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Lydia Mallett

Corporate executive Lydia G. Mallett was born on August 22, 1954 in Detroit, Michigan to Conrad Mallett Sr. and Claudia Mallett. In 1976, Mallett received her B.A. degree in psychology from Michigan State University. She went on to receive her M.A. degree in labor and industrial relations in 1979 and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in social psychology in 1981, all from Michigan State University.

After serving as an assistant professor at the University of Michigan-Flint School of Management, Mallett moved to Chicago, Illinois to join James H. Lowry Associates as a consultant. She later served as director of human resources advisory at Coopers & Lybrand. Mallett went on to serve as vice president/chief diversity officer at General Mills, where she designed and implemented a co-mentoring strategy for women and people of color. In 1999, she served as director of human resources for the Snacks Unlimited division of General Mills. In 2004, Mallett was hired by Tyco International as vice president of staffing and vice president of diversity and inclusion. Eight years later, she joined DuPont as director of global talent acquisition, chief diversity officer, and employee engagement leader. In 2018, she attended Harvard Business School’s Executive Education program, “Women on Boards: Succeeding as a Corporate Director.” The same year, Mallett served as managing director of Mallett Consulting & Associates in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Mallett is a board member of the Feminist Press and a member of the American Psychological Association. Mallett served as chair of the Executive Leadership Council’s governance committee and as chair of the Conference Board’s Council on Global Diversity. She was elected president of the Minnesota Women’s Campaign Fund and served as the White House appointment for the National Women’s Business Council. Mallett served as president of the Chicago chapter of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women before being elected national president in 1997. In 2011 and 2018, she was listed as a Top Executive in Corporate Diversity by Black Enterprise.

Mallett lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania with her partner Stanley White. She has one daughter, Noel.

Lydia Mallett was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 13, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.069

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/13/2019

Last Name

Mallett

Maker Category
Middle Name

Gwendolyn

Occupation
Schools

Michigan State University

Saint Gregory School

First Name

Lydia

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

MAL11

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Do you want to be heard, or do you want to have your say?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

8/22/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

USA

Favorite Food

King Crab Legs

Short Description

Corporate executive Lydia G. Mallett (1954- ) served in executive positions at General Mills, Tyco International, and DuPont.

Employment

The University of Michigan-Flint

James H. Lowry Associates

Coopers & Lybrand

General Mills

General Mills, Snacks Unlimited Division

Tyco International, Inc.

E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Mallett Consulting & Associates

Wayne County Government

Favorite Color

Red

Hattie B. Dorsey

Founder and former president of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership (ANDP), Hattie Beleatha Dorsey was born the eldest of eleven children on May 31, 1939 in Teachey, North Carolina. When Dorsey was an adolescent, her family moved to New York City where she attended Charles Evan Hughes High School. As a high school student, Dorsey took courses in fashion design and interior design. The Dorsey Family moved to Atlanta where she attended David T. Howard High School. Her father was the residing pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Atlanta and chairman of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s Operation Bread Basket. She is a first cousin to the father of gospel music great Thomas A. Dorsey.

After attending Spelman College, Dorsey transferred to Clark Atlanta University. In 1964, Dorsey graduated from Clark Atlanta University with her B.S. degree in secretarial science. Dorsey performed secretarial work for various companies, until she became an administrative assistant for the National Urban League. Dorsey continued her civil rights work by working on the NAACP’s legal defense team throughout the 1970s and 1980s, helping to bring landmark legal suits against those who practiced housing discrimination. Dorsey worked for Stanford Mid-Peninsula Urban Coalition on Affordable Housing in San Francisco, California before becoming director of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership.

As president of ANDP, Dorsey worked to solidify Metro Atlanta neighborhoods and community development corporations. Under Dorsey’s leadership, issues related to public housing became a regional priority. A larger part of Dorsey’s success as ANDP’s president resided in her ability to develop financial resources from all sectors – private, public and philanthropic. In 1995, ANDP launched a $16 million capital campaign to accelerate housing construction and innovation in preparation for the Olympic Games.

Dorsey has received many awards and honors including the 2005 Spelman College Local Community Service Award; Atlanta Woman magazine’s nominee for Woman of the Year, Georgia Trend magazine’s “2004 Notable Georgians”, 2001 Honoree of Women Looking Ahead; 2003 Inductee into the Atlanta Business League’s Women Hall of Fame, The Georgia Black Caucus Grace Towns Hamilton Leadership Award, and the Atlanta Regional Commission’s Golden Glasses Award.

Dorsey and her daughter, Victoria “Michelle,” live in Atlanta.

Dorsey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 13, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.259

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

9/13/2007

Last Name

Dorsey

Maker Category
Middle Name

B.

Schools

Ps 26 Jesse Owens School

Bayard Rustin Education Complex

David T. Howard High School

Charity Middle

Spelman College

Clark Atlanta University

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Hattie

Birth City, State, Country

Teachey

HM ID

DOR05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

5/31/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Soul Food

Short Description

Civil rights activist and community development executive Hattie B. Dorsey (1939 - ) is the former president of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership. As president, she worked to solidify Metro Atlanta neighborhoods and community development corporations.

Employment

U.S. Department of the Interior

U.S. Congress

National Urban League

Model Cities

City of Atlanta

Cannonlene Company

Stanford Mid-Peninsula Urban Coalition

Edna McConnell Clark Foundation

Voter Education Project

Atlanta Economic Development Corporation

Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership

Favorite Color

Blue, Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529257">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hattie B. Dorsey's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529258">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529259">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her mother's upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529260">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529261">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls the sights, sounds, and smells of visiting her family in rural North Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529262">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her white heritage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529263">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her mother's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529264">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her father, Rev. Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529265">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529266">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529267">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about music in her family, and her first cousin once-removed, gospel singer Thomas A. Dorsey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529268">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her father, the Reverend Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529269">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls being hospitalized at the Roslyn, New York Home for Cardiac Children from 1949 to 1951</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529270">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her childhood illness and the treatment she received at the Roslyn, New York Home for Cardiac Children</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529271">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls her family and home life in 1940s Brooklyn, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529272">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey lists her ten siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529273">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her neighborhood growing up in Brooklyn, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529274">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her elementary school years at P.S. 26 in Brooklyn, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529275">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes attending P.S. 26 in Brooklyn, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529276">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls her mother's strict discipline</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529277">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her classes at P.S. 26 in Brooklyn, New York, and her interest in sewing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529278">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her favorite books as a child, and her decision to attend Straubenmuller Textile High School (later Bayard Rustin Educational Complex)…

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529279">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about moving from Brooklyn, New York to Teachey, North Carolina at age fifteen</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529280">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes attending Charity High School in Rose Hill, North Carolina until her father, the Reverend E.H. Dorsey, moved the family to Atlanta,…

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529281">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about moving to Atlanta, Georgia and attending David T. Howard High School there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529282">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls her friends and extracurricular interests at David T. Howard High School in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529283">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey recounts her decision to attend Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, then to transfer to Clark College (now Clark-Atlanta University)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529284">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes attending Clark College (now Clark Atlanta University) in Atlanta, Georgia from 1958 to 1962</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529285">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey explains her father, the Reverend Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey's role in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529286">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes the Atlanta, Georgia home of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529287">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about the Atlanta, Georgia chapter of Operation Breadbasket, headed by her father, the Reverend Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529288">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about marrying her first husband, Samuel Thomas, and moving to Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529289">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes her first job as an administrative assistant at the U.S. Department of the Interior</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529290">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about working for Representative Charles L. Weltner (D-Georgia)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529291">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes working for the National Urban League in Washington, D.C. with HistoryMakers Sterling Tucker and John E. Jacob</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529292">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about returning to Atlanta, Georgia after her 1968 divorce, working for the federal Model Cities Program and then for Mayor Ivan Allen</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529293">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes working for Atlanta, Georgia mayor Ivan Allen after the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1968 assassination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529294">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about moving to Oakland, California in 1971 to work for the Urban League, then the Stanford, California Urban Coalition; and marrying James…

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529295">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes working for the Stanford, California Urban Coalition</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529296">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey recounts her fundraising work as the Stanford, California Urban Coalition's Director of Resource Development</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529297">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes the Stanford, California Urban Coalition's education and training programs, and its independence from federal funding</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529298">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about working for the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation in New York City and adopting her daughter Michelle</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529299">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her friendships with HistoryMakers Vernon E. Jordan, Jr., Julian Bond, and Xernona Clayton; and Atlanta, Georgia mayor Maynard Jackson<…

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529300">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hattie B. Dorsey describes working at the Atlanta Economic Development Corporation in Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529301">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about founding the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership in Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529302">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hattie B. Dorsey lists some of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership's projects</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529303">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hattie B. Dorsey recalls the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, and the role of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529304">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hattie B. Dorsey explains the benefits of mixed-income urban communities, and the need for affordable housing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529305">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hattie B. Dorsey reflects upon the communities her Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership has strengthened, and the challenges they face</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529306">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Hattie B. Dorsey reflects upon her legacy, and what she would like to tell future generations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529307">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Hattie B. Dorsey talks about her involvement with 100 Black Women in America and her hopes for HistoryMaker Barack Obama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/529308">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Hattie B. Dorsey narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Hattie B. Dorsey explains her father, the Reverend Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey's role in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia
Hattie B. Dorsey talks about founding the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership in Georgia
Transcript
Now the Civil Rights Movement was heating up during this time. Were you involved in any of the activities as a student?$$Observation for the most part, my father [Edward Henry "E.H." Dorsey] was very involved. He was friends with the King family. In fact if you ever passed the Historic Center, you would see the house with the family, you know was where the Kings grew up and I use to have dinner in that house, so you know and I taught Sunday school at Ebenezer [Baptist Church, Atlanta, Georgia] for Mrs. King.$$Okay well tell me about some of those times.$$Daddy was like involved in the Civil Rights Movement, he was the first Chair of Operation Breadbasket which was the predecessor to [HM Jesse L. Jackson's] Operation PUSH and all, but he and, and because Daddy King [the Reverend Martin Luther King, Sr.] was instrumental in bringing him back, my father mentored A.D. [Alfred Daniel Williams King] 'cause he was at Morehouse [College, Atlanta, Georgia] and Daddy was taking some refresher courses at Morehouse so Cameron Alexander, Reverend A.D. King and Carl Moncrieff were young ministers going to school there. So Daddy mentored that, Daddy was a, known as one of the few people that could manage A.D. because A.D. had a, a drinking problem and so Daddy was like the person that could, you know if A.D. was acting up or whatever, Daddy was sent to help him. He was very instrumental in, in like starting up Head Start programs and stuff here in Atlanta. He believed in buying property to house members of his congregation who you know couldn't afford to live in other places. So Daddy was, as, as I look back at some of my, the stuff that sort of changed my way of thinking, was that daddy had a profound impact without knowing it on what I do today or what I did in my profession. I would have to go to church, you know, pastor's daughter, you had to go to church. I went to church and I would put on big hats and sit in the back, you know getting over Saturday night (laughter). So but I was absorbing what was happening in high school you know, and I don't know but I was absorbing what was happening in high school and not in high school but in, what my father was doing during Civil Rights, the marches, the saying to your congregation, "You're gonna wear last Easter's hats 'cause we're gonna boycott Richard's Department Store. We can't eat at their counters, we can't shop. We can't try on clothes in their dressing rooms, we can't buy". So he basically stopped a whole lot of stuff you know with reference to his congregation.$All right and you began that organization [the AEDC Neighborhood Development Department] in what year, '91 [1991]?$$That operated under the umbrella of AEDC [Atlanta Economic Development Corporation], the Neighborhood Development [Department]. Maynard Jackson came on board as the mayor again and he felt AEDC should be a pure economic arm and housing had no role there. Now we argued about housing being a part of the economic drivers, as we all see the economy is in a mess because of our housing issues, but at any rate, we argued about that, and so I had a grant from the Ford Foundation to begin the community development corporation movement in Atlanta [Georgia]. So I went to them, I said what do you think about my spinning out? And so we spun out and formed the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership. The best move possible, 'cause AEDC was quasi-public and had public funds, and never had done any fundraising until I came on board, and so with me having worked for a foundation, having worked with the private sector, raising money from a corporate network, knew how to raise money, and so nobody believed that this could happen. So I formed ANDP, and I think in their minds they probably said, "Whew, that'll be gone in a year you know. She can't survive, they're not gonna respond". But it was untapped resources, and so again you remember the lessons learned, the storehouse, pulled that forward and I started a capital campaign just like you would if you were building you know a monument or whatever. I started a formal campaign, and raised, and I would say from that point to this almost a hundred million dollars in investment loans and grants over the period of time that I headed up ANDP.$$And what period of time was that?$$We formed it in 1991, that was the birth date even though the activities before--was before that until I retired last year in 2006 at the end of the year.

Jewell Jackson McCabe

Founder of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Jewell Jackson McCabe was born on August 2, 1945, in Washington, D.C., to broadcasting pioneer Harold “Hal” Jackson and businesswoman, Julia O. Hawkins. McCabe started dancing at three and graduated from the New York High School of Performing Arts as a dance major in 1963. McCabe attended Bard College until 1964, when she left after her marriage to Frederick Ward, an advertising copywriter; they divorced in 1967. McCabe later married Eugene McCabe, then-president of North General Hospital in New York City; though the couple divorced in 1992, McCabe retained her former last name for professional purposes.

Active in the community, McCabe spent summers in the late 1960s teaching dance to at-risk teens in Harlem. McCabe began her institutional career when she took a receptionist’s job with the city in 1969. After swift and repeated promotions, McCabe was named Director of Public Affairs at the New York Urban Coalition in 1970. That same year, McCabe joined a small group of women, the first chapter of the NY Coalition of 100 Black Women. McCabe served as Press Officer for Women and Minorities under Gov. Hugh Cary from 1975 to 1977. In 1977, McCabe became Director of Government and Community Affairs for WNET-TV. Elected president of the Coalition of 100 Black Women, in 1976, McCabe expanded the organization nationally; it became the National Coalition of 100 Black Women in 1981. In 1991, McCabe stepped down to become the Chairman of the Board, an office she held until 1993 when McCabe became the first woman finalist for the executive directorship of the NAACP.

A Presidential, Gubernatorial, and Mayoral appointee, McCabe was appointed by President Clinton to the United States Holocaust Memorial Council’s Committee on Conscience. Governor Mario M. Cuomo appointed McCabe to the New York State Council on Fiscal and Economic Priorities and to Chair of the New York State’s Job Training Partnership Council.

McCabe has earned two honorary doctorates, from Iona and Tougaloo Colleges, and has served on the following boards: Reliance Group Holdings; the New York City Investment Fund, L.I.C; The Wharton School of Business; and Bard College. McCabe is President of Jewell Jackson McCabe Associates – a multi-lingual strategic communications firm specializing in competitiveness training and executive coaching. The firm has advised American Express; Time Warner; The Coca-Cola Company; Matsushita Electric Corporation of America (Panasonic); International Business Machines Corporation (IBM); Council for Opportunity in Education (COE); NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.; Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and The College Board. McCabe, a frequent guest political analyst, has opined on the Today Show, in The New York Times, and is featured in Brian Lanker’s “I Dream A World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America”. McCabe has also been honored for her community activism by receiving the following awards: citation from Malcolm/King College; citation from the YWCA; Eastern Region Urban League Guild Award; a Seagram's Civic Award; a Links, Inc. Civic Award; and an Outstanding Community Leadership Award from Malcolm/King College.

Accession Number

A2007.181

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/7/2007

6/20/2007

6/25/2007

Last Name

McCabe

Maker Category
Middle Name

Jackson

Schools

Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts

Bard College

P.S. 136 Roy Wilkins School

Park View Elementary School

First Name

Jewell

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

MCC10

Favorite Season

Fall, Summer

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. James Island, Italian Riviera, French Riviera

Favorite Quote

In order to be in the right place at the right time, one has to be in the wrong place 90% of the time with the perseverance to keep going in order for that 10% to pay off.$Behind every significant finding in American history are black women that are unrecognized.$

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

8/2/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Shellfish

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive Jewell Jackson McCabe (1945 - ) was the founder of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, president of Jewell Jackson McCabe Associates. She was also the first female finalist for the executive directorship of the NAACP.

Employment

New York Urban Coalition

New York City Human Resources Administration/Department of Social Services

Summer in the City

Coalition of 100 Black Women

National Coalition of 100 Black Women

Favorite Color

Gold, Orange, Red, Yellow

Timing Pairs
246,0:3936,130:5248,146:5986,158:6314,163:6642,168:7790,190:12686,225:18827,326:23010,389:24434,407:28450,412:29542,426:31999,452:33182,470:34365,484:35275,496:36185,507:38005,537:39097,551:39734,559:47625,593:48255,601:51122,615:56858,696:58286,727:60326,762:61414,787:62162,799:64134,838:65154,855:65630,864:66106,872:67194,891:68350,909:71810,914:72622,923:77880,960:81284,1025:81580,1030:82246,1041:82542,1046:82986,1053:83356,1059:84688,1085:85058,1091:97700,1244:98225,1252:101525,1345:105184,1369:105676,1376:106086,1383:106906,1395:109530,1437:109940,1443:116034,1478:125840,1592:128420,1633:128936,1641:129366,1647:137482,1714:138298,1724:139930,1737:141052,1750:160831,1977:161115,1982:162109,1998:162393,2003:162748,2009:163316,2019:166093,2035:166805,2044:167962,2067:168585,2075:181688,2244:182458,2256:186000,2312:186539,2321:187155,2331:187694,2339:188310,2350:199253,2481:199609,2486:209156,2601:223859,2812:225077,2823:227280,2854:227730,2860:241482,3024:241794,3029:248034,3278:248658,3288:252713,3315:253441,3332:254533,3349:254988,3355:255716,3366:256444,3377:261904,3456:262814,3467:263360,3475:263906,3483:267240,3497$0,0:1128,16:1840,27:4243,76:4688,82:5311,92:13264,259:14356,279:22211,377:22834,385:23368,392:23813,401:24436,409:25237,427:26483,476:28530,579:34938,663:35561,671:36184,679:36629,685:42748,707:45631,762:50343,788:61116,1069:71948,1182:72620,1191:74048,1214:75644,1238:76316,1248:77240,1259:80290,1272:103956,1582:106200,1592:106764,1599:113438,1699:114472,1714:115694,1736:116352,1751:117010,1759:127730,1809:128252,1816:131210,1858:132341,1876:132950,1884:135380,1895:137405,1926:138215,1941:139187,1958:141050,1991:143399,2036:155432,2252:159192,2295:161517,2338:166494,2388:167160,2398:170120,2501:176220,2569:176880,2576:179080,2603:179960,2613:184458,2660:184726,2665:184994,2671:186066,2692:186937,2706:188344,2740:194010,2832
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587542">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jewell Jackson McCabe's interview, session 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587543">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe lists her favorites, session 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587544">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587545">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's upbringing, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587546">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her father's radio program, 'The House That Jack Built'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587547">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her maternal grandmother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587548">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother and grandmother's relationship</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587549">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her parents' education and religious background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587550">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's first marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587551">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reads Ahmet Ertegun's introduction to her father's autobiography</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587552">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her parents' early years of marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587553">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587554">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her earliest childhood memories, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587555">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587556">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her parents' famous acquiantances</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587557">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her extracurricular activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587558">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her birth at her parents' home</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587559">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her relationships with her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587560">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her childhood in Washington, D.C., pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587561">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her family's traditional meals</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587562">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her early sense of responsibility</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587563">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her dance training</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587564">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her schooling, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587565">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her hobbies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587566">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her home life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587567">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her start at the High School of Performing Arts in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587568">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her audition for the High School of Performing Arts in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587569">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the dancers she admired</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587570">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her challenges at the High School of Performing Arts, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587571">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her challenges at the High School of Performing Arts, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587572">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her decision to attend Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587573">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her first marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587574">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers living in New York City's Greenwich Village</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587575">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her parents' relationship</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587576">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her experiences as a switchboard operator, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587577">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls joining the New York City Human Resources Administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587578">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls working for the Summer in the City program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587579">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes how she met Eugene L. McCabe</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587580">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her divorce</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587581">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls how she came to work for the New York Urban Coalition</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587582">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her early career at the New York Urban Coalition, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587583">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her early challenges as a manager</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587584">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about successful businesspeople who were not college graduates</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587585">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early philanthropy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587586">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother's career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587587">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her mother's stroke</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587588">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her mother's influence</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587589">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the circumstances of her parents' divorce, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587590">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the circumstances of her parents' divorce, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587591">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her father's business activities in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587592">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's career, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587593">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Jewell Jackson McCabe's interview, session 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587594">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe lists her favorites, session 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587595">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her maternal grandmother's experiences of discrimination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587596">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls lessons from her maternal grandmother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587597">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her mother's upbringing and parenthood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587598">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587599">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her father's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587600">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's career, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587601">Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587602">Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother's leadership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587603">Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her upbringing in a wealthy black family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587604">Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her mother and father's parenting style</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587605">Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her mother's social circle</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587606">Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers moving with her family to New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587607">Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers going backstage at New York City's Apollo Theater</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587608">Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her family's food traditions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587609">Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's legacy in the entertainment industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587610">Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her transition to the High School of Performing Arts in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587611">Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers the dance department of the High School of Performing Arts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587612">Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her experiences as a dancer at the High School of Performing Arts in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587613">Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her exclusion from the senior recital at the High School of Performing Arts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587614">Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers Arthur Mitchell's advice</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587615">Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her dance background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587616">Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her father's social circle</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587617">Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers her mentors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587618">Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her decision to study dance at Bard College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587619">Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587620">Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her experiences in the dance department at Bard College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587621">Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587622">Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her charitable activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587623">Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early ambitions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587624">Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls teaching dance to pregnant youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587625">Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her position at the New York City Human Resources Administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587626">Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the political climate of the 1960s and 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587627">Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early career advancement, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587628">Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her early career advancement, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587629">Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her start at the New York Urban Coalition</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587630">Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her promotion at the New York Urban Coalition</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587631">Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the Commission on the Status of Women</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587632">Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the black community's tradition of service</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587633">Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the erasure of black women's achievements</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587634">Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls the founding of the Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587635">Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her introduction to the coalition movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587636">Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the aims of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587637">Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls the early years of the Coalition of 100 Black Women</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587638">Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers the mentorship of J. Bruce Llewellyn</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587639">Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her work with the Partnership for New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587640">Tape: 11 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the importance of networking</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587641">Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her early career, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587642">Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her early career, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587643">Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers lobbying the U.S. Senate</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587644">Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587645">Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about Governor Hugh Carey's administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587646">Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about globalization</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587647">Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her recruitment strategy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587648">Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the founding of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587649">Tape: 12 Story: 9 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the founding of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587650">Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her involvement in the Coalition of 100 Black Women</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587651">Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her connection to social activists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587652">Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls the founding of the Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587653">Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about black women's history of service</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587654">Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about white male leadership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587655">Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her political values, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587656">Tape: 13 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her skill set</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587657">Tape: 13 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the New York Urban Coalition's Give a Damn newsletter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587658">Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her political values, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587659">Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her nomination for the NAACP presidency</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587660">Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her campaign for the NAACP presidency, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587661">Tape: 14 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls her campaign for the NAACP presidency, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587662">Tape: 14 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her challenges while running for the NAACP presidency</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587663">Tape: 14 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the male supporters of her NAACP presidential candidacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587664">Tape: 15 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her criticism of Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587665">Tape: 15 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe shares her criticism of the Million Man March</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587666">Tape: 15 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers Spelman College's centennial drive, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587667">Tape: 15 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers Spelman College's centennial drive, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587668">Tape: 15 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Coalition of 100 Black Women's role modeling programs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587669">Tape: 15 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Coalition of 100 Black Women's role modeling programs, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587670">Tape: 15 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the Candace Award, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587671">Tape: 15 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the Candace Award, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587672">Tape: 16 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Aspen Institute Executive Seminar</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587673">Tape: 16 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers organizing a black women's leadership seminar, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587674">Tape: 16 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe remembers organizing a black women's leadership seminar, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587675">Tape: 16 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her poll about black female leadership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587676">Tape: 16 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the corporate board selection process</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587677">Tape: 16 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her involvement with the Wharton School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587678">Tape: 16 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about her international travels</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587679">Tape: 17 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her work as an executive coach</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587680">Tape: 17 Story: 2 - Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about food traditions in the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587681">Tape: 17 Story: 3 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Panasonic Kid Witness News program, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587682">Tape: 17 Story: 4 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the Panasonic Kid Witness News program, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587683">Tape: 17 Story: 5 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes her goals for the National Coalition of 100 Black Women</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587684">Tape: 17 Story: 6 - Jewell Jackson McCabe reflects upon her professional opportunities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587685">Tape: 17 Story: 7 - Jewell Jackson McCabe recalls suffering a nearly fatal car accident</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587686">Tape: 17 Story: 8 - Jewell Jackson McCabe describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/587687">Tape: 18 Story: 1 - Jewell Jackson McCabe narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

2$2

DATape

11$12

DAStory

2$9

DATitle
Jewell Jackson McCabe talks about the erasure of black women's achievements
Jewell Jackson McCabe describes the founding of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, pt. 2
Transcript
When I'm asked about the 100 Black Women [Coalition of 100 Black Women; National Coalition of 100 Black Women] it's amusing to me because we know that if you look back over history, there's always been an Ida B. Wells in the picture. You know, there were the great Candaces in the Bible, great warrior princesses, you know. You've got these images that are just--repeat themselves. The responsibility is from generation to generation to improve, to empower, to be as sophisticated because the challenges tend to be the same. But the mechanisms of society that have the issues of classism, racism, sexism, those change. So you've got to know the modern tools, whatever the rhetoric is of the industry. I mean we're in the telecommunications industry today, right. We're in instant information transfer today. So we've got to be as sophisticated in terms of dealing with the issues of suppression as we were after we were so called freed, so that if you look at a Frederick Douglass--and that's why my quote, to me, is very important, that behind every important initiative is a black woman or a group of black women going unrecognized. It was Ida B. Wells whose scholarship--and see, we have to take ownership over our gray matter. My problem with Louis Farrakhan [HistoryMaker Minister Louis Farrakhan]--I enjoy sitting next to him to discuss things, but you cannot have a Million Man March with 50 percent of your gray matter being because of--his religion, suggests that, that 50 percent of the gray matter be disempowered, disenfranchised, marginalized, ignored. You can't have that. So our history starts back--and I like to think about the chronicling, the journalism of Ida B. Wells, who did the research, that had the information, that helped to empower abolitionists but helped to empower the Frederick Douglasses of the world. And when she had to flee, before she went to Europe, when she had to flee Memphis [Tennessee], it was fifty thousand women that came together in New York State under the umbrella of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs. So these were 19th century women. Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, 1896, elected the head of. And then the continuum is, here you have--and these become metaphors because for every one name that I mention that has big aura and big marquee, there are smaller examples. When you look at my library and you, and you, and you look at the young women in the Civil Rights Movement of the '60s [1960s] and what they represented--and it has to be recorded, and it has to be respected--it was the elder middle-class black women that said we needed black men. They found Martin Lu- [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] he was talented, but they found him and empowered him. So we went from 1896 with Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin to twe- early 20th century. And then you had Ida still fighting in the Niagara Movement with W.E.B. Du Bois. But who's remembered? W.E.B. Du Bois, you know. So you have in 1913, you have this sort of plethora, this, this burst of--whether it be the AKAs [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.] started, then the Deltas [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.] started and the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] start, so you have these starts. But there are major, not better than the black men or the white men or the white women, but need to be recognized and need to be role models to inspire you, to inspire me, for us to understand that we have to raise the bar.$The grid for me when I was going into a town, number one, Ruth Mueller Hill would call, you know, the elder stateswoman, who was usually either a Delta [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.] or an AKA [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.], who--but it didn't matter because she was the woman that everybody genuflected to. And I would look at the, the city and I'd say, "What is the revenue stream from the private sector?" Is it a real estate driven town? Is it a finance driven town? Is it, you know--does Procter and Gamble [Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio] own the town? Does--is it a consumer product kind of town? And then I'd say, "Give me the highest ranking black woman there." Now at that point, honey, we didn't have titles. We were all secretaries at best. The rarity of the Claudine Malones [Claudine B. Malone], you know, MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts] trained, MIT professor, you know, heads of--Claudine, I'd marvel at her successes. I mean back in the '80s [1980s] Claudine was the chair of audit committees when people didn't know what audit committees (unclear) corporations were. But I say that to say the critical mass of us were in the public sector as either teachers, educators, lawyers. We were not in the private sector. Listen, Ken Chenault [Kenneth Chenault] didn't get recruited. He was an arbitrage specialist but--until 1983. So when I'm talking organizing the 100 Black Women [National Coalition of 100 Black Women] around about 1979, 1980, we launched in 1981. From 1981, in ten months I organized twenty states, and I had launched with fifteen, including District of Columbia. So we were in thirty-four states and the District of Columbia, right? And in certain areas it just proliferated. We lost no one until second generation of presidents after me. And I made a commitment because part of my responsibility was to be a new face for a new generation. And succession planning had not been institutionalized in any of the civil rights organizations. And we were a gender driven civil rights organization [National Coalition of 100 Black Women]. We were good race women, and we're feminists, and it's a combined thing. It's not either/or, you know, when and where I enter, the whole race, so that the grid was I want somebody from the governor's office--in the founding group. And we basically said twenty-four because twenty-four had started the New York [Coalition of 100 Black Women]--. And I want somebody--I want not just somebody. So it was private sector, public sector. It was municipal, state and federal. And you say federal, how could you? Very easy, because you've got a congressional delegation. Therefore, there are people that are legislative aides that work for congressional delegation based in that city.