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Carolyn Glenn

Publisher and entrepreneur Carolyn Jernigan Glenn was born on June 28, 1947 in Greenesboro, Georgia to parents Flossie Hill and Albert Jernigan. In 1963, Glenn graduated from Carver High School at the age of sixteen. She went on to receive her B.S. degree in business education from Albany State University in Albany, Georgia in 1967. She then received two M.S. degrees from Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, one in business and vocational education in 1972, and one in in educational administration in 1985. She is also licensed to practice real estate in Georgia and Florida.

Glenn spent twenty years working in public education, as a secretary, business teacher, vocational coordinator, and high school administrator. In 1991, Glenn and her husband, Dr. Earl Glenn, established ACE III Communications and founded The Champion Newspaper with Glenn as publisher. The Champion is Georgia’s largest African American-owned newspaper, and, since 1996, has been the most award-winning weekly among all newspapers in The Georgia Press Association. In 1999, they launched Atlanta Goodlife, a magazine focused on the lifestyles of African Americans in the Atlanta metropolitan area. In 2008, Glenn became the president of the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation. Under the auspices of that foundation, she and her husband created Unconditional Love for Children, which provides opportunities for disadvantaged children to become empowered through educational enrichment programs, life skills training, athletics, and access to health services. She has been a log-time Foundation Board trustee and past chair at Georgia Perimeter College, and has endowed a perpetual scholarship for students at Albany State University.

Glenn has also been the recipient of numerous awards and honors. In 1994, she received the Benjamin Hooks Business Award from the DeKalb branch of the NAACP. In 1995, her newspaper won two Business of the Year Awards, one from the South DeKalb YMCA and another from 100 Black Men of DeKalb. That same year, Glenn was named Outstanding Entrepreneur by Success Guide. In 1996, she was named Businesswoman of the Year by the South DeKalb Business Association. The Atlanta Business League named her Businesswoman of the Year in 1997, and one of the 100 Top Black Woman of Influence from 1996 to 2014. She has also been named a Woman of Distinction by Living Word COGIC and listed among six influential Georgia women in Women Looking Ahead magazine. She won a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Humanitarian Award from Georgia Perimeter College in 2006, and a Trail Blazer Award from Congressman Hank Johnson in 2013.

Glenn lives in Stone Mountain, Georgia with her husband. They have one grown son, Christian.

Carolyn Jernigan Glenn was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 20, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.017

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/20/2014

Last Name

Glenn

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Jernigan

Occupation
Schools

George Washington Carver Middle School

Albany State University

Georgia State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Carolyn

Birth City, State, Country

Greensboro

HM ID

GLE03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

This Little Light Of Mine, I’m Going To Let It Shine.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

6/28/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Publisher Carolyn Glenn (1947 - ) founded Georgia’s largest African American-owned newspaper, The Champion, which became the state's most award-winning weekly publication.

Employment

ACE III Communications, Inc.

The Champion Newspaper

Earl D, Glenn, DDS

DeKalb Schools, Gordon High

DeKalb Schools, Cedar Grove

Atlanta Schools, Murphy High

Dalton GA Schools, Dalton High

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carolyn Glenn's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her maternal grandfather's work to rebuild the family wealth

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her maternal grandfather's charity to black sharecroppers

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her parents' early relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes the challenges of integration

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her neighborhood in Monroe, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers her influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn remembers her activities at George Washington Carver Elementary and High School in Monroe, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her parents' fears of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her decision to attend Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes her experiences at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her transfer from Spelman College to Albany State College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn recalls witnessing President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's motorcade

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn recalls protesting against segregation at Rich's Department Store

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn describes segregation in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn remembers joining the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls her mentors at Albany State College in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers teaching at Dalton High School in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes the black community in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her success at Dalton High School in Dalton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Carolyn Glenn recalls teaching at J.C. Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn remembers mentoring a gay student at Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her promotion to vocational coordinator at Murphy High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her educational philosophy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the growth of the black community in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn describes her experiences as a graduate student at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her transition to vocational coordinator at Cedar Grove High School in Ellenwood, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the highlights of her time at Cedar Grove High School in Ellenwood, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes her decision to leave the education profession

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Carolyn Glenn talks about founding The Champion

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn describes the founding of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the first issue of The Champion

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn recalls founding ACE III Communications, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn remembers The Champion newspaper's financial challenges

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn recalls preparing The Champion to become the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn talks about The Champion's designation as the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the legal battle over The Champion's designation as the newspaper of record for DeKalb County, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers creating The Champion Free Press

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn talks about Atlanta Goodlife magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about the name of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes the news coverage in The Champion

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her civic activities

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn remembers the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn recalls the coverage of President Barack Obama's election in The Champion

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about The Champion's digital platform

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn remembers founding the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Carolyn Glenn describes her philanthropy in Jamaica

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn talks about the funding of the Earl and Carolyn Glenn Foundation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her plans for the future of The Champion newspaper

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Carolyn Glenn describes her concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Carolyn Glenn describes her concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Carolyn Glenn reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Carolyn Glenn reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Carolyn Glenn talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Carolyn Glenn describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Carolyn Glenn narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Carolyn Glenn narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

10$2

DATitle
Carolyn Glenn talks about founding The Champion
Carolyn Glenn talks about her transfer from Spelman College to Albany State College
Transcript
So between '88 [1988] and '91 [1991] when you found The Champion newspaper, what was going on? What was informing this process by which you established the, the newspaper?$$Remember, now this is the migration, you know, of all these people coming to Atlanta [Georgia]. A lot of people said, you know, "Yeah, I live in Atlanta now." Well, you know, you--we talk about, we really said--in terms of metro. But at that time, most of the people moving here were moving to DeKalb County [Georgia]. Because you had the great location, and you had the best values in homes. So in my husband's dental office, we were working in there, you know, all day, every day together. And we're seeing all of these people, all of these important people, accomplished people, moving to DeKalb County and living in DeKalb County, and we don't even know each other. Because when I used to, when I grew up in Monroe, Georgia, the only way to get to Atlanta was to come through DeKalb County because there were no expressways or what have you. We knew that it was 95 percent white. So, now you've got a Tuskegee Airman as a patient. You've got a gentleman who designed an official stamp for the UN [United Nations]. You've got movie stars, you've got top entertainers. You've got news anchors, you've got, just all kinds of people. Who was the president at that time? The gentleman who handled the security for the president of the United States. You've got top educators, you know, retirees. You've got college presidents. Just wonderful, accomplished people. But we didn't know each other. So in my family, my husband [Earl D. Glenn] is the visionary. He sees things way, way, way ahead. I'm the worker bee. I know how to--he does the research and he puts it together and then he--I figure it out. So he said, "Carol [HistoryMaker Carolyn Glenn]," we said to each other, "we need a way to get to know one another." And eventually after lots of talks and whatever, we came up with the idea that we needed a forum, and the newspaper may be that forum. So we started The Champion newspaper.$When I went home for the summer, after the first year, I was--a letter came from Spelman [Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia]. So, you know, now in my house you don't open other folk's mail. But in that it was from Spelman, I just figured it was okay. So I opened it, and I saw where my mother [Flossie Etchison Hill] had paid on the tuition, but she had not completed the first year's tuition. So, now it's, you know, time for me to get ready to go back for the second year. And I'm looking--I've got five sisters and brothers. And, you know, she's working really hard. So I decided my--this aunt, my favorite aunt [Azalie Etchison Richardson] that I was telling you about--she was a--are you familiar, familiar with Jeanes curriculum directors?$$Yes.$$She was one (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) She was a Jeanes supervisor--$$She was a Jeanes super- she was just real special.$$James Jeanes funds [sic. Anna T. Jeanes Foundation], right?$$Yes, Anna Jeanes [Anna T. Jeanes], she was really special. So she was a Jeanes supervisor down in South Georgia. And, you know, I went to stay with her during the summer or something, a week or two. And we were just very close.$$They worked on a special grant to improve the teaching in the South in small, rural schools, right?$$Absolutely.$$So they were sent down into--$$They were almost like the black superintendent. They were called supervisors, but they were like regarded on the level of a--the black superintendent, even over the principals, in most cases. So she, and she was one, she and my aunt were one of the first to get their master's degrees way back, you know, in my hometown [Monroe, Georgia]. So I guess that was a part of her acceleration, in that she had her master's degree. But she was a Jeanes curriculum director down in Cordele, Georgia then in Sylvester [Georgia], which is thirty miles from Albany [Georgia]. And I called her, and I told her what I saw. And, so she and I strategized. And I went--she took me over--I went to visit, went out secretly, clandestinely, went to Albany State [Albany State College; Albany State University, Albany, Georgia]. The dean of students, she and the dean of students had been in, had gone to co- had gone to college together, so she knew everybody. And she just walked me through, and I'm now enrolled, you know, in two hours. And, so the dean said, "Well, you know, if this is your niece, I know what stock she comes from. So she's--she has a job in my office." And that was the plum job of the campus. I worked for him the whole time I was there. And, so I told my mother and my stepfather [Julius Hill, Sr.], I'm going to Albany State. My father cursed the whole way to Albany State. "I don't know why you want to go to the country, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." And my mother cried. And it was only about, I think it was about five years ago that I told her why I did that. And she said, "I'm so glad you told me because I have never understood why you changed from Spelman to Albany State."$$That was certainly a sign of maturity, I guess and--$$Yeah.$$--to be that considerate.$$Well, again, it was--I always, I loved my mother.