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Jessye Norman

Opera singer Jessye Norman was born on September 15, 1945 in Augusta, Georgia to Janie King Norman and Silas Norman. She graduated from Augusta’s Lucy C. Laney Senior High School. Following her participation in Philadelphia’s Marian Anderson Vocal Competition in 1960, Norman received a full-tuition scholarship to attend Howard University, where she completed her B.M. degree in 1967. She then earned her M.M. degree from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1968.

After Norman won the ARD International Music Competition in Munich, Germany in 1969, Egon Seefehlner invited her to perform as Elisabeth in Tannhauser with Deutsche Oper Berlin. She signed a three-year contract with the opera company and, in 1970, she performed in Deborah, followed by L’Africaine and Le nozze di Figaro at the Berlin Festival. In 1972, Norman sang Verdi’s Aida at La Scala in Milan. Norman continued to perform internationally as a soloist and recitalist. She returned to the stage, performing in Oedipus rex and Dido and Aeneas with the Opera Company of Philadelphia in 1982. The following year, Norman performed at the Metropolitan Opera for its 100th anniversary season. Following a 1987 performance with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Norman was featured in Erwartung, the Metropolitan Opera’s first single-character production, and Bluebeard’s Castle in 1989. In 1990, she performed in Tchaikovsky: 150th Birthday Gala from Leningrad along with Yo-Yo Ma and Itzhak Perlman. Her first appearance with the Lyric Opera of Chicago was in the title role of Alceste in 1990. She was cast as Jocasta in a televised production of Oedipus rex at the inaugural Saito Kinen Festival Matsumoto in 1993, the same year she was featured in Ariadne auf Naxos at the Metropolitan Opera, followed by The Makropulos Case in 1996. In 1998, she performed at Carnegie Hall in Sacred Ellington, featuring music by Duke Ellington, and released a jazz crossover project, I Was Born in Love with You, with Michel Legrand. In 2002, she established the Jessye Norman School of the Arts, a tuition-free, after school arts program in her hometown of Augusta, Georgia. In collaboration with New York City cultural institutions, Norman curated Honor!: A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy in 2009. With seventy-five recordings to her credit, in 2010, Norman released Roots: My Life, My Song.

A five-time Grammy Award winner, including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, Norman has received forty-five honorary doctorate degrees, is a Kennedy Center Honoree and holds the National Medal of the Arts. Graduate fellowships at the University of Michigan’s School of Music have also been named in her honor. Norman serves as a spokesperson for The Partnership for the Homeless and was named an honorary ambassador to the United Nations. Additionally, she serves on the board of trustees of the New York Public Library, The New York Botanical Garden, The Dance Theatre of Harlem, Paine College and Carnegie Hall.

Norman passed away on September 30, 2019.

Jessye Norman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 21, 2016 and April 27, 2017.

Accession Number

A2016.128

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/21/2016 |and| 04/27/2017

Last Name

Norman

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Walker Traditional Elementary School

A.R. Johnson Health Science and Engineering Magnet Middle and High School

Lucy C. Laney High School

University of Michigan

Howard University

First Name

Jessye

Birth City, State, Country

Augusta

HM ID

NOR08

Favorite Season

Fall, song: God will take care of you.

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere there's an ocean

Favorite Quote

When people show you who they are, believe them.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/15/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Smoked salmon

Death Date

9/30/2019

Short Description

Opera singer Jessye Norman (1945- ) began performing with international and American opera companies in 1969. She received multiple Grammy awards, founded the Jessye Norman School of the Arts, and wrote a memoir, Stand Up Straight and Sing!, published in 2014.

Employment

Deutsche Oper Berlin

Teatro Communale

Temple University Music Festival

Various

Jessye Norman School for the Arts

Favorite Color

Yellow

Gordon J. Davis

Lawyer and civic leader Gordon J. Davis was born on August 7, 1941, in Chicago, Illinois to William Allison Davis and Elizabeth Stubbs Davis. Davis grew up near a predominantly African American neighborhood, where he gained a passion for jazz and the arts. He graduated from Williams College in 1963 with his B.A. degree, and then from Harvard Law School in 1967 with his J.D. degree.

Upon graduation, Davis moved to New York City and worked as special assistant to Mayor John Lindsay. He served on the New York City Planning Commission from 1973 until 1978, when he was appointed New York City’s first African American commissioner of Parks and Recreation. During his service as commissioner, Davis was instrumental in the founding of the Central Park Conservancy. In 1983, Davis resigned as commissioner of Parks and Recreation and joined the law firm of Lord, Day & Lord. He began serving as counsel to the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts that same year. In 1990, he became the founding chairman of Jazz at Lincoln Center.

Davis was named partner at the law firm of LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene & MacRae in 1994, but left in 2001 when he was voted the first African American president of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Davis held this position for nine months before returning to LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene & MacRae as a senior partner. In 2002, the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, the organization overseeing the redevelopment of the Ground Zero site, became his client. Davis was named partner at Dewey & LeBoeuf in 2007, after a merger joined LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene & MacRae and Dewey Ballantine. In 2012, he moved to Venable, LLP as a partner. Davis’ clients have included the New York Public Library, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, the United States Tennis Association, and the American Museum of Natural History.

Davis has served on the board of directors of the Municipal Art Society of New York as well as other civic and arts organizations in New York City. In 2001, he was honored by 100 Black Men for his public service, and was named one of “America’s Top Black Lawyers” by Black Enterprise magazine the following year. He was appointed to a six-year term on the board of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts by President Barack Obama in 2010.

Davis lives in New York City with his wife, and has one daughter.

Gordon J. Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 17, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.205

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/17/2014 |and| 7/13/2016

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Jamison

Occupation
Schools

Francis W. Parker High School

Hyde Park Academy High School

Williams College

Columbia University

Harvard Law School

First Name

Gordon

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

DAV34

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Oak Bluffs

Favorite Quote

Black People Are Just As Good As White People, Actually, They're A Little Better.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/7/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken, Watermelon

Short Description

Lawyer and civic leader Gordon J. Davis (1941 - ) a partner with the law firm of Venable, LLP, was the first African American commissioner of Parks and Recreation for the City of New York, as well as first African American president of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

Employment

Venable LLP

LeBoeuf Lamb / Dewey LeBoeuf

Lincoln Center Inc.

Lord Day & Lord

New York City Parks Department

New York City Planning Commission

Mayor's Office, New York City

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Gordon J. Davis narrates his photographs, pt.1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gordon J. Davis narrates his photographs, pt.2

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gordon J. Davis narrates his photographs, pt.3

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Gordon J. Davis' interview

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gordon J. Davis lists his favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his mother's family history

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gordon J. Davis recalls the untimely death of his maternal uncle, Frederick Douglass Stubbs

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his mother's education and his parents' marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gordon J. Davis compares his experience at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts to his father's

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gordon J. Davis recounts his confrontation with the dean of freshman at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gordon J. Davis describes his childhood neighborhood of Hyde Park in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Gordon J. Davis details his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his paternal grandfather's civil service career being derailed by President Woodrow Wilson's racist policies

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Gordon J. Davis cites publications that include his paternal family history

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his father's time and legacy at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his paternal family's educational achievements

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Gordon J. Davis explains his father's bitterness toward Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Gordon J. Davis describes his father's experiences at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts and his Natchez research

Tape: 2 Story: 16 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his father's second marriage to Lois Mason and how the two met at Dillard University in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 17 - Gordon J. Davis describes his father's friendship with the author Sterling Brown

Tape: 2 Story: 18 - Gordon J. Davis describes his father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 19 - Gordon J. Davis describes his father's success as an academic innovator and mentor

Tape: 2 Story: 20 - Gordon J. Davis explains the significance of the Rosenwald Foundation

Tape: 2 Story: 21 - Gordon J. Davis describes his mother's later years

Tape: 2 Story: 22 - Gordon J. Davis describes his earliest childhood memories and his experience at Hyde Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his older brother

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gordon J. Davis recalls perceptions of race and class while growing up in Hyde Park, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his family's sense of racial identity, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gordon J. Davis talks about his family's sense of racial identity, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gordon J. Davis describes the use of humor in diffusing racially charged situations

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gordon J. Davis remembers his time at the University of Chicago Laboratory School in Chicago, Illinois and in Jack and Jill

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gordon J. Davis explains his academic goals and choosing to attend Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gordon J. Davis describes his family lineage and racial identity

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gordon J. Davis reminisces about his classmates at Francis Parker High School in Chicago, Illinois and his mother's death

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gordon J. Davis describes his father's and uncle's careers academic careers

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gordon J. Davis describes his summers at Idlewild, Michigan and his experience at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gordon J. Davis remembers joining civil rights protests during his freshman year at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gordon J. Davis recalls the social atmosphere during his time at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gordon J. Davis talks about the movement to abolish fraternities at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Gordon J. Davis talks about his family's sense of racial identity, pt. 1
Gordon J. Davis talks about the movement to abolish fraternities at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts
Transcript
Now, about the issue of color, can I ask you that, like you know, you talk about Allison [S. Davis] being, I mean, you know, he was confused. Well he was (simultaneous)--$$He wasn't confused. He just didn't understand the meaning of the word.$$Okay (laughter).$$We were never confused about race.$$And why (simultaneous)$$That maybe a bit apocryphal, but generally I don't ever remember him being confused about race, because of what our parents [Elizabeth Stubbs Davis and W. Allison Davis] taught us. They taught us, even to this day, sometimes white people almost say, "Well you could have passed for white, why didn't you?" As if it were a rational question. And I look at them and say, "Why would I want to be white?" (Laughter) Even if I had a choice, why would I want to be, and that always stuns them, because they never could imagine that being the answer. They can only imagine it would be much better to be white than.... And of course, that day, most days there were all kinds of black people disappearing, who'd passed, and so forth. But my parents were social scientists. My father spent his life studying race in this country, and education, and race and education, caste and stuff. So there was a consciousness about these issues in the house, not that we were going around thinking, but they--and the issue being anything other than colored people was never an issue. Even though--you know, and it wasn't an issue not only with us, it wasn't an issue with my father's brother [John A. Davis] and sister [Dorothy Davis]. It wasn't an issue in my mother's family (unclear) light-skinned people, all of us, although my father was darker.$$Yes, people talk (simultaneous)--$$He was darker.$$That's right. People talk about that. That he was darker.$$So that, so the whole growing up is littered with stories about how funny race can be. That Allison saying the teacher's white when she was black. We went to Hawaii (laughter). My father went to Hawaii (laughter) we went to Hawaii in 1947. My father was going to teach at the University of Hawaii. And his principal reason for going, however, was Hawaii was supposed to be the only place in the United States and its dominion, where there was no color line. Coming off the boat, you knew that wasn't true. It didn't take any research. You knew the minute you got to Hawaii there were color lines all over the place. I mean, there were white people, Hawaiians, Japanese, they're all, you know. But it didn't take any study to feel, to realize there was a color.... There's a great picture in the Hawaii Gazette [sic.], 1947, a picture of my father clearly black, a black person, "Distinguished Professor Comes to Hawaii From the University of Chicago to Study," blah, blah, blah. Well, that was, you know, we were a big deal. But there wasn't any need to study because we knew right away there was a color line. Although it was very diverse and the friends my parents had, there were a couple, she was very black, he was white, and the only place they could live a decent life was Hawaii in 1947. So they lived in Hawaii. Actually she, the woman, was she the grandmother of [HistoryMaker] Lani Guinier?$$Oh, I (simultaneous)--$$Lani Guinier's first name comes from the name of the woman who was--in any event, there's a picture of me--we lived in the Moana Hotel [Moana Surfrider, Honolulu, Hawaii]. There's a picture of me when my last day of class in whatever grade I was in, kindergarten, and the kids all gave me a lei with little good-bye notes on it. And you look at my class, there're very white kids there, all these Asian kids, it was very diverse. On the boat on the way over, which was only one class, it wasn't first class, it was only one class, we were in a boat on the way over. And we were a curious group. People would look at us and couldn't quite figure out what we were. A train, even the Pullman porters couldn't quite figure it out. (Sound). So we're on this boat for five days going to Hawaii and it's a woman from the South, she'd sort of been buzzing around and one time--you go up and down on an elevator, so we're in an elevator and my sister, my brother [Allison S. Davis] and myself going up and down the elevator. She finally had her chance. She said, "What are you all?" This is one of these stories from Urbana [ph.]. My brother said something like, "What do you mean?" "Well, what nationality are you all?" My brother said, "We all is Indians." (Laughter). This is another family story. Did he say that? I think, oh that's the story we told for sixty years, that he actually.... The woman was for real. I mean she definitely was trying to figure out what we were. So the issue of race, of color, it wasn't for a long time--the only people didn't know we were, couldn't figure out we were black were white people, because in Chicago [Illinois] everybody knew everybody on Langley [Avenue] everybody knew. I mean every once in a while some kids would wonder into our area of Langley and not know, and start to beat us up and we'd run to the school yard and say, "Tell them, tell them we're"--you know.$So I said about the guys freshman year, walking into the freshmen dining room to say come picket the White House [Washington, D.C.] and got booed and they didn't bounce, they didn't, you couldn't deter them at all. As an example of leadership I hadn't seen before. So at the end of our sophomore year, some guys who were in the so-called best fraternity in the campus, an incident occurred involving an Asian student that they thought should be a member, but the rest of the fraternity members booed down and wouldn't even consider him because he was Asian, even though he was eating his meals there every day. They walked out and they called a meeting in the physics lab to discuss the future, what should be done about fraternities and their effect on Williams [College, Williamstown, Massachusetts]. It ended up as something called the Grinnell Petition, named after the guy [Bruce Grinnell] who was the captain of the football team and lead the--and ninety of us signed the petition saying Williams should get rid of fraternities, the spring of our sophomore year. People had been saying things about fraternities at Williams for fifty years. My father [W. Allison Davis] said, "Don't go to Williams because of the fraternities." (Sound). But this was a little bit different because the people signing the petition were more centrists than the wacky non-affiliates and beatniks. That summer the president of Williams, James Phinney Baxter [III], who had been president for twenty-five years, it was his last year, he resigned, and the new president was a guy named John [Edward] Sawyer, a Yale [University, New Haven, Connecticut] economist. He began my junior year. He invited some of us "campus leaders" to come to dinner at his house--the president's house, and he and his little white wife and his little, tight-ass white self couldn't have been more boring, less interesting, less anything, I mean, we came away saying "Oh God, nothing is ever going to change." A week later, he eliminated the compulsory chapel. And the summer between our junior and senior year the board voted to abolish fraternities, immediately, no all-deliberate speed, no nothing. They said we're going to get rid of fraternities as fast as we can. The campus was in a state of shock. We were, the ninety of us, were in a state of shock. So within (simultaneous)--$$There were ninety of you?$$Only ninety had signed this petition (simultaneous)--$$Only nine (simultaneous)?$$--of the thousands of students, ninety, nine-o. And here this new president got the board to abolish it. Well, clearly he came with that as an agenda. It wasn't just us. He knew that was on his agenda, because he knew that Williams would never be a better institution until fraternities were gone, we could go co-ed without fraternities because fraternities meant you couldn't go coed. They housed--80 percent of the students were housed in fraternities, all men. Fraternities were a deterrent for anybody of color to go there. So, we were stunned. And outside of Williams, the Civil Rights Movement was reaching its crescendo. So I graduated in June of 1963 and a week before the graduation a bunch of guys who were my friends who had just come back from Birmingham [Alabama], they had been down there--the campus was all up in a civil rights thing, everybody was reading [James] Baldwin's '[The] Fire Next Time' and signing up to get on buses, the same place where they were, everybody was booed when they raised it four years before; the whole campus was swept up in the civil rights--had students visiting. SNCC [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee] [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther] King [Jr.] spoke there. So this was the profound part of Williams. One, there's a personal change going on. It's a totally different experience than my father's [W. Allison Davis] experience obviously. But the world is changing and then Williams is changing, so it was sort of this triple layer of things going on. So the Williams experience became very indelible for me and for my group of friends, who are still very close. We still email all the time. We still talk all the time. It was a very indelible experience because all these things were happening happened at the same time. And all the guys who were totally, I mean, the outcry from the alumni about the fraternity issue, it did not--these WASPs [White Anglo Saxon Protestants], from this WASP, this boring WASP president and his boring WASP board, chairman of the board, who was a guy from--a Brahmin from Boston [Massachusetts], they didn't give a shit. And sure enough within three years the fraternities were gone, I mean gone. They had taken over the houses, they had kicked out all the fraternities, they were gone. I said, "Damn," and three years later it went coed, or four years later. And every step of the way--and the number of diverse students increased, increased, increased, increased. And every step of the way, it got better. All these guys were saying, oh it's going to be terrible, it's going to be (unclear). It became better academically. It became better socially. It's now the number one liberal arts college in the country, has been the last ten years and all this stuff. And it all began with this guy, Jack Sawyer, who nobody thought would change anything, and he just fooled the shit out of everybody. And he eventually became head of the Carnegie Foundation [sic. Andrew W. Mellon Foundation] and he was quite something. So, that in not quite a nutshell, that is why Williams was very profoundly important to me and my--changed me, affected me, whatever the right words are.$$So--

Raymond J. McGuire

Investment banker Raymond J. McGuire was born on January 23, 1957, in Dayton, Ohio. After graduating from the Hotchkiss School in 1975, McGuire enrolled in Harvard University. He went on to graduate from Harvard College cum laude with his A.B. degree in English in 1979. McGuire was awarded a Rotary Fellowship to attend the University of Nice in France in 1980. In 1984, McGuire graduated from Harvard Business School with his M.B.A. degree and from Harvard Law School with his J.D. degree.

McGuire began his career in the mergers and acquisitions department at First Boston Corporation. In 1988, when Joseph R. Perella and Bruce Wasserstein, top officers at First Boston Corporation, left to start their own firm, McGuire went with them. At Wasserstein Perella & Co., McGuire played a key role in many transactions, including Pitney Bowes, Inc.’s acquisition of Ameriscribe. He served as a partner and managing director at Wasserstein Perella & Co. from 1991 to 1994, and then became the managing director of mergers & acquisitions at Merrill Lynch Investment, Inc. In 2000, McGuire was appointed as the the global co-head of mergers & acquisitions at Morgan Stanley where he advised the $19.8 billion sale of Nabisco Holdings to the Philip Morris Company and Pfizer’s sale of its Schick Wilkinson Sword business to Energizer for $930 million in 2003. In 2005, McGuire left Morgan Stanley and was appointed as the co-head of investment banking at Citigroup Corporate and Investment Banking. He became the head of global banking in 2009. While there, McGuire managed more than two thousand employees and advised business mergers and acquisitions valued at more than $200 billion, such as Time Warner, Inc.’s $45 billion separation from Time Warner Cable.

McGuire was named chairman of the board of the Studio Museum in Harlem and vice chairman of the board and investment committee chairman of the Whitney Museum of American Art. He also served on the executive committee of the International Center of Photography, as a trustee of the Lincoln Center and chairman of the board of the De La Salle Academy, and as a member of the board of the Mayor’s Cultural Affairs Advisory Committee for the City of New York. In addition, he served as a trustee of New York-Presbyterian Hospital. For Harvard University, he has served as a member of the Overseers and Directors Nominating Committee.

In 2002, Black Enterprise magazine named McGuire one of the “Top 50 African Americans on Wall Street.” He has also received the Alumni Professional Achievement Award from the Harvard Business School, and was named a Distinguished Patron of the Arts by the Pratt Institute.

Raymond J. McGuire was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 24, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.195

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/12/2013

Last Name

McGuire

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Jeffrey

Occupation
Schools

Harvard University

Harvard Business School

Harvard Law School

University of Nice

First Name

Raymond

Birth City, State, Country

Youngstown

HM ID

MCG06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Saint Barthelemy

Favorite Quote

Hold Fast To Dreams, For If Dreams Die, Life Is A Broken Winged Bird That Cannot Fly, Hold Fast To Dreams, For If Dreams Go, Life Is A Barren Field, Frozen With Snow.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/23/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Turkey Burgers

Short Description

Investment banker Raymond J. McGuire (1957 - ) is an alumnus of Harvard University and Harvard Law School. He worked in mergers and acquisitions at First Boston Corporation, Merrill Lynch, and Morgan Stanley, and serves as head of Global Banking at Citigroup where he advises on deals valued at more than $200 billion.

Employment

First Boston Corporation

Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Merrill Lynch

Morgan Stanley

Citigroup

Favorite Color

Blue, Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Raymond McGuire's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire describes his earliest childhood memories in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire describes his community in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about his age difference with his older brothers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about growing up in the Bethel Church of God in Christ

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire continues to describe his community in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire describes his childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes his earliest memories of grade school

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Raymond McGuire talks about differences between his academic environment and home environment

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Raymond McGuire talks about attending The Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about his first jobs in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire describes the student demographic at Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about people he looked up to as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about interviewing for and attending the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire describes student style at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his friendship with Michael Carroll

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio and at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about deciding to attend Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about a prank he took part in at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about his high school interest in literature and basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire recalls his graduation from the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes his first year as an undergraduate student at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about his experience as an undergraduate at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about the political community at The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about the athletic community at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and playing basketball for the Crimson Classics

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about the private club community at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and his membership to the Owl Club

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about his membership to the Owl Club at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his racial experiences in his life from Dayton, Ohio to Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about experiencing racism while studying abroad in Europe

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about the Owl Club and other communities at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about the African American Cultural Center at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about studying literature at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about studying abroad at The Nice Sophia Antipolis University in Nice, France

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about being admitted to Harvard University's dual degree program for law school and business school

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his graduate studies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and his summer internships

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire reflects on adjusting the Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts and the Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking a summer internship at First Boston

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his education at the Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking two internships in one summer

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about earning his graduate degrees and receiving job offers

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about First Boston, Joseph Perella, and Bruce Wasserstein

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire recalls being interviewed for a position at First Boston

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about working at First Boston after graduating from Harvard Law School and Harvard Business School

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes mergers and acquisitions work

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about the creation of Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about deciding to leave First Boston to work at Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his roles and duties at Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire explains why Joseph Perella left Wasserstein Perella & Co. in 1993

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire explains why he left Wasserstein Perella & Co. and joined Merrill Lynch Wealth Management

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about managing a business deal with Nabisco and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking Fort Howard Paper Company private and the slowdown in mergers and acquisitions in the early 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about the importance of Japanese investors to mergers and acquisitions

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about working with the Unilever Group on mergers and acquisitions deals

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about how mergers and acquisitions deals are executed

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about advice he gave during leadership changes at Morgan Stanley

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about the changes in leadership at Morgan Stanley in the mid-2000s

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about leaving Morgan Stanley for Citigroup in 2005

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about Franklin A. Thomas

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about opportunities at Citigroup

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about working through crises

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about handling the sale of Wyeth pharmaceutical company to Pfizer Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about the effect of the 2007 economic crisis

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire ranks international regions by market size and economic influence

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about his work for Citigroup and its development during his tenure

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about his art-collecting

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about creative organizations and artists he supports

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire reflects over his life

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his son and describes what he envisions for his future

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire considers what he may have done differently

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire considers his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

2$6

DATitle
Raymond McGuire talks about the political community at The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Raymond McGuire talks about managing a business deal with Nabisco and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Transcript
So the other communities that you mentioned--$$Mm-hmm.$$So what were some of the other communities? You mentioned the athletics--$$(Unclear) to the politics as an example.$$Okay.$$This is at the Kennedy School [The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts]. And this is one where you were introduced to some of the country's great politicians. Dutch Morial [Ernest Nathan Morial] I can remember back, the great mayor of New Orleans [Lousiana]. And when, when Dutch came, this is, remember this is a time when you're first getting a number of, of black mayors.$$That's right$$And so to get exposed to that in the world of politics was, was, we actually could see in a way that, in a world where black representation had been denied for all the reasons that we know, to see these people who had been able to, to, to get to that level, to command the respect of the voting population to get them to that level was, was, it was encouraging. It was up lifting. It was certainly inspiring. So you would see these politicians, you can, then you'd go and you go to debate but that was part of the political process. At least you are at a much junior level at that level at the, at the college you thought you were actually practicing. So it is a, it was a world of, of politics and, and governance and government. And for people who aspired to be in public service, who wanted to be in government service that was a great training ground for that. And many of them have gone on to do that. Many people who weren't part of that have gone on to become part of that as well but many of them have gone on to do that. That's, that was kind of the intro to politics.$Okay, so let me ask you, during this period of time what deals are you most proud of that you did?$$The, the Nabisco transaction was a big deal.$$And that, that deal was--$$Carl Icahn went after Nabisco.$$Mm-hmm.$$And I was the lead M&A [mergers and acquisitions] banker on that deal.$$And that deal was of, almost a $15 billion deal.$$It was probably $15 billion, something along that line.$$Yeah, right.$$It was a big deal.$$On that line. And is this your first time in a deal where Carl Icahn is involved? 'Cause he was, is it, is it the first time?$$I'm thinking through that, Carl, there had been other instances I think where I was probably something that Carl did but directly, where Carl is directly on the other side and I'm associated, this is probably the first one.$$Okay. And the person heading up of, you know, what, what I found interesting because this, you do a similar deal later than this but with, 'cause you work on another Philip Morris later, right?$$Yeah, that's, that's--$$That's much later.$$Yes.$$Okay. But, but the thing that I found interesting about this, can you just talk about the nature of what Nabisco, why the Philip Morris and Nabisco deal made sense at the time, and who was trying to do what? Can you talk a little bit about that?$$Yeah this, this goes on, if, if I remember the facts correctly, RJR [R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company] and Nabisco had been under the overall, back when the big deal was done, the, the take private deal back in the '80s [1980s] I guess it was, large leverage buy out. And we split the, the tobacco up from the food company. The reason it got to be so complex is because the heavy tax implications for selling the food business prematurely. And the reason, the way that, that the deal evolved was because there was an outsider who came in, who instigated a, a transaction in the form of Carl Icahn. The rules didn't apply to the sale of the food business. And we eventually ran an auction for the sale of the food business, for the sale of the Nabisco business. And Philip Morris bought it, great strategic deal for them. We got a great price for the Nabisco shareholders. Carl made off well, his investors made off well. And we eventually left with the, the RJR business was primarily a cash business. It had a lot of cash on its balance sheet. It was, was and was a good business, sort of backup business from a cash flow generating standpoint. And we will successfully sell the business to, to, to the Philip Morris people. And they ran it well and then it got sold or spun off.$$So was the use of an auction, had you used that before and--$$Sure.$$Okay. So there are lots of-$$Yeah, it's a public auction.