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Barry Williams

Barry Williams was born on July 21, 1944, and raised by his parents, Otis and Ilza Williams, in a racially diverse community in Mt. Vernon, New York. His parents, both college graduates, instilled strong values of education, hard work, and family in their three children. Williams attended Grimes Elementary School as a young child. He graduated from George Washington Junior High, and later went to high school at a small boarding school in New England.

In 1962, Williams entered Harvard University. While there, he was elected class marshall and played college basketball. Williams received his B.A. degree in 1966 from Harvard University. He then won a fellowship through Corning Glass that allowed him to travel around the world for fourteen months. Williams traveled through Europe, Latin America, and Africa. In 1968, Williams returned to Harvard to study law and business. In 1971, he received his J.D. degree and M.B.A. degrees jointly from Harvard Law School and Harvard Business School.

Upon graduating, Williams moved to San Francisco where he worked at the international management consulting firm of McKinsey and Company until 1979. Harvard University awarded Williams the Harvard Medal in 1979 for his outstanding service in business and the community, and at Harvard University. Between 1979 and 1986, Williams worked as managing principal at Bechtel Group. In 1987, he founded Williams Pacific Ventures, Inc., a real estate and private equity investment and consulting firm.

Since 1990, Williams has served on the board of directors of Pacific Gas and Electric Company. He has served on the board of PG&E Corporation since 1996, and is also a member of the board for CH2M HILL; Simpson Manufacturing Company; Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company; SLM (Sallie Mae) Corporation; and the RH Donnellet Corporation. He has taught classes in entrepreneurship at the graduate business school of the University of California, Berkeley. During his six year term on the National Park Foundation board, Williams co-founded the African American Experience Fund. The objective of the fund is to raise money to support the National Park Foundation’s African American parks and historic sites. He has also served as a U.S. delegate for the Conference on National Parks in Durbin, South Africa. In 2000, Williams became interim president and CEO of the American Management Association, the largest national provider of seminars, and a senior mediator for the Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services (JAMS).

Williams lives in the San Francisco Bay area.

Accession Number

A2005.240

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/11/2005

Last Name

Williams

Maker Category
Middle Name

Lawson

Schools

Harvard University

P.S. 68

Grimes School

Westminster School

Harvard Law School

First Name

Barry

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

WIL29

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

7/21/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Investment chief executive Barry Williams (1944 - ) is the founder of Williams Pacific Ventures, Inc., a real estate and private equity investment and consulting firm. He co-founded the African American Experience Fund for the National Park Foundation, and serves as a director of the PG&E Corporation.

Employment

McKinsey and Company

Bechtel

Williams Pacific Ventures

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Barry Williams' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Barry Williams lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Barry Williams describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Barry Williams describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Barry Williams describes his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Barry Williams talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Barry Williams describes what he knows about his ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Barry Williams remembers his childhood babysitter

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Barry Williams describes his childhood household

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Barry Williams talks about his aunts

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Barry Williams describes his brothers

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Barry Williams describes his family's emphasis on education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Barry Williams recalls his childhood neighborhood in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Barry Williams describes the sights of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Barry Williams describes his childhood education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Barry Williams recalls his middle school years

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Barry Williams describes significant teachers in his life

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Barry Williams remembers his childhood activities and aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Barry Williams recalls his experience of church

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Barry Williams talks about his values

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Barry Williams recalls games from his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Barry Williams remembers attending Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Barry Williams remembers his sophomore year at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Barry Williams recalls how the Civil Rights Movement influenced him

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Barry Williams describes his extracurricular activity at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Barry Williams recalls playing basketball against his friend Bill Bradley

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Barry Williams recalls influential figures at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Barry Williams recalls travelling the world for fourteen months

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Barry Williams recalls becoming interested in business at Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Barry Williams talks about his interest in China

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Barry Williams describes his job at McKinsey and Company

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Barry Williams describes working at Bechtel Group, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Barry Williams remembers a difficult period in his life

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Barry Williams describes Williams Pacific Ventures, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Barry Williams recalls a fire in Oakland, California

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Barry Williams remembers losing his home in a fire in Oakland

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Barry Williams describes where he lived after the Oakland fire

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Barry Williams talks about his businesses

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Barry Williams recalls working with Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Barry Williams describes his business interests and black entrepreneurship

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Barry Williams recalls serving as interim CEO of American Management Association

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Barry Williams remembers receiving a Harvard Medal

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Barry Williams describes his interest in reading and theater

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Barry Williams remembers joining the National Park Foundation board

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Barry Williams describes his work with the African American Experience Fund

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Barry Williams describes fundraising for the African American Experience Fund

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Barry Williams describes his goals

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Barry Williams describes his hobbies

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Barry Williams describes his reading list

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Barry Williams talks about traveling

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Barry Williams talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Barry Williams talks about his wife, Lalita Tademy

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Barry Williams recalls hosting an inaugural family reunion

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Barry Williams recalls dating his wife, Lalita Tademy

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Barry Williams describes his proposal to his wife, Lalita Tademy

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Barry Williams reflects upon the importance of history

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Barry Williams recalls being part of The Board at Bechtel Group, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Barry Williams recalls contributing to Winston Tubman's Liberian presidential campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Barry Williams talks about his hero, Nelson Mandela

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Barry Williams describes philanthropic work he intends to do

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Barry Williams describes his future plans

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Barry Williams reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Barry Williams describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Barry Williams reflects upon his values

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Barry Williams reflects upon his family

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Barry Williams describes his hopes for his children

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Barry Williams describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Barry Williams narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Barry Williams narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Barry Williams narrates his photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

4$10

DATitle
Barry Williams recalls working with Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services
Barry Williams describes his work with the African American Experience Fund
Transcript
I found it very interesting: you are a senior mediator with JAMS.$$I spent about seven or eight years with JAMS.$$Could you first tell us what JAMS is (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) JAMS stand for Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services. So an alternative to the court system is to take something to mediation slash arbitration and that's where you voluntarily go and try and seek a solution amongst the parties. Now there is a technical difference between mediation and arbitration. Mediation is where the mediator tries to get you together but he can't force a decision. Arbitration is where the judge comes to a decision which you have to abide by. But again I have this dual education, law and business, and I've always had this sense that I want to do something with my law. I spent three years and paid a lot of money to go to law school [Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts] and a member of the bar and I had this theory that if the goal of the process of mediation or arbitration is to settle. I thought a lot of times it's probably, you're settling on a business basis, you're making business decisions on whether you want to settle now or pursue the case. So I approached what is--what was and what is the most outstanding mediation arbitration firm JAMS and said, "I'd like to be a mediator. I'm not a retired judge," that's the J in JAMS, "but I'd like to do some joint mediations and I'd like to really see if I could help settle cases by identifying the business considerations and how they interface with a solution." So I did that for many years jointly with a very good friend of mine and significant person at JAMS, Judge Danny Weinstein [Daniel Weinstein], and Danny was wonderful because the first couple of days he said, "This is a friend of mine who is sitting in," and then I was his assistant and then I was his co mediator (laughter) and Danny gave me all the opportunity in the world. I developed a specialty of complex business litigation where multi parties, multi issues and the area I very much liked was the environmental area and I eventually became a trustee or the trustee of an environmental site where I was not the mediator, I was in charge of cleaning up the site. I had the litigation, the insurance, the technical side and what have you. So for those reasons I had to leave JAMS because I was full time on a site. But I came across a lot of interesting cases when I was at JAMS. One of the cases [Pigford v. Glickman] that I spent a lot of time, more than a year on, was the settlement with the federal loan home board [Farmers Home Administration] and the black farmers of the South where the black farmers had won a class action showing discrimination for years within this government agency in dispensing of loan funds, and so then we had to divvy up the money that had been put together as damages. And we adjudicated many, many cases, and I did a lot of the individual cases, but we had many people doing that. The thought was that there might be about twelve thousand black farmers. I think we adjudicated more than twenty-eight thousand cases and there was a recent case saying that there were plenty more black farmers who either didn't have legal representation or what have you. So we had many people adjudicating these suits. And so I was with a panel of three other people: a former California state supreme court [Supreme Court of California] justice; a law professor; and the dean of a local law school. And we tried to put together a quality control program so that there was some consistency in the rendering of decisions. But I'm very proud of that case, and the opportunity through JAMS to work on a case like that.$And you were telling us about the National Park--$$Well, I fell in love with the National Park Foundation. The National Park Foundation is a federally chartered foundation. It's the only federally chartered foundation in that space which raises money, private money, for the national parks and over the last couple of years we've been averaging raising $50 million a year for the National Park. This is very important because the government principally is the principal source of money for our national parks. But money tends to go to maintenance and capital projects, not to education, not to outreach, and one of our goals is to make sure there's lots of interpretive material so parks are not only where you go see a bear. You know, we have this wonderful collection of American history in our parks. They are an educational institution but you need the interpretive material to go with, and then you need the outreach programs to make sure kids and diverse people come to our parks. Well, I happen to be in a meeting where we were putting together a program to fund the Civil War sites, and between the state parks and the national parks we've got about 80 percent of the Civil War embodied in our parks. I thought it was a great project, but it's not what I came to spend three days to--it's not my principal cause. Well, interesting enough a young black woman came up to me her name is Falona Heidelberg. I remember that 'cause she had called me and I had meant to answer the call but when you get a call from somebody named Falona Heidelberg you wouldn't suspect she was a young black woman who really had something she wanted to talk to you about. She asked me to make a long story short how I felt about the conversation 'cause she said there were seventeen national parks which principally deal with African American themes and because they are small parks, new parks, because they don't have bears and wolves they're not the attraction, they don't get the funding. So we had just allocated a couple of hundred thousand dollars for Civil War, I went back in there and said, "Well how about a program for these seventeen parks?" And she raised her hand and said, "I'd like to work with Director Williams [HistoryMaker Barry Williams] on this," and we looked at each and said, "We expect the same allocation for the national parks" and the group said yes. We started the African American Experience Fund. Our goal is to raise money for those seventeen national parks and historic sites, eighteen if you include the Underground Railroad because quite frankly I couldn't name them all, they're not household names. You would know about the Martin Luther King center [Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site, Atlanta, Georgia]. You might know about the Tuskegee Airmen site [Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, Tuskegee, Alabama], you wouldn't know about Nicodemus [Nicodemus National Historic Site, Nicodemus, Kansas], you wouldn't know about Cane River [Cane River Creole National Historical Park, Natchitoches, Louisiana], you wouldn't know about Maggie Walker [Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site, Richmond, Virginia], you wouldn't know about Frederick Douglass site [Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, Washington, D.C.]. Frederick Douglass is my favorite site.$$Why?$$A black man who went to the White House [Washington, D.C.] in the early 1920s who had a ten thousand volume book collection and a bottle of 1890 Chateau Montagne wine in his house and had a mansion in Anacostia Washington, D.C. which is a slum now as people call it that's where his mansion was. And this has to be reserved, and one of goals is to get the books out of storage into a working collection. But there are lots of these stories that we need to tell African Americans, that we need to tell Americans, that we need to tell children. And one of the interesting discussions I've had was--I can't even remember the name of the picture, but I've always been impressed with Jewish people and how they tell their story and I said, "What's the difference between the Jewish experience and the African American experience?" I don't know if these are the principal differences but the differences that resonated with me is that when you look at the Jewish story and how they've told the story it's not only a story of survival, it's a story of triumph. And I believe if we characterized what we've done, which is an equal story not just of survival but of triumph, it would mean a lot. The other thing Jewish people do is they teach their kids and so that's my focus in this African American Experience Fund to teach the kids.

Glennette Tilley Turner

Educator and historical researcher Glennette Tilley Turner was born November 23, 1933 in Raleigh, North Carolina. Her mother, Phyllis, was a teacher, and her father, John, was the first executive director of the SCLC. As a child, Turner moved several times with her family, first to Florida, and then to Illinois. After graduating from high school, she attended Lake Forest College, earning her B.A. in 1955, and she later returned to school at Goddard College to earn her master’s degree in 1977.

After earning her bachelor’s degree, Turner first went to work in advertising, but made the switch to education in 1962. That year, she was hired by the Chicago public school system, and she remained there for four years. In 1966, Turner went to work for the Maywood-Melrose Park public schools, and in 1968, she began teaching in the Wheaton-Warrenville public schools. She remained there for the next twenty years. Today, Turner supervises student teachers at National-Louis University.

In addition to her work as a teacher, Turner is a historian, and has focused much of her research efforts on the Underground Railroad. Her first book, The Underground Railroad in DuPage County, Illinois, was published in 1978, and since then she has continued to write and conduct research. Most recently, she has published The Underground Railroad in Illinois. Turner has also written collections of biographies of notable African Americans, and she serves as an advisor to the National Park Service, where she helps plan programs for the national historic Underground Railroad trail.

Turner lectures widely on the history of the Underground Railroad, and she has been honored numerous times both as an educator and historian. She is the recipient of the Studs Terkel Humanities Award, the Alice Browning Award from the International Black Writers Conference, and she is a member of numerous historical organizations.

Turner and her husband have two grown children. They reside in Illinois.

Glennette TIlly Turner was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 12, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.125

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/12/2004

Last Name

Turner

Maker Category
Middle Name

Tilley

Schools

West Aurora High School

Lake Forest College

Excelsior Elementary

Goddard College

Crosby-Garfield School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Days, weekends

First Name

Glennette

Birth City, State, Country

Raleigh

HM ID

TUR02

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $500 - $1,000

Favorite Season

Fall

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Underground Railroad Locations

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/23/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lamb Chops

Short Description

Elementary school teacher and historian Glennette Tilley Turner (1933 - ) taught in Wheaton-Warrenville Public Schools for twenty years. Turner has also served as a supervisor for student teachers at National-Louis University, and is a published historian, who focused much of her research efforts on the Underground Railroad.

Employment

Chicago Public Schools

Maywood-Melrose Park Public Schools

Wheaton-Warrenville Public Schools

National-Louis University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:1764,33:2100,38:9828,144:26355,327:27048,338:27510,346:64514,919:77568,1154:78576,1164:78936,1169:87432,1353:88368,1368:98490,1477:100218,1504:100506,1509:101730,1532:102018,1537:102882,1556:111274,1620:111578,1625:114466,1670:116062,1687:118874,1733:120774,1758:121154,1764:122750,1787:123282,1796:123586,1801:133576,1899:133844,1904:134246,1913:134715,1922:137931,2003:143224,2124:145301,2165:149524,2174:153980,2243$0,0:288,4:1536,71:2496,94:3648,164:13536,290:14496,305:41950,603:50950,784:51670,793:52030,798:52480,804:53380,817:55810,860:78330,1176:81850,1241:88002,1298:96865,1409:97197,1414:100932,1471:108740,1526:111115,1561:117480,1652:118145,1671:119490,1687:126497,1852:127806,1873:128345,1886:128730,1892:129269,1901:136640,1995:137080,2001:145968,2225:158424,2371:158732,2376:160426,2411:184900,2804
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Glennette Tilley Turner's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Glennette Tilley Turner lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Glennette Tilley Turner talks about her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her maternal ancestors' experiences in Holt County, Nebraska

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Glennette Tilley Turner explains how her maternal great-grandfather abandoned his family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Glennette Tilley Turner shares stories from her mother's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her mother's experiences growing up in Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her mother's role model Colonel Otis B. Duncan

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes one of her mother's experiences with racism growing up in Springfield, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her mother's decision to attend college and how her parents met in North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Glennette Tilley Turner talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes a paternal great uncle's attempt to be seated in the U.S. Congress in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her paternal uncle's run for reelection in the North Carolina state legislature

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her father and grandfather's skill at accounting

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes Robert Glenn's enslavement

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes Robert Glenn's reunion with his family and name change

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her father's background

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her father's familiarity with Frederic H. Hammurabi Robb

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Glennette Tilley Turner talks about Frederic H. Hammurabi Robb

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her father's activities at the University of Chicago in the late-1920s

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her earliest childhood memories of Raleigh, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Raleigh, North Carolina, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Raleigh, North Carolina, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Glennette Tilley Turner recalls visiting family in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Glennette Tilley Turner remembers her close friend and tattling on a classmate at Crosby-Garfield School in Raleigh, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Glennette Tilley Turner recalls moving to St. Augustine, Florida and listening to her father's stories

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her father's relationships with African American academics

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her father's involvement in the Voting Rights Campaign in Baltimore, Maryland in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Glennette Tilley Turner explains how her father was invited by Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to lead the Southern Christian Leadership Conference

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her father's familiarity with notable African American ministers

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her maternal grandmother's pull toy invention

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Glennette Tilley Turner lists the schools she attended

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes moving to Aurora, Illinois for high school

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her experiences living with an elderly couple in Aurora, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Glennette Turner describes writing experiences at West Aurora High School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her social life during high school

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her graduation from West Aurora High School in 1951

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her teachers at West Aurora High School

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Glennette Tilley Turner explains why she decided not to attend Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her experiences at Lake Forest College in Lake Forest, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes entering and winning a nationwide poetry competition

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes developing her interest in teaching

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Glennette Tilley Turner recalls writing advertising copy in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes attending school in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Glennette Tilley Turner lists the schools in which she taught in Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her initial interest in researching the Underground Railroad

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes pursuing her master's degree through Goddard College's external degree program

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Glennette Tilley Turner explains how she published her first children's book 'Surprise for Mrs. Burns'

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Glennette Tilley Turner recalls self-publishing her booklet 'The Underground Railroad in DuPage County, Illinois'

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes the history of the Underground Railroad in DuPage County and Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes abolitionists and freedom seekers of the Underground Railroad in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes the history of Quinn Chapel AME Church in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes the history of Quinn Chapel AME Church in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes Richard and George DeBaptiste

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes 'Running for Our Lives'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes 'The Underground Railroad in Illinois'

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Glennette Tilley Turner considers the tradition of self-publishing for African American authors

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes being chosen to serve on the Underground Railroad Advisory Committee

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Glennette Tilley Turner reflects upon important events in the history of the anti-slavery movement

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Glennette Tilley Turner reflects upon the lack of information about radical white abolitionists and politicians

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes the importance of sharing stories about the Underground Railroad

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her current work

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes interviewing Harriet Tubman's great-niece

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes her parents' support for her work and her father's work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Glennette Tilley Turner reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Glennette Tilley Turner reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Glennette Tilley Turner describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Glennette Tilley Turner narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$6

DAStory

12$2

DATitle
Glennette Tilley Turner describes a paternal great uncle's attempt to be seated in the U.S. Congress in Washington, D.C.
Glennette Tilley Turner describes 'Running for Our Lives'
Transcript
One of the stories--well like so many black communities, they formed a church and one of the stories my father [John Lee Tilley] told was of an uncle who was a minster, Hugh [Granville] Tilley, who served in the North Carolina legislature [North Carolina General Assembly]. And some of the family stories say that he also was elected to come to Washington [D.C.], but it was really at that point that the--Reconstruction was ending. And as I tried to do research on him, I wasn't able to find a record of him having been seated in Washington, but in a Washington City directory, I found him listed as a laborer. So evidently he remained in Washington, I don't know if to save face you know if he just sort of stayed gone for the length of time he would've been serving (laughter) and then sort of went back home, or if he, you know, was hopeful that he would be eventually be seated. And just wanted to you know be there in town and be available, but later he went back and was quite (simultaneous)--$$So, so he thought he was gonna serve in the legislature?$$Yeah, he was, he came to Washington (simultaneous)--$$I mean in [U.S.] Congress.$$Yeah in congress, U.S. Congress and he brought his family (simultaneous)--$$When he got there and (simultaneous)--$$Evidently he was not seated. I haven't been able to find documents you know with any like explanation of that. But he left North Carolina thinking he was going to be seated, and yet, as I look in those records of black congressmen, he--his name doesn't appear, but it does appear in the city directory. So I've just tried to connect the dots, but--but he went back and evidently enjoyed quite a, you know successful later career as, as a minister. One of my father's sisters remembers how he would sometimes travel--well what was long distances then in, you know, a carriage and that where he would let go one day and then speak and come back you know the next day. Which she would sometimes get to go with him and she talked about the foot heater, you know, that they had in the carriage, how they keep their feet warm. And how, you know, they would stay with families and, you know, and just be treated, well not royally but, you know, people would bring out the best food.$Now when did (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Dedication.$$Speaking of Detroit [Michigan] and Chicago [Illinois], now when did--was it after the Fugitive Slave Law that what is now the trail, which is now I-94 [Interstate 94] become like this Underground Railroad highway, sort of, with--$$Well it really that road begins and right, it's called Milan [Ohio], I'm not--it's, it's spelled M-I-L-A-N, but I think, I'm not sure there's a pronunciation Milan or someway, it's an old Indian [Native American] trail going to Detroit. You know that was later paved over and became highway, so you know to give that historical perspective. But it was a, a route--in one of the books I did, 'Running for Our Lives' [Glennette Tilley Turner], the characters in the book escape from slavery in Missouri with their parents, the kids in the book. And they have all these experiences of you know getting across Missouri and hiding in a cave and crossing the river and all. And then there was a white lumberyard owner named Van Duren [ph.] in Quincy [Illinois], in Quincy. But I knew if it was gonna be a children's book, I had to get the parents out of the picture you know and let the focus shift to the kids. So the abolitionists in Quincy put the parents on a train, a boxcar with the thought they'll be reunited in Detroit. And then the kids make their way through Illinois, but by the time they, well they visit John Jones and he's--has a visit from Allan Pinkerton who was also a Chicago area abolitionist. But they, then John Jones after the kids have wintered over to Allan Pinkerton's house in Dundee [Illinois], they take a train, well the Michigan Central [Railroad] really. But by that time I have them have all these harrowing escapes as they came to Illinois so and by that time a little boy has learned to read. So he looks at a crack in the boxcar and reads the names of all these towns in Michigan you know as they pass through so the reader you know knows that they've passed these towns along that same route leading to Detroit. And then in Detroit they're met by, I think they're met by George DeBaptiste and then taken to Second Baptist [Church, Detroit, Michigan] where they meet William Lambert. And--it's been so long since I you know did the book (laughter) I had to stop and think on some of it.$$Well, that's a wonderful kind of story. There's so much history in the Midwest.$$Um-hm and it's been overlooked.$$Heroic history, too, of you know there's a Crosswhite Affair in Marshall, Michigan that accumulated and rose up against slave catchers (simultaneous)--$$That's right and they branded with an SS on it.$$Yeah, the man who--with the branded hand, I mean all these, all these stories. Cassopolis, Michigan, Bear Cave, I was talking about the other day, and--$$Um-hm, um-hm.