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Dolores D. Wharton

Civic leader Dolores D. Wharton was born on July 3, 1927 in New York City to V. Kenneth Duncan and Josephine Bradford. Wharton attended New York University, Danbury State Teacher’s College, and the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York City, where she studied modern dance with Martha Graham. She received her B.F.A. degree from Chicago State Teacher’s College in the 1960s.

Wharton and her husband, Clifton R. Wharton, Jr., lived in Southeast Asia from 1958 to 1964. Following her return to the United States, Wharton wrote Contemporary Artists of Malaysia: A Biographic Survey, the first academic survey ever written on Malaysian art. Wharton became the first lady of Michigan State University in 1969, when her husband was appointed president of the university. As first lady, Wharton strengthened the university’s relationship with the greater Lansing, Michigan area, and with the student body. President Gerald Ford appointed Wharton to the National Council on the Arts of the National Endowment for the Arts in 1971. She became the first woman, and the first African American, elected to the board of the Michigan Bell Telephone Company in 1974, as well as the boards of the Kellogg Company and the Phillips Petroleum Company in 1976. Wharton initiated and chaired both company’s first social responsibility committees. She was also the first woman, and the first African American, elected to the board of the Gannett Company in 1979. Wharton went on to establish the Fund for Corporate Interns, Inc. (later the Fund for Corporate Initiatives) in 1980. In 1984, Wharton expanded FCI to include the young executives program, a week-long seminar that provided corporate leadership development to minority and women corporate employees.

Throughout her career, Wharton served on numerous other boards including the New York Telephone Company, Tulane University’s board of visitors, The Key Bank National Association, Golub, Inc., the Corporation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NPR, and COMSAT. Wharton was also served on the board of the Michigan Council on the Arts, the Aspen Institute, the Asia Society, CSIS, the SUNY Fashion Institute of Technology, the New York City Center, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Glimmerglass Opera, among others. Wharton has been awarded nine honorary degrees.

Wharton and her husband, Clifton R. Wharton, Jr., have two sons, Clifton Wharton III and Bruce Wharton.

Dolores Wharton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2016 and October 4, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.001

Sex

Female

Interview Date

07/14/2016 |and| 10/4/2016

Last Name

Wharton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

D.

Schools

Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School

New York University

Western Connecticut State University

Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theater

University of Chicago

Main Street School

Danbury High School

Bethel High School

First Name

Dolores

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

WHA03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Wonderful.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/3/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Asian Food

Short Description

Civic leader Dolores D. Wharton (1927 - ) was the first woman, and the first African American, elected to the boards of Michigan Bell Telephone Company, Kellogg Company, Phillips Petroleum Company, and Gannett Company.

Employment

The Fund for Corporate Initiatives

Favorite Color

Multicolor

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dolores D. Wharton's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls the social scene in Philadelphia and New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers her family home in New York City, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers her family home in New York City, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton describes the Little Red School House in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her childhood activities in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about race relations in New York City during the 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about her stepfather, James W. Owens

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her high school experiences in Danbury, Connecticut, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her high school experiences in Danbury, Connecticut, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her mother's second marriage to James W. Owens

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about racial boundaries in Danbury, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her mother's departure from the Episcopal church

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers meeting her husband, Clifton R. Wharton, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls living in New York City and Connecticut during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers the military service of her friends and family during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her dance training in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers reconnecting with Clifton R. Wharton, Jr. after World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls being neighbors with Marian Anderson in Danbury, Connecticut

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her wedding, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her wedding, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls living with her husband in Harlem, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls attending the University of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her lifestyle in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls moving back to New York City in the late 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers living in Singapore with her family

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls the art scene in Southeast Asia in the early 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her dance program in Malaysia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about her children's education in Malaysia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her husband's appointment as president of Michigan State University

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about her role as first lady of Michigan State University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about her support of her husband's career at Michigan State University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers student protests at Michigan State University in the 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls joining the Michigan Council for the Arts

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls visiting Michigan universities with her husband

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about joining corporate boards in Michigan

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton describes the fundraising campaigns at Michigan State University

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her husband's presidency of the State University of New York System

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about corporate social responsibility committees

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton describes the Fund for Corporate Initiatives' programs

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Dolores D. Wharton's interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls joining the board of Michigan Bell Telephone Company

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about her corporate boards responsibilities

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls joining the board of the New York Telephone Company

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers joining the board of the Phillips Petroleum Company

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her experiences on the board of Phillips Petroleum Company

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her travels to Norway

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers corporate board members

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls founding corporate social responsibility committees

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about her experiences on the board of the Kellogg Company

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton describes responsibilities at Michigan State University

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls joining the board of the Gannett Company, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her not-for-profit board memberships in Albany, New York

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls mentoring college undergraduates in Albany, New York

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Dolores D. Wharton describes the Fund for Corporate Initiatives

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her collaboration with the Aspen Institute

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about the Fund for Corporate Initiatives participants

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her internship programs

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about the age limit rules on corporate boards

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls traveling to South Africa with the Kellogg Company

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her visit to Soweto, South Africa

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls the Kellogg Company's presence in South Africa

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls her husband's appointment as deputy secretary of state

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton remembers Cyrus Vance and Grace Sloane Vance

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about her board activities during the 1990s

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls founding a charity in memory of her son, Clifton R. Wharton III

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Dolores D. Wharton recalls retiring from various boards and non-profit programs

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Dolores D. Wharton talks about the process of writing her memoirs

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Dolores D. Wharton reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Dolores D. Wharton reflects upon her life

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Dolores D. Wharton describes her plans for the future

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Dolores D. Wharton narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Dolores D. Wharton narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

4$6

DATitle
Dolores D. Wharton remembers meeting her husband, Clifton R. Wharton, Jr.
Dolores D. Wharton describes the Fund for Corporate Initiatives' programs
Transcript
Now you're in high school. When did you meet Cliff [HistoryMaker Clifton R. Wharton, Jr.]? You were in high school, correct?$$Yes. There was no social--there was no real social interaction with young men in, in Danbury [Connecticut]. There was one--no, I won't go there--and he would (unclear).$$Well, I read that you were--you had a date with someone else, and then when you met--you went on a date with a cadet or (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh, that was--yeah, well, that was much--that was later.$$It was later, okay.$$That was later.$$All right.$$Mother [Josephine Bradford Owens] wanted me to interact more with--well, I think she did. I think she wanted me to go up to meet--she was interacting with her cousin, the Fitzgeralds, who were in Boston [Massachusetts]; they had been--they were related to the Bradfords, the mother. Bertha Fitzgerald was related to--she was related to the Bradfords, and mother went once to visit them, and she had me going up to Boston. I went to Boston once to visit my cousin, and she had a party, a birthday party, and Cliff was supposedly at that party and I was supposed to have met him then. I don't remember it--having met him; I had a lot of young men paying attention to me (laughter). The year later, Betty [Betty Fitzgerald] invited me up for a--she was at Radcliffe [Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Massachusetts], and she invited me up to a dance at Radcliffe, and she got Cliff as my date, and we met at Harvard Yard [Cambridge, Massachusetts].$$How old were you?$$I think I was what--eighteen? We went to--we met in Harvard Yard, he took us to Adams House--for dinner at Adams House, and then we went back to Betty's dorm and got dressed for the dance; it was black tie, but--well, it might have been semiformal. The girls were in long dresses. And we went to the dance, we had a lovely time--just grand, just really delightful. I've described this as, I felt like I was--what was it--Sarah [sic. Scarlett O'Hara] in 'Gone with the Wind,' dancing with Clark Gable. Ooh! He was gorgeous (laughter), he really was so handsome. He's tall and thin, and he was Mr. Harvard, and oh, it was lovely. Then the dance was almost over and Cliff asked Betty and me if we would like to come to his church the next morning, where he was serving as an acolyte, and we accepted. We--you know, an extension of the weekend. So, the next morning we got on the "T," and went to the black part of Boston--Roxbury [Boston, Massachusetts]--and we went to the church. We were sitting in the pews quietly, and we thought we were being very quiet, and up comes a little white priest with all of his British accent and pulled back and said, "How dare you speak at the House of God!" Well, we just disintegrated, the two of us sitting in those pews. So, off he goes, and he goes back to where the acolytes are, and he tells this story back there, with the acolytes, of these two girls who happen to be there inside the vestry, talking. Can you imagine that? Well, Cliff knew full well who it was (laughter), of course. And the ceremony began, and he was going through with all of his incense and waving all this smoke all over the place. That passed, and then we went outside, and there were lots of people outside doing their--you know, the little old ladies with their bonnets; they were all black. It was a totally black church, and Cliff got his mother [Harriette Banks Wharton] and introduced me to his mother. His mother was very stern. She was a schoolteacher. She was very much a schoolteacher, and she was very busy greeting people--her friends, the other members of the congregation. And she greeted me and then she left, she went off someplace, and I was talking to Cliff. And then she came back suddenly and said, "Cliff, Cliff, you have to excuse yourself from these young ladies, I want--," and then she said, "he has to go, he has to meet some friends of mine." So, off he went, and we said, "Goodbye," and Betty and I got back on the "T" and I came back to Danbury.$You wanna get into all this?$$Sure.$$I went to the corporations--the major corporations there in Albany [New York]. I just had my secretary call up and say, "Mrs. Wharton [HistoryMaker Dolores D. Wharton] would like to come and have an appointment with you," and I went to see all the CEOs and human resource people, and talked--sat down--well, I--first I, with Cliff's [HistoryMaker Clifton R. Wharton, Jr.] help, I made a questionnaire for these--to find out what was going on in the corporations in Albany, why the blacks, why the women were not moving up the corporate ladder. What's happening? And I went to the CEOs and I--a number of them--and found out a lot about what might be able to be done, and got some ideas, and I talked about it a lot here and there, and got a contact with a chap who was the head of the school of--dean of the school of business and--but basically, Cliff and I really talked about what could be done. And we organized a program [Fund for Corporate Interns, Inc.; Fund for Corporate Initiatives, Inc.] and I went to the dean of the school of business and asked him to come aboard and to do some teaching with the young people, but first I went to the corporations and asked them to give me summer internships in their companies for women and minorities to work in their companies for a real job--a job with a beginning, a middle and an ending--just not a gofer's job. I negotiated this and a decent salary for them, and knowing--and telling them that on the weekends those young people would be coming to me and I would be teaching--I would be training them. I got a let- ooh, I got a number of corporations to come aboard saying, "Okay Dolores Wharton, we'll give you jobs for these kids." I went to the deans of the schools of business and the universities all around--Union [Union College, Schenectady, New York] and RPI [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York]--all around, and I got those deans to take my material to their bright students that don't--you can't deal with them if they're not bright. I couldn't do it, I couldn't do it. I'm small, I can't do it. So, for the young people to apply to me to come for the internships--these jobs that I had gotten for them--and I placed them, and gave them the jobs, and they went off on--in the summer, throughout the entire summer, to their jobs, but they came to me on weekends, and that's when I trained them where I had this dean of the school of business from State University of New York in Albany [State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York]--and we trained them in person in various aspects of what you do in developing your relationships to your colleagues on the board in your company. And we also gave them writing, I--one of our--Cliff's colleagues there, we taught them writing for the business sector. They don't always write for business, they write for their compositions. But writing for the business sector, I gave them speech, I got a speech teacher from the youth theater; he taught them how to stand up and make presentations.$$Right.$$And I had lovely residents. I gave them--how to deal with people outside of their corporations when they would be invited to dinners, and that kind of thing. How do you introduce some people, one outstanding person to another? How do you behave yourself? Good program. And that's what we did on weekends. And I was told by the dean that when those--when my young people went out to get jobs at the university--when the recruiters came in to hire at the universities, my kids just turned out, they just got the jobs--they cleaned up because they knew how to behave themselves.$$How many students moved through that program?$$I don't really remember, but there were a--I know it's the other program, the young executive program, that I remember. We put a couple a hundred through that one, and I (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And does it exist anymore?$$No. Once I got to a certain age, I'd gone off my boards. I--you know, I--at seventy, I had to go off.$$Okay.$$And I didn't have the contacts anymore. Cliff didn't have the contacts. We used our contacts, that was our faculty--our contacts. They were brilliant (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So it lived as long as you were on the board.$$Yes. And also, other institutions were beginning to develop programs like--they were copying me, they really were. They were doing what I was doing, quite a few others. So it got so--and I didn't have to do this, so I decided it was time to close the doors.

Troy Carter

Music manager Troy Carter was born on November 14, 1972 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was raised in West Philadelphia, where he attended Huey Elementary and Sayre Middle School. In 1990, at the age of seventeen, Carter dropped out of West Philadelphia High School in pursuit of a career in the music industry.

Carter first worked for Will Smith and James Lassiter’s Overbrook Entertainment. He then joined Bad Boy Entertainment in 1995, where he worked with musical artists such as Notorious B.I.G. In 1999, Carter met and began to manage rapper Eve Jeffers. He subsequently co-founded his own management company called Erving Wonder, where he managed rap acts like Floetry and Nelly. In 2004, Erving Wonder was acquired by the Sanctuary Group.

In 2007, Carter was asked to manage Lady Gaga. That same year, he founded Coalition Media Group. In 2010, he established Coalition Media Group’s management division Atom Factory, where he serves as chairman and chief executive officer. Since then, Carter has managed the careers of numerous recording artists such as John Legend, Greyson Chance, Mindless Behavior, Priyanka Chopra, Lindsey Stirling, the Ceremonies, and John Mayer.

In 2011, he co-founded The Backplane, a Silicon Valley-based startup branding company. In 2012, he created A \ IDEA, a product development and branding agency, as well as AF Square, an angel fund and technology consultancy with investments in over sixty startup companies including Spotify, Warby Parker, Songza, Dropbox, Fab, and Uber. In addition, Carter has established a beverage company called POPwater.

Carter has served as an Aspen Institute Henry Crown Fellow and sits on the boards of The Grammy Foundation, the T.J. Martell Foundation, the United Nations Foundation Global Entrepreneurs Council and The Buckley School.

Troy Carter was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 9, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.244

Sex

Male

Interview Date

08/09/2014

Last Name

Carter

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Lemar

Occupation
Schools

Samuel B. Huey School

William L. Sayre High School

West Philadelphia High School

First Name

Troy

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

CAR31

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

You Can’t Fall Off The Floor.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

11/14/1972

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chinese

Short Description

Music manager Troy Carter (1972 - ) was the founder, chairman and chief executive officer of Atom Factory, Inc. He managed the careers of numerous recording artists including Lady Gaga, John Legend and John Mayer.

Employment

Overbrook Entertainment

Bad Boy Worldwide Entertainment Group

Erving Wonder

Coalition Media Group

Eve Jeffries (recording artist)

Atom Factory

Lady Gaga (recording artist)

The Backplane

AF Square

A \ IDEA

POPwater

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Troy Carter's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Troy Carter lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Troy Carter describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Troy Carter remembers his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Troy Carter describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Troy Carter talks about his father's research into his family lineage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Troy Carter remembers his parents' divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Troy Carter describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Troy Carter describes his early home life

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Troy Carter talks about his early interests

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Troy Carter describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Troy Carter describes his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Troy Carter talks about his father's incarceration, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Troy Carter talks about his father's incarceration, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Troy Carter talks about his father's accomplishments

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Troy Carter recalls his challenges during his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Troy Carter talks about the crack cocaine epidemic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Troy Carter remembers Lawrence Goodman

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Troy Carter recalls his early interest in music

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Troy Carter remembers getting into trouble as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Troy Carter recalls his mother's efforts to reform him and his brothers

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Troy Carter talks about his hip hop group, 2 Too Many

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Troy Carter talks about working with Will Smith and James Lassiter

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Troy Carter recalls the breakup of 2 Too Many

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Troy Carter remembers working with James Lassiter at Overbrook Entertainment in Beverly Hills, California

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Troy Carter reflects upon his time with James Lassiter

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Troy Carter remembers living in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Troy Carter talks about the mentorship of James Lassiter, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Troy Carter talks about the mentorship of James Lassiter, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Troy Carter recalls meeting P. Diddy

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Troy Carter talks about his experiences as a concert organizer in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Troy Carter remembers Kenny Gamble

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Troy Carter remembers the death of The Notorious B.I.G.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Troy Carter recalls managing Eve

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Troy Carter talks about his experiences as Eve's manager

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Troy Carter recalls selling Erving Wonder Entertainment to Sanctuary Records Group Ltd.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Troy Carter describes his experiences working for Sanctuary Records Group Ltd.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Troy Carter recalls reacquiring his company from Sanctuary Records Group Ltd.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Troy Carter talks about his professional setbacks in the mid-2000s

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Troy Carter remembers meeting Lady Gaga

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Troy Carter talks about his initial experiences as Lady Gaga's manager

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Troy Carter recalls using social media to market Lady Gaga

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Troy Carter talks about Lady Gaga's early tours

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Troy Carter describes Lady Gaga's sudden popularity

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Troy Carter talks about his working relationship with Lady Gaga

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Troy Carter reflects upon his success with Lady Gaga

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Troy Carter remembers his favorite Lady Gaga performance

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Troy Carter describes the logistics of Lady Gaga's international tours

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Troy Carter talks about celebrities' use of social media

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Troy Carter talks about the corporate structure of Atom Factory, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Troy Carter describes his clientele

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Troy Carter talks about his clients' philanthropic work

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Troy Carter describes his experiences as a technology investor

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Troy Carter describes the diversification of the Atom Factory, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Troy Carter talks about his technology company investments

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Troy Carter talks about the social media platform Backplane

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Troy Carter talks about ending his professional relationship with Lady Gaga

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Troy Carter talks about the importance of mentorship

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Troy Carter talks about his mentors

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Troy Carter reflects upon his connection to Reginald F. Lewis

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Troy Carter reflects upon the legacy of his generation

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Troy Carter describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Troy Carter talks about his family

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

5$6

DATitle
Troy Carter recalls meeting P. Diddy
Troy Carter reflects upon his connection to Reginald F. Lewis
Transcript
How do you get to Bad Boy [Bad Boy Records] at that time?$$I was doing--I was promoting these shows in Philly [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and you know I, I--the hip hop shows in Philly, nobody--none, none of the big promoters would touch the hip hop shows in Philly and you couldn't get them insured. They were really, really tough to get insurance for just because it would be violence and you know things like that would happen so nobody didn't want to touch it. So--and I loved the music and I would go and I would get money from guys in my neighborhood to go out and, and bring these acts from New York [New York] in to do these concerts. And--$$Would you get the place for it to be held?$$Yes, I would go, I would find the hall or the nightclub and you know, and you know, we would pay a rental fee and we would pay the acts you know a few thousand bucks [dollars] or whatever. And what I didn't know is you know those acts would turn out to be you know, Wu-Tang Clan, Notorious B.I.G. [Biggie Smalls; The Notorious B.I.G.], Jay-Z, Lil' Kim, Foxy Brown, so a lot of those acts you know we were the first promoters to bring them to Philly. And one of the concerts that I had, I was bringing Notorious B.I.G. to the, to the Penn, to University of Penn's campus [University of Pennsylvania] at the Civic Center [Philadelphia Convention Hall and Civic Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and one of his first concerts in Philly, I--one of the kids who was working on the show runs to the back and he said he you know, "B.I.G.'s not here yet. He's scheduled to be on stage in fifteen minutes. We got to call the manager." So, I called up the manager and you know I said, "Where the hell is B.I.G.? Where is he?" He said, "We're shooting this video right now in New York but you know we're going to still try to make it down in time." You know New York's two hours away from Philly. And, and they came two hours late, the show was over. And the guy who ran the music label was this guy named Puff, P. Diddy [Sean Combs] and he told the manager, Mark Pitts, he said, "You know what, let's give this guy his money back and let's give him another, another show. Let's go all hang out." So, we had this, we were having this after party at a club called Fever downtown [Club Fever, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], and I was asking Puff, I said, "You know what, what, what do you do? Like tell, tell me about what you do?" So, you know he's telling me you know, "I run, da, da, da, da, da, da." I said, "I want to come work for you." He said, "Your first job is to get me that girl behind the bar," (laughter) and I went up to the bar and I told the girl, I said, "Hey, this guy is--," you know. So, I made the, I made the introduction. Probably three or four weeks later I was, I was joining the internship program at Bad Boy Entertainment.$$So, where was Bad Boy located at that point?$$In New York City.$$No, but I mean what, what building?$$This--we were on 19th [Street] and 5th [Avenue] at the time.$So, you know a few weeks ago--and this was like my, it was, it was mind blowing. Because you know I read, I read the, I read you know Reginald Lewis' biography ['Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun?: How Reginald Lewis Created a Billion-Dollar Business Empire,' Reginald F. Lewis and Blair S. Walker] you know when I--in, in '95 [1995], '96 [1996], some- somewhere like when it first came out. And no, it was before that, maybe '93 [1993], and it blew my mind. I read this book probably fifteen, twenty times, over and over. And I always would think about this guy, what would he do? Like you know it just really, it was incredible. So, last year I spoke at this MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts] conference and I was coming off stage and this girl [Christina Lewis Halpern] walks over to me and she said, "You know I'm starting this foundation around black kids that code. I would love to talk to you about it." So, I said, "I'm in." I said, "Anything around computer science with young black kids I'm, I'm in." So, you know we, we're talking about it. So, a guy walks over and he has his lanyard on and she says, "Oh this is such and such. He, he, he worked with my father." And then I looked and it said the Reginald F. Lewis Foundation [New York, New York] and I said, "Your dad was Reginald Lewis [Reginald F. Lewis]?" She said, "Yes." I said "Look," I said, "I got chills." I said, "You have no idea the impact your dad has had on my life." I said, "I'm here on--today because of him. Like you have no idea." So, I'm getting excited, I'm talking to her about it. So, over the last year I helped her with it. Three weeks ago she had this thing at her house. And, and it was at her place, their, their place in the Hamptons [New York] and it was the launch of this, of the, the foundation that they launched, All Star Code. And me and my wife [Rebecca Carter] flew in and at the airport is this you know astute black gentleman at the airport and he says, "Mr. Carter [HistoryMaker Troy Carter], we've been waiting for you. The, you know, thank you for coming, dah, dah, dah." And I'm not, and I'm you know so he walks us to this car and it's a 1988 Bentley and we get in and he turns around and he says, "This was Mr. Lewis' car. And it, and you're sitting where Mr. Lewis used to sit." This--the guy was his but- was his butler and driver. So, now it's like--I was you know in the car, I was speechless because I never could have imagined sitting in his seat, going to his house and spending that time with his family, I never could have imagined being there. And so, you know, we stayed the night at the house and the next morning when we, when we were leaving Loida [Loida Nicolas Lewis] walked over to me and she said, "It's time for you to write your book." And I said, "Well you know I thought about it. I don't know if I, you know, if I want to do it, you know, I don't, you know I don't know if it, if it's time." And she said, "I'm telling you," she said, "you know my--," she's like my--, "I had to do my husband's book after he died." She said, "It's time for you to write your book." She said, "I'm going to introduce you to Blair [Blair S. Walker] who wrote my husband's book." This is how the world comes full circle. Monday she introduces, she sends out an email with, to Blair and Blair responds, "I've been looking for you." He said, "I've called your office. I've tried to get in touch with you. I've been wanting to write this book about you, you know because this is the next generation of what Reginald left behind, this is, this is for that next generation behind Reginald," because Reginald was about Wall Street and you know and leverage buyouts and that sort of thing. And to be able to talk to young black kids about technology and thinking--you know. So, and so now Blair and I are getting ready to start on, embark on this project.$$Thanks to Loida.$$Yep.