 1978.

After graduating from Harvard, Patrick was awarded a Rockefeller Fellowship, where he worked for the United Nations, traveling and living in the Sudan. He returned to the United States in 1979, and enrolled in Harvard Law School, and earned his J.D. degree in 1982. After working as a clerk in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Los Angeles for a year, Patrick moved to New York City and joined the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. There, he met, and filed a lawsuit in a voting rights case against then Governor Bill Clinton He remained with the NAACP until 1986, when he joined the Boston law firm of Hill & Barlow, P.C. as a partner. He continued his civil rights work, and in 1994, President Clinton appointed Patrick to the position of assistant attorney general in charge of the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division. In this role, Patrick worked to ensure that federal laws banning discrimination were enforced. He also oversaw an investigation into a series of church burnings throughout the South.

In 1997, after three years with the Clinton Administration, Patrick returned to private practice with the Boston law firm of Day, Berry & Howard, where he focused his efforts on major commercial litigation and civil rights compliance issues. Patrick then joined Texaco in 1999 as vice president and general counsel, and in 2001, he became executive vice president, general counsel and secretary to the Coca-Cola Company, where he was responsible for the corporation's worldwide legal affairs. Patrick left Coca-Cola in December of 2004.

Patrick serves on the board of directors of Reebok International, Inc, Coca-Cola Enterprises, and A Better Chance, Inc. He is a trustee of the Ford Foundation, and sits on the board of overseers of Harvard University and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Patrick is also the recipient of numerous awards and seven honorary degrees.

He and his wife, Diane Beamus Patrick, have two children.

Accession Number

A2004.202

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/14/2004

Last Name

Patrick

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Schools

Du Sable Leadership Academy

Martha M. Ruggles Elementary School

Mary Church Terrell Elementary School

Milton Academy

Harvard University

Harvard Law School

First Name

Deval

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

PAT02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Berkshires, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

To Hew Out Of The Mountain Of Despair A Stone Of Hope.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/31/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Corporate general counsel and governor The Honorable Deval L. Patrick (1956 - ) was appointed by President Bill Clinton to be assistant attorney general in charge of the Civil Rights Division. Patrick has since served as general counsel to Texaco, as executive vice president, general counsel and secretary to The Coca-Cola Company, and as the 71st governor of the State of Massachusetts.

Employment

United States Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Legal Defense Fund

Hill & Barlow, P.C.

United States Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division

Day, Berry & Howard

Texaco

Coca-Cola Company

State of Massachusetts

Bain Capital

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating for The Honorable Deval L. Patrick's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his father's gift for listening

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about his grandfather's job at South Shore Bank in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about the apartments he lived in as a child in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his childhood neighborhood of Washington Park, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his experiences in elementary school in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the origin of his first name

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about his childhood interests and aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on his influences from his childhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about growing up near the Robert Taylor Homes in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls gang activity from his childhood in Washington Park, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls the effect of civil strife in the 1960s on his neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about why he chose to leave Chicago, Illinois for high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the history of Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about his scholarship and involvement with A Better Chance

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the process of adjusting to Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about the influence of his English teacher, A.O. Smith, at Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls returning to Chicago, Illinois while on breaks from boarding school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on the impact that attending Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts had on his life

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the educational standards of Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about how he came to attend Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls his experience attending Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about receiving a Rockefeller Fellowship to live in Sudan

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his experience working for a job training program in Sudan

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick remembers traveling in Egypt during his year abroad

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes applying to Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts while living in Sudan

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his experiences at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about his summer jobs in corporate law while attending Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his tenure as a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick explains his reasons for working at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his job as a clerk for Judge Stephen Reinhardt on United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on what he learned as a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls memorable cases from his tenure at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about joining the law firm Hill and Barlow in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his rise to partner at Hill and Barlow in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his responsibilities at Hill and Barlow in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about being considered for the position of United States attorney for Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls being nominated as United States assistant attorney general for civil rights

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls being confirmed as United States assistant attorney general in 1994

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his experiences as United States assistant attorney general in the Clinton administration

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls accompanying President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton to a commencement at Gallaudet University

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about advising President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton on the appointment of Justice Stephen Breyer

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes forming the National Church Arson Task Force

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his work advising on affirmative action as United States assistant attorney general

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls President Bill Clinton's speech on affirmative action at the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about the effects of serving as United States assistant attorney general on his personal life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his tenure working for Texaco

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his tenure as general counsel for The Coca-Cola Company

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on the responsibilities for African American leaders whose careers symbolize success and progress

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describe some of the challenges faced by The Coca-Cola Company

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about the duties of a general counsel at a major corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on the progress made by African Americans in the corporate realm

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

1$8

DATitle
The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes applying to Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts while living in Sudan
The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about advising President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton on the appointment of Justice Stephen Breyer
Transcript
You took this year off. You get back, right? And--$$I decided while I was over there that I wanted to go to law school.$$Okay.$$And in the true, sort of, you know, Harvard College [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts] keeping all your options open behavior, I had brought in my backpack one application to one law school (laughter). And when I knew that, that we were going out to western Sudan, and there would be no mail or phone service, I decided to, that night, the night before we left Khartoum [Sudan], to go out and fill out this application and send it in. So I went out behind this little hostel where I was staying, and I made a big--and there was no electricity--made a big mound of sand. And I took my fat flashlight and put that on top of the mound of, of sand so I would have, you know, light on my work surface, which was on the ground. And I filled out this application by hand. It was a mess. I'm (laughter) sure it was covered with bugs I swatted and all that. And then I gave it the next morning before we left to somebody who knew somebody who was going to London [England] where they would mail it, because the mail service thing was a little more reliable from London. And in fact, I mailed it to Jim Vorenberg [James Vorenberg], and I said, "If you think I should, then please submit this application." And when I got to Khartoum months later, and I collected all my mail from the poste restante, there was a telegram for me saying, and it was from my mother [Emily Wintersmith Patrick] actually saying congratulations, you've been admitted to Harvard Law School [Cambridge, Massachusetts].$The faculty's all lined up in the kitchen to process out to the graduation [at Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C.]. And the president [President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton] starts shaking hands, one at a time, every single faculty member's hand. Still don't know what I'm supposed to do, so the aide says, "Come stand down here," and she puts me down at the end of the receiving line. The president shakes the last hand, and then turns. And the aide says, "Mr. President, here's [HistoryMaker] Mr. [Deval L.] Patrick." And the president says, "Oh, Deval." He said, "I hoped you would be here." And then at just that moment somebody else says, "Right this way, Mr. President." They hold open the doors to the men's room. So he strolls, strides into the men's room. There are two Secret Service on the other side of the door. And just as the door is closing, he grabs the door, and he looks out at me, and says, (finger motions to come here). So in he goes and I go; it's just the two of us in the men's room. He's at the urinal. He starts talking to me, and he says, look. He said, "I've got this vacancy on the [U.S.] Supreme Court," he says, "and I've got to fill it." And I said, "Oh yeah, I've been reading about that." And he said "Well, I'm down to three finalists, but I'm really only focused on two of 'em. And I want to ask you," he said, "you know this guy, [Justice Stephen] Breyer, don't you?" And I said, "Oh yeah, I've known him for years. I've worked with him. I've appeared before him and so on." He said, "Well, what do you think? Would he do a good job?" And I said, "Mr. President, I think he'd be a fine, a fine justice. And I think, frankly, he'd be great on our stuff in the civil rights division because he's fair and because he's respectful of precedent." And I said, "And I'd be proud to say that publicly if that's what you need." I said, "But sir, if you're asking me, (laughter) I'd say you've already made up your mind." He said, "No, no, I've really gotta decide." So, he said, "But I'd heard you'd say good things about Breyer, but I'm struggling." And he began to talk about some of the others that he was thinking about, including about a judge from Arkansas, federal judge from Arkansas. And at that point, the valet had come in with his cap and his gown and was getting him together. And I said, "Well, Mr. President, I'll just give you some advice." I said, "If you do choose Judge Breyer, say to the press why you chose Judge Breyer, not why you didn't choose the other ones who are being speculated about. The press, the public doesn't need to know your whole reasoning. Just focus on him." He said, "Well, that's good advice." Of course, he didn't take it, but that's good advice. So off we go. He does the procession. He finishes the speech. We all pile back into the cars, get back to the White House [Washington, D.C.], and then I have to hustle off to the airport because I had something in Boston [Massachusetts] that night. And I'm coming from the airport through the tunnel, and the radio is on in the taxi. It's about five o'clock, and the, and the announcer says we interrupt the broadcast to go to the White House South Lawn for a special announcement. And the president says I'm pleased to announce the nomination, my intent to nominate Stephen Breyer to the Supreme Court. I thought, oh my goodness (laughter), this just happened. So, I had to get back to Washington [D.C.] that night because the next day, the next morning, I was going with the president to I think it was Indianapolis [Indiana]. So, I go out to Andrews [Air Force Base; Joint Base Andrews, Maryland], up to Air Force One. These are all first experiences for me. And Air Force One is a series of sort of living rooms. And I'm given a seat in one of these living rooms, and there are TV monitors all around the walls. And it's all broadcasting news about Stephen Breyer's nomination. The plane starts to move, which means the president gets on. You have to be on beforehand, and as soon as he's on it starts going. And he comes striding into this living room where I am. And of course, I'm the only one in my seatbelt with my tray table in its upright position, and my (laughter) seatbelt locked. Everybody else is walking around. The plane's moving. And he comes in, and he shakes my hand. And he points up at the monitor, and he says, "You see that, Deval?" He said, "You did that." And I thought, wow.