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Hazel Trice Edney

Journalist Hazel Trice Edney was born in Charlottesville, Virginia. She received her M.A. degree from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. Edney also graduated from Harvard University’s KSG Women and Power Executive Leadership program.

In 1987, Edney was hired as a reporter for the Richmond Afro-American newspaper. She went on to work as a staff writer for the Richmond Free Press until 1998, when she was awarded the William S. Wasserman Jr. Fellowship on the Press, Politics and Public Policy from Harvard University. In 2000, Edney was hired as the Washington, D.C. correspondent for the National Newspaper Publishers Association. Then, in 2007, she was appointed editor-in-chief of the NNPA News Service and Blackpressusa.com, serving in that role until 2010. Edney also worked as an investigative reporter as part of the NNPA NorthStar Investigative Reporting Program. While at NNPA, she covered the World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa in 2001; the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the Pentagon; Hurricane Katrina; and earthquake-ravaged Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

In 2010, Edney launched the Trice Edney News Wire. She also serves as president and CEO of Trice Edney Communications and editor-in-chief of the Trice Edney News Wire. Edney has worked as an adjunct professor of journalism at Howard University, and has served as interim executive director of the NNPA Foundation. She has appeared on the Tavis Smiley Show; CNN; C-Span, Bishop T.D. Jakes' Potter's Touch; The Al Sharpton Show; Washington Watch with Roland Martin; and the Washington Journal.

Edney’s awards include the New America Media Career Achievement Award; a fellowship at the Annenberg Institute for Justice in Journalism at the University of Southern California; the Lincoln University Unity Award in Media; the Tisdale Award; and NNPA Merit Awards, including the NNPA First Place Feature Story Merit Award in 1990 for her final interview with Virginia death row inmate Wilbert Lee Evans. She was also a congressional fellow in 1999 and 2000, and was the first African American woman inducted into the Virginia Communications Hall of Fame. Edney was named a "2008 Role Model" by the National Baptist Congress of Christian Education, and a "2010 Phenomenal Woman" by the Phenomenal Women’s Alliance. Hazel Trice Edney was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 6, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.339

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/3/2013

Last Name

Edney

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Trice

Occupation
Schools

Harvard University

Thomas Jefferson Elementary School

Louisa Elementary School

Louisa County High School

Saint Paul's College

Virginia Commonwealth University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Hazel

Birth City, State, Country

Charlottesville

HM ID

EDN01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Unto Everything There’s A Season And A Time For Every Purpose Under The Heavens

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/13/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Journalist Hazel Trice Edney (1960 - ) , founder of the Trice Edney News Wire, was editor-in-chief of the NNPA News Service and Blackpressusa.com. She was the first African American woman inducted into the Virginia Communications Hall of Fame.

Employment

Trice Edney Communications

Trice Edney News Wire

National Newspaper Publishers Association

BlackPressUSA.com

Richmond Free Press

Richmond Afro-American

Howard University

Greater Abyssinia Baptist Church

Greater Mount Calvary Holy Church

WTVR-TV

WFTH Radio

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hazel Trice Edney's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her mother's singing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her mother's favorite songs

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her father's military service, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her father's military service, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her early memories of her father

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her early home

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her community in Louisa, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers the desegregation of Louisa public schools

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the difficulties at home

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers the birth of her son

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls seeing a vision of an angel as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about an inspiring teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her behavior in school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her interest in music

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her early encounters with black media

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her decision to pursue collegiate study

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers marrying Eugene Edney, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the end of her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers transferring to Virginia Commonwealth University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the challenges in leaving her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the emotional support she had while finishing school

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working at WTVR-TV in Richmond

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls being the news director at WFTH radio station

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working freelance at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about working full time at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coworkers at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes Richmond, Virginia's political climate

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls major stories she covered at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her success as a political news reporter

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her move to the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her coverage of the L. Douglas Wilder's gubernatorial election

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working with media leaders at the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the highlights of her work at the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about contemporary instances of racial discrimination

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers being offered a fellowship at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers influential instructors at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls speaking at her Harvard University graduation

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her experiences as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about becoming a correspondent at the National Newspaper Publishers Association

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers covering the 2000 U.S. Election scandal

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the events of September 11, 2001, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the events of September 11, 2001, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coverage of Hurricane Katrina, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coverage of Hurricane Katrina, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls flying with the family of Rosa Parks

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about a lack of recognition for female leaders in African American civil rights organizations

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the similarities of discrimination against individuals of African descent worldwide

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers covering the 2008 U.S. elections

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about the importance of accountability in black leadership, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about the importance of accountability in black leadership, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls founding the Trice Edney News Wire

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her work at the Trice Edney Newswire

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her presidency of the Capital Press Club

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her experiences as a professor at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her encounters with racial slurs throughout her life

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Hazel Trice Edney talks about her decision to pursue collegiate study
Hazel Trice Edney recalls major stories she covered at the Richmond Afro-American
Transcript
When you were a senior then in high school [Louisa County High School, Mineral, Virginia], are you in the--you're in a school play, you're doing better in school? You feel energized; you won the contest. What did your counselors tell you about college?$$ They didn't. I sought them out. I, I had to go and seek out the counselors. You know, I wa- I had been the bad girl and who had suddenly become, you know, sort of like the star. And, and everybody was watching to see what was gonna happen next, but nobody said, "You know what, let me sit down and talk to you about college." I just suddenly decided in a conversation one day with a government teacher, Mr. Clutter [ph.]. I had written a story--a paper about John F. Kennedy [President John Fitzgerald Kennedy], and he was discussing the paper with me. It was something about it he disagreed with. Maybe I didn't do my research or something. It was something about he was scolding me. And I threw my head back and I said, "Well, I'm going to college" (laughter). And I didn't know--I, I don't even know why that came up at that moment, but--or why I said it at that time, but I--that was the first time I declared I'm going to college. And it was fra- and that was in the eleventh grade, and that's when I began to seek out the guidance counselors. And one of them told me actually about Saint Paul's College in Lawrenceville [Virginia], and they thought that I could possibly get in. And so in the twelfth grade I applied to Saint Paul's; and surely they accepted me. That was my, my bright--I always tell people that was my HBCU [historically black colleges and universities] cred.$What were some of the big stories in, in Richmond [Virginia] that you remember, or the memorable stories?$$ The memorable stories pertain to usually the, the, the pain and suffering of, of black people. There was a story, for example, about a, a food stamp line that stretched for blocks. You know, I wrote this story--that stretched for blocks in the wintertime, in, in the cold, in, in the summertime, in the sweltering heat, you had pregnant mothers. You had elderly women, et cetera who had to wait outside for their food stamps. And I would notice this line year after year, and finally I inquired, "What is this line?" It was in August that particular year. And I went inside the facility where they got their food stamps. There was no water, no air conditioning. It was like third world. I hate to use that term, but that's what it was like, literally. This was like--it couldn't be America happening. And so I wrote a story on it, and that story impacted the public policy pertaining to that particular food stamp distributor. The city manager at that time, who was Robert [ph.], Bob, actually cut the contract--ended the contract for that particular distributor and moved the, the recipients to another facility that--in which they could pick up their food stamps in a much more humane condition. And at the same time--and I don't take credit for this, but it just happened to have--happen at the same time. So it could have been my story that did it. Virginia went to like a stagger system in the, the food stamp recipients picking up their food stamps. They didn't all pick 'em up on the same day that caused that humongous line. And so a lot happened after that story broke that I, I believe brought hu- you know, humanity to the people who were suffering there. There were so many other stories. I remember doing a story on, on this--on seeing homeless people sleeping in paper--in cardboard boxes outside the shelter at night in the dead of winter. And we took pictures of these cardboard boxes with these people in them outside, and it was on the front page of the Afro [Richmond Afro-American; Afro-American Newspapers]. And then the next day, it was on the front page of the white daily--the Richmond Times-Dispatch. And so in many instances the stories that we were doing were followed by the white press, and this is just at the Afro. This is before I'd go to the Richmond Free Press. And, and--$$Now this is the opposite of what happens in some of the cities that I know of where the black press seems to--you know, pe- people joke that they're actually reading a white pa- paper the night before, you know.$$ Yes, they'll say we--we're following--well, this is--it's always been opposite in--you know, for, for me. It's always been opposite. I--you know, I've always tended to say okay, this is the story that goes against the grain, but nobody else is saying it. Nobody was writing it, so I'm gonna write it. And it ends up, for example, in The New York Times, which happened when I was at the Free Press. And it ended up on the front page of The Washington Post, which happened when I was at the Afro. And so it's, it's just a matter of having a gut instinct as a journalist and saying, you know what? This is a story regardless of what paper; and other papers will follow you, 'cause it is a story.

Pluria Marshall, Jr.

Publisher and broadcasting executive Pluria Marshall, Jr. was born on January 17, 1962 in Houston, Texas. His father, Pluria Marshall, Sr., is a professional photographer and a civil rights activist in the media business. Marshall graduated from Clark College, now Clark Atlanta University, in 1984 with his B.S. degree in business administration and management.

In 1981, while attending Clark College, Marshall was hired at KLTV in Tyler, Texas, as a management-training intern. He spent the next two summers in Lufkin, Texas, and continued his management-training program. He then worked for WXIA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia and for Turner Broadcasting in 1982 and 1983. From 1984 to 1985, Marshall completed his management training and development position at WLBT-TV in Jackson, Mississippi. In 1986, he served as the station manager and then as vice president of WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi. Marshall entered into an agreement to purchase WLBM in 1990, but the transaction did not consummate due to a suspicious fire at the facility in April of that same year. In 1992, he purchased The Informer & Texas Freeman in Houston, Texas. Then, in 1993, Marshall became general manager and owner of WLTH Radio in Gary, Indiana, and also purchased the KHRN radio station licensed to the Hearne, Texas, Bryan College Station radio market in 1994. He ran both the AM talk radio station in Gary and the radio station in Bryan College Station for several years.

In 1997, Marshall joined the board of the Wave Community Newspapers, and purchased a controlling interest in 1998. He then purchased the Los Angeles Independent in 2000. After the purchase of the Los Angeles Independent, Marshall merged both operations to form the Los Angeles Wave Publications Group. In 2013, he launched Integrated Multicultural Media Solutions; a media planning and buying firm that specializes in placing ads that target multicultural audiences.

Marshall has been a member of the National Black Media Coalition, the National Association of Broadcasters, and the National Association of Television Programming Executives. He has also served on the boards of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, the Texas Association of Broadcasters, the California Newspaper Publishers Association, and the National Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation. Marshall is chairman of the board and president of the Watts Willowbrook Boys & Girls Club.

Pluria Marshall, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.295

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/15/2013

Last Name

Marshall

Maker Category
Schools

Clark Atlanta University

Lockhart Elementary School

Meyerland Performing and Visual Arts Middle School

James Madison High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Pluria

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

MAR17

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Don't Make Dollars That Don't Make Cents.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

1/17/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hamburgers

Short Description

Broadcast executive, publisher, and newspaper publishing chief executive Pluria Marshall, Jr. (1962 - ) was the owner and publisher of the Houston Informer and Texas Freeman and the Los Angeles Wave Publications Group. He also operated WLTH Radio and Integrated Multicultural Media Solutions.

Employment

KLTV

WXIA TV

Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

WLBM TV

WLTH Radio

KHRN

Informer & Texas Freeman

Los Angeles Wave Publications Group

Integrated Multicultural Media Solutions

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Pluria Marshall, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his mother's upbringing in the Third Ward of Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his father's civil rights activism

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his paternal grandparents' professions

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his father' role in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his father's accomplishments as a photojournalist

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his household

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls accompanying his father on photography shoots

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his neighborhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his early interest in sports

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the influence of his father

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his experiences of integration busing

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers Johnston Middle School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes the racial demographics of James Madison High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his participation in athletics at James Madison High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his part-time position at KPRC-TV in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the black publications in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his father's relocation to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his decision to attend Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes the communications department at Clark College

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his college internships, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his college internships, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Children cases

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the historically black college experience

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his decision to major in business

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his training at WLBT-TV in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his first impressions of Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his role at WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his management approach at WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the programming on WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls the major news stories in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the fire at WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his sales position at KBXX Radio in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls acquiring WLTH Radio and KHRN Radio

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers his partnership with Lorenzo Butler

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the programming on WLTH Radio in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers the programming changes at KHRN Radio in Hearne, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his decision to settle in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the Houston Informer and Texas Freeman

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his editorial philosophy

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his role at the National Newspaper Publishers Association

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls joining the board of Wave Community Newspapers, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes the history of Wave Community Newspapers, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his challenges at the Wave Community Newspapers, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes the Los Angeles Wave Publication Group's role in the community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his business strategy for Los Angeles Wave Publications Group

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. remembers filing for bankruptcy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about his hopes for African American broadcasting

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. reflects upon his family

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. talks about the Black Media Preservation Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Pluria Marshall, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

7$11

DATitle
Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls his role at WLBM-TV in Meridian, Mississippi
Pluria Marshall, Jr. recalls joining the board of Wave Community Newspapers, Inc.
Transcript
So you were there fif- fifteen months. What happened? Why did you, well why didn't you stay longer?$$Well, as you can probably tell by my, my history, I, I like to work, and there was really not a whole lot more for me to do. I mean I had been in three years--three summers of training, been at WLBT [WLBT-TV, Jackson, Mississippi] for, you know, a little over a year. And so Frank [Frank Melton] would, you know, we'd have board meetings, and he was, he'd allow me and my cohort to attend the board meetings, you know, for the exposure. And so, they would always talk about this little station [WLBM-TV; WGBC-TV] in Meridian [Mississippi]. They said, "Oh, man, that station's not making money." The guy would come, and he would have a song and dance every month. Why we're losing money, why we're doing this, why we're doing that or whatever. And so I said to Frank, you know, I'm twenty-two, twenty-three years old, I'm like, "Frank, come on, man, you know, if it's losing money, I mean, you know, give me a shot. Let me run it," you know, and I'm, yeah, as they say full of piss and vinegar. And so he said, "Well, hell, Pluria [HistoryMaker Pluria Marshall, Jr.], you know, you can't do any worse than what's going on there now. We're losing money." And so I said, "Okay, great." So he says, "All right, you can move to Meridian." And so, I said, "Okay, great." So we had to renegotiate my little package that I was getting paid and everything. And so he said--so I said, "So what do I do?" He said, "You make it make money." I said, "Okay, so how do I do that?" He said, "You cut your expenses, raise your revenue." I said, "Oh, okay, great. That's easy, you know." And so literally, I got there and the guy that ran the station, it was a guy named Glenn Rose. Glenn was a nice old guy, but he's just not really good at raising or selling ads and things of that sort. And he used to always say, "Pluria, you just, you're just too aggressive, you just, you know, you just, you gotta be patient." I said, "Dude, I have no patience, you know, I've gotta get this done." So--$$This sounds like a clash in cultures of--in Mississippi, they do, they move slower. They move slower.$$Oh, they do. They do.$$So I mean you're like, you know--$$Yeah, I (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) anybody watching this can see.$$Oh, yeah, yeah, I'm like, hey, guys, you gotta move. You know, I mean I'm, I can't sit here and wait, you know. So, finally, after probably about, you know, two or three months, you know, Glenn gave me, through Frank, he said, "All right let him be a--," I was a station manager. And so I'd go in, "I'm sorry, fine. We can fire this person. We need to do this. We're gonna raise the rates. We're gonna make the--," I did all the things that I was trained to basically do. And so ninety days after I got there, the station made money. And so, you know, I said, "Frank. I did it, all right? So make me the general manager," (laughter). And so he was like, "You know, you're being a little impatient, Pluria." I'm like, "Yeah, I am, you know." And so I kept pushing and pushing and pushing. And so finally Glenn said, you know--and Glenn was a little bit older and been around the business for quite some time. He said, well, he's gonna basically retire. And so I said, well, you know, the station's mine at that point. And so Frank, you know, put me in as the vice president and general manager. And it also helped that NBC was on its rise in the mid-'80s [1980s]. So we had 'The Cosby Show' and we had all this great programming. Although the station was a bit of a, less than a full powered station, it covered the Meridian area. But it wasn't as big as the station in Jackson [Mississippi]. And so, you know, I kept it, it never lost a dime as long as I ran it. It was always very profitable. And so I ran it from, essentially, '85 [1985], '86 [1986] until 1990.$$Okay, and you got a large black viewing audience down there, I would imagine?$$We do, we do. Yeah, the state's about 50 percent black.$$Right.$$Yeah.$$So anything you put in the air, there's gonna be a lot of black folks, at least by this time, having--with TV sets. They can check it out.$$Right, oh, yeah, definitely, definitely.$$And watching a lot of TV.$$Yeah, 'The Cosby Show' was a hit. It definitely was.$$Okay, okay, so you were there--you weren't there that--were you there very long? I mean--$$From, from, as I said, from about '85 [1985] to '90 [1990], roughly 'cause when I spent--I was in Jackson for about fifteen months. So, and that was from '84 [1984] to '85 [1985]. So, late '85 [1985] to 1990. So I was there about, you know, for five and a half years.$Is it now talk, time to talk about the Wave?$$Sure, sure, sure, sure.$$'Cause there's--$$(Simultaneous) So, so all right, so we segued, so we have Houston [Houston Informer and Texas Freeman]. We had Gary [WLTH Radio, Gary, Indiana], we had KHRN [KHRN Radio; KVJM Radio, Hearne, Texas]. I mean we got all these properties, and so as I said, when they, they deregulated radio, it made it difficult for me to one, find stations, two, acquire financing. And, and so our offices in Houston [Texas] were domiciled within the 610 loop [Interstate 610]. So Houston has a loop system. So 610 is the loop. So there was this company that was getting a fairly large bit of notoriety called Enron [Enron Corporation]. And, you know, I knew who they were. They were big. They were doing all kinds of things.$$That's the big energy company that--$$Enron, oh, yeah.$$--the big energy that got in trouble.$$This is the big one.$$Enron, all right.$$Enron, so, you know, as I'm out looking for money, I get a phone call from someone who says, "Hey, Enron company is looking to do things locally in a local community." And so they said, "Okay, so--," I'm like, "Great, that was good. How does that help me?" "Well, they have money to invest." I said, "Oh, fantastic." So they said, "One of the first requirements--," (laughter), which was you had to be within the 610 loop. I said, "Really?" I said, "As long as my business is inside the loop, I'd qualify for one of their possible loans?" And he said, "Yes. I said, "Wow, okay," I said, "that's great." So I'm involved with NNPA [National Newspaper Publishers Association] and I'm out scouting and talking to people and so, they, I get a call that there's this paper in Los Angeles [California] called the Wave. And so I said, "Okay, fine." So I went and did my research on L.A. There was a Wave, the Los Angeles Wave was a community paper. The Los Angeles Sentinel was a black paper. So I said, "Well, heck, let's just, you know, run the gamut and see what we can find out." I contacted the people over at the Sentinel, had a real difficult time getting to the owner, just never could get any traction there at all. So I talked to the, this gentleman that was running the Wave, C.Z. Wilson. And so, you know, I talked to him, and, he says, "Oh, yeah, man, we're doing great things. We got a bunch of people, and I'm taking over, and we're looking to acquire, had some challenges." And so I said, "Okay." He said, "Oh, I want you to come over and join my board [of Wave Community Newspapers, Inc., Los Angeles, California]?" I said, "Really?" I said, "C.Z., I mean, I know I'm a young, young guy," probably thirty-eight, thirty-nine years old, "but I'm buying businesses just like this. I mean I would buy this newspaper." He said, "Oh, don't worry about it--," he used to call me young buck, "Oh, don't worry about it, young buck. You come on in." So I said, "No, I'm gonna have my lawyer write you a letter to basically let you know that essentially, I'm a fox and you're a henhouse. And I like eggs," (laughter), you know. "So I want you to be very clear that if you add me to your board, there's a possibility that I would acquire, acquire this newspaper, you know, from you guys." And so, you know, he said, "Oh, fine." I said, "Okay, no worries. I'll come in, and I'll join the board."

Elinor Tatum

Newspaper publisher Elinor Ruth Tatum was born on January 29, 1971 in New York City, New York to Wilbert and Susan Tatum. Her father was a former publisher and chief executive officer of the New York Amsterdam News. Tatum was raised in New York City and was educated in the City’s primary and secondary schools. She graduated from St. Lawrence University with her B.A. degree in government studies in 1993. Tatum went on to attend Stockholm University in Stockholm, Sweden, where she studied international relations until 1994.

Upon returning from Sweden, Tatum joined her father at the New York Amsterdam News, where she accepted a position as assistant to the publisher. In 1996, she was promoted to associate publisher and chief operating officer. Tatum received her M.A. degree in journalism from New York University in 1997, and was promoted to publisher and editor-in-chief of the New York Amsterdam News, becoming one of the youngest publishers in the history of African American press. In 2006, Tatum began producing and co-hosting a weekly segment of Al Sharpton’s weekly radio show “Keep’in It Real.” She has also appeared on WNBC evening news, ARISE, The O'Reilly Factor, 20/20, New York 1, CUNY TV, the Today Show, and NBC Nightly News. After her father passed away in 2009, Tatum assumed full control of the New York Amsterdam News.

Tatum has held many civic positions and served on numerous community boards, including St. Lawrence University, the New York Urban League, the Neighborhood Defender Service of Harlem, the Chinatown YMCA, Manhattan Community Board 3, and the Creative Visions Foundation. She was also the former secretary of the National Newspaper Publishers Association.

Tatum has received many awards including recognition in Who’s Who of American Women; a Doctor Of Humane Letters Honorus Causae from Metropolitan College (New York City); Manhattan Borough Presidents’ Women’s History Month Award; the Public Advocate of New York City Award of Distinction; the Women Who Make A Difference Award; Outstanding Business Empowerment from the New York Chapter of Black Business and Professional Women Award; Standing On their Shoulders Award from the National Action Network, the Good Scout Award, and the Pi Beta Phi’s Members of Distinction Award.

Elinor Tatum was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 11, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.282

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/11/2013

Last Name

Tatum

Maker Category
Middle Name

Ruth

Schools

St. Lawrence University

Stockholm University

New York University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Elinor

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

TAT02

Favorite Season

Seasonal Changes

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

I Promise to Try.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/29/1971

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vegetables

Short Description

Newspaper publishing chief executive Elinor Tatum (1971 - ) was named publisher and editor-in-chief of the New York Amsterdam News at age twenty six, making her one of the youngest publishers in the history of African American press.

Employment

New York Amsterdam News

Delete

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Elinor Tatum's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Elinor Tatum lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Elinor Tatum describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Elinor Tatum talks about her father's start in New York politics

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Elinor Tatum describes her father's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Elinor Tatum talks about her father's experiences in Japan and Sweden

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Elinor Tatum describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Elinor Tatum talks about her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Elinor Tatum describes the block where she grew up

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Elinor Tatum describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Elinor Tatum talks about her parents' work and community activism

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Elinor Tatum remembers learning from her father that her voice mattered

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Elinor Tatum talks about her father's activism and political career

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Elinor Tatum recalls the eclectic mix of people she met as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Elinor Tatum reflects on her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Elinor Tatum reflects on the importance of holidays in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Elinor Tatum describes the privileged culture of the Dwight School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Elinor Tatum recalls two teachers' reactions to her dyslexia at the Dwight School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Elinor Tatum describes overcoming her dyslexia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Elinor Tatum describes her interests in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Elinor Tatum talks about the start of her father's career with the 'Amsterdam News'

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Elinor Tatum describes her father's changing positions on Louis Farrakhan's anti-Semitic comments

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Elinor Tatum talks about navigating her black and Jewish identities

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Elinor Tatum remembers a letter she sent to her father

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Elinor Tatum talks about how she decided to go to St. Lawrence University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Elinor Tatum reminisces about her summers while growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Elinor Tatum recalls being invited on a life-changing trip to Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Elinor Tatum talks about diversity at St. Lawrence University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Elinor Tatum talks about leaving for Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Elinor Tatum recounts the achievements of the friends she traveled with

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Elinor Tatum talks about her trip to Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Elinor Tatum talks about experiences at Lincoln University and the New School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Elinor Tatum talks about her life in Sweden

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Elinor Tatum talks about starting her career at the 'Amsterdam News' in 1994

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Elinor Tatum talks about practicing journalism in college

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Elinor Tatum talks about the culture at the 'Amsterdam News'

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Elinor Tatum talks about the National Newspaper Publishers Association

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Elinor Tatum talks about her father becoming sole owner of the 'Amsterdam News'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Elinor Tatum remembers how she learned about her promotion to Editor-in-Chief of the 'Amsterdam News'

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Elinor Tatum talks about studying journalism at New York University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Elinor Tatum talks about adopting her father's legacy at the 'Amsterdam News'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Elinor Tatum talks about the success of the 'Amsterdam News'

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Elinor Tatum talks about her transition into Editor-in-Chief at the 'Amsterdam News'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Elinor Tatum reflects upon her accomplishments as Editor-in-Chief of the 'Amsterdam News'

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Elinor Tatum talks about gentrification in Harlem during her lifetime

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Elinor Tatum talks about the importance of the black press for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Elinor Tatum talks about her political involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Elinor Tatum talks about necessary technological changes in the black press

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Elinor Tatum talks about her mother and motherhood

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Elinor Tatum describes her hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Elinor Tatum talks about the changes she wants for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Elinor Tatum talks about the significance of her father's generation

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Elinor Tatum reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Elinor Tatum reflects upon how she has changed since her childhood

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Elinor Tatum talks about the legacy of the Obama presidency

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Elinor Tatum narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

3$2

DATitle
Elinor Tatum recalls two teachers' reactions to her dyslexia at the Dwight School
Elinor Tatum remembers how she learned about her promotion to Editor-in-Chief of the 'Amsterdam News'
Transcript
So what--tell me--I know it was privileged, but how do you think it affected you going there [the Dwight School in New York City, New York]? And, and ha--they were better at services there?$$They were better at services 'cause I had the money and they understood learning disabilities.$$Because I've heard that people say sometimes they have to rely on public schools because their--$$Well, see at that point in time--now the public schools have a lot more resources, and they have IEPs [Individualized Education Programs] and they understand learning disabilities in a way that they did not. Because in the 1970s the word dyslexia was like a dirty word.$$That's right.$$And--$$It was something to be ashamed of. That's--$$Exactly, exactly, and so there was no help. People just ignored it. In the public schools they put you in the slower track, I mean, to the point where I had a teacher in the 6th grade at Hunter [Hunter College Elementary] who basically told me that I was never gonna amount to anything.$$I had read that. I had read tha--$$And, I mean, she was this absolutely horrible, old woman who I couldn't stand. Her name was Mrs. Kerry. She was downright evil, downright evil. And so one of my favorite stories about her is I ran into her in the--in the summer of 1989, when I had just graduated from high school. And she saw me, and I said "hello, Mrs. Kerry." She's like, "hi, how are you? Have you graduated from high school?" And I said, "well, yes." She's like, "well, are you going to trade school?" And I said "oh, no. Actually, I'm a scholar at St. Lawrence University; thank you very much." And I walked away from her. Four years--no, five years later I ran into her again. I'd completed four years at St. Lawrence University, a year of graduate work at Stockholm University, and I was then editor at the 'Amsterdam News,' and--I may not have actually been an editor yet, but she didn't need to know that. So I run into Mrs. Kerry again. She lived not too far from here. She said, "so what are you up to? Did you graduate from college? Do you have a job?" I said "well, yes; I'm an editor at the 'Amsterdam News,' thank you, and what are you doing?" She said "I've retired," and I looked at her and I said "thank God," and I walked away and I never saw her again.$$See those people--you never--I mean, it's that story of people, you know.$$But I've got--but I've got a good story from that same place. There was a woman named Mrs. Kagan, and that name might be familiar to you, that last name Kagan.$$Yeah, oh, I know.$$Well, there was a woman named Gloria Kagan, who was my teacher at the same time that Mrs. Kerry was my teacher, and she worked really, really hard with me and made sure that I was successful. She was this great woman. In 1994 or 1995, a piece ran in the "New York Times" about me. It was on the public lives page. And I got a note from her, and the note just said, "It's so great to see my kids grow up so well." And Gloria Kagan happened to be the mother of Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan.$$That's lovely. But she, she's brilliant herself. That's lovely.$$Yeah.$So in 1996, this--you know, the--everything is sort of set in motion now. Is there a discussion with you and your father [Wilbert Tatum]? I mean, you know, he ha--remember his words were, you know, it's now or--$$Well, you know, there, there really wasn't a discussion. I was going to graduate school at that point [New York University in New York City, New York], and I was learning the business from the ground up. I was I think Chief Operating Officer at that point at the paper, and I was--I was learning everything, and I was learning it at my father's side, which was one of the greatest gifts I could possibly have gotten. And then I graduated from NYU. And the National Association of Black Journalists--actually no, it was the local--it was the NYABJ [New York Association of Black Journalists] was having their annual dinner. And we had two or three tables at this dinner this year, and I had no idea why. We had never participated in NYABJ before. I knew very little about it. And I'm sitting at the, the table at the dinner. And Terrie Williams, the PR guru, says, "Ellie, have you read the, the 'Amsterdam News' ad in the journal?" And I said no. She's like, "Well, look at it." So I open up the journal ad, and I said, oh, it's looks nice and close it up again. She's like, "No, read it." I open it up again and I read it, and I read the whole thing. And it's signed by me as publisher and editor-in-chief of the 'Amsterdam News.' That was the way my father announced to me that I was now heading the organization. So that's--that was my father's way of telling me, "okay, kid, your turn now."$$Was he there that evening?$$Yep, he was there that evening, and he gave a speech, and it was really--it was an amazing evening. It really was an amazing evening. I was completely dumbstruck. I had absolutely no idea it was gonna happen.$$So wait, he had written the, the--he had written the--he had written and it's signed by you. Did somehow Terrie knew that you didn't know?$$Yeah. Yeah, she was one of our guests at the table.$$Wow. So what did that mean then, him handing over the reins? What did that mean at that point 'cause you're just finish--you just finished. And, and--$$Right, but I'd all--already been at the paper for, you know--well, actually no, I had not been--$$No, you, you--$$--had not--had not--$$--hadn't been there--$$--for very long.$$You'd been there--you'd been there for two years.$$No, no, no, I'd been there for--it was 1998. I'd been there for four years already.$$Oh, 1998, okay.$$Yeah, yeah.$$Okay, so, so you had already finished NYU--$$Yeah, yeah.$$--at that point, okay.$$It was after--it was right after I finished NYU--$$Okay.$$--that was done.

William Lee

Newspaper publisher William H. Lee was born on May 29, 1936 in Austin, Texas. Williams attended Sacramento State College from 1953 to 1955, and went on to earn his A.B. degree in journalism from the University of California in 1957.

From 1959 to 1965, Lee served in the U.S. Air Force. Lee, along with radioman Glino Gladden and businessman John W. Cole, founded the Sacramento Observer on November 22, 1962. Despite early challenges, Lee became president and sole publisher of the paper in 1965. At that time, he also founded Lee Publishing, Col. Five years later, under his leadership, the Sacramento Observer was named the number one African American newspaper in the United States. Throughout the years, the Sacramento Observer has been a strong community leader and was the catalyst for organizing the local chapter of the National Urban League. In the past TheSacramento Observer has sponsored numerous community events including organizing the annual Sacramento Black Expo to celebrate African American history featuring seminars, workshops, concerts and a marketplace.

In 2001, a year after Lee appointed his late wife Kathryn Lee, as co-publisher, the newspaper launched an online news site, SacOberver.com. Its first inception featured select articles from The Sacramento Observer newspaper. Lee’s youngest son, Lawrence Charles Lee, served as the president and CEO of SacObserver.com. Then, in 2005, executive and publishing control of the Sacramento Observer passed from Lee and his wife to his son Lawrence Charles Lee, who now is the sole publisher, president, general manager of the Sacramento Observer and Lee Publishing, Co.

From 1970 to 1973, Lee served as secretary and as a member of the board of directors of the National Newspaper Publishers Association. He was elected as president of the West Coast Black Publishers Association 1974. He is founder and past president of the Men’s Civic League of Sacramento, co-founder of the Sacramento Area Black Caucus, and is a lifetime member of the N.A.A.C.P.

Lee received Sacramento’s Outstanding Young Man of the Year Award (1965), the Carly Murphy Plaque for community service (1994), the. The Sacramento Observer was a recipient of the Media Award from the Western Regional Conference of Elected Black Officials in (1973) and the John B. Russwurm Trophy – which is considered to be the Pulitzer Prize in African American newspaper publishing – from the National Newspaper Publishers Association (1973, 1975).

Lee and his late wife Kathryn Lee, have three sons: Lawrence Charles, William Hanford, Jr., and Roderick Joseph (deceased).

William H. Lee was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 5, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.293

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/5/2013

Last Name

Lee

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widower

Middle Name

Hanford

Schools

University of California, Berkeley

California State University, Sacramento

Roosevelt Middle School

Grant Union High School

Raphael Weill Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Austin

HM ID

LEE07

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

5/29/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Sacramento

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Newspaper publishing chief executive William Lee (1936 - ) co-founded the Sacramento Observer where he served as president and publisher for over fifty years.

Employment

The Sacramento Observer

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:13050,190:19762,350:20326,357:21548,372:21924,377:22864,390:23804,398:27564,449:28692,463:29632,474:30948,494:31888,506:50474,661:51062,670:51986,683:52322,688:60860,812:61500,823:61980,831:64418,843:72400,919:81889,1041:86749,1113:87721,1127:88612,1139:94175,1160:94475,1165:95450,1184:97850,1222:101000,1276:101600,1287:109209,1356:109956,1368:115600,1467:115932,1472:116264,1478:120248,1549:120580,1554:134630,1742:135098,1752:137672,1869:138140,1877:143234,1909:143762,1918:144356,1929:144818,1937:149692,1993:150910,2009:151519,2018:152215,2028:153085,2041:154129,2056:156217,2103:166234,2171:167312,2187:168082,2199:168544,2206:171258,2234:172410,2262:178098,2384:179178,2444:179610,2459:180258,2471:180546,2476:187034,2538:187910,2564:188859,2585:192582,2638:192947,2644:196326,2660:197862,2675:200262,2704:204198,2741:204582,2746:206598,2753:206982,2758:211100,2768:211428,2773:211756,2778:213642,2813:214708,2827:215118,2833:215446,2838:216020,2848:217660,2861:217988,2866:220448,2903:220776,2908:229568,2968:230063,2974:237870,3035:238330,3042:241550,3094:242930,3111:243298,3121:243666,3126:251909,3192:252619,3206:253870,3219$0,0:788,8:5036,96:7160,145:10346,170:19330,280:21430,320:21920,329:22690,345:23180,354:23950,367:24440,376:24860,384:25980,415:32030,459:32590,467:33150,474:33630,481:37070,519:37870,530:39070,550:39790,589:40350,598:40910,607:42830,632:43710,644:57602,802:59996,876:65240,1050:70028,1103:80873,1239:81335,1247:81720,1253:82259,1259:82875,1264:83260,1270:83645,1276:85801,1304:87803,1337:88188,1343:89497,1371:90113,1380:90806,1396:91576,1412:96820,1428:97645,1443:98620,1457:98920,1462:102595,1530:103795,1552:104695,1571:105220,1579:105745,1586:108820,1626:110170,1654:112516,1670:113172,1680:114730,1707:116862,1747:117764,1762:118174,1768:119158,1782:120142,1793:120962,1804:123914,1829:124898,1843:125800,1857:131166,1890:134766,1959:136350,1988:136854,1997:137502,2002:138294,2017:139014,2029:139518,2037:139806,2042:140382,2054:145418,2090:145828,2096:146156,2101:146484,2106:146812,2111:150092,2156:150420,2162:152962,2200:153700,2210:154848,2227:155914,2232:156570,2242:163844,2300:166124,2319:166428,2324:167416,2341:167872,2349:169088,2371:170608,2395:173496,2445:173876,2451:174332,2458:178920,2477:184230,2528:184590,2533:185040,2539:188190,2612:191790,2649:192330,2656:192870,2663:196560,2717:201340,2726:203797,2774:204049,2779:209220,2883:210690,2914:213280,2972:213840,2982:217200,3049:217690,3057:222610,3082:223234,3088:223546,3093:223858,3098:227290,3145:228304,3160:228928,3170:232438,3225:233452,3242:239030,3262:241910,3288:242630,3299:243170,3307:243530,3312:245970,3324:247845,3352:248895,3371:249945,3400:250245,3405:251145,3416:252270,3433:252945,3443:253545,3453:254820,3477:256095,3494:256470,3500:258795,3540:261720,3545
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of William Lee's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - William Lee lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - William Lee describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - William Lee talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - William Lee describes his parents' education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - William Lee describes his father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - William Lee talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - William Lee remembers his family's move to San Francisco, California

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - William Lee talks about his brother and sister-in-law

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - William Lee describes his likeness to his father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - William Lee remembers his father's strokes

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - William Lee describes his upbringing in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - William Lee describes the children's book based upon his family

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - William Lee remembers playing basketball in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - William Lee remembers moving to Del Paso Heights in Sacramento, California

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - William Lee describes his experiences at Grant Union High School in Sacramento, California

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - William Lee remembers his arrival at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - William Lee talks about his time at Sacramento State College in Sacramento, California

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - William Lee remembers his accounting professor at Sacramento State College

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - William Lee describes the student organizations at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - William Lee remembers the student activism at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - William Lee recalls the lack of support for black students at University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - William Lee remembers being hired at Aerojet Rocketdyne in Sacramento, California

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - William Lee remembers his courtship with his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - William Lee describes the African American community in Sacramento, California

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - William Lee recalls the founding of The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - William Lee talks about the Men's Civic League of Sacramento, California

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - William Lee talks about the cofounders of The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - William Lee remembers the restrictive housing covenants in Sacramento, California

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - William Lee talks about the professional legacy of William Byron Rumford

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - William Lee describes the political climate in California during the early 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - William Lee describes the black leadership of Sacramento, California

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - William Lee talks about the growth of the black community in Sacramento, California

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - William Lee remembers becoming the sole owner of The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - William Lee talks about success of The Sacramento Observer, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - William Lee talks about the success of The Sacramento Observer, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - William Lee describes the operations of The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - William Lee talks about the advertisements in The Sacramento Observer, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - William Lee talks about the advertisements in The Sacramento Observer, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - William Lee describes the readership of The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - William Lee talks about The Sacramento Observer's outreach programs

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - William Lee talks about the impact of technology on the newspaper industry

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - William Lee describes the editorial goals of The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - William Lee talks about Mayor Kevin Johnson of Sacramento, California

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - William Lee talks about the stories covered in The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - William Lee describes the staff of The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - William Lee describes The Sacramento Observer's sports coverage

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - William Lee talks about his sons

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - William Lee reflects upon his career at The Sacramento Observer

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - William Lee describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - William Lee reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - William Lee talks about his wife

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - William Lee describes his youth outreach programs

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - William Lee describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

2$7

DATitle
William Lee remembers being hired at Aerojet Rocketdyne in Sacramento, California
William Lee talks about the success of The Sacramento Observer, pt. 2
Transcript
But you graduated you know in '57 [1957]--$$Yes.$$--with a degree in accounting?$$Yes.$$And you're a good student from what I've read--$$Yes.$$--and you, and you were good at what you did?$$That was an experience in itself. It's interesting I--so when I graduated [from the University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California], I and two of my fellow classmates who were both whites, went to apply for an accounting opportunity that was being offered by an accounting firm, and they were looking for graduates in accounting to go work for them. And when we went in, we went in individually, and I went in initially and they did not hire me. The firm--I tried to reassure the firm that I was a good student and I brought my transcripts and everything else. And the other two students, when they went in, they hired both of them. Now, when I--when I was being interviewed, I asked the interviewer why I was not being hired, they said, "Well, I don't think my staff, my organization is ready to accept an African American--," at that time "a Negro to join our organization." So I was being denied. I was introduced to racism in a real absolute way in that experience; and it really hit me in the gut, because I'd never had it so vividly shown and experienced to me. When I got back to the car and my buddies got back, they had been accepted, and they got so upset and both of these friends of mine and these fellow students--and I was a better student than they were, both of them, and they knew it. But it was all about--I told them the fact that they just did not hire me, and they wanted to go in and turn in and resign just from being accepted or take that--refuse the job to be accepted. That too was an experience for me as well. So again, I called Mom [Carrie Woods Lee] and Dad [Charles R. Lee] and I said I wanted to come home. And I moved in--I came to Sacramento [California]. I was thinking about then joining with the [U.S.] Air Force, going to the effort that was going on; and I called a friend of mine who was working at the time at Aerojet [Aerojet Rocketdyne] here as a space industry--the aerospace industry was booming, and Aerojet was flourishing and growing and hiring people. And it was through that friend's effort, and I asked him very vividly, I said, "Now look, I don't want to go out there and experience what I just experienced in the Bay Area [San Francisco Bay Area, California], Sacramento." He said, "No, you need to see this person," and he gave me a name of a person that I interviewed with. He hired me on the spot. And I went to work at Aerojet as a statistician right out--shortly after that. But that experience was something I'll never forget, because it was--it was a--it was the true racism that reflected even when you're qualified, even when you're knowledgeable about your skill and your art and your profession. So I was very, very let down from going--trying for other employment in the Bay Area. I think that my warmth and growth at Aerojet gave me the reassurance that I needed to eventually to move forward, and to set my sights on what I felt were some earlier and eas- and dreams and plans and hopes that I had for my career and my life and all.$Did you model, in terms of managing the paper [The Sacramento Observer], did you--was there any other publication, African American or, or white that you modeled after?$$After?$$Yeah in terms of presentation and content and that sort of thing?$$No, we didn't. We really didn't. We've had our own sense of mission, our sense of purpose and the sense of direction in terms of what we wanted to do in publishing our newspaper. We minimized, not to the extent that it became faulty information, but we minimized all the negativity that existed in our community [in Sacramento, California], which we felt was marginal compared to the outstanding achievements and the accomplishments of the community.$$Now, I've heard that before. I know the--I know one of the papers that's--was accused of egregiously using, you know, murders and that sort of thing I think was the St. Louis American. At one time they were considered a murder sheet. A lot of black papers, the Courier [Pittsburgh Courier; New Pittsburgh Courier], the Defender [Chicago Defender] opened with a violent scene.$$Yes.$$And was this the history of the old--well not the reverend's [J.T. Muse] paper [Sacramento Outlook], right, he didn't do that?$$No. There were some and many of those cases that built their reputation or their formats based upon the crime, as you say crime sheets of the negative cri- negative things that are going on in the community. But again, we felt realistically that that was not truly a description of our community. We wanted to be representative of the community. And if there's only 2 percent crime, we wanted 2 percent news that reflected that, not 98 percent and the other way around, so that's--that is always--. So we sort of focused on the issues, on the needs that existed, education, employment opportunities, the whole desire to own property, the building of wealth; a variety of different positive motives and missions that are so important to our community. And we built our paper on that format, and we continue to have it even today as we move through the wavelength. And I think it's been very successful, very helpful to us. We see, you know, there's movement going on and--in the newspaper industry and all that tells you that, you know, even with print in mainstream is somewhat dying, it's losing much revenue and that type of thing, but if you can focus on satisfying our community or satisfying a community need building value within those communities, which is what our motto was. So we went on to win from those days, we went on to win the Russwurm [John B. Russwurm Trophy], this top trophy awards, six times, and we--it became almost like our pri- our awards. So we stopped entering the contest, because we were just winning too many awards in that sense. We didn't want it seemed like it was being set or anything else. And then we stayed away a few years and went back and we won that year that we went back to in the '90s [1990s]. So a number of times that we just have backed away, and we have not re-entered in several years. But I think, you know, that even today, as I said, you see many of the products suffering, but there's a resurgence, I sense, that's going to go on and will be going on for the press. I see print becoming again an element that we'll have to deal with, and I think the ones that will be successful in that effort, will be the ones who have that, that concentration of community building, support of communities, recognition that their communities have values and building on that.

Amelia Ashley-Ward

Newspaper publisher, editor and journalist Amelia Ashley-Ward was born on September 17, 1957 in Magnolia, Mississippi to Amile Ashley and Louise James Ashley. While still a child, Ashley-Ward’s family moved to San Francisco, where she attended junior high and high school. Ashley-Ward went on to receive her B.A. degree in journalism and photojournalism in 1979 from San Jose State University.

During her final year at San Jose State University, Ashley-Ward interned at the Sun-Reporter Publishing Company in San Francisco, where she was hired as a reporter and photojournalist for the Sun-Reporter newspaper in 1979. Then, in 1984, Ashley-Ward was promoted to managing editor of the Sun-Reporter. When the Sun-Reporter Publishing Company’s publisher Carlton Goodlett resigned in 1994, Ashley-Ward was promoted to publisher. While working at the Sun-Reporter, she also published photographs in People magazine and Jet magazine, and wrote a feature story for the African American magazine Sepia. Following Goodlett’s death in 1997, she bought the Sun-Reporter Publishing Company from Goodlett’s son, acquiring all three of the company’s newspapers: the California Voice, the Metro and the Sun-Reporter. Ashley-Ward also created the nonprofit Sun-Reporter Foundation in 2004, and was the founding president of the Young Adult Christian Movement.

Ashley-Ward has received many honors and awards while working at the Sun-Reporter Publishing Company. In 1980, she won the Photojournalism Award from the National Newspaper Publishers Association, and, in 1981, she received the Feature Writing Award from the same organization. The National Newspaper Publishers Association granted Ashley-Ward one more honor when, in 1998, she was elected Publisher of the Year. In 1997, she received the Woman of the Year award from the San Francisco Black Chamber of Commerce. In 2004, Ashley-Ward received the Alumnus of the Year award from San Jose State University, and was the commencement speaker for the university's Journalism department that same year. She was also honored in 2005, when she was selected as Woman of the Year by California State Senator Carole Migden. In 2008, Ashley-Ward was named one of the forty nine Most Influential People in San Francisco by 7x7 Magazine. She also served on the boards of the National Newspaper Publishers Association and the San Francisco branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Ashley-Ward has one son, Evan Carlton Ward, an electronic media major at Middle Tennessee State University.

Amelia Ashley-Ward was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 4, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.251

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/4/2013

Last Name

Ashley-Ward

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

San Jose State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Amelia

Birth City, State, Country

Magnolia

HM ID

ASH03

Favorite Season

Fall, Winter

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Las Vegas, Nevada

Favorite Quote

It Must Be Borne In Mind That The Tragedy Of Life Doesn't Lie In Not Reaching Your Goal. The Tragedy Lies In Having No Goal To Reach.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

9/17/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Fish

Short Description

Newspaper publishing chief executive Amelia Ashley-Ward (1957 - ) has worked at the Sun-Reporter for over thirty years. She now owns the Sun-Reporter Publishing Company.

Employment

Sun-Reporter

Favorite Color

Black

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Amelia Ashley-Ward's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Amelia Ashley-Ward lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes how racial tensions in Mississippi forced her relatives to leave the state

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes the living conditions in San Francisco when her family first moved to California

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Amelia Ashley-Ward reflects upon her parents' marriage and how they first met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about her two sisters

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Amelia Ashley-Ward explains why her father left Mississippi for California

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Amelia Ashley-Ward explains the role of the church in her life and activism

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Amelia Ashley-Ward recounts living in Hunter's Point, the Fillmore, and Ingleside in San Francisco, California

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes the impact of Martin Luther King Jr.'s death on the black community in San Francisco, California

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Amelia Ashley-Ward recalls a personal experience with racial hatred from her youth, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Amelia Ashley-Ward recalls a personal experience with racial hatred from her youth, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about creative writing as a favorite childhood pastime

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Amelia Ashley-Ward recalls her early writing influences in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Amelia Ashley-Ward remembers living in poverty after her father left the family

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about helping her mother financially in high school and the type of student she became in college

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about her awareness of black consciousness and sub-culture in San Francisco, California in the 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her experiences in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her experiences at San Jose State University in the late 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about famous individuals and entertainment venues that were well known in the black community in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes the racial makeup at San Jose State University and the prevalent party culture of the late 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about her experiences with racism and sexism at San Jose State University

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Amelia Ashley-Ward recalls an experience with the People's Temple cult and Jim Jones in San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes Jim Jones' impact on the black community in San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Amelia Ashley-Ward compares San Francisco Reverend Thomas McCall to Jim Jones

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about Dr. Carlton's Goodlett's connection to Jim Jones

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Amelia Ashley-Ward recalls being hired at the Sun-Reporter

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Amelia Ashley-Ward gives a history of the Sun-Reporter's founders Tom Fleming (also a HistoryMaker) and Dr. Carlton Goodlett

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her close personal relationship with Dr. Carlton Goodlett

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Amelia Ashley-Ward remembers tension with fellow staff during her early days at the Sun-Reporter, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Amelia Ashley-Ward remembers tension during her early days at the Sun-Reporter, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about the sensationalist tactics previously used by the Sun-Reporter

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about Dr. Carlton Goodlett's influence in the San Francisco black community

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Amelia Ashley-Ward remembers some of her favorite stories she has written over the years

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes two different photo-essays from her career in Mississippi and California

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about the death of Chauncey Bailey, a journalist in Oakland, California

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her rise in the Sun-Reporter Publishing Company and how she acquired the company and its associated newspapers

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about the implications of digital media for the newspaper industry

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about the purpose of the National Newspaper Publishers Association and its history

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Amelia Ashley-Ward explains the differences between the National Newspapers Association and the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about the status of black newspapers in America and the Sun-Reporter's advertising revenue

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about the journalistic philosophy of the Sun-Reporter Publishing Group

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Amelia Ashley-Ward describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Amelia Ashley-Ward reflects on her career and assisting in the 2013 election London Breed, San Francisco District Supervisor

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Amelia Ashley-Ward states that her mother Louise James Ashley encouraged her to fight against injustice

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Amelia Ashley-Ward reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about choosing to stay with black newspapers over the mainstream media and fighting against injustice

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about her son Evan's football career at Middle Tennessee State and the politics associated with college sports

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Amelia Ashley-Ward talks about how she would like to be remembered

Mollie Belt

Newspaper CEO and publisher Mollie Finch-Belt was born on August 7, 1943 in Dallas, Texas. Finch-Belt’s mother, Mildred, was a mathematics instructor; her father, Fred J. Finch, Jr., founded the Dallas Examiner in 1986. But after publishing only one issue, Belt’s mother and father were murdered in their home. In 1961, Finch-Belt graduated from Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas. After briefly attending Spelman College, she enrolled at the University of Denver where she graduated with her B.A. degree in sociology and psychology in 1965.

Upon graduation, Finch-Belt began working as an employment counselor for the Texas Employment Commission. She then held positions in the Harris County Manpower Program and for City of Dallas where she administered the Title IV program. Between 1977 and 1997, Finch-Belt was a branch chief in the Civil Rights Compliance Department for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In 1997, Finch-Belt and her husband, attorney James C. Belt, Jr., invested their personal resources to revitalize the Dallas Examiner. In 1998, with a grant from AT&T, she started Future Speak, a publication aimed at developing young minority journalists. Finch-Belt has also used the Dallas Examiner to increase HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention by publishing numerous articles and supplements, including “PROBE,”  “Battling AIDS in Our Communi ty” (2003) and “Innocence Lost” (2004). Finch-Belt also hosted public programs such as an HIV/AIDS town hall meeting at the Inspiring Body of Christ Church in Dallas, Texas. She also co-hosted the Youth Angle luncheon on World AIDS Day with Paul Quinn College. Since assuming editorial responsibilities of the Dallas Examiner, Finch-Belt has continued her father’s dream of providing the Dallas African American community with its own news service.

Finch-Belt is a member of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. She has led the the Dallas Examiner to win numerous national, state and local awards, including the prestigious Katie Awards. The Dallas Examiner was named “Best Weekly Newspaper” in 2002 by the Texas Publisher’s Association awarded; and, in 2004, it received twelve awards from the regional chapter of National Association of Black Journalists, including “Best Newspaper” and “Best Practices.”

Finch-Belt lives in Dallas with her husband, attorney James C. Belt, Jr. They have two children, James C. Belt, III, advertising manager at the Dallas Examiner, and Melanie Belt, M.D.

Mollie Finch-Belt was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 29, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.023

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/29/2013

Last Name

Belt

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Finch

Schools

George Carver Elementary

Lincoln High School

Spelman College

University of Denver

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Mollie

Birth City, State, Country

Dallas

HM ID

BEL06

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Padre Island, Texas

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

8/7/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Newspaper publishing chief executive Mollie Belt (1943 - ) , daughter of Dallas Examiner founder Fred J. Finch, Jr., has been CEO and publisher of the Dallas Examiner since 1997.

Employment

Texas Employment Commission

Harris County Manpower Program

City of Dallas

United States Department of Health and Human Services

Dallas Examiner

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:9492,147:22830,287:31062,420:34572,462:35188,515:79008,1180:85318,1338:129168,1816:134064,1922:147420,2030:156827,2230:160185,2300:165076,2573:179154,2729:204910,3017:213385,3193:213685,3275:237428,3517:246050,3594:246589,3602:248437,3649:248745,3657:253558,3720:254244,3728:278430,4094$0,0:5025,94:5718,104:10312,172:27168,531:27424,536:45702,832:47014,866:47342,871:48654,895:50048,928:50868,942:51196,947:51524,952:56386,1045:64028,1116:64538,1123:71372,1249:79534,1355:88840,1530:89800,1550:92920,1602:93320,1608:98040,1755:111698,1989:140249,2342:141118,2391:143567,2604:144278,2612:144752,2661:176720,2949:186320,3092:189920,3183:194940,3196
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Mollie Belt's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt describes her mother's family background, pt.1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt talks about her mother's experiences growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt describes her father's work for the Department of Defense and his joining the Air Force

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Mollie Belt describes her childhood experiences in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Mollie Belt describes her experience in Cambridge, Massachusetts while her father attended Harvard Law School

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Mollie Belt describes her similarities to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt talks about attending school in Tuskegee, Cambridge, Massachusetts and Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes going to the library with her mother and meeting Eleanor Roosevelt in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt describes her mother's teaching school and her attending schools in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt talks about the integration of schools in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt talks about her experience at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Mollie Belt describes her reasons for attending Spelman College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Mollie Belt describes her reasons for not wanting to return to Spelman College after her freshman year

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt describes the atmosphere at Spelman College in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt describes her experience at the University of Denver

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt describes her post graduation search for employment in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes her experience in Harlingen, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt describes her experience living and working in Houston for the Manpower Program and her move to Dallas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt describes the changes in Dallas from the 1960s to the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt describes working in Dallas for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Mollie Belt describes how her father started The Dallas Examiner

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt talks about her father's role in starting The Dallas Examiner

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt talks about the murder of her parents during a home burglary

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt describes taking over ownership of The Dallas Examiner after her parents' death, pt.1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes taking over ownership of The Dallas Examiner after her parents' death, pt.2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt describes the demographics of Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt describes the changes she made to The Dallas Examiner after her father died

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt talks about Future Speak program for area youth, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt talks about Future Speak, pt.2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt describes the key issues covered by The Dallas Examiner Newspaper

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt talks about The Dallas Examiner's coverage of HIV/AIDS, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt talks about The Dallas Examiner's coverage of HIV/AIDS, pt.2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt describes The Dallas Examiner's coverage of the arts, and its editorial section

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt reflects upon her legacy and the legacy of The Dallas Examiner

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt talks about what she might have done differently

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Mollie Belt describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Mollie Belt talks about the future of The Dallas Examiner

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt talks about the relevance of print media

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt talks about her children

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt describes the state of Texas politics, pt.1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes the state of Texas politics, pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt talks about The Dallas Examiner's freelance employees

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt describes her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

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DATitle
Mollie Belt describes taking over ownership of The Dallas Examiner after her parents' death, pt.1
Mollie Belt talks about The Dallas Examiner's coverage of HIV/AIDS, pt.2
Transcript
So you're working at this time and you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--I'm working at the federal government.$$So you could have, you know, kept working and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--I did for a while; I did continue working for a while and I'd come over here to the office at night and we'd--well, no. When that happened, you remember, I took a year's leave of absence, so I was over at the paper every day; that was kinda like my therapy. My whole thing was my father's vision, he'd worked so hard to start this paper that I just had to see it continue, and so it was at it's very infant stages. In order to join like NNPA [National Newspapers Publishers Association] or API [Amalgamated Publishers Incorporated], you had to join--you had to print 52 issues, so I had to make sure that 50--that--and it's hard printing 52 issues. I know advertising. And it was hard then and it's hard today to get advertising in black newspapers. So I stayed there at the office, I wasn't a publi--I wasn't a publisher that was going out; I didn't even put my name on the pa--on the (unclear) of the paper. I owned the paper but I didn't--Charles was the editor. And so I sat there and we worked, made sure we joined API, NNPA and, you know, I would help assign stories and things. We had freelance writers and, you know, stuff like that, but I did not go out to events and things; I just kinda stayed locked up in that building like--go there to--so after--I guess I took a leave maybe a year, a year and a half, may have been two years and--that I went back to work, and it was just--my son was here, you know, going to college, and he was like distributing the paper part time; you know, distribution's a part-time job, and he would run over there to my office downtown and, you know, I'd have--to get me to sign stuff and do stuff. And I loved the work that I was doing; I'm very interested in health care but I just could not continue to do the paper and that job. And because I supervised people, it's very difficult when you supervise people for the federal government; you can't fire 'em (laughter). You know, you can't fire them, so you know, you have to develop them. And, and, and I guess they thought I was a good manager because they always gave me some really hard employee to deal with, so that meant you gotta work--do the employment development plans and all that kinda stuff, you know? They don't have satisfactory evaluation; it just was a--so that stress plus, you know--my supervisor would say things to me like, 'Well Mollie, do you realize that you want off just about every Friday?' 'So-what? I'm the highest performer in the office; so-what if I take off every Friday, I have the leave.' At that time, when I was taking off every Friday, my kids were in college and so my, my, my husband and I--he--I had a good friend and a little boy got him put out of his home; he was a high school student at Desota (ph.) High School, so she called me and asked me did I know of some family that could take him in and he could live with 'cause he was living with the coach and his coach's wife was pregnant and he was sleeping on the sofa in the living room and that just wasn't good. And I told my husband, I said, 'Do you know somebody?' And he said, 'Well how come he can't come stay with us?' Well, I guess he could, you know. We had plenty of room, so we took him in and he ran track, so we'd go to track meets every Friday, you know. But I just got tired of that, you know, that, that structure of having to ask somebody can I be off on Friday. And I just decided that, you know, the best thing for me to do is just to work at the paper full-time, so I took an early retirement and started working at the paper. My husband and I had contributed just--I don't even wanna add up the money that we put into the paper from the time my father died because the paper, it just--it was not sustaining itself.$$Now was your husband a partner with your father before?$$No.$$Okay.$$Well, no--yeah, a law partner--$$Yeah.$$--in the law office, but not with the paper.$It's not just gay men disease.' He say, 'Okay,' he say, 'you can have it here.' It was on a Wednesday night. He say, 'You can have it on one condition.' I say, 'What's that?' He said, 'I wanna meet Danny Glover.' I say, 'Okay.' I say, 'I'm supposed to go out there and meet him at the airport at 6:00.' And I told him the morning I'm gone' meet him and--because with--I took--arranged to take him to all the radio--black radio stations so that he could go on and tell people to come to the Town Hall meeting, you know, and talk about AIDS. So Rickie [Reverend Ricky Rush] met me out there at the hotel and he ended up riding with me to all the venues to take Danny [Glover] so he could get out and go in and talk. And he asked me, he said, 'Well, what you gone' do about feedin' him?' He say, 'I'll have my people at the church fix dinner.' I say, 'Well that will be wonderful.' He said, 'And I'll get my people to help park the cars that night.' I said, 'That's fine.' He said, 'Well Mollie, what do you think I oughta wear?' I said, 'What you oughta wear? I don't know, whatever you wanna wear.' He's a real little man, you know. So--then I thought; he had been wearing fatigue wear with boots, to fight drugs, you know, in the community. And he wore the fatigue like a war on drugs. I say, 'It's a war on AIDS so wear your fatigue tonight,' and he say, 'Okay.' So he wore his fatigue and he stood up there in the pulpit and he told--we had about a thousand people in the church and he told them to go get tested. We had the County Health Department; all these AIDS agents had their testing stuff, we had rooms inside the church and mobiles outside. He say, 'Go get tested now,' and they went and got tested; we tested about 200 that night, and then a lotta people got tested after then. I would go in a restaurant, and I'd see people and they'd say, 'I want you to know I heard it on the radio and I went and got tested,' 'cause we had it broadcast live on the black radio stations. So then the next year we did PROBE, you know. We did--that was another health--AIDS supplement. You know, it's kinda like--and you know when I think about it, we never got money to publish the--to, to, to pay for the printing--The Dallas Examiner, we incurred those costs. Because it is so hard getting advertising. The thing that helped me with the first supplement was one company and one man I met who worked for Pfizer and he was in governmental affairs, and he got it; he called the people up in New York at Pfizer and told them to buy a full-page, full-color ad and, and, and I had that in there. But it's--we did the supplements. We've done other supplements, too--$$Okay.$$--we do.$$So when you deal with a story, you rally the community around--you do education forums and all, you know (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--Yeah, with AIDS we did; we, we had several programs with AIDS; we had one out at Paul Quinn College, with a nurse, to get--we did the same thing, had the mobile unit out there to get those students tested. We don't do that with everything; it just depends on what the issue is--$$Okay.$$--you know. I don't wanna say we're known for those events.