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Debbye Turner Bell

Broadcast journalist and veterinarian Debrah Lynn Turner Bell was born on September 19, 1965 in Honolulu, Hawaii to Gussie Turner and Frederick C. Turner, Jr. Raised in Jonesboro, Arkansas, Turner Bell graduated from Jonesboro High School in 1983. She went on to attend Arkansas State University, where she received her B.S. degree in agriculture in 1986. In 1991, Turner Bell obtained her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

In 1989, Turner Bell won the Miss Missouri pageant title. Later the same year, she became the first delegate from the State of Missouri to win the Miss America crown. After winning the title of Miss America, Turner Bell became the national spokesperson for Ralston Purina’s Caring for Pets Program. In 1995, she was hired as a host of the Public Broadcasting Service animal show, “The Gentle Doctor”, and as co-host of KSDK’s entertainment magazine show, “Show Me St. Louis”, where she was nominated for multiple Emmy Awards. From 2001 to 2003, Turner Bell worked as an on-air contributor to CBS networks’ “The Early Show”, and from 2003 until 2012, she served as a staff correspondent for CBS News. In 2013, she was hired as an anchor for Arise News.

Turner Bell has hosted “48 Hours on WE” and appeared on Animal Planet's “Cats 101” and “Dogs 101” series. She has also hosted the Miss Missouri, Miss Florida, and Miss Georgia pageants, and was a Miss America Pageant judge in 1997 and 2011. Turner Bell has appeared as a guest on numerous television programs including “The Late Show with David Letterman”, “Oprah”, and the “Today” show. In addition, she has served as a motivational speaker for over twenty years.

Turner Bell’s honors include the University of Missouri - Columbia, Black Alumni Organization's Distinguished Alumni Award; the Outstanding Young Alumnus Award from the College of Agriculture, Arkansas State University; Outstanding Alumnus Award from the University of Missouri-Columbia; and the First Place award for Outstanding Reporting from the New York Association of Black Journalists. In 1998, she was named a Distinguished Alumna of Arkansas State University, where she established the Debbye Turner Scholarship and the Gussie Turner Memorial Scholarship. Turner Bell received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, and was inducted into the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame in October of 1994.

She has served on local, state and national boards, including the Children’s Miracle Network, the National Council on Youth Leadership, the Missouri Division of Youth Services, the Mathews-Dickey Boys Club, and the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council as part of the National Institutes of Health. She served as director of the Consortium of Doctors from 1994 to 1995.

Turner Bell lives in the New York City area with her husband and daughter.

Debbye Turner Bell was interviewed by “The HistoryMakers” on August 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.229

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/12/2014

Last Name

Turner Bell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Lynn

Schools

University of Missouri

Arkansas State University

Jonesboro High School

Douglas MacArthur Junior High School

East Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Debrah

Birth City, State, Country

Honolulu

HM ID

BEL07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Hawaii

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/19/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pepperoni pizza and thanksgiving dinner

Short Description

Broadcast journalist and veterinarian Debbye Turner Bell (1965 - ) is a motivational speaker and anchor for Arise News. In 1989, she became the first delegate from the State of Missouri to win the title of Miss America.

Employment

Arise News

CBS News

Self Employed

DOGS 101/CATS 101 Television Shows

48 Hours on WE

CBS Networks' "The Early Show"

"ShowMe St. Louis"

PBS "The Gentle Doctor"

Ralston Purina's Caring for Pets Program

Miss America 1990

Dillard's Department Store

Safeway Food Store

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Debbye Turner Bell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Debbye Turner Bell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her mother's effort to find her biological father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her great aunt, Gussie Lee Jones Turner's, domestic work in Kennett, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her paternal family ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her paternal great-grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Debbye Turner Bell describes spending time at her paternal great-grandparents' farm in South Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about the history of Juneteenth and her great-great grandparents' freedom

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Debbye Turner Bell talks briefly about the farmland her uncle inherited from her great-grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Debbye Turner Bell describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Debbye Turner Bell describes growing up with a parent in the military and her father's teaching appointment at Arkansas State University

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Debbye Turner Bell remembers staying with her aunt while her father was serving in the U.S. military during the Vietnam War

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her father's experience in the Vietnam War

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her parents' divorce and co-parenting

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Debbye Turner Bell describes home life, including her mother's taking in of mental health patients and Thursday night Bible study group

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about competing for her mother's attention as a girl

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Debbye Turner Bell describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood neighborhood in Jonesboro, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about developing a relationship with her older sister after the death of their mother in 1990

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Debbye Turner Bell explains the unconventional spelling of her name

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Debbye Turner Bell describes wanting to be a veterinarian and volunteering in a veterinary clinic

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her houseful of pets

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her grade school years in Jonesboro, Arkansas

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Debbye Turner Bell describes growing up in a predominantly white neighborhood in Jonesboro, Arkansas

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Debbye Turner Bell remembers discussing race and current events at home

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her racially integrated friend group

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her experiences in both St. Paul A.M.E. Church and Carter Temple CME Church in Jonesboro, Arkansas

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her acceptance of Christianity and learning to read the Bible

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Debbye Turner Bell describes how she first got involved in pageants

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her experience in the Southern pageant circuit

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Debbye Turner Bell describes entering the Miss Arkansas pageant three times and placing first runner-up twice

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about Vanessa Williams winning the Miss America title in 1984

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Debbye Turner Bell remembers the statement she made about her racial identity at her first press conference as Miss America

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Debbye Turner Bell remembers an article written about her by HistoryMaker Lynn Norment for Ebony magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about being the first brown-skinned African American winner of the Miss America pageant

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Debbye Turner Bell describes attempting to address a controversial statement she made at the Miss America press conference

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about differences between Miss America and Miss USA and describes how she financed pageant competitions

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about body type and typecasting in beauty pageants

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Debbye Turner Bell describes the Miss America pageant scholarship prizes

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Debbye Turner Bell describes differences in the contemporary Miss America pageant

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about controversy in the Miss America and Miss USA pageants

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Debbye Turner Bell describes winning the Miss America title in 1990, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Debbye Turner Bell describes winning the Miss America title in 1990, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Debbye Turner Bell describes Miss America's yearlong responsibilities

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Debbye Turner Bell remembers appearing on the David Letterman Show

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her platform as Miss America and finishing her degree in veterinary medicine after giving up the title

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about her first job out of veterinary school as the spokesperson for Ralston Purina's Caring for Pets program

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Debbye Turner Bell explains how she got started in broadcast television anchoring 'Show Me St. Louis,' an entertainment show in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Debbye Turner Bell describes meeting her husband and getting married, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Debbye Turner Bell describes meeting her husband and getting married, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Debbye Turner Bell explains how she got to CBS Networks' 'The Early Show' as an on-air contributor and resident veterinarian

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Debbye Turner Bell explains why she left the CBS network in 2012

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Debbye Turner Bell explains how she was hired as an anchor for the global cable network, Arise News

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Debbye Turner Bell describes the mission of global cable network, Arise News

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Debbye Turner Bell considers her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about parenting

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Debbye Turner Bell considers her regrets

Tape: 5 Story: 15 - Debbye Turner Bell shares her advice for the up-and-coming generation

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her experience as an anchor-reporter on 'Show Me St. Louis'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Debbye Turner Bell describes learning to be a broadcast journalist at 'Show Me St. Louis'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Debbye Turner Bell describes her experience on CBS', 'The Early Show' and talks about the advantages and disadvantage of its number three time slot

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Debbye Turner Bell talks about traveling as a reporter for Arise News

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Debbye Turner Bell describes lessons from her career in broadcast journalism

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Debbye Turner Bell narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

9$2

DATitle
Debbye Turner Bell describes her experience in the Southern pageant circuit
Debbye Turner Bell remembers the statement she made about her racial identity at her first press conference as Miss America
Transcript
So the journey of being in these pageants as a smart young women who didn't necessarily buy into the pageantry of it, what was your journey? How did you experience going from contest to contest?$$What you first have to understand is not only was I in a pageant, The Miss America System, I was in the Miss America System in the South. And pageants to this day are a big, you know, bouffant business. And there were girls who were born, bred, and burped to be Miss Somebody, so I entered the system with, you know, no preconceived notions of a it would be like and no investment really in whether or not it affected my life. It was just something fun to do, win some scholarship money. And I entered with these girls who had been raised for this. And so first it served as a challenge because now in some ways, I'm in a foreign land. So now, I've got to learn a new language and a new way of being. You know, I didn't wear makeup, I barely wore dresses and I wasn't really a tom girl, just wasn't bothered with those things. So it was a challenge for me just to sort of figure out the game and to beat the others who had been playing it for a long time. So at first that's sort of what it was, it was just a game to me. And it took I believe three tries for me to win a local. I went to the Miss Arkansas pageant for the first time, again, this is a big hairy deal. And most girls on their first time don't do anything. I made the top ten and that got people's attention. And I remember one of the pageant people saying, "You really have potential. If you would actually apply yourself, you could do very well." So that was the first time it ever entered my mind that maybe I could excel at this, maybe I could be Miss America. So I set about to win another local to take me back to Miss Arkansas. It took a couple tries, went back to Miss Arkansas the second time and I got first runner-up, which again, big deal for a second try. And then I was told, if you can just win a state pageant, you will be Miss America. And that was when I set as my sight to be Miss America, it was no longer just about the scholarship. I'd learned more about the system; who this organization is; who Miss America is, what she does. I was like, oh that would be kind of cool.$I will tell you though, my aspiration to be Miss America was not connected to Vanessa [Williams] in any way, I was already involved in pageants by the time she won and I already had my own reasons for wanting to be there and wanting to win. So much so, that when I won, the first thing that Miss America does as Miss America, is goes into her first official press conference. There were dozens if not more than a hundred members of the press from around the world in the pressroom. And I remember after I walked the runway and waved and, you know, all the girls surround the winner and, you know, was congratulated and hugged by all my fellow contestants. The head of the Miss America Pageant at that time, Leonard Horn said, "I'm gonna walk you to your press conference. They're gonna ask you all kinds of things. We don't limit what you can talk about. You can say whatever you want to say; you can talk about whatever you want to talk about, but as an attorney"--because he was---"let me just caution you, what you say can and will be held against you." And I was so high on just winning Miss America, "Okay." And I, you know, I walk in, the flashbulbs go off. And it's important to understand, a part of competing for Miss America is preparing for a private, job-style interview. The most rigorous questioning I've ever endured. And so I knew how to answer questions. That's a part of what helped me win the pageant. So I didn't feel any intimidation, I felt like I was fully prepared for this because that's part of the competition. They want to know can you handle this. I was not prepared for the very first question. Second question, the first one was how did--what were you thinking when you walked down the runway? Second question. "How does it feel to be a representative for little black girls out there as the new Miss America?" I'd never thought of myself in that way. I was just this veterinary kid who wanted to pay for her education, from Arkansas. And while I was very aware of my ethnicity growing up, it didn't define me and I was caught of guard and I gave a poor answer. I said, "Being black is not everything that I am, it's just a part of who I am." And I went down, "I'm a veterinarian--or I'm a veterinary student, I play the drums, I was raised by a single--"I mean I went down this list of the things that define me and again I said it, "It's just part of who I am." And the next question came. As you might imagine, that didn't go over well with many members of the African American community, because what I didn't get in my youth at that time, was the significance of the achievement coming after Vanessa. We had a shot, didn't go so well, I was the next shot. And I only saw it as it related to me, not as the significance in society. And I spent a lot of my year explaining that statement.

Gloria Scott

Gloria Dean Randle Scott was the eleventh president of Bennett College located in Greensboro, North Carolina. She was the second female chief administrator at Bennett College. Scott was born on April 14, 1938 in Houston, Texas to Juanita and Freeman Randle. She attended Blackshear Elementary School and Jack Yates Secondary School where she graduated from in 1955. A scholarship fund afforded Scott the opportunity to attend Indiana University. She received her B.A. degree and M.A. degree in zoology in 1959 and 1960, respectively, and her Ph.D. in higher education in 1965.

In 1961, Scott’s career began as a research associate in genetics and embryology at Indiana University Institution for Psychiatric Research. During this time, she worked as a biology instructor at Marion College until 1965, making her the first African American instructor at a predominately white college in Indianapolis, Indiana at the time. Scott held the positions as Dean of Students and Deputy Director of Upward Bound at Knoxville College in 1965 and as the Special Assistant to the President and Educational Research Planning Director at North Carolina A&T University in 1967. During her ten year tenure, Scott continued to make history by becoming the first African American National President of the Girl Scouts in 1975. She then served as the Institutional Research Planning Director at Texas Southern University for a year before becoming Vice President at Clark College in Atlanta in 1977.

After ten years at Clark College, Scott became the President of Bennett College in 1987, thus fulfilling her life’s mission to educate African American women.

Scott is the recipient of three honorary doctorate degrees. She has been featured in several publications such as Who’s Who Among American Women, Famous Texas Women and Essence magazine.

Scott is married to Dr. Will B. Scott, a professor of sociology.

Scott was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 8, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.055

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/8/2007

Last Name

Scott

Maker Category
Middle Name

Dean Randle

Occupation
Schools

Blackshear Elementary School

Jack Yates High School

Indiana University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Gloria

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

SCO05

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Any. Especially teens.

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - 0 - $500

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Any. Especially teens.
Special Interest: Women's groups, education, girl scouts, defense groups, religious groups, and social action groups,.

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Favorite Quote

We Must Do And Not Just Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

4/14/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Corpus Christi

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Peach Cobbler

Short Description

College president Gloria Scott (1938 - ) was the president of Benedict College and was the first African American national president of the Girl Scouts of America.

Employment

Indiana University Institute for Psychiatric Research

Marian College

Knoxville College

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Texas Southern University

Clark College

Bennett College

Girl Scouts USA

Favorite Color

Red

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gloria Scott's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott talks about her older siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott talks about her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes her younger sister

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gloria Scott describes her youngest sister, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott describes her youngest sister, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls attending kindergarten at the Fourth Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers enrolling at Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott talks about her father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her father's interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her neighborhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott remembers the Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott remembers her baptism

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her experiences of color discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott remembers Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott remembers her paper route

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott remembers her experiences as a Girl Scout

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott describes her aspiration to become a doctor

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes Jack Yates Senior High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Gloria Scott remembers attending the prom at Jack Yates Senior High School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott remembers Bernie Harper

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her decision to attend Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers William S. Holland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott recalls her arrival at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her studies at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott recalls meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott remembers the delay of her marriage license

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her early career in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls being hired as a dean at Knoxville College in Knoxville, Tennessee

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott recalls her civil rights activism with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes Stokely Carmichael's visit to Knoxville College

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott talks about school desegregation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott recalls the accreditation of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott recalls working at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her vice presidency of Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her presidency of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott talks about Johnnetta B. Cole and Niara Sudarkasa

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott talks about the accreditation of historically black colleges

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her work with the Girl Scouts

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott remembers promoting diversity in Girl Scouting

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her presidency of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott recalls leading the National Urban League's education committee

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes her work with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her conflict with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott talks about the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes her community involvement, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes her community involvement, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott talks about her presidency of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 3

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott reflects upon her life

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott recalls the St. John Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

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DATitle
Gloria Scott remembers the Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas
Gloria Scott describes her work with the Girl Scouts
Transcript
So now we're in elementary school [Blackshear Elementary School, Houston, Texas].$$Okay. Um-hm.$$What type of student were you?$$Um-hm.$$Well I should say what type of child were you? We know you were a good student.$$Um-hm. Well, I really was a child, I guess that you would probably call square, because, and then again, the early adults to whom I was exposed, starting I guess with kindergarten and my parents [Juanita Bell Randle and Freeman Randle] and the people around us, all were about having you do right and I attributed a lot of my development as the person to my church. I said, I was for a while, I was the only person in my house who went to church. This is before my sister [Greta Randle] and brother [Billy Randle] came back and before the other children were born, I was staying alone with my parents. And Rose Hill [Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church, Houston, Texas] was right across the street and as later life, I would describe that I was a high energy child, I used up a lot of peoples energies, I mean I was like a sponge and I was attracted to the church and I, I said it many days, the church probably helped keep me out of a lot of trouble, because I would, I would go over--this is the truth and this sounds weird to people when they say, when I say this. I think on Monday night may- maybe they had prayer meeting, I would go over and sit in the back of the church for prayer meeting. On Tuesday night, they had something else, I would go over. On Wednesday night they had Christian benevolence meeting. Now, I learned probably as a very young girl what a benevolence fund was, how people in the church would put their money together so that when people needed loans and things, benevolence and I, 'cause I asked, what the word was, I, I was inquisitive like that. If there was something I didn't really know, I'd ask. And Mr. Milligan [ph.], the husband of the ma- of the woman I was telling who'd take--I would go home with them on Sundays he worked for the post office, he was the person in charge of that, then I'd go to choir rehearsal and then Sunday school teacher, teachers' meeting on Friday night, I would go over and sit and listen. So, the church, a lot of that and then the people there would take us on field trips and we always had six weeks of summer bible school, you know, it isn't like now days, it's two days or whatever? We would have six weeks and it was great for the children, because we had nothing else really to do. And so that kind of helped to shape me to be the kind of person that I was and to really learn. And when I was seven, we were practicing for the Easter play. We had Easter, churches, you know, used to have Easter programs on Easter Sunday, and we were doing the, going to reenact the crucifixion and so we were practicing on Friday evening, Good Friday before Sunday and this, the girls were playing Mary Magdalene and all the others and the boy had the cross on his shoulder and, you know, the--the various things and so we were going down the aisle and so the girls were crying and we were, and so our, our director said, "Okay, you all can stop, that was good, we're all ready for Sunday." And so I remember sitting down and I was crying, I sat in the chair and I was crying, and so she came over she said, "Gloria [HistoryMaker Gloria Scott], you can stop crying now. It's all over, it's good. You all are doing good," and I said to her, "Did they really kill him just because he was doing good?" And she said, in later years, again as an adult, she said, that you can't imagine, "I said, 'What, what--if, I said, yes?'" And I said, "Well, if that's the truth, I want to be like him and I want to be a Christian, so I want to be baptized Sunday." They always baptize on Easter Sunday, and she told us later, she said, "I said, 'Oh girl, unh-uh, your mama, no you can't just decide you wanna be baptized. No you--I have to go and ask.'" I said, "Well, will you go and ask my mother?" She said, "I have to go and ask your mother." Well, we lived right across the street. So we went over to my house and again at this time my mother was not in church, nobody in my family was in church so she told my mother that I had said that I wanted to be baptized. So my mother said, "Girl, you don't know what you're talking about," and I said, "I do, I wanna be like Jesus." And she said, "Oh, you don't know what you're talking about," and I said, "I do, yes I do, I do want to be like Jesus, I want to do good; I want to do the right things." So eventually she relinquished and so she had to get a dress, get a white dress for me for Sunday to be baptized. So I was baptized on Sund- Easter Sunday morning, and nobody in my family was there.$Now, s- stepping out of the academic arena--$$Um-hm.$$--we need to talk a little bit about your involvement with the Girl Scouts [Girl Scouts of the United States of America].$$All right, sure. I was a girl, Girl Scout here in Houston [Texas] in San Jacinto Girl Scout Council and I think a little bit earlier I told you about that, about going to Oklahoma and all that. So, when I went away to college [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana] I was not involved and at my job at Knoxville [Knoxville College, Knoxville, Tennessee] as dean of students, at that time that was in 1965, a Dr. Jeanne L. Noble who was on the board of Girl Scouts, national board, who was one of my mentors, she had been president of Delta Sigma Theta [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority] when I was the second vice president and they had gotten Girl Scouting to try out a new program, called Campus Gold, to try to look at young women who had gone, who'd graduated and had gone to college who were Girl Scouts and to see could we not get them as volunteers to learn to be troop leaders and so forth. And so, she called up and ha- had the Girl Scouts ask me if I would have a Campus Gold group on Knoxville's campus and we did. So we created that Girl Scout group and we sponsored three troops for girls, Brownies, Juniors and ca- two, two Brownies and a Junior troop in the low income neighborhood right around Knoxville College. And it was a fantastic thing for the college girls as well as the students so. And in Girl Scouting once you start doing something as a volunteer, they keep, you know they keep rolling over and so, the next thing I knew I was asked to serve on a regional committee and that to help select kids for international opportunities, and I said I would do that because also, I wanted to always try to make sure that things are equal and the girls, black girls had a acqu- equal access to those. So I served on that group and then we moved to North Carolina to Greensboro at A&T [Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University], and while I, when I went there, Girl Scouting was just undergoing kind of a realignment like it's doing right now nationally, and council coverage and a new council had been created and I was asked to serve on a committee to help set up the personnel policies and all for that council and to help them recruit the first executive director. So I did and I did another volunteer job.