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Dawn Davis

Publisher Dawn Davis was born on June 23, 1965 in Los Angeles, California to Leona Julia and Louis Davis. She graduated from Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles, California in 1983, and received her B.A. degree in international relations from Stanford University in Stanford, California in 1987.

In 1987, Davis entered into a two year analyst program at the investment bank First Boston in New York City. Davis was then awarded a scholarship through Rotary International to complete an independent study abroad in Nigeria. While on this trip, Davis decided to leave investment banking and returned to New York City where she became the assistant to Andre Schiffrin at his newly founded publishing house, The New Press. In 1991, Davis published her first book, If You Can’t Stand the Heat: Tales from Chefs and Restaurateurs, with the help of world renowned chef Anthony Bourdain. Davis left The New Press and joined the Penguin Random House imprint of Vintage where she became the paperback editor. Then, in 2001, Davis moved to HarperCollins as the vice president and editorial director of the company’s African American imprint, Amistad. While there, Davis acquired and published award-winning novels including Edward P. Jones’ The Known World and Chris Gardener’s The Pursuit of Happyness, which became a major motion picture. Davis moved to the HarperCollins imprint of Ecco Press in 2010 as an executive editor under Daniel Halpern. Then, in 2013, Davis founded her own imprint, 37 INK, under the publishing house of Simon & Schuster, Inc. 37 INK has published a variety of works including Carolina Clarke’s Postcards from Cookie, The Butler by Wil Haygood, Dear White People by Justin Simien, and Gathering Blossoms Under Fire, the collected journals of poet Alice Walker. Through 37 INK, Davis also launched the first online national black book club, The Inkwell Book Club.

Davis has received several awards and honors for her work. In 2014, she received the Groundbreaker Honor award from the organization Girls Write Now. She was also honored alongside Reginald Van Lee with the Visionary Award from the Metro Manhattan Chapter of The Links, Incorporated in 2014. Davis also served on the Board of Directors of the Harlem School of the Arts in New York City.

Dawn Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 20, 2018.

Accession Number

A2019.077

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/19/2019

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Our Savior's Lutheran School

Immaculate Heart High School

Stanford University

First Name

Dawn

Birth City, State, Country

Los Angeles

HM ID

DAV44

Favorite Season

Summer

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard and Italy

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

6/23/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Favorite Food

Pasta

Short Description

Publisher Dawn Davis (1965 - ) was vice president and editorial director of the HarperCollins’ African American imprint, Amistad, before becoming the founder, publisher, and vice president of 37 INK, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Employment

Credit Suisse First Boston

The New Press

Random House Publishing

HarperCollins

Simon & Schuster

Simon & Schuster, 37 Ink

First Boston Corporation

Penguin Random House- Vintage Books

Amistad

Ecco Press

Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Inkwell Book Club

Favorite Color

Gray

Alexander Smalls

Restaurateur and opera singer Alexander Smalls was born on February 7, 1952 in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He graduated from Spartanburg High School in 1970, and enrolled at Wofford College before transferring to the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, where he received his B.F.A. degree in opera in 1974. He then attended the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania between 1974 and 1977.

Upon graduation, Smalls, a classically trained baritone, toured professionally as an opera singer. As a member of the Houston Grand Opera, he performed in the George Gershwin opera Porgy and Bess, which earned Grammy and Tony Awards in 1977. Smalls studied opera and culinary arts in Europe; upon returning to the United States in the late 1970s, he founded his own catering business, Small Miracle. In 1994, Smalls launched his first restaurant, Café Beulah, in New York City, specializing in Southern Revival cooking that combined Gullah and international cuisines. Then, in 1996, Smalls opened Sweet Ophelia's, a casual dining venue featuring late-night, live entertainment in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood. He went on to open The Shoebox Café, an upscale Southern bistro in New York City’s Grand Central Terminal; however, the restaurant closed in 2001 in the aftermath of 9/11. Smalls founded a second catering business, Smalls & Co., which served a celebrity clientele that included Denzel Washington, Spike Lee and Toni Morrison. In 2012, Smalls established Harlem Jazz Enterprises; and, in partnership with Richard Parsons, opened two restaurants in Harlem in 2013: Minton’s and The Cecil.

Smalls has appeared on television on NBC, CNN, ABC, CBS, and the Food Network, among others. He also served as a contributor to Food & Wine, The Washington Post, the New York Times, the New York Daily News, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Crain's New York Business. Smalls authored the memoir and cookbook Grace the Table: Stories and Recipes from My Southern Revival, which features a foreword from jazz musician Wynton Marsalis.

Smalls was the recipient of the Legacy Award given by Amsterdam News in 2014, and the C-Cap Honors Award given by C-Cap in 2015. He joined the board of the Harlem School of The Arts in 2014, and served as board chair of director of Opus 118 Music School from 2007 to 2009.

Alexander Smalls was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 20, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.021

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/20/2016

Last Name

Smalls

Maker Category
Middle Name

Bernard

Schools

Curtis Institute of Music

University of North Carolina School of the Arts

Wofford College

First Name

Alexander

Birth City, State, Country

Spartanburg

HM ID

SMA05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa

Favorite Quote

And There You Have It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

2/7/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Peanut Butter and Jelly, Franks and Beans

Short Description

Restaurateur and opera singer Alexander Smalls (1952 - ), the father of Southern Revival Cooking, has opened five restaurants in New York City: Café Beulah, Sweet Ophelia's, The Shoebox Café, Minton’s and The Cecil. He wrote the cookbook Grace the Table: Stories and Recipes from My Southern Revival.

Employment

Harlem Jazz Enterprises LLC

Smalls & Company

Shoebox Cafe

Sweet Ophelia

Cafe Buelah

Favorite Color

Yellow

Soledad O'Brien

Broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien was born on September 19, 1966 in Saint James, New York. Her father, Edward, was a mechanical engineering professor; her mother, Estela, a French and English teacher. O’Brien graduated from Smithtown High School East in 1984, and went on to attend Harvard University from 1984 to 1988, but did not graduate until 2000, when she received her B.A. degree in English and American literature.

In 1989, O’Brien began her career at KISS-FM in Boston, Massachusetts as a reporter for the medical talk show Second Opinion and of Health Week in Review. In 1990, she was hired as an associate producer and news writer for Boston’s WBZ-TV station. O’Brien then worked at NBC News in New York City in 1991, as a field producer for Nightly News and Today, before being hired at San Francisco’s NBC affiliate KRON in 1993, where she worked as a reporter and bureau chief and co-hosted the Discovery Channel’s The Know Zone. Then, in 1996, O’Brien returned to New York to host MSNBC’s new weekend morning show and technology program The Site. Although The Site was cancelled one year later, O’Brien continued to work as a reporter and anchor for a number of shows, including MSNBC’s Morning Blend and NBC News’ Weekend Today until 1999, when she was named permanent co-anchor of Weekend Today.

In 2003, O’Brien left NBC and joined CNN as the co-anchor of the network’s flagship morning program, American Morning. In 2007, she moved to CNN’s documentary division, where she primarily worked on Special Investigations Unit and In America. From 2007 to 2013, O’Brien hosted a number of CNN documentary shows, including the Black in America series, the Latino in America series, and numerous Special Investigations Unit episodes. From 2012 to 2013, she anchored CNN’s Starting Point; and, in 2013, she established the Starfish Media Group production company, which has produced segments for CNN, HBO and Al Jazeera America. O’Brien was also hired by Al Jazeera America in 2013 as a special correspondent to the network’s America Tonight.

O’Brien has authored two books: 2009’s Latino in America, and the 2010 memoir, The Next Big Story: My Journey through the Land of Possibilities. In addition, she and her husband founded the Soledad O'Brien and Brad Raymond Starfish Foundation. O’Brien is a member of the board of directors of The After-School Corporation, the Harlem School of the Arts and the Foundation for the National Archives. She also served on the advisory board of Cyberangels, an internet safety organization.

O’Brien has received numerous awards, including the Emmy, the NAACP’s President's Award, the George Foster Peabody Award, an Alfred I. du Pont Award, and the Gracie Allen Award. In 2008, she was the first recipient of the Soledad O’Brien Freedom’s Voice Award from the Morehouse School of Medicine, and was the first recipient of The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Goodermote Humanitarian Award. O’Brien received the 2009 Medallion of Excellence for Leadership and Community Service Award from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. In 2010, she was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists.

Soledad O’Brien was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 21, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.055

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/21/2014

Last Name

O'Brien

Maker Category
Schools

Smithtown High School East

Harvard University

St. James Elementary School

Nesaquake Middle School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Soledad

Birth City, State, Country

Saint James

HM ID

OBR01

Favorite Season

Late Spring, Early Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Miama, Florida

Favorite Quote

Remember, Most People Are Idiots. If You're Listening To Them, You're Probably A Bigger Idiot.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/19/1966

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Black Beans And Rice

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Soledad O'Brien (1966 - ) founded the Starfish Media Group, and anchored national television news programs like NBC’s The Site and American Morning, and CNN’s In America.

Employment

KISS-FM

WBZ-TV

NBC News

KRON-TV

MSNBC

CNN

Starfish Media Group

Al Jazeera America

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Soledad O'Brien's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Soledad O'Brien lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Soledad O'Brien describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Soledad O'Brien describes her mother's upbringing and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Soledad O'Brien talks about how her parents met and married

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her parents' aspirations, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Soledad O'Brien lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her parents' aspirations, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Soledad O'Brien describes her home life

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Soledad O'Brien describes her community in Smithtown, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Soledad O'Brien describes the sights of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Soledad O'Brien recalls her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Soledad O'Brien describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her racial identity

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Soledad O'Brien describes her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Soledad O'Brien remembers her interests during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Soledad O'Brien recalls her decision to attend Harvard University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Soledad O'Brien describes her experiences at Harvard University

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Soledad O'Brien remembers the diversity at Harvard University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Soledad O'Brien describes her activities at Harvard University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Soledad O'Brien recalls her decision to leave Harvard University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Soledad O'Brien recalls her start at WBZ-TV in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Soledad O'Brien describes her parents' reaction to her decision to leave Harvard University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her work ethic

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Soledad O'Brien talks about Jeanne Blake's mentorship

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Soledad O'Brien recalls the minority training program at WBZ-TV

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Soledad O'Brien recalls joining KRON-TV in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Soledad O'Brien describes her initial challenges at KRON-TV

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Soledad O'Brien remembers her colleagues at KRON-TV in San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Soledad O'Brien recalls hosting 'The Know Zone' on the Discovery Channel

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Soledad O'Brien remembers anchoring MSNBC's 'The Site'

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Soledad O'Brien reflects upon her self image

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Soledad O'Brien remembers 'Imaging America'

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Soledad O'Brien describes her role at NBC News in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Soledad O'Brien recalls joining 'Weekend Today'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Soledad O'Brien reflects upon her success in the broadcast industry, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Soledad O'Brien reflects upon her success in the broadcast industry, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Soledad O'Brien talks about the skills of a successful television anchor

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Soledad O'Brien talks about balancing her family and career

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Soledad O'Brien remembers broadcast journalist David Bloom

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Soledad O'Brien recalls joining CNN

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Soledad O'Brien remembers completing her degree at Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Soledad O'Brien talks about the history of CNN

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Soledad O'Brien describes a typical day at CNN

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her experiences of gender discrimination at CNN

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Soledad O'Brien remembers covering Hurricane Katrina for CNN

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Soledad O'Brien recalls her experiences of racial discrimination at CNN

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Soledad O'Brien recalls her transition to documentary production at CNN

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her work on 'Black in America,' pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Soledad O'Brien talks about her work on 'Black in America,' pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Soledad O'Brien reflects upon the success of 'Black in America'

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Soledad O'Brien talks about CNN's documentary production team

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Soledad O'Brien reflects upon her CNN documentary series

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Soledad O'Brien talks about the depiction of African Americans in the media

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Soledad O'Brien talks about the changes in broadcast media

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Soledad O'Brien describes her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Soledad O'Brien talks about the importance of storytelling

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Soledad O'Brien reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Soledad O'Brien reflects upon her career

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Soledad O'Brien talks about the future of media

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Soledad O'Brien describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Soledad O'Brien talks about the PowHERful Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Soledad O'Brien reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Soledad O'Brien shares a message to future generations

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

5$9

DATitle
Soledad O'Brien talks about her experiences of gender discrimination at CNN
Soledad O'Brien talks about her work on 'Black in America,' pt. 1
Transcript
I remember once being called at the end of 2004, 2005 to go, to cover the tsunami, and I got a call from a, a young woman actually on the assignment desk. And her whole strategy was like, "Listen I've been sent to call you to see, we're trying to send someone to Thailand, but I know you're a mom and you're not gonna want to go and so I just have to run it by you and you know, now you got babies." I was like, "Who more than me wants to get on a plane to Thailand? Oh, me, send me." And I went, you know, and I always felt like you had to joke about these things to kind of get them past people, you know. And then when you got there you better bust your ass and do a good job because everybody was waiting for you to screw up. The first guy, when I got to Thailand, sat me down, pretty sure I'd end up working with a lot. He said, "Listen, so I know you're like this little star and all, but you should know that if I feel like you're not doing your job, I'm gonna call back to the network and tell them." I was so stunned, me not doing my job? The entire history of work had been over doing it. I was just--I was so upset. I was so upset, I went back to my room. In fact I had--I had my luggage. I hadn't even checked into the hotel yet. I was sent to go do a documentary, to do an hour long, sort of special for the network on the tsunami.$$Which was major. That tsunami had everyone--$$Right. One hundred and fifty thousand people died, and I remember--and I was also trying to do my show ['American Morning'] again, same thing, I was like well, I'm here, the news is here, why would you not do your show? And by the way because Thailand's twelve hours ahead, I can do my show from six p.m. to ten p.m., right. So I could shoot all day and then do my show and to have this producer, the first thing he said to me was to explain--"Let me explain to you, little girl--," basically, you know. "I know you're a star, but you should know that I'm going to call back and tell them if you don't do your job." I was so surprised, I was so surprised, you know, and I shot all day, I'd come back, six p.m. I'd say. "I'm available to do my show." I would do my own show with no producer 'cause they didn't send one for the show. I had been a producer, I know how to produce. Set up the lights. I mean because that's sort of how you're successful. And that's the great thing about CNN was that if you did that you know you really could be successful. A lot of your success was in your own hands. I mean I really liked that about CNN, you could--if you were prepared, if you got yourself prepared, if you did a good job reporting, you could be successful, you know, if someone else didn't have to make you, you could do it yourself. I'm trying to think of another good example. It was just--It was just you know, covering the Haitian earthquake, Wolf Blitzer, who I love said, "How do you feel as a mother covering this story?" I was like, "Well, as a reporter, like everybody else who's here reporting on this story, it's a very tough story to report. I'm holding onto babies who are dying in my arms, so yeah, I think it's tough for everybody." And my mother [Estela Marquetti y Mendieta O'Brien] called me and said, "Good for you, good for you. Don't let them call you a mother while you're working, make sure you tell them you're a reporter." You know, so if that's terribly dramatic and tough and whatever, no, but you know, I definitely was very cognizant all the time that as a woman and as a minority there were a lot of people watching to see kind of what you would do; and you know if you screwed it up (makes sound), that was it.$'Black in America'--$$So how did that come about, because--?$$The president of CNN at the time, a guy name Jim Walton, and Jon Klein [Jonathan Klein]--I'm sorry, the president of CNN Worldwide and then the president of CNN Domestic, a guy named Jon Klein, were trying to figure out what do you do for the fortieth anniversary of the assassination of Dr. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.]. And so they asked me would I be interested in hosting this big series, just be tons of hours on the assassination and then kind of like about black people today, and called 'Black in America.' And so I was intrigued, I wanted to do it, and I said yes, and so it was kind of up to us to shape how it would go, but it was a very--it was not a great experience. It was very stressful. There almost no black people who worked on it, and it was very--very contentious, you know, because a lot of people were like, "Listen the story of 'Black in America' is prison, black men in prison, statistics clearly show this is an issue. The story of Black America is a failure, the story of Black America is unwed mothers to poverty--," and then it's kind of like, I remember one of the producers said to me, and we've interviewed Michael Eric Dyson and he's talked a lot about the statistics and just how dire the situation is for black people, especially black men, and I think we need to do this and this and this. And I was like, and who is the funniest, happiest guy you know? It's Michael Eric Dyson, right. Michael Eric Dyson is not a bummer. If you've ever gone out, you know, hung out with Michael Eric Dyson, you'd laugh your butt off the whole time, right? So I said, so clearly we're not--that's not the story, it's more nuanced than that and if you do a story about, you know, the statistics, show doom. And you're going to call it 'Black in America,' like what? And I remember calling Kim [Kim Bondy], I would send her all the scripts, which was a big no, no. Not to send scripts out you know, and she would go through the scripts and say, "You know I think what you want to do is show the story of a guy, you know--," she said, "listen, I think that the issue of the prison thing is people are successful often connected to people who are struggling, right, so--so it's hard to be very successful because you've always got one arm or one leg being pulled down." So I think that's a more nuanced story. You know how do we tell these stories of success and struggle and we were trying to be very balanced about it like literally to the point of story count, but you know you are terrified sometimes by some of the producers. I remember saying to somebody, "So like, are we getting a really diverse group of people?" "What do you mean?" "I'm getting like dark skinned black people and light skinned black people. I mean who--I haven't done all the shoots, who are we interviewing?" And she said, "Oh, it's just everybody like So and So, everybody like Butch Warren." Butch Warren is who you and I would consider to be a relatively light skinned brother. I mean, oh, my god. We're--everybody looks like Butch Warren? Do you now understand that there's a subliminal message sent, like this is part of the story and you don't even understand that this is a dynamic in the story. It felt very stressful all the time because it was such a big project and I just felt, you know, sometimes that I was arguing with producers all the time.

Raymond J. McGuire

Investment banker Raymond J. McGuire was born on January 23, 1957, in Dayton, Ohio. After graduating from the Hotchkiss School in 1975, McGuire enrolled in Harvard University. He went on to graduate from Harvard College cum laude with his A.B. degree in English in 1979. McGuire was awarded a Rotary Fellowship to attend the University of Nice in France in 1980. In 1984, McGuire graduated from Harvard Business School with his M.B.A. degree and from Harvard Law School with his J.D. degree.

McGuire began his career in the mergers and acquisitions department at First Boston Corporation. In 1988, when Joseph R. Perella and Bruce Wasserstein, top officers at First Boston Corporation, left to start their own firm, McGuire went with them. At Wasserstein Perella & Co., McGuire played a key role in many transactions, including Pitney Bowes, Inc.’s acquisition of Ameriscribe. He served as a partner and managing director at Wasserstein Perella & Co. from 1991 to 1994, and then became the managing director of mergers & acquisitions at Merrill Lynch Investment, Inc. In 2000, McGuire was appointed as the the global co-head of mergers & acquisitions at Morgan Stanley where he advised the $19.8 billion sale of Nabisco Holdings to the Philip Morris Company and Pfizer’s sale of its Schick Wilkinson Sword business to Energizer for $930 million in 2003. In 2005, McGuire left Morgan Stanley and was appointed as the co-head of investment banking at Citigroup Corporate and Investment Banking. He became the head of global banking in 2009. While there, McGuire managed more than two thousand employees and advised business mergers and acquisitions valued at more than $200 billion, such as Time Warner, Inc.’s $45 billion separation from Time Warner Cable.

McGuire was named chairman of the board of the Studio Museum in Harlem and vice chairman of the board and investment committee chairman of the Whitney Museum of American Art. He also served on the executive committee of the International Center of Photography, as a trustee of the Lincoln Center and chairman of the board of the De La Salle Academy, and as a member of the board of the Mayor’s Cultural Affairs Advisory Committee for the City of New York. In addition, he served as a trustee of New York-Presbyterian Hospital. For Harvard University, he has served as a member of the Overseers and Directors Nominating Committee.

In 2002, Black Enterprise magazine named McGuire one of the “Top 50 African Americans on Wall Street.” He has also received the Alumni Professional Achievement Award from the Harvard Business School, and was named a Distinguished Patron of the Arts by the Pratt Institute.

Raymond J. McGuire was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 24, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.195

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/12/2013

Last Name

McGuire

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Jeffrey

Occupation
Schools

Harvard University

Harvard Business School

Harvard Law School

University of Nice

First Name

Raymond

Birth City, State, Country

Youngstown

HM ID

MCG06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Saint Barthelemy

Favorite Quote

Hold Fast To Dreams, For If Dreams Die, Life Is A Broken Winged Bird That Cannot Fly, Hold Fast To Dreams, For If Dreams Go, Life Is A Barren Field, Frozen With Snow.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/23/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Turkey Burgers

Short Description

Investment banker Raymond J. McGuire (1957 - ) is an alumnus of Harvard University and Harvard Law School. He worked in mergers and acquisitions at First Boston Corporation, Merrill Lynch, and Morgan Stanley, and serves as head of Global Banking at Citigroup where he advises on deals valued at more than $200 billion.

Employment

First Boston Corporation

Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Merrill Lynch

Morgan Stanley

Citigroup

Favorite Color

Blue, Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Raymond McGuire's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire describes his earliest childhood memories in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire describes his community in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about his age difference with his older brothers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about growing up in the Bethel Church of God in Christ

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire continues to describe his community in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire describes his childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes his earliest memories of grade school

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Raymond McGuire talks about differences between his academic environment and home environment

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Raymond McGuire talks about attending The Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about his first jobs in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire describes the student demographic at Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about people he looked up to as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about interviewing for and attending the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire describes student style at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his friendship with Michael Carroll

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio and at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about deciding to attend Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about a prank he took part in at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about his high school interest in literature and basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire recalls his graduation from the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes his first year as an undergraduate student at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about his experience as an undergraduate at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about the political community at The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about the athletic community at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and playing basketball for the Crimson Classics

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about the private club community at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and his membership to the Owl Club

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about his membership to the Owl Club at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his racial experiences in his life from Dayton, Ohio to Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about experiencing racism while studying abroad in Europe

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about the Owl Club and other communities at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about the African American Cultural Center at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about studying literature at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about studying abroad at The Nice Sophia Antipolis University in Nice, France

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about being admitted to Harvard University's dual degree program for law school and business school

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his graduate studies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and his summer internships

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire reflects on adjusting the Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts and the Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking a summer internship at First Boston

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his education at the Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking two internships in one summer

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about earning his graduate degrees and receiving job offers

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about First Boston, Joseph Perella, and Bruce Wasserstein

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire recalls being interviewed for a position at First Boston

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about working at First Boston after graduating from Harvard Law School and Harvard Business School

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes mergers and acquisitions work

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about the creation of Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about deciding to leave First Boston to work at Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his roles and duties at Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire explains why Joseph Perella left Wasserstein Perella & Co. in 1993

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire explains why he left Wasserstein Perella & Co. and joined Merrill Lynch Wealth Management

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about managing a business deal with Nabisco and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking Fort Howard Paper Company private and the slowdown in mergers and acquisitions in the early 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about the importance of Japanese investors to mergers and acquisitions

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about working with the Unilever Group on mergers and acquisitions deals

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about how mergers and acquisitions deals are executed

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about advice he gave during leadership changes at Morgan Stanley

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about the changes in leadership at Morgan Stanley in the mid-2000s

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about leaving Morgan Stanley for Citigroup in 2005

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about Franklin A. Thomas

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about opportunities at Citigroup

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about working through crises

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about handling the sale of Wyeth pharmaceutical company to Pfizer Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about the effect of the 2007 economic crisis

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire ranks international regions by market size and economic influence

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about his work for Citigroup and its development during his tenure

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about his art-collecting

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about creative organizations and artists he supports

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire reflects over his life

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his son and describes what he envisions for his future

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire considers what he may have done differently

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire considers his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

2$6

DATitle
Raymond McGuire talks about the political community at The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Raymond McGuire talks about managing a business deal with Nabisco and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Transcript
So the other communities that you mentioned--$$Mm-hmm.$$So what were some of the other communities? You mentioned the athletics--$$(Unclear) to the politics as an example.$$Okay.$$This is at the Kennedy School [The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts]. And this is one where you were introduced to some of the country's great politicians. Dutch Morial [Ernest Nathan Morial] I can remember back, the great mayor of New Orleans [Lousiana]. And when, when Dutch came, this is, remember this is a time when you're first getting a number of, of black mayors.$$That's right$$And so to get exposed to that in the world of politics was, was, we actually could see in a way that, in a world where black representation had been denied for all the reasons that we know, to see these people who had been able to, to, to get to that level, to command the respect of the voting population to get them to that level was, was, it was encouraging. It was up lifting. It was certainly inspiring. So you would see these politicians, you can, then you'd go and you go to debate but that was part of the political process. At least you are at a much junior level at that level at the, at the college you thought you were actually practicing. So it is a, it was a world of, of politics and, and governance and government. And for people who aspired to be in public service, who wanted to be in government service that was a great training ground for that. And many of them have gone on to do that. Many people who weren't part of that have gone on to become part of that as well but many of them have gone on to do that. That's, that was kind of the intro to politics.$Okay, so let me ask you, during this period of time what deals are you most proud of that you did?$$The, the Nabisco transaction was a big deal.$$And that, that deal was--$$Carl Icahn went after Nabisco.$$Mm-hmm.$$And I was the lead M&A [mergers and acquisitions] banker on that deal.$$And that deal was of, almost a $15 billion deal.$$It was probably $15 billion, something along that line.$$Yeah, right.$$It was a big deal.$$On that line. And is this your first time in a deal where Carl Icahn is involved? 'Cause he was, is it, is it the first time?$$I'm thinking through that, Carl, there had been other instances I think where I was probably something that Carl did but directly, where Carl is directly on the other side and I'm associated, this is probably the first one.$$Okay. And the person heading up of, you know, what, what I found interesting because this, you do a similar deal later than this but with, 'cause you work on another Philip Morris later, right?$$Yeah, that's, that's--$$That's much later.$$Yes.$$Okay. But, but the thing that I found interesting about this, can you just talk about the nature of what Nabisco, why the Philip Morris and Nabisco deal made sense at the time, and who was trying to do what? Can you talk a little bit about that?$$Yeah this, this goes on, if, if I remember the facts correctly, RJR [R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company] and Nabisco had been under the overall, back when the big deal was done, the, the take private deal back in the '80s [1980s] I guess it was, large leverage buy out. And we split the, the tobacco up from the food company. The reason it got to be so complex is because the heavy tax implications for selling the food business prematurely. And the reason, the way that, that the deal evolved was because there was an outsider who came in, who instigated a, a transaction in the form of Carl Icahn. The rules didn't apply to the sale of the food business. And we eventually ran an auction for the sale of the food business, for the sale of the Nabisco business. And Philip Morris bought it, great strategic deal for them. We got a great price for the Nabisco shareholders. Carl made off well, his investors made off well. And we eventually left with the, the RJR business was primarily a cash business. It had a lot of cash on its balance sheet. It was, was and was a good business, sort of backup business from a cash flow generating standpoint. And we will successfully sell the business to, to, to the Philip Morris people. And they ran it well and then it got sold or spun off.$$So was the use of an auction, had you used that before and--$$Sure.$$Okay. So there are lots of-$$Yeah, it's a public auction.