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Norma White

25th International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated, Norma Solomon White (1998 – 2002) was born on November 17, 1934 in Jacksonville, Florida. Under White’s leadership the Alpha Kappa Alpha administration focused its agenda on “Blazing New Trails.”

White was inducted into the Beta Alpha chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha at Florida A&M University (FAMU) in 1950. As a student at FAMU, White was the first female member of the famed FAMU Marching 100 Band to graduate. She graduated in 1955 with her B.S. degree and furthered her education by earning her M.A. degree in music at Columbia University. After graduating, White pursued a career in education in the public schools of Jacksonville, Florida.

White served as Regional Director for the South Atlantic Region from 1974 until 1978 and was successful in raising $100,000 for the United Negro College Fund. She later was elected to the office of First Supreme Anti-Basileus at the 56th Boule in Indianapolis, Indiana. In that capacity, she also served as the first vice-president of the sorority’s Educational Foundation Board. Then, in 1998, White became the 25th Supreme Basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha at the Boule held in Chicago, Illinois. The theme for her administration embraced six target areas: leadership development, education, health, the black family, economics and the arts. White also initiated the sorority’s “On Track” after school program which targeted at-risk students in grades three through six to prepare them for middle school.

White is Alpha Kappa Alpha’s first Supreme Basileus to be part of a mother-daughter legacy and is honored as the first female member of the famed FAMU Marching 100 Band through Jacksonville, Florida’s proclaimed day for her.

Dr. Norma Solomon White was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 27, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.033

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/27/2008

Last Name

White

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Schools

New Stanton High School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Columbia University

First Name

Norma

Birth City, State, Country

Jacksonville

HM ID

WHI15

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Alpha Kappa Alpha

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

The Door to Success is Marked 'PUSH.'

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/17/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Jacksonville

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood (Crabs, Shrimp)

Short Description

Association chief executive Norma White (1934 - ) was the 25th International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. She also served as an educator in Jacksonville, Florida Public Schools for many years.

Employment

Duval County School District

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Green, Pink

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Norma White's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Norma White lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Norma White recalls her election as supreme basileus of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Norma White describes her vision for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Norma White talks about her achievements as supreme basileus of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Norma White describes her leadership style

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Norma White recalls lessons from her tenure at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Norma White talks about the challenges she faced during her tenure at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Norma White describes her initiatives at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Norma White describes her initiatives at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Norma White recalls her greatest moments as a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Norma White reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Norma White describes the commitment to service at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Norma White talks about the future of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Norma White describes the importance of new members to the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Norma White reflects upon the idea of sisterhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Norma White describes her mother's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Norma White remembers her maternal grandparents

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Norma White talks about her mother's accomplishments

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Norma White talks about her mother's experience in college

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Norma White describes her father's childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Norma White describes her paternal grandparents

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Norma White talks about her paternal aunts and uncles

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Norma White describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Norma White talks about how her parents met

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

5$5

DATitle
Norma White talks about her achievements as supreme basileus of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
Norma White describes her earliest childhood memory
Transcript
How was your vision communicated and carried out throughout the sororities programs during your administration?$$At my election [to supreme basileus], the program was presented at the boule to everyone and then I had the first international program lunch after I had been in office a couple of months where we invited all chapters to send representatives to a central spot so that the total program, the total vision could be presented to them and in this way everybody went home with the same information, with the same enthusiasm, so that they could go back and motivate their chapters. It was also communicated through our Ivy Leaf. Every issue of the Ivy Leaf carried my message and information about program, what it is and how it should be implemented. Another part of that vision was preparing our students, and so we had a program called ON TRACK and the goal there was to keep twenty thousand students on track during my term of leadership. And we wanted to keep them on track academically, socially, physically, spiritually, and chapters were asked to conduct programs around the country that would help to do this and we were able, we were very successful with the program. We didn't reach our twenty thousand goal, but we did keep fifteen thousand on track. At the end of the four years, the chapters who had implemented the program were, should have proven to us that the children stayed in school, they were not suspended, they got promoted, you know they were good citizens, they felt good about themselves because self-esteem is so important with young children. We started with the children in sixth grade and worked with them over the four year period. So, that, that worked out very well for us.$$So you told me some things that you did to communicate your vision, was there anything else that you specifically did to successfully communicate your vision and effectively institutionalize it as a guiding principle?$$Well, I went around the country speaking in and out of the United States to chapters and to various communities, to all of the regional conferences. We have ten regions in the sorority [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.] and so I went to all the conferences every year and talked with the members there about what we were doing. We started with the state of the sorority and in the state of the sorority speech, that's where I would tell them what the goal, goals were for that year and what we had accomplished during that time. And so this helped members because I would say we have about ten to twelve thousand members who go to regional conferences, you know when you combine all of them together, so to be able to reach that many people. And then we also have cluster meetings. Every region has from six to eight or ten clusters, so I was able to go to many of those and talk with the members because that, to have a national president there so that they can look eye, eye to eyeball it makes a difference. And of course you know it's good to read about it in the Ivy Leaf, but then it's also good to see that person so that they can talk with you and feel in touch and hug and kiss. And then we made, well at that program launch, we did video on sisterhood and that was shown at all of the meetings and various chapters purchased the video. So in fact all of the chapters were given a copy so that when they brought new members into the sorority they could share this with them. And in this video it talked about the sisterhood, what it really is, and what is expected of members and what the sorority has done and can do and how they can connect and communicate and be able to inspire others through what we do.$Now when you think about the neighborhood that you grew up in, what really, what comes to your mind? What, what is your earliest childhood memory?$$When we were in the core of the city and we lived on the main street called Beaver Street and of course there was a market right across the street that was called the city market and of course I remember sitting on the porch on the swings just swinging, swinging, swinging watching the people go over to the city market all of the time and with it being a busy street and of course at that time we had no stoplights or anything. I was not allowed to go over there without my parents [Ruth Cummings Solomon and Gilbert Solomon] or some older person taking me across the streets, but I would look forward to the time of going over there. And of course we walked to school, all of us in the neighborhood walked to school. There was a train that divided one section of the city from the other, and my mother always told me there were trains that would stop on the track and just stay there for an hour and the children would crawl under the train to get to the other side so they wouldn't have to wait, and she always told me to never, if I had to wait two hours, just wait, but don't ever do that because one child crawled under there and got killed one time. And so I remember how we would just stand there and wait for the train to pass by and then we would walk home and everybody sort of lived right, right around in that little circle. One of my good friends now told me that she never could understand why I could walk straight down Beaver Street and turn the corner and I was right there at the church [West Union Baptist Church, Jacksonville, Florida]. But, she said I would come down her street, which was about three blocks away. She never could understand why I did that, and she said every time I passed by her grandmother would say, "Oh there's that Solomon girl [HistoryMaker Norma White], and she is just so, look how she walks. She has so much poise and dignity." She said, "I would get so angry with you." I said, "Why did she come down this street?" I said, "I was going to pick up this other little girl who went to our church" 'cause they didn't go to our church. I said, "I would come by to pick up Monty [ph.]." She said, "Well I never knew until now that that's why you came all the way down there." I said, "Yeah I would come to get her and then we would walk on to church together."

Dr. Hollis Underwood

Internal medicine physician Dr. Hollis Jonetta Crowe Underwood was born on October 29, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois to Robert Arthur and Janetta Martha Crowe. Underwood graduated from Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan in 1975. She attended the University of Maryland as a zoology major. Underwood then completed her M.D. degree at Howard University School of Medicine and did her post graduate residency training at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota.

In 1987, Underwood worked in the National Health Service Corps at Frederiksted Health Center in St. Croix, Virgin Islands. While there, Underwood co-chaired the 1989 Peer Review Committee at the Virgin Islands Medical Institute in Christiansted, Virgin Islands. Underwood then began working as the Medical Director and Acting Project Director for Frederiksted Health Center and as the District Health Officer at the Charles Harwood Memorial Hospital in Christiansted until 1990.

In 1990, Underwood was hired as the Lead Internist and Director of Hypertension & Lipid Clinic at the Ohio Permanente Medical Group in Parma, Ohio, before working as an intermediate Lipid Specialist for the American Heart Association at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1994, Underwood became a consultant for the Department of Community Internal Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, where she worked until 2000.

In 1997, Underwood acted as a consultant on a sixteen member multi-disciplinary medical team that traveled to Dakar, Senegal to provide cardiovascular medical care for the community. The venture, Project MEDHELP, led by Albert F. Olivier, consisted of cardiothoracic and general surgeons, anesthesiologists, cardiologists, internists, public health experts, dermatologists and gynecologists.

In February 2000, Underwood became President of Sonoran Health Specialists, Inc., working alongside her husband Dr. Paul L. Underwood, Jr., in Scottsdale, Arizona. Underwood served on several boards and organizations including the Center for Women’s Health, Vibetree Foundation and Planned Parenthood. She is also active in several organizations including the Links, Inc., the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Jack and Jill of America, Inc.

Dr. Hollis Jonetta Crowe Underwood resides in Phoenix, Arizona with her family.

Dr. Hollis Jonetta Crowe Underwood was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.208

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/14/2007

Last Name

Underwood

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Holly

Schools

Cass Technical High School

University of Maryland

Howard University College of Medicine

Ernie Pyle Elementary School

Mayo Medical School

Lutheran Parish School

First Name

Hollis

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

UND02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

If You Can't Be Who You Need To Be, By Remaining Who You Are.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arizona

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/29/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Phoenix

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Salad

Short Description

Internal medicine physician Dr. Hollis Underwood (1957 - ) specialized in internal medicine and was president of Sonoran Health Specialists, Inc. in Arizona.

Employment

Sonoran Health Specialists, Inc.

Mayo Clinic

Ohio Permanete Medical Group

Charlest Harwood Memorial Hospital

Frederiksted Health Center

Favorite Color

Chartreuse

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Hollis Underwood's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Hollis Underwood lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls living in Gary, Indiana and Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Hollis Underwood lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her neighbors in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes the socioeconomic climate of Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes Ernie Pyle Elementary School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls living on St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her community in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers her father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls moving to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her early aspirations to become a doctor

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her peers at Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers applying to college

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers the University of Maryland in College Park

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her professors at the University of Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls the summer program at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers Howard University College of Medicine

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her mentor, Dr. John Townsend

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers treating her first patient

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers her experiences at the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers dating her husband, Dr. Paul Underwood

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her fellowship at the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls working at the Frederiksted Health Clinic in St. Croix

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers becoming a mother

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Hollis Underwood reflects upon her humanitarian medical work

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers moving to Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Hollis Underwood talks about her community activism

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her peers at Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan
Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers treating her first patient
Transcript
So you go to Cass Tech [Cass Technical High School, Detroit, Michigan], now for the benefit of our viewers, Cass Tech is considered, was considered one of the elitist schools of Detroit, Michigan?$$Um-hm.$$So now you go to Cass Tech and what, what happens there for you?$$Well, you know, well the first thing is that, and this was a new concept for us, but, you're right, it was a magnet school, but you had to test to get in but there was, there were some of us who were invited to attend. And we were invited to attend and become a part of science and arts curriculum, which was an honors curriculum and, and not knowing Detroit, so we're relatively new there, but my mother's [Jonetta Everette Crowe] best friend who was like a second mother to me in many ways, just said, "Oh, absolutely, this is an opportunity you don't want, you know, not take advantage of," and, and that was it. You know, that was it and I, Cass was--it opened up even broader horizons, now you know we used to call it the pickle factory 'cause it looked like a pickle factory, you know, it was a pretty big old school, we had to all take the city bus to go to school. But I went to school with some kids that were just incredible people, some of whom are friends to this day, some of whom have done some amazing things in this world, made some tremendous footprints.$$Okay give us a few names of people that that, that we might want to know about.$$Oh wow. Well one is David Alan Grier, who is a very well-known actor, and he was a Cass Techite, you know, a Cass Techie, and Wanda [Wanda Whitten-Shurney], oh gosh, I'm blocking out her last name, she's a hematologist, her father [HistoryMaker Dr. Charles Whitten] was a, a very, very well-known hematologist in Detroit, did a lot of ground breaking research with sickle cell disease and she was a classmate, actually not only in high school, but also medical school [Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.], Harriet Covington [Harriet Covington-Smith], also a friend from medical school as well as high school, oh my gosh. And then, then you had the musicians who are amazing, Geri Allen, one of my classmates who is a very well-known established recording artist, straight ahead jazz pianist, J. Jones [ph.], a very accomplished saxophone player, I mean, so we, you know, we had all of the curriculums, then you had the perfor- the performing arts crowd and you know, and nobody gave any credence to the computer science club, but they're probably all, they've--$$(Laughter).$$--probably all became millionaires, up to the '90s [1990s], and we just lost track, I don't know (laughter).$$So--so Cass, they had a very fertile environment for you to grow, would you say (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Oh amazing. So, so much, I mean, you know, friends were attorneys and, and you know, the whole, you know the, the legacy, the Patti Coutiver [ph.], a very good friend of mine in high school, an attorney, her fam- her father was an educator, a very well established and well known educator. The former superintendent of schools [Cornelius L. Golightly], his daughter, Linnie Golightly [Linnie M. Golightly], was a classmate at Cass, so it was incredible and many of my friends wer- are physicians and, and, and attorneys and other careers that are considered leadership type careers as a result of that.$(Simultaneous) Do you recall your first assignment?$$Uh-huh. I was in community internal medicine, oh my goodness, ha, ha, with a gentleman who sadly, y- what I've come to realize is that some people's mediocrity prevents them from seeing the greatness in other people and they make it a conscious effort to put the squash on other people because of their own internal insecurity, and I saw a lot of that, I saw a lot of that, people hiding behind the shields of the Mayo Clinic [Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota] and with their own mediocrity. And I saw some things that really exposed what that whole experience was, was all about but, but I, I remember being nervous, a, a new intern, first rotation out of medical school [Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.] and a patient came in, he was very, very, very critically ill, we worked on him, you know, along with the, you know, the E- you know he came in through the ER [emergency room], I worked on him, did, you know, some things; read, worked, read, worked, you know, you had to really kind of move fast, got him kind of stabilized but you know, the, the attendings, consultants would always say, you know, call us, keep us posted, let us know what's going on. So maybe I called them at four o'clock and when I said, "I just wanted to let you know about the person came in and this is what happened and, you know, he's, he's doing better now." He said, "Well if he's still alive, call me in the morning," bam! Or, "We'll deal with it in the morning," and he hung up the phone on me, and I thought, okay so that, that, that was the first baptism by fire, and I realized, okay, so now I understand.$$So, so, so what did you do at that point when he did that to you?$$Oh, I--$$Were angered, or, or do you say, or what did you do?$$Oh, yeah (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) 'Cause you--$$--it angers you.$$--had a patient.$$But it makes you strong. Let me tell you something, and, and this is what the old folks say, if it doesn't kill you, it'll make you strong. It made you strong. Every little hurt, every little slight, every little obstacle, every little pin that was pushed in my side intentionally, and mes- mostly intentionally, it just made me stronger. I'm, I, I'm, I made sure that there wasn't anything in medicine that I had not seen or knew about and I've, I've made that my philosophy. And I read, I read the PDR ['Physicians' Desk Reference'] and never forgetting once, I went to see somebody at his office, one of the consultants and I had the PDR and I was reading about something, he said, "What are you doing? Reading the PDR?" You know, he was kind of snickering, kind of in a very snide, and I said, you know, and I just laughed and said oh no. Yeah, I was reading the PDR, as a matter of fact, I was gonna read every aspect of that drug, at least what we knew about so I would be that much better informed so.

Bunnie Jackson-Ransom

Bunnie Jackson-Ransom was born on November 16, 1940 in Louisburg, North Carolina to Burnell James Hayes and Elizabeth Day Hayes. She attended North Carolina College in Durham, North Carolina, graduating magna cum laude with a B.S. degree in business and a minor in education. Jackson-Ransom then received her M.S. degree in business from North Carolina Central University School of Business and Economics in 1969.

Jackson-Ransom was hired as an instructor of business and supervisor of secretarial services at Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina. She then joined Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., where she was a contract specialist, program coordinator, director of planning and program development during her five-year tenure. In 1965, she met and married Maynard Jackson, who went on to become the first black mayor of Atlanta in 1973; Jackson-Ransom and Jackson divorced in 1976.

In 1975, Jackson-Ransom founded firstClass, Inc., a company specializing in marketing, community affairs, communications and public relations. With firstClass, Inc., she has worked with many clients including The National Conference of Black Mayors, Waste Management, Inc. and the Burger King Corporation. Jackson-Ransom is responsible for designing and implementing many on-going community action projects for her clients, working to include the goals of the urban community that benefit and enhance the lives of the least fortunate. In 1978, Jackson-Ransom worked with Bernadette Carey, publicity director of Fashion Fair Cosmetics, on a line of black cosmetics. She would later marry Raymond Ransom, a bass player for the musical group, Brick. From 1979 to 1983, Jackson-Ransom was owner and operator of Airport Amusement Concessions at Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta. She also managed the careers of several performing artists between 1978 and 1988 when she served as Chief Administrative Officer of a conglomerate company under the umbrella of Atlanta Artists. For Atlanta Artists Management, Jackson-Ransom served as president. She managed multi-million dollar record sales, toured the world with performances and promotions, negotiated production deals for her artists (which included CAMEO and Larry Blackmon, The SOS Band and Cashflow) and carried her artists to gold and platinum record status. She also served as an instructor at Georgia State University teaching a course called “Artist Representation” from 1981 to 1990 and in 1995.

Jackson-Ransom is a member of the Atlanta League of Women Voters (organizer of the Cascade Heights Branch), Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Executive Committee member of the Atlanta branch of the NAACP, the Azalea Chapter of The Links, Inc., the Metropolitan Atlanta Coalition of 100 Black Women and the National Council of Negro Women. Her awards include Outstanding Young Women in America (1970-1980). Jackson-Ransom has been listed in Who’s Who in American Women, Who’s Who in Georgia and Who’s Who in Black America from 1981 to the present. She was listed in Dollars and Sense Magazine as one of “America’s Top 100 Black Business and Professional Women” in 1985. She was also listed among Atlanta’s “Top 100 Women of Influence” by the Atlanta Business League from 1997 to 2005 and received a community service award from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 2008.

Jackson-Ransom is the proud mother of four (Beth Jackson Hodges, Brooke Jackson Edmond, Rae Yvonne Ransom and Maynard H. Jackson, III), grandmother of five (Isabella Daisy Jackson, Luke Benjamin Jackson, Hayes Jackson Edmond, Brooke Lee Irene Edmond and Cassandra Elizabeth Edmond) and is an active member of Cascade United Methodist Church.

Jackson-Ransom was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 27, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.113

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/27/2007 |and| 7/13/2010

3/27/2007

7/13/2010

Last Name

Jackson-Ransom

Maker Category
Schools

Franklin Country Training School

North Carolina College

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Bunnie

Birth City, State, Country

Louisburg

HM ID

JAC24

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Adults, seniors, women's groups.

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Adults, seniors, women's groups.

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any City

Favorite Quote

Say What You Mean And Mean What You Say.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/16/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Marketing entrepreneur and music manager Bunnie Jackson-Ransom (1940 - ) owned and operated Atlanta's Airport Amusement Concessions and managed the musical groups, The SOS Band and Cameo.

Employment

firstClass, Inc.

Bennett College

Economic Opportunity Atlanta

Georgia State University

The North Carolina Fund

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:4114,57:5442,98:23361,301:23998,310:43629,615:45570,620:48714,654:49424,665:52832,731:53329,739:54891,771:57021,817:57305,822:59009,861:59293,866:60003,877:61139,895:61636,903:69400,971:69825,977:70590,986:71185,994:76189,1054:76521,1059:76853,1064:80090,1120:81750,1146:84157,1192:94034,1398:94532,1405:102377,1473:111857,1683:112726,1698:114543,1757:116518,1870:132330,1995$0,0:207,6:483,11:1035,20:2139,39:9039,184:10626,221:14007,348:14283,353:15180,370:15663,380:15939,385:22483,424:34958,571:45421,707:45918,715:46912,733:47835,749:48332,757:48687,764:49184,772:54729,856:55425,865:55860,871:57078,888:58035,905:58644,913:61144,932:61536,937:62908,960:65848,1003:68984,1059:70062,1078:73710,1096:76302,1127:76734,1134:77598,1152:77886,1157:78462,1166:81270,1270:85302,1347:90990,1430:92340,1465:93240,1484:93540,1489:94965,1519:96615,1556:98190,1593:99165,1611:99990,1632:103825,1647:104329,1659:104581,1665:105148,1679:106345,1710:107668,1744:108361,1768:109999,1808:110629,1827:117180,1887:123570,1986:126990,2025:131852,2048:132184,2053:135891,2129:136584,2148:137466,2163:138726,2180:139671,2201:140238,2218:141939,2260:142758,2280:143577,2295:163822,2488:164190,2493:165720,2504
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bunnie Jackson-Ransom's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her community in Louisburg, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers harvesting tobacco

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her relationships with her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers the Franklin County Training School in North Carolina, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes the South Main Street Baptist Church in Louisburg, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers the Franklin County Training School in North Carolina, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls the television programs and music of her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls the teachers at the Franklin County Training School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls North Carolina Central University at Durham in North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls her marriage to Donald Burke

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers returning to school after her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls her work at the James E. Shepard Memorial Foundation, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers earning her M.B.A. degree

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls teaching at Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers the sit-ins in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls her introduction to the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers her move to Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers Julian Bond

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her work at Economic Opportunity Atlanta, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her work at Economic Opportunity Atlanta, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes the planning department of Economic Opportunity Atlanta

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes Maynard Jackson's political career, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes Maynard Jackson's political career, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls Maynard Jackson's election to Atlanta vice-mayor

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her career

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls her volunteer work in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers Maynard Jackson's first mayoral campaign

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her work with formerly incarcerated women, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her work with formerly incarcerated women, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about representing artist Ernie Barnes

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers founding firstClass, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls becoming the sole owner of firstClass, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes the development of her clientele at firstClass, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers her celebrity clients at firstClass, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her divorce from Maynard Jackson

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers meeting Ray Ransom

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her work in the music industry

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her marriage to Ray Ransom

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her community engagement at firstClass, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her organizational affiliations, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her organizational affiliations, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes the Cascade United Methodist Church in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her board memberships

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her retirement

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Bunnie Jackson-Ransom's interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls joining the sit-in movement in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers the sit-ins in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls meeting Reverend Jesse L. Jackson

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her marriage to Maynard Jackson

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers the events of 1968

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls Maynard Jackson's U.S. Senate campaign

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls Maynard Jackson's vice mayoralty of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers the law firm of Jackson, Patterson, and Parks

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her work in the entertainment industry

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom reflects upon the death of Michael Jackson

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers Lena Horne

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her marriage to Ray Ransom

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers managing The S.O.S. Band and Cameo

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls leaving the entertainment industry

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom recalls developing her corporate clientele

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her venture into public transit advertisement

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers her venture into airport hospitality

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her daughter, Rae Ransom

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her grandchildren

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom talks about her book, 'Getting the Word Out'

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom describes her plans for the future

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Bunnie Jackson-Ransom narrates her photographs

DASession

1$2

DATape

1$7

DAStory

9$3

DATitle
Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers harvesting tobacco
Bunnie Jackson-Ransom remembers the sit-ins in Durham, North Carolina
Transcript
Then, during the summer, in another area of, of property that my father [Burnell Hayes] owned, he would plant tobacco and cotton, and during the summer, he would harvest the cotton and the tobacco. And he would get people to go out and pick cotton and, and, and pull tobacco, where you would pull it from the bottom of the stalks. As the stalks would grow, you'd pull the tobacco out, off, and get them cured. And there would be thick worms, oh, and the worms would frighten me, obviously. But my mother [Elizabeth Day Hayes]--this is a story--my mother had some white leather glove, and my father wanted me to work with him in the summertime. So I discovered that working in, in the tobacco part would keep me out of the sun because there was a big shade tree, and they would wrap the tobacco. In other words, they would harvest the tobacco, bring it to this particular area in a manmade tobacco truck, which they pulled. And the peo- and the people, the workers would take the tobacco leaves out of the truck, and wrap them around a stick. You call that wrapping tobacco, so I discovered that if I wrapped the tobacco around the stick, getting it ready to put it in the barn, so it would cure, that I could do that in the shade, rather than in the sun, where they were really pulling it. So I got my mother's white leather gloves, put them on, because when you handle tobacco, there was sticky stuff that would get all over your hands. It would turn your hands black. It, it would coat your hands. So, I'd gotten my mother's white leather gloves (laughter), put them on, and wrapped tobacco (laughter). Obviously, my mother was furious. She never had another pair of black leather, black, I'm sorry, white--$$White--$$--white leather gloves because I ruined them wrapping tobacco. But I remember her telling me, "Sug, you know, you should not have done that." But my mother was very loving and very kind. She didn't spank me. I wonder why--I would have spanked me (laughter).$Well, what happened during the sit-in, when you went in to sit-in, tell me what ha- what transpired while you were there.$$We were coached on why we were going, and we were coached on what not to do, you know.$$What were some of the things you were taught, or told to do or not do (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) We were told not to get angry. We were told not to talk back. We were told to just sit-in, be calm, be quiet primarily, and be pleasant, not to be rude, and to behave (laughter). And so, we did that. Now, you know, there were a lot of us, so we were, we were typical eighteen year olds, seventeen year olds. I was seventeen at the time, and I think I was just as concerned about who I was sitting next to, as I was about why I was sitting there, because that was what was on our minds. And they took Mr. McKissick [Floyd McKissick], and somebody whose name was--he was president of our student body, and his name will come to me, but he was also a, a student leader who galvanized us together and, and sent us there.$$When you say a lot of students, was it a hundred?$$Fifty.$$Fifty?$$Um-hm.$$Okay. And the police came in. Tell me what happened after the sit-in (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) The police came in, and herded us all out, and we were told to, to move, and we were told, oh, we were told to, to be still when we were asked to move. We knew that we were going to be asked to leave. And we were told to just sit there. So we sat there, and then we were told that we were going to be arrested if we didn't leave. And we continued to sit, and so we were, we were all asked to leave, and we walked outside of the store. And then, there was the vehicle there to put us in the back of a van, and take us to the jail. Well, that never happened. That's when the negotiations must have happened because we were all told to go back to the campus.$$And the outcome of the sit-in? Did they do any good?$$Oh, well ob- yes, it (laughter), it, it did, but at that point, we didn't go--I did not go back to sit-in again. Once again, I, I had a child [Elizabeth Jackson Hodges]. My oldest daughter was born, and so I had some different responsibilities that led me to go to class, and I had jobs and so forth. So, I didn't never go back to sit-in. My experience was that one time.$$Okay. So, and tell me what year your daughter was born.$$She was born in '59 [1959].$$All right. So, the next--$$This was in February, February or March of '60 [1960] when we were sitting in.

The Honorable Lucille Whipper

Academic administrator and state government administrator Lucille Simmons Whipper was born on June 6, 1928 in Charleston, South Carolina, to Sarah and Joseph Simmons. In 1944, Whipper was a student activist at her high school, Avery Institute, in Charleston, South Carolina; her graduating class sought to desegregate the College of Charleston. While a student at Talladega College, where she received her B.A. degree in economics and sociology, Whipper became involved in a movement to integrate college student organizations throughout the state. Whipper continued her graduate education in political science at the University of Chicago where she received her M.A. degree. Whipper also later earned a certificate in guidance and counseling at South Carolina State University.

In the late 1960s, Whipper served as an organizer and director of Operation Catch-Up, a tutorial program for high school students; Operation Catch-Up was a forerunner of the Upward Bound programs. In 1972, Whipper was appointed to serve as Assistant to the President and Director of the Office of Human Relations at the College of Charleston. Whipper became the College’s first African American administrator and developed its first affirmative action plan. With the support of members of the Charleston County delegation and the President of College of Charleston, Theodore Stern, Whipper organized the Avery Institute of Afro-American History and Culture committee. The committee then founded the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture in 1990.

Whipper served as vice chairman of the Democratic Party Convention in 1972 and was later elected to the Charleston District 20 School Board. In 1985, Whipper became the first African American female to serve as an elected state official from the Tri-County area. Whipper served for years on South Carolina Human Affairs Commission and sponsored two important pieces of legislation — one making marital rape a crime and the other requiring the monitoring of state agencies' hiring goals for minorities and females. In 2004, Whipper co-founded the Lowcountry Aid to Africa project, donating money to foundations and organizations helping people and families in Africa affected by AIDS.

Lucille Simmons Whipper was married to the late Rev. Dr. Benjamin J. Whipper, Sr., and lives in Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. She is the mother of six children and is a grandparent.

Lucille Simmons Whipper was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 1, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.039

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/1/2007

Last Name

Whipper

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Schools

Avery Normal Institute

Talladega College

University of Chicago

South Carolina State University

Burke High School

Buist Academy

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church School

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Lucille

Birth City, State, Country

Charleston

HM ID

WHI11

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Carolina

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/6/1928

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Charleston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chocolate

Short Description

State government administrator and academic administrator The Honorable Lucille Whipper (1928 - ) served as the organizer and director of Operation Catch-Up, the vice chairman of the Democratic Convention in 1972, a member of the South Carolina Human Affairs Commission, and the first African American administrator at the College of Charleston.

Employment

College of Charleston

Charleston County Public Schools

Charleston Public Schools

South Carolina. General Assembly. House of Representatives

Favorite Color

Green, Pink

Timing Pairs
0,0:1715,20:2475,29:5705,101:6275,108:27965,363:38260,417:40052,430:54528,531:55149,541:63370,627:64358,642:66106,699:67398,722:73022,822:83950,964:89930,1081:97630,1148:111817,1270:112303,1277:112627,1282:117898,1318:118780,1329:119172,1334:124350,1357:135492,1458:136164,1467:141120,1572:141624,1579:150620,1643:162456,1740:183775,1973:185500,2004:205030,2198:205758,2207:206486,2216:208215,2238:209307,2252:209853,2259:212401,2299:213038,2307:215040,2338:219712,2352:220576,2362:221008,2367:221872,2381:224198,2386:229685,2458:230702,2468:236013,2556:241500,2594:265846,2829:267106,2842:271642,2901:272230,2909:275470,2915:276172,2927:277108,2941:277576,2948:277888,2953:278200,2958:284128,3030:284752,3042:285766,3057:286780,3075:295944,3147:300960,3191$0,0:5408,49:7696,77:8736,86:9152,92:24446,218:24774,223:25676,237:26004,242:26988,251:27562,259:45358,549:45826,556:46450,566:51442,666:58310,740:58610,745:59135,753:63710,837:64310,846:75832,928:76197,934:76562,940:80139,1012:83140,1027:84376,1039:95345,1149:100538,1230:101126,1243:107610,1341:125674,1581:126064,1587:127624,1611:129106,1638:129964,1650:130510,1658:131056,1670:131914,1686:143612,1866:144020,1873:144700,1888:148168,1965:149936,2007:150344,2014:151092,2031:152792,2066:158544,2094:168606,2298:169230,2307:193980,2521:194320,2526:200440,2612:206140,2648:212230,2773:216360,2855:229564,3010:230032,3020:241810,3167:242960,3179:247600,3222
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Lucille Whipper's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers her parents' parties

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her mother's occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her mother's involvement in the church

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her stepfather's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers her sister

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers the Great Depression

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers St. Stephen's Episcopal Church School in Charleston, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes the Buist School in Charleston, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her early interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her experiences in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes the color discrimination at the Avery Normal Institute in Charleston, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her college aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers her mentors at the Avery Normal Institute

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers discrimination at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers her high school graduation

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers Talladega College in Talladega, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls joining Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her early civil rights activism

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her social life at Talladega College in Talladega, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers her husband, Stephen Edley

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers attending the University of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls teaching at the Haut Gap School on Johns Island, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her husband, Benjamin Whipper, Sr.

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper talks about the Gullah language

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper talks about racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers the birth of her daughter

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes the A Better Chance program

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her challenges at Bonds-Wilson High School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers school segregation in South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes Operation Catch-Up

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her position at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers Margaretta Pringle Childs

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her efforts to preserve the Avery Normal Institute, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her efforts to preserve the Avery Normal Institute, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her first elected office

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers her election as a state legislator

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her committee involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls serving on the South Carolina Human Affairs Commission

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls her challenges as a legislator

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers the South Carolina Legislative Black Caucus

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper talks about gerrymandering

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her decision not to seek reelection

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper recalls mentoring David J. Mack, III

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her work with The Links, Incorporated

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes her presidency of the state women's Baptist convention

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper share a message to future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lucille Whipper narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$5

DATitle
The Honorable Lucille Whipper describes Operation Catch-Up
The Honorable Lucille Whipper remembers her election as a state legislator
Transcript
You participated in tutorial program for black children in Charleston County [South Carolina]?$$Yeah during Johnson's [President Lyndon Baines Johnson], I think I was then at Burke [Burke High School, Charleston, South Carolina].$$Okay.$$During the War on Poverty when, what, what they call equal opportunity commissions or something under the War on Poverty the county was granted money to establish commissions for programs for economic and educational opportunity and Charleston County established the OEO, I think you call it, Office of Economic Opportunity, and they had the various programs. They established Head Start programs. Our church in the city, my husband's [Benjamin Whipper, Sr.] church, was one of the first to have a Head Start program.$$What church was this?$$St. Matthew--$$Matthew okay.$$--Baptist Church [St. Matthew Baptist Church, North Charleston, South Carolina].$$Okay.$$'Cause I went to all of the community meetings and so forth to find out. At least I was keeping up with the program as it was developing through [U.S.] Congress and so I was well aware of what, what purposes it could serve and so forth and I was focusing on what could be done as far as education was concerned. And so when they established the OEO office I knew the people that were on the commission and even the people who were staffing and together, besides the Head Start program that they started and one was at my church, we wrote a proposal for a tutorial program. I was still impressed by the ABC program [A Better Chance] and what they did in the summer and things like that, so we established what we called Operation Catch-Up, which was sort of the beginning of the Upward Bound idea of working with students and enrichment program in the summer and then tutoring them during the school year. And so we established Operation Catch-Up that worked in the county, worked throughout the county. It was most, in the summer we had a summer program, I think the first summer program was at my church, St. Matthew. Again, I got the church involved all these things, and then the next year we were at the Catholic school and I think one year we were at Burke one summer. And we employed graduate students from the northeastern universities, became faculty, and that created a lot of stir because they lived in the homes of the students, and there was some negative new, news stories about that, you know these white--$$White.$$--graduate students living in black homes, and then the curriculum, 'Lord of the Flies' [William Golding], and all of that stuff coming down with all that, that type of curriculum. So, we got some negatives on that score, and I directed that project and gave it up, I forgot when. I think I probably gave it up when I moved to the College of Charleston [Charleston, South Carolina]. But, that program really identified a lot of students and assisted them into college being ready to go into just any school that they wanted to go into. It was a very enriching experience for them, and we expanded it throughout the county and we had stations for tu, tutoring and homework throughout the county of, in the city and in the various areas of the county.$So what happens next?$$The next thing was that I thought I was living in the district that, where a vacancy occurred. We'd gone to single member districts, okay, the state, and the representative for District 109 had been indicted with some charges, federal charges, and was it federal or state charges, that's Representative Woods [Robert Roosevelt Woods]. He had become very powerful, chaired the Ways and Means Committee [House Ways and Means Committee] in the state, as with blacks we always, always say when you get to have certain power you better watch out because somebody is waiting to get you on maybe some charge you never even thought about. He was a minister and had, I think he had a Head Start, if not a Head Start he had some federal program and so they threw all of that into whatever they charged him with. So, the district became vacant and I thought that I lived, I did not look at the boundaries, I was about three blocks outside of when I decided that I was gonna run with my husband's permission and enthusiasm, family, everybody yeah go for it. So, I had to move into the district. We built that house, and I was a few blocks outside of the district. And I thought it would be easy for me to find a house in the district. Couldn't find a house in the city, that's how I got in Mount Pleasant [South Carolina] because all my life I've been in the city, except no when we first got married I was in North Charleston [South Carolina]. So, I had to look at the laws as to when you had to be in the district legally and so forth, and we rented after my first announcement and I made sure that, and it was very interesting because some of the first questions people would ask, "What a minister's wife doing running for a political office?" And I said, "What a minister doing," 'cause we had many ministers--South Carolina is one of those states that you don't really get paid to be a legislator, you know you get a stipend. And that of course know, you know holds back a lot of people from running for political office because you gotta work, but pastors were more flexible, so you would find everyday to have a lot of pastors and I said, "Well if the pastor can run for political office I sho' don't see why his wife can't." My husband [Benjamin Whipper, Sr.] had no problems with it at all, and so we moved into the district. We finally found a house and moved into the district; I've downsized since then. I was very interesting, very interesting. I had to fight one of the person who also offered was a male who was a long-time activist, at least he was among those that had desegregated the golf club. He was supported by most of the Democratic leaders like Hollings [Ernest Hollings], you know and so folks said, "You sure are crazy that you're gonna run against," what they call him Big John. He was the, the key person in all of the elections and so forth and so on. And so I told them I thought I could be, beat him because at the level that I had worked, you know with that Operation Catch-Up, I've been all in the county, I knew parents all over the county and Big John was just in political environment more so, and so that was my first battle and I won that in the primary.

Anne Ashmore-Hudson

Psychologist Anne Ashmore-Hudson was born on June 23, 1942, in Atlanta, Georgia, to Willie Mae, a businesswoman, and Clifford Ashmore, executive vice principal of Grady High School. Ashmore-Hudson received his B.A. degrees in English and psychology from Spelman College in Atlanta in 1963, and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical psychology in 1979 from the University of California, Berkeley.

A licensed clinical psychologist, Ashmore-Hudson founded, and for eight years was president, of Urban Psychological Associates in Brookline, Massachusetts, the first minority firm in the Northeast to contract with industry to provide employee assistance services. A valued member of academia, Ashmore-Hudson was a visiting scholar at the E. Franklin Frazier Institute for Social Research in the School of Social Work at Howard University, where she focused on the link between present-day psychopathology and the psychological trauma of slavery. Ashmore-Hudson also taught at San Francisco State University and Boston College, and was a visiting fellow of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University from 1985 to 1987.

Ashmore-Hudson served on the boards of the Washington Ballet; the Sasha Bruce Youthworks; the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology; the United Way of Massachusetts; and the Roxbury Community College Foundation. Ashmore-Hudson also served as the president of the Potomac chapter of Links. Ashmore-Hudson's numerous honors included receiving the Clark-Atlanta University Civil Rights Award, and being named YWCA Volunteer of the Year. Ashmore-Hudson published articles in several magazines and journals, and was a popular guest lecturer, panel participant, and media consultant.

Ashmore-Hudson was married in 1990 to James L. Hudson; the couple raised one son, Alan Poussaint, and two stepdaughters, Ayanna and Julia Hudson.

Accession Number

A2003.176

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/1/2003

Last Name

Ashmore-Hudson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Public

Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School

Howard High School

Palmer Memorial Institute

Spelman College

Simmons College School of Social Work

University of California, Berkeley

The Howard School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Days

First Name

Anne

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

ASH01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Adults

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium Specifics: Depends on audience-- whether non-profit or for-profit

Preferred Audience: Adults

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Santa Fe, New Mexico

Favorite Quote

My Buddhist Mantra

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/23/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Broccoli

Short Description

Clinical psychologist Anne Ashmore-Hudson (1942 - ) is the founder Urban Psychological Associates. Anne Ashmore-Hudson has taught at San Francisco State University, was a visiting scholar at the E. Franklin Frazier Institute for Social Research in the School of Social Work at Howard University, and was a visiting fellow of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University.

Employment

Urban Psychological Services

E. Franklin Frazier Institute for Social Research, Howard University

Delete

Boston College

Favorite Color

Melon

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Anne Ashmore-Hudson interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson describes her mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson describes her father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses issues of racial identity from her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson begins to describe her childhood environs, Atlanta, Georgia, part 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson continues to describe her childhood environs, Atlanta, Georgia, part 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson names the schools she attended

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson recalls her grade school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson describes her high school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her college prospects

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her participation in sit-ins as a Spelman College student

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson remembers inspirational figures from her college years

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson explains how her background and personality led to her activism

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson remembers historian Howard Zinn and his wife from her college years

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson recalls her stay in Africa during college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses the development of her academic interests

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her social work efforts in San Francisco, California.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her graduate school experience at UC Berkeley

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her involvement in jury selection for the Angela Davis trial

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her marriage to psychiatrist Alvin Poussaint

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses the Association of Black Psychologists

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her research interests

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson reflects on issues from her therapy practice

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson reflects on current issues around racial identity

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson expresses her hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson begins to discuss her adoption of two young children

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson continues to discuss her children

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses her divorce from Alvin Poussaint

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses divorce in today's society

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses opportunities for changing society

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson discusses the impact of activist Robert Moses

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Anne Ashmore-Hudson talks about individual involvement in social change