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Carver Gayton

Academic administrator, corporate executive, and museum chief executive, Carver Clark Gayton was born on October 18, 1938 in the Madrona District of Seattle, Washington to John Jacob and Virginia Clark Gayton. Born to a rich heritage, Gayton was raised in a family of ten and attended Madrona Grade School and Meany Junior High School as a youth. Afterwards, he attended Seattle’s Garfield High School where he excelled academically and athletically. He was a member of the school’s football team and was named to the All-City and All-State teams for his talents as a running back. In his senior year, he was elected Class President and was recruited by the University of Washington Head Football Coach Darrel Royal with a four year scholarship. In 1959, Gayton started as a freshman on the University of Washington football team, but was injured and unable to play after his second game, when he tore ligaments and cartilage in his knee. By the following season, Gayton recovered from his injuries, and he was allowed to play in the 1960 Rose Bowl, helping the Huskies defeat the University of Wisconsin forty-four to seven. That spring, he graduated from the University of Washington with his B.A. degree in history and a minor in English.

In 1961, under the leadership of Coach Jim Owens, Gayton served as an Assistant Coach for the University of Washington and was instrumental in the team winning the Rose Bowl for a consecutive year. Afterwards, he was hired as a teacher at his alma mater Garfield High School. In January of 1964, Gayton became the first black Federal Bureau of Investigation agent from the state of Washington when he received a letter signed by the bureau’s director J. Edgar Hoover. While serving in that capacity, he conducted thorough background checks on appointed government officials and alleged members of the Italian mafia. Subsequently, Gayton returned to his career in education and pursued his M.A. degree in educational administration at Temple University. In 1967, he went on to work as a special security representative for the Lockheed Missiles and Space Company in Sunnyvale, California.

In 1968, Gayton became the first full-time black coach for the University of Washington. He was also assigned to the Department of University Relations and served an assistant to the department’s vice president. During his tenure as an assistant football coach, Gayton recruited fourteen black players, the most in the University of Washington's history. In 1969, in protest of the suspension of four black players by Coach Jim Owens for threatening to boycott the team, Gayton resigned as head coach and was appointed to the new position of Director of Affirmative Action Programs. As the director, he established the first affirmative action program by an institution of higher learning in the state, and instituted the first comprehensive staff training program at the University of Washington. In 1972, Gayton earned his M.A. degree in public administration, and in 1976, he received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington. Shortly after, he was hired as a full-time assistant professor in the Department of Public Administration at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida.

After serving two years as Assistant Professor, Gayton was recruited by the Boeing Company as Corporate Manager of Education Relations, and was responsible for supervising a contract with Cogswell College. Under his leadership, Boeing helped its employees in furthering their education by promoting night classes at Cogswell College. In the mid-1980s, Gayton was promoted to Director of Education Relations and Training, and in 1991, he became Boeing’s Corporate Director of College and University Relations. From 1997 until 2001, Gayton served under Governor Gary Locke as the Commissioner of Washington State Department of Employment Security. Prior to becoming the Executive Director of the Northwest African American Museum in 2005, Gayton was a lecturer and consultant for the University of Washington. He serves on several boards, including the U.S. Department of Education National Advisory Panel/National Center for Post Secondary Governance and Finance and The Association of Governing Boards. Gayton retired as Executive Director June 25, 2008 and lives in Seattle, Washington with his wife Carmen and their son Chandler.

Carver Gayton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 4, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.080

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/4/2008 |and| 10/09/2017

Last Name

Gayton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Madrona Grade School

Meany Junior High School

James A. Garfield High School

University of Washington

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Carver

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

GAY04

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Education reform, workforce development, Afro-American History, organizational development, and management development.

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Education reform, workforce development, Afro-American History, organizational development, and management development.

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

10/18/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chili

Short Description

Corporate executive, academic administrator, and museum chief executive Carver Gayton (1938 - ) became the first black F.B.I. agent from the State of Washington. Gayton also became the first full-time black coach for the University of Washington in 1968. When appointed as Director of Affirmative Action programs, he established the first affirmative action program by an institution of higher learning in the state.

Employment

Northwest African American Museum

University of Washington

State of Washington

Boeing Company

Florida State University

Lockheed Martin

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)

Seattle Public Schools

Garfield High School

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carver Gayton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton talks about his maternal great-grandfather, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton talks about his maternal great-grandfather, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton talks about his mother's relationship with her family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton describes his family's relationship with Horace R. Cayton, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton describes his paternal family's roots in Africa

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton describes his paternal grandfather

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton describes his paternal family's organizational affiliations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton remembers Homer Harris

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton describes his father's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton describes his father's education

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton describes how his parents met

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton talks about his father's interest in classical music

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton describes his parents' personalities, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton describes his parents' personalities, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton lists his siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton describes the Central District of Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton remembers segregation in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton talks about his namesake

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Slating of Carver Gayton's interview, session 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton lists his junior and senior high schools in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton remembers playing football at James A. Garfield High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton recalls his high school English teacher, Miriam Eskanazi

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton talks about Quincy Jones

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton recalls earning a football scholarship to the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton recalls playing football at the University of Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton talks about being recognized by the black press

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton talks about the impact of racism on his football career

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton talks about the football program at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton describes the long-term impact of his football injuries

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton reflects upon the changing attitudes toward football injuries

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton remembers his history professor, Thomas J. Pressly

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton talks about the field of African American studies

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton remembers historian and actor Edward L. Jones

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton recalls Professor Thomas J. Pressly's rejection of his great-grandfather's slave narrative

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton talks about the institution of slavery

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton talks about the importance of learning African American history

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton recalls his teaching experiences at James A. Garfield High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton recalls the visit of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton remembers his brother's career advice

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton describes early representation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton recalls becoming an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton remembers the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton describes the start of his career at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton describes the representation of African Americans in the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton remembers meeting J. Edgar Hoover

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton talks about his introduction to Kansas City

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton describes the start of his career at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton talks about his experiences in the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton remembers James P. Hosty

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton recalls the investigations into the murders of the civil rights workers in Philadelphia, Mississippi

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton talks about being recognized for his civil rights work in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton talks about FBI infiltration of the Ku Klux Klan and the Communist Party

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Carver Gayton talks about his transfer to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Carver Gayton talks about his experiences as an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Carver Gayton talks about his relationships with informants

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Carver Gayton remembers meeting Alex Haley

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Carver Gayton reflects upon the leadership of J. Edgar Hoover

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Carver Gayton recalls encountering threats from white supremacists at the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Carver Gayton describes his experiences as an FBI agent in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Carver Gayton remembers a notable informant

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Carver Gayton talks about his decision to leave the Federal Bureau of Investigation

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$2

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Carver Gayton remembers segregation in Seattle, Washington
Carver Gayton describes his family's relationship with Horace R. Cayton, Jr.
Transcript
--The whites stayed on the other end, and so you would--there'd be this big, you know, you were really brave if you went on the side where the whites were 'cause, you know, they'd look at you funny and all that sort of stuff but there were no--again it wasn't like the South, where you had signs saying whites only and blacks only.$$No enforced segregation (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) No, but you knew that you were, you know, you just knew that you were supposed to stay on your side and--there's a certain--you had these rafts out there in the water and, you know, the black kids wouldn't be with the whites at the other--sometimes a little bit of intermingling, but those were the kinds of things that--you 'member it was, you know, you didn't think of it as that offensive, not necessarily, I mean as a kid, you know, that was just part of growing up but, you know. I always like to push the envelope and be on the other side and all that sort of stuff and see what people say, "Oh God you were over there," (laughter) and, you know, old days at the beach [Madrona Beach, Seattle, Washington], summertime as a kid and then, you know, just hiking through those vacant lots and building forts and those images, and all of us had paper routes, and interesting combination. We lived right on the border of the, you, know, of the Gold Coast, you know, very wealthy. On one end, it's almost like a Mason-Dixon Line, you know, you had the Madison Valley [Seattle, Washington] where we were, 32nd Avenue, and then you'd go into, you know, where, you know, the--where the Tennis Club [Seattle Tennis Club, Seattle, Washington] was and Broadmoor [Seattle, Washington], all these sort of special gated communities and all those kids interestingly enough, the majority of kids did not go to private school back in those days. The white kids they went to Garfield [James A. Garfield High School, Seattle, Washington] so you had this really, really interesting dichotomy of wealth and poverty going to the same school. All the kids for the most part, very few went to private schools--nowadays, you know, you still have those gated communities, 90 percent of those kids go to private schools now. But back in those days, it was, it was an interesting mix of folks, and Garfield was guarded, you know probably--not really the case, but they always considered that kind of a nirvana or, you know a microscope or microscopic, you know, United Nations. And Quincy, he all--but he continues to talk about--[HistoryMaker] Quincy Jones, about his wonderful experiences there. I had good experiences there too, if you just push aside all that other stuff and look at the positive of it. Quincy, his primary mentor was a white gentlemen, Mr. Cook, Parker Cook, who encouraged Quincy to do everything, did the same thing with Jimi Hendrix and, you know, lot of it. So those were wonderful, wonderful experience at that, at that school, not to say that it was a perfect situation. There were limitations socially and all that sort of stuff that you knew about. Most of 'em, you know, unspoken, unwritten, you know, kinds of things, you just knew, rather than forced upon you, but it was a pleasant growing up experience for me. I can't speak for others, but I enjoyed it, with the blacks and whites--and there's a large Sephardic Jewish population too, in that Madrona [Seattle, Washington] neighborhood too, that I probably--my first swear words were Yiddish (laughter) back in the day and, and those kids they wanted to take me, what they called Talmud Torah, you know, where they, where they would--after school. Yeah, they were--Hebrew classes, you know, so the kids would try--then a guy got stopped at the door, you know, by the headmaster, you know, no you can't come in here 'cause you're not Jewish, but--and still--and it's great being in this museum [Northwest African American Museum, Seattle, Washington] because a lot of those kids I grew up with are Jewish and otherwise blacks, you know, coming through here and talking about gosh back in the day, you know, reminiscing and all that sort of thing. I mean the fact that I've been here for so long and that and--folks are still--they might be coming from Bellevue [Washington], you know, Mercer Island [Washington], all over the place, they may not live in the area anymore, but they're coming back, you know, this is a kind of a gathering place for the, whole, you know, the community. And a lot of those folks back in the '50s [1950s] and '60s [1960s] are coming back here to, you know, to check out this place because a lot 'em went to school here and--so it brings back, you know, a lot of, you know, pleasant, pleasant memories and pleasant stories that kids have had. And then there were some times to, but you know, you really didn't get into those things often, really until you became an adults and what adults tend to do to each other. But the kids--wasn't that, you know, it was, it was enjoyable, you know certainly in my experiences.$(Simultaneous) Okay, so we were talking about off camera--$$Yes.$$--the relationship between your family and the family of Hiram--$$Revels [Hiram Rhodes Revels], right.$$Revels, that the Caytons and the Woodsons--well the Caytons, yeah, Caytons and the Revels yeah.$$Right.$$So Susie Revels Cayton, Horace Cayton's [Horace R. Cayton, Sr.]--?$$I'm not quite sure if that was his wife or his daughter.$$Yeah, right.$$But if I recall, there was a daughter of Horace Cayton and his wife, was close to my mother [Virginia Clark Gayton] and father [John J. Gayton]. In fact, I have a letter, I was just reading it a couple of weeks ago. Susan--Susie Revels Cayton wrote to my mother saying she was gonna be in play. Langston Hughes asked her to be in a play 'cause you know, he was moving around different places trying to, you know make a living and then he had this wonderful musical, it's in his autobiography, I can't remember the name of it and she said she was flattered that Langston Hughes in this letter she wrote to my mother, she was flattered (laughter) that Langston Hughes wanted her, you know, to be in that play, but she said didn't--that wasn't her interest to move in that direction. But she was back there talking to Horace Cayton, Jr. [Horace R. Cayton, Jr.] with her brother. Horace Cayton, Jr., who was very prominent in his own right.$$Sociologist?$$Sociologist, yeah, and he wrote the 'Long Old Road' ['Long Old Road: An Autobiography,' Horace R. Cayton, Jr.], and he wrote that--the 'Black Metropolis' ['Black Metropolis: A Study of Negro Life in a Northern City,' St. Clair Drake and Horace R. Cayton, Jr.], co-wrote that with St. Clair (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) With St. Clair Drake, right.$$St. Clair, yeah St. Clair Drake. And so Horace Cayton, Jr. and my father were basically the same age, who grew up together and played together. In fact, in Horace Cayton, Jr.'s book 'Long Old Road,' there's an account of a--you know, of a picnic, you know, wonderful picnic that they had over--my grandfather had out in the country, which is only a matter of a couple of blocks away (laughter) a farm over there and so the black kids in the community would go together, you know, to the--my grandfather's farm, and, and this is--that's J.T. Gayton, John Thomas Gayton, Sr. [John T. Gayton].$$I have to apologize, whoever is watching this video in the future who wonders why I can't make the--all the right connections here, but that is the connection. If you look at Susan Woodson's [HistoryMaker Susan Cayton Woodson] interview with The HistoryMakers, and the first part when she describes her family, and then somebody watches what you just described, they could put all that history together.$$Oh isn't that something, yeah.$$But then they can put it all together. But, you know, I just can't remember all of it to be able to admit it myself right now but that's how you do it.$$Well, it's such a small world when you start talking about the so called black intelligentsia or what Langston Hughes called the Negro elite, he didn't say Negro (laughter). But you know, it is a small world particularly going back in those early years in the 1900, you know, the Talented Tenth kind of thing, you know.$$Yeah, that's right. Well, Susan Woodson I think is still alive in Chicago [Illinois], has a gallery. She was active in the WPA [Works Progress Administration; Work Projects Administration] arts projects, and the creation of the South Side Community Art Center [Chicago, Illinois], and sponsored a lot of the artist, and she runs a gallery out of her home in Hyde Park, in Chicago [Illinois].$$She--I'm sure she worked with Hor- 'cause Horace Cayton had a, you know, kind of a center, community center, one of the first of its kind in the country as I understand, that he was running back there, and I think while he was still, you know, teaching at the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois].$$That's right, I can't think of the exact name of it (laughter).$$Yeah I (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So, anybody watching this can go refer back to the other one.$$Exactly.$$And put it together 'cause it was an interesting history. Paul Robeson. There's an activist history, there's an arts history here. So migration, migration history that goes all over the place.$$That's right. Yeah.$$From Kentucky, to Mississippi, to Vancouver [Canada], you know.$$Well, as I recall in the 'Long Old Road,' Horace Cayton, Jr., you know, talks about them meeting up here in Seattle [Washington]. Booker T. Washington, and Horace Cayton, Sr., and Hiram Revels may have been up here himself, you know, but, but, you know, just, you know, talking about the issues of the day. And the thing is there's a--Horace Cayton was reflected in our exhibit, and the thing is the newspaper he had, had the largest--second largest circulation of any newspaper black or white in the Seattle area in the late 1800s. The Republican [Seattle Republican].$$Okay, the Republican, that's right.$$Right, right, and so--I mean that was--Horace Cayton and his wife, regarded as a pretty, pretty elite, you know, family, couple here in Seattle back in those days, because they, they represented the best of what, you know, African American intelligentsia is, you know, is all about, and anywhere in the country really, if you stop and think about it.

Huel D. Perkins

Retired educator Huel Davis Perkins was born on December 27, 1924 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Between 1943 and 1946, Perkins served in the U.S. Navy as a musician first class. He graduated from Southern University with highest honors in 1947.

From 1948 to 1950, Perkins worked as a music instructor at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri. Perkins then served as an associate professor of music at Southern University from 1951 through 1960. During this time, Perkins also completed his M.A. degree in music from Northwestern University in 1951 and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1958. From 1968 to 1978, Perkins served as the Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities at Southern University. In addition, Perkins was appointed as the deputy director of education programming at the National Endowment for the Humanities in Washington, D.C. in 1978. Perkins then commenced a long tenure at Louisiana State University where he served as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs from 1979 through 1990 and as Executive Assistant to the Chancellor and Special Assistant to the Chancellor from 1990 through 1998. In 1996, President Bill Clinton appointed Perkins to the Board of Advisors of the J.W. Fulbright foreign scholarship program. He served in this capacity until 2002. Perkins then founded Huel D. Perkins & Associates, Inc., a consulting firm and speakers bureau. He serves as its president. Perkins has also served as Chairman on the Education Foundation of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and has served as Grand Sire Archon of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity. In 2005, Louisiana State University acknowledged Perkins’ years of service by awarding him the honorary Doctor of Humane Letters and naming a doctoral fellowship program after him.

Perkins has also been honored by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities (Humanist of the Year); the National Conference of Christians and Jews (Brotherhood Award); the LSU Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa (Outstanding educator); the Baton Rouge Human Relations Council (Brotherhood Award); the Istrouma Area Council of Boy Scouts of America (Citizen of the Year); the Louisiana Chapter of NAACP (A. P. Turead Award); the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity (Award of Merit) and received the Centennial Award given by Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity. He has served as a member of the President’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Perkins has critiqued and published numerous books and articles on the African American experience in America. He has served on several dozen boards dealing with social and educational issues including the Baton Rouge Symphony, Louisiana Public Broadcasting, Corp., and the New Orleans Museum of Art. Perkins is the recipient of many public service awards for his achievements both in the civic and academic communities.

Perkins is married to Thelma O. Smith. 2008 marks the couple’s sixtieth wedding anniversary. They have one child, Huel Alfred Perkins.

Perkins was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 26, 2008.

Dr. Huel Perkins passed away on April 15, 2013.

Accession Number

A2008.063

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/26/2008

Last Name

Perkins

Maker Category
Middle Name

D.

Schools

Southern University Laboratory School

Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

Northwestern University

First Name

Huel

Birth City, State, Country

Baton Rouge

HM ID

PER04

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Boule Foundation

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Man Comes To Earth Unarmed Except For His Mind; His Brain Is His Only Weapon.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Louisiana

Birth Date

12/27/1924

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baton Rouge

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti, Meatballs

Death Date

4/15/2013

Short Description

Academic administrator and music professor Huel D. Perkins (1924 - 2013 ) was an instructor at Lincoln University and Southern University, where he also served as dean of the College of Arts and Humanities. At Louisiana State University, he served as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. In 2002, Perkins founded Huel D. Perkins & Associates, Inc.

Employment

Southern University and A&M

Louisiana State University

National Endowment for the Humanities

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:428,2:14325,255:34112,546:36928,609:46547,710:48002,738:49845,767:52870,796:53410,804:60300,880:61140,898:63298,914:63922,927:68186,1031:96740,1333:98927,1369:99494,1378:109430,1525:112972,1566:116505,1606:123000,1656:135260,1818$0,0:3686,56:4268,63:12566,301:12934,400:33072,574:34934,601:35326,606:36698,628:43950,738:46890,791:56588,977:62396,1121:72796,1273:73300,1280:75988,1331:80250,1372:80538,1377:80826,1382:81114,1387:82050,1408:83346,1429:83634,1434:88026,1481:89780,1487:92030,1501:94026,1516:105798,1704:110369,1739:113531,1794:127146,1986:129858,2020:136525,2105:140683,2141:141015,2146:144916,2202:145248,2207:161054,2379:162086,2396:162430,2401:162860,2408:172942,2560:173412,2566:178220,2614
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Huel D. Perkins' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Huel D. Perkins lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Huel D. Perkins describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Huel D. Perkins talks about the significance of his first name

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Huel D. Perkins describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Huel D. Perkins describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Huel D. Perkins describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Huel D. Perkins describes his father's law career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Huel D. Perkins describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Huel D. Perkins describes how he takes after his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Huel D. Perkins describes his childhood in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Huel D. Perkins describes his childhood in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Huel D. Perkins recalls Mount Zion First Baptist Church in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Huel D. Perkins talks about Reverend Gardner Taylor

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Huel D. Perkins recalls his early musicianship

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Huel D. Perkins recalls the musicians who served at Naval Station Great Lakes

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Huel D. Perkins recalls his decision to return to Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Huel D. Perkins remembers his influential teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Huel D. Perkins recalls meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Huel D. Perkins remembers his fiftieth wedding anniversary

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Huel D. Perkins describes his interdisciplinary teaching style

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Huel D. Perkins remembers his graduate studies in the humanities

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Huel D. Perkins recalls student demonstrations at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Huel D. Perkins reflects upon Felton Grandison Clark's legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Huel D. Perkins talks about Valerian Smith's family

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Huel D. Perkins remembers his students at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Huel D. Perkins describes his transition to academic administration

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Huel D. Perkins remembers joining the National Endowment for the Humanities

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Huel D. Perkins describes his career at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Huel D. Perkins talks about the National Endowment for the Humanities

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Huel D. Perkins describes his research on the Harlem Renaissance

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Huel D. Perkins talks about his published works

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Huel D. Perkins reflects upon the importance of the humanities

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Huel D. Perkins describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Huel D. Perkins talks about his favorite figures in the humanities

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Huel D. Perkins remembers influencing his students' interest in opera

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Huel D. Perkins talks about 'Cyrano de Bergerac' by Edmond Rostand

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Huel D. Perkins talks about 'The Fountainhead' by Ayn Rand

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Huel D. Perkins describes his civic activities in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Huel D. Perkins reflects upon his health

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Huel D. Perkins reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Huel D. Perkins describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Huel D. Perkins narrates his photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Huel D. Perkins remembers joining the National Endowment for the Humanities
Huel D. Perkins describes his career at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge
Transcript
I spoke there [Dallas, Texas] on the importance of the humanities. The fellow was there, who was the chairman of the endowment for, for the humanities. And he came to me right after that and said, "Would you like to come to Washington [D.C.], would you like to come to the National Endowment for the Humanities [NEH]?" I said, "No sir, no sir, I would not like to." I said, "Besides, I've only, I've recently signed a contract to go to LSU [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana]." He said, "Oh, what's his name, I'll talk with your chancellor down there. I, I think I can get you released from them." I said, "Well, I, I'm not certain I want to do that." He twisted my arm and said, "You come up and you look at our operation. I think you will want to be a part of it." I went to Washington on a kind of a look-see. I decided that's what I wanted to do. They offered me a contract to, to join them in September. I'm supposed to report to LSU. What do I do? Now, I have, I've signed a contract. I have that commit- commitment. I go down--I'll never forget this. I go down to the chancellor, Paul Murrill [Paul W. Murrill], the same fellow who had enticed me to come to LSU. I said, "I agree, I will sign, I will sign my contract." I said, "I'm supposed to report September 1st." I said, "But in the meantime, I have gotten an offer to join the National Endowment for the Humanities in Washington." You know what he said? I'll never forget this because he made, he made me feel so relieved about it all. He said, "Take the job in Washington." He said, "It will be both beneficial to you and to LSU. Drop me a note, and request a year's leave of absence, and go to Washington." That's what I did, that's what I did, and I am very happy that I did it, I am very happy that I did it.$Well, I--in Washington [D.C.], I was reading proposals, making speeches, interpreting the endowment [National Endowment for the Humanities] to, to the various publics and whatnot. At the end of that year, I didn't want to come to LSU [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana] (laughter). They sent a dean up to Washington. He came up for another meeting. When he came by to see me, he said, "I'm told--we hear that you, you might want to stay in Washington a little longer than this year." He said, "I'm up here to tell you that we want you back, that we're expecting you back, and we have increased your salary just to make you, make sure you come back." So, I'm in another quandary--look, look, the qua- the quandary I gave to you earlier was when I wanted to go to--come back to Southern [Southern University; Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana], and finish my, my senior year, you remember. And I said, my mother [Velma Davis Perkins] and the fraternity [Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity]--. Here I am, another quandary in my life: do I want to negate the contract down there, and stay on in Washington? 'Cause I was, I was really doing nicely in Washington, I really was--traveling all over the country and making speeches. And they liked me at the endowment, and that sort of thing, so I had to come and make some hard decisions there. My decision then was to come back to LSU. I talked with somebody, and they said, Washington is temporary. It changes administration every four years (laughter). You, you put your, your eggs in that basket, you don't know how long you're going to be there, you know, it could change. Well, I had some good counseling, so I came on back to LSU, came back to LSU, and stayed twenty-three years. I did twenty-seven at Southern, and I came back to LSU and did twenty-three, including two retirements. I retired once--they asked me to come back. I retired again, they asked me to come back. Then, this last time, which was in 2005, I think it was, I said I'm not going back this time. It became a joke: you're back (laughter) you're back down here. Every chancellor would ask me to come, come, come back there, mainly because I, I, I did a lot of letter writing, a lot of speech writing. And they would let me represent the university and I could represent it well, and people would see they have a black now at LSU, I mean, you know, who, who represents the university. Each chancellor would ask me, ask me to come back, and I, I'd stay here two or three months and, oh, come on, I'd go back down there.