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Carol Cutting

Radio station owner Carol Moore Cutting was born on April 24, 1948 in Livingston, Alabama. She was raised in an educational family and a close-knit community. Cutting enrolled at Tuskegee University in 1965 and graduated from there in 1969 with her B.A. degree in secondary education. She went on to attend graduate school at Springfield Community College and graduated from there in 1971 with her M.A. degree in community leadership.

Upon graduation, Cutting moved to New England. In September of 1971, she received her official license from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). In 1984, Cutting applied for a construction permit for 106.3 but was challenged by an existing broadcaster who applied to operate on the same frequency. She then became the owner and general manager of Cutting Edge Broadcasting, Inc., making her the first African American woman in Massachusetts to operate a radio station. After eight years of litigation and several technical delays, Cutting was granted the construction permit and her station, WEIB - 106.3 Smooth FM, tested for broadcast with the FCC in 1999. Cutting was also appointed as an independent director of United Financial BanCorp. in 2001. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. (AKA) and she has served on many committees and boards including the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts, WGBY, the University of Massachusetts-Amherst Amherst Fine Arts Center, the American Heart Association, and National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB) where served as the Northeastern Regional Representative.

Cutting has been recognized for her community service and her entrepreneurship with many honors, such as the “Woman of the Year,” “Businesswoman of the Year,” and other similar awards. She was inducted into the Springfield Technical Community College’s Entrepreneurship Hall of Fame; and, in 2000, she received the Business Woman of Distinction award.

Cutting has been married for forty-three years to Dr. Gerald B. Cutting. They have two children, Alysia Cutting and Darrel Cutting, and six grandchildren.

Carol Moore Cutting was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 28, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.161

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/28/2013

Last Name

Cutting

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Tuskegee University

Springfield Technical Community College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Carol

Birth City, State, Country

Lexington

HM ID

CUT02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

I can do all things through Christ that strengthens me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

4/24/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Radio station owner Carol Cutting (1948 - ) , President and CEO of Cutting Edge Broadcasting, Inc. and WEIB 106.3 Smooth F.M., is the first female in Massachusetts and the first African American in New England to have been granted a FCC-FM radio station construction permit.

Employment

WEIB Radio

United Financial BanCorp.

Favorite Color

Green, Pink

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carol Cutting's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carol Cutting lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carol Cutting describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carol Cutting describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carol Cutting describes her mother's family background, pt. 3

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carol Cutting describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carol Cutting describes her father's background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carol Cutting describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carol Cutting talks about her sister

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carol Cutting talks about her mother's desire to have a college education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carol Cutting talks about living with her grandparents on their farm

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carol Cutting describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carol Cutting describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carol Cutting describes her childhood experience attending a country Baptist church

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carol Cutting describes her experiences attending school, pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carol Cutting describes her experiences attending school, pt 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carol Cutting talks about her childhood desire to learn

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carol Cutting talks about her childhood experience with the radio

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Carol Cutting describes her childhood aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carol Cutting talks about her high school mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carol Cutting describes the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carol Cutting talks about the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carol Cutting talks about the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama, pt. 3

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carol Cutting describes her experience at Tuskegee University, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carol Cutting describes her experience at Tuskegee University, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carol Cutting describes her experience at Tuskegee University, pt. 3

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carol Cutting talks describes her experience at Tuskegee University and Tom Joyner who also attended there

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carol Cutting talks about her initial reaction to Springfield, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carol Cutting describes the black community in Springfield, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carol Cutting talks about her initial experience with radio in Springfield, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carol Cutting describes her search for her own FM frequency and broadcasting license, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carol Cutting describes her search for her own FM frequency and broadcasting license, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carol Cutting talks about the legal battle over her radio frequency, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carol Cutting talks about the legal battle over her radio frequency, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carol Cutting talks about the construction of her radio station, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carol Cutting talks about the construction of her radio station, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carol Cutting talks about the adult jazz format of her radio station

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carol Cutting talks about the adult jazz format of her radio station, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carol Cutting talks about the deregulation of radio, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carol Cutting talks about the deregulation of radio, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carol Cutting reflects upon the importance of perseverance, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carol Cutting reflects upon the importance of perseverance, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Carol Cutting describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carol Cutting reviews her life and whether she would have done anything differently

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carol Cutting reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carol Cutting describes her responsibilities at the radio station

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carol Cutting talks about her radio station's listeners

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carol Cutting talks about her employees at the radio station

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carol Cutting talks about how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

1$7

DATitle
Carol Cutting talks about her initial reaction to Springfield, Massachusetts
Carol Cutting talks about the legal battle over her radio frequency, pt. 2
Transcript
So when you were on the verge of graduating from Tuskegee [University], what were your thoughts? You were gonna go and teach in high school, you were gonna apply for teaching positions, or had you thought about going to graduate school or--$$No. By that time, my husb--well, I married my husband [Dr. Gerald B. Cutting] during Christmas break December, 1968--$$Okay, so (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--and we graduated together in 1969--$$Okay.$$--and so it wasn't about me at that point; it's where he got his job which was Springfield--East Longmeadow, Massachusetts, and he in fact had the job, and so I--we came up here together.$$Okay, so that's how you get up here to the Springfield [Massachusetts] area.$$That's how I got up into the Springfield [Massachusetts] area. I had spent some summers in Boston [Massachusetts] working; I had relatives there in Boston and so I worked there several summers and so I--but that was Roxbury, this was Springfield, Massachusetts and when we moved here, we didn't know anyone here; we didn't (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--'Cause your husband is from Roxbury [Boston, Massachusetts], right?$$Yes, he, he was born in Boston [Massachusetts] and grew up in New Haven, Connecticut so he was familiar with New England; I was to a little extent from the summer time spending the summers here, but I--we didn't know Springfield [Massachusetts]. We, we had no idea where anything was, and so when we moved here in June of 1969, it was like, 'okay, so where are we? What's happening in the community? How do you connect to the churches?' You know, how does one who comes to this area find out about the, the social life or--here? You know. Where do you get your collard greens? Where do you get your hair done? Where do you go to church? We didn't know, and we didn't know anyone who knew because his primary frame of reference was not--was primarily in the white community, from the edge of Longmeadow to East Longmeadow [Massachusetts]; that's what it was about. And so we didn't have a radio station and we didn't have public television at that time; we didn't know (unclear) maybe had two radio stations--I mean two television stations at the time here.$$Emm hmm.$$And so I thought coming from Tuskegee [University], a place where you've got all kinds of commerce and things going on, and you could listen to radio station even if it wasn't owned by African Americans, I found it very--very depressing. I thought we were coming to liberal New England, and so I found it to be rather separate.$So it was basically because of the opposition of this one person?$$Yes. He, in fact, took me through the entire comparative hearing process; he appealed all the way to the [Washington] D.C. Court of Appeals--the final one, where I also prevailed. But by that time, it was years later and, you know, no resources. And I can say that there was a broadcaster--an existing broadcaster by the name of Ed Perry, who I would not have this station had it not been for him because he went, he assisted me through the process. When there was a need to argue, he came to [Washington] D.C. in our favor, so I can just say that he was responsible for helping, helping me through this process. Now there was time when--during this time, you know, we'd have to pack up the kids and put 'em in the car, and my husband would drive us to [Washington] D.C., he would, he would then take the kids off sightseeing; they're thinking they're on a field trip, and I'm going to the, you know, to the courts, and being called everything except a child of God because it was that strong--I mean they wanted that frequency so badly that whatever it took to try to litigate me financially out of the process was being done, and so I can say that Ed [Perry] was there and he was--and he owns a radio station in Marshfield, Massachusetts--WATD; and he's still a friend to this day. He went to college in, in Amherst, Massachusetts and knew the area.$$What's his last name again?$$Ed Perry.$$Perry, okay.$$Emm hmm.$$He's the owner of WATD?$$WATD, in--here in Massachusetts, Marshfield. Not only did he, did he do that, but he also--finally, when we were able to, to get things going he, he was there and helping to oversee things, 'cause he was all--not only was he an owner, but he was also an engineer--$$Emm hmm.$$--so he was able to help me with the technical part of things.$$Okay.$$And so it was during those years of trying to get this station, and having to go to [Washington] D.C., that--there was no one in this Springfield [Massachusetts] area that I could talk to that I could--who could relate to what I was going through because no one in the Springfield area knew what I was doing. It was very quiet, and so I knew that it was taking a toll on my family, terms of the resources, and so it became--well, is it, it is, is it worth it? And so that was one of those times when I called--out of the clear blue sky called Gayle King; she's probably not even aware of the fact of the impact that she made, but she was an anchor at Channel Three, and I called her and said, 'You don't know me at all,' I said, 'but I'd like to know if I can meet you.' And--'because I have--I'd like to discuss something with you.' And I shared wi--and she said, 'Oh yes, come on down to the studio.' And I did, and she--I was able to share with her some of the things that I was going--and my--what I was going through; my dilemma. Is it fair? My children are growing up, we're taking resources from the family, and you know, is that, is that fair? Should I just forget about this and move on to some other thing? And--but she was very encouraging, very supportive, knew that there was a need, and encouraged me to, to stick with it. And that was a word that I need because I couldn't--it's hard to go to your husband when you're--I needed someone who was neutral, someone outside, who could look at it and give me advice, and she, and she did; I've never been able to or never had the opportunity to really let her know what, what her words meant, and how much she encouraged me and--to move forward, and what has happened to even now.