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Pierre Sutton

Broadcasting executive Pierre M. Sutton was born on February 1, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York, to parents Percy E. Sutton and Leatrice Sutton. He attended the University of Toledo in Ohio and received his B.A. degree in 1968. Sutton then pursued graduate studies at the University of Kentucky and New York University, and later completed the Owner/President Management Program at Harvard Business School.

In 1971, Sutton, along with his father, co-founded the The New York Courier, a weekly newspaper, where he served as the executive editor until 1972. During that time, he also fulfilled duties as the vice president of Inner City Research & Analysis Corporation in New York City. Also in 1971, Sutton’s father co-founded Inner City Broadcasting Corporation (ICBC), one of the first African American-owned broadcasting companies in the United States. When ICBC acquired WLIB Radio in New York City in 1972, Sutton was brought on as the public affairs director. He then served as the vice president of ICBC from 1975 until 1977. Then, in 1977, Sutton became the president of ICBC and assumed responsibilities of the company’s radio stations in New York and California.

Sutton has held leadership positions in numerous professional, business and non-profit organizations. He served as a member of the board of directors for the Better Business Bureau of Harlem from 1972 to 1977; then Sutton was named as the inaugural vice president of the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB). He also became a member of the board of directors for the Minority Investment Fund. Sutton’s community involvement includes serving as the chairman of the board of directors for the Harlem Chapter of the Boy Scouts of America. He was selected to sit on the board of directors for the New York City Marathon in 1979, and was appointed as its executive commissioner. He also served as a member of the board of directors for the Hayden Planetarium, and as a member of the board of trustees for the Alvin & Ailey Dance Foundation.

Pierre M. Sutton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 10, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.314

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/10/2013

Last Name

Sutton

Maker Category
Middle Name

Monte

Occupation
Schools

University of Toledo

University of Kentucky

New York University

Harvard Business School

P.S. 123

Intermediate School 59

Andrew Jackson High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Pierre

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

SUT03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

2/1/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Broadcast executive Pierre Sutton (1947 - ) was the cofounder of The New York Courier and president of the Inner City Broadcasting Corporation. He also served as the inaugural vice president of the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB).

Employment

New York Courier

Inner City Research & Analysis Corporation

WLIB Radio

Inner City Broadcasting Corporation

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:1878,32:2494,42:2802,47:3264,54:3880,63:9578,156:10117,166:12504,202:13043,211:13505,218:14275,228:15738,245:16431,256:18048,285:23850,302:29656,352:30237,360:45448,471:45824,476:46294,482:47422,495:52860,553:53628,559:58716,645:60156,669:65320,696:66904,731:67264,737:70790,763:71305,769:101694,1112:102006,1120:104112,1155:104580,1163:108948,1261:109650,1272:118825,1313:136800,1439:137160,1445:137592,1453:141768,1536:146075,1556:151603,1609:151911,1614:153143,1637:155684,1674:156531,1687:156916,1693:157301,1699:158764,1743:159072,1748:160997,1780:161844,1791:162383,1802:166156,1896:169082,1922:171546,1963:172932,1988:198242,2235:198538,2240:200314,2300:200832,2340:204828,2382:205198,2388:205716,2397:210704,2428:211848,2442:216864,2512:217304,2517:218272,2529:219240,2541:224480,2564:225232,2573:225890,2582:226548,2590:230308,2623:230778,2629:239090,2708:239888,2716:240572,2724:246455,2796:247877,2818:248351,2826:249457,2845:249773,2850:252610,2870$0,0:2100,69:2688,98:3276,106:4704,125:5292,133:5796,141:6216,147:8210,195:8777,204:10154,226:17444,352:19226,488:26678,597:27407,611:27731,616:28298,625:30566,671:44279,817:46604,849:51626,909:51998,914:52370,921:52928,929:56183,965:71787,1087:87919,1269:88792,1280:89180,1285:89859,1293:90538,1301:92687,1311:93239,1321:94481,1339:96344,1370:96896,1380:97379,1388:98138,1400:99035,1415:99449,1427:99932,1435:100829,1461:104830,1493:113240,1550:116824,1616:126666,1773:128829,1798:130065,1808:133010,1861:133274,1866:133802,1876:150134,2129:171145,2371:171715,2379:173235,2398:179940,2442
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Pierre Sutton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Pierre Sutton lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Pierre Sutton describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Pierre Sutton describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Pierre Sutton talks about his father's move to New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Pierre Sutton describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Pierre Sutton talks about his parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Pierre Sutton recalls his neighborhood in Queens, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Pierre Sutton describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Pierre Sutton talks about his home life

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Pierre Sutton recalls his early personality

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Pierre Sutton describes his schooling in Queens, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Pierre Sutton describes his father's law practice

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Pierre Sutton talks about his dyslexia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Pierre Sutton describes his father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Pierre Sutton talks about his college education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Pierre Sutton recalls his experiences in the U.S. Marine Corps

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Pierre Sutton remembers the black market during the Vietnam War

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Pierre Sutton talks about acquiring The New York Courier

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Pierre Sutton remembers the Woolfolk-Petioni family, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Pierre Sutton remembers the Woolfolk-Petioni family, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Pierre Sutton describes the content of The New York Courier

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Pierre Sutton describes the Inner City Research and Analysis Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Pierre Sutton talks about the life and death of Malcolm X

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Pierre Sutton recalls the impact of the Vietnam War on his relationship with his parents

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Pierre Sutton remembers the acquisition of WLIB Radio

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Pierre Sutton talks about the success of WBLS Radio

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Pierre Sutton recalls the Inner City Broadcasting Corporation's community involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Pierre Sutton talks about the initial financing of the Inner City Broadcasting Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Pierre Sutton describes his initial role at the Inner City Broadcasting Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Pierre Sutton talks about the black politics of the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Pierre Sutton talks about the role of radio in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Pierre Sutton describes the programming on WBLS Radio and WLIB Radio

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Pierre Sutton remembers the invention of the circular polarized antenna

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Pierre Sutton talks about Dionne Warwick

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Pierre Sutton describes his father's mayoral campaign

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Pierre Sutton remembers David Lampel

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Pierre Sutton reflects upon the impact of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Pierre Sutton describes the founding of Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Pierre Sutton recalls the expansion of the Inner City Broadcasting Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Pierre Sutton remembers the economic and political challenges of the 1980s

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Pierre Sutton remembers his acquisition strategy for the Inner City Broadcasting Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Pierre Sutton describes the founding of the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Pierre Sutton compares the black communities in New York City and Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Pierre Sutton talks about the Harlem Clubhouse

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Pierre Sutton remembers his financial challenges

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Pierre Sutton remembers meeting Coleman Young

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Pierre Sutton talks about Inner City Broadcasting Corporation's expansion into California

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Pierre Sutton remembers the revitalization of the Apollo Theater in New York City, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Pierre Sutton remembers the revitalization of the Apollo Theater in New York City, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Pierre Sutton remembers selling KGFJ Radio and KUTE Radio

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Pierre Sutton talks about the work of Janice Campbell and Vy Higgensen

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Pierre Sutton talks about his competition from disco radio stations

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Pierre Sutton recalls the competition between WBLS Radio and WRKS Radio

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Pierre Sutton talks about the deregulation of the broadcasting industry

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Pierre Sutton talks about Charles Warfield, Jr.'s career at WBLS Radio

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Pierre Sutton remembers 'Showtime at the Apollo'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Pierre Sutton remembers the introduction of cable television

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Pierre Sutton talks about the changes in cable franchise agreements

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Pierre Sutton talks about the Queens Inner Unity Cable System and Urban Cable Works

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Pierre Sutton describes his partnership with Time Warner Cable

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Pierre Sutton talks about the merger of the National Black Network and Mutual Black Network

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Pierre Sutton recalls the pressure to expand the Inner City Broadcasting Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Pierre Sutton remembers his failed deal with Cathy Hughes

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Pierre Sutton recalls the problems with the Apollo Theater revitalization project

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Pierre Sutton recalls his father's ambition to develop Africa's cable infrastructure

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Pierre Sutton talks about his father's impact on New York City's Harlem community

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Pierre Sutton remembers the Telecommunications Act of 1996

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$11

DATitle
Pierre Sutton describes the programming on WBLS Radio and WLIB Radio
Pierre Sutton remembers the revitalization of the Apollo Theater in New York City, pt. 1
Transcript
So let's talk about those early years and what you're learning about radio and the immediacy of radio. You know, because you spoke about a little bit, you know, the difference. So you--you're head of news and public affairs. What are--who is already in place on air, and who do you bring in place?$$Well, we were fortunate in that we had a terrific program director, the famous Frankie Crocker, Frankie "Hollywood" Crocker, a unique man who became--we spoke about the club scene earlier. We became number one for a reason. It was, it was in ra- in radio because we were, we would, we had it all. We had all--on FM radio, we had all of the music. They came to us first, and they came to us often with their music. We got it first because we're the biggest radio station, as we saw it, in America (laughter), you know. Frankie Crocker--we used to--he is something, Frankie Crocker. "I am the originator, not the imitator, not the flower or the root or the rod. While others are laughing and joking, Frankie Crocker," or he would supplant that with WBLS [WBLS Radio, New York, New York], "WBLS is taking care of business, cooking and smoking, too much to take too soon. If you don't dig where we're coming from, you got a hole in your soul. Don't eat chicken on Sunday" (laughter). You know, you know, that is kind of a rap. But it's--it was, it expresses pride, and it certainly got people's attention. We would, so we had a great deal of influence of course in music that's being played. But we brought the music to the people. There was, record day was an interesting day. That was the day when people from the record companies would come to our place of business and would bring their wares. "Will you play this, will you play this?" And it was kind of well organized, that day. However, if you would walk into our lobby, I sometimes described it as a scene, the bar scene from 'Star Wars,' because people looked wild, you know. They were from a different kind of world. You know, the music scene is very different from our relatively conservative (laughter) broadcasting environment. So, but it, but it was--there were two sides of it. It was, there was entertainment, which was WBLS. And then there was a much more serious side at WLIB [WLIB Radio, New York, New York], where we were still on the AM band. We were doing more talk radio, we were doing black news and information. We were, we were communicating with the Caribbean. We would, we had shows where we were interacting with continental Africa. We were doing our best to interact with the African diaspora on WLIB--a very serious other side of Inner City Broadcasting [Inner City Broadcasting Corporation]. The AM station made no money. It was completely flipped. FM is god now; and all the money is coming in from the FM side in order for us to do this work on the AM side.$Your father [Percy Sutton] comes on. I want to move into the Apollo Theater [New York, New York] because that besides--that becomes part of Inner City [Inner City Broadcasting Corporation], but that's a huge project, take on project. And you're really, you're becoming an entertainment conglomerate sort of, with--am I right? No?$$That would be the idea, but that's not really how it worked out (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay. I know, I know, I know. But that was the concept, that was--$$That was--oh boy--$$Okay.$$--was it the concept. There's--there was very few monies that we saw that we could make money in this man's world and one of whom of course is entertainment. And you have to put sports in there, too, that's part of entertainment. It is what it is. The Apollo Theater, we talked earlier about the death of the Chitlin' Circuit and the radio--I'm sorry, the venues, the theaters, that were a part of that Chitlin' Circuit that existed, that died with the end of segregation. Well, the Apollo Theater was like many of these other theaters, going to become a church, and it was in bankruptcy. And my father thought it was a good idea to buy it out of bankruptcy.$$Wow.$$Now here was the trick. There would be a conversion of this theater, taking its mere fifteen hundred seats and making it into a television production and post-production facility, thereby effectively increasing the size or the seating capacity by the number of people who had television sets, potentially. So that--the theater was bought and it was supported by--and its--bought by Inner City, basically bought and supported by Inner City Broadcasting--and its, and its building, its state of the art television production and post-production facilities--only to discover that the people who were producing things wouldn't come to Harlem [New York, New York], just would not come to Harlem. I can kind of understand. The only thing that was on Harlem that was still sta- was standing was the Apollo Theater. The rest of 125th Street was an absolute mess. And to get through that mess to get to the Apollo Theater--why would they, why would they do that, when they can stay downtown and be comfortable? So the grand idea of the Apollo Theater becoming, re- revitalizing the Apollo Theater, bringing back the glory of the Apollo Theater was greatly diminished by the lack of enthusiasm for the project in the producing community downtown.

Rochelle Stevens

Track and field athlete and fitness center entrepreneur Rochelle Stevens was born on September 8, 1966, in Memphis, Tennessee to the Reverend Beatrice Holloway-Davis. She attended Melrose High School and took to running competitively at an early age. By the time Stevens graduated high school, she was a TSSAA high school State Champion, a National High School All-American, a city champion, and an AAU Junior Olympics National Champion. She attended Morgan State University on a full track scholarship and received her B.S. degree in telecommunications and sales from that institution. She went on to receive an M.S. degree in public relations from Columbus University and then began her professional track career in earnest, coached by her mother who had also been a college track star.

After her first attempt in 1988, Stevens qualified for the Olympics and went to the Olympic Games in 1992, in Barcelona, Spain. She won the silver medal for her performance in the women’s 4x400 meter relay race and came in sixth in the world in the solo 400 meter race. At the next Olympic Games, held in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1996, Stevens competed in the women’s 4x400 meter race again and this time took home the gold medal.

Upon returning home to Memphis, Stevens founded the Rochelle Stevens Health and Wellness Spa, where she developed exercise, diet, and therapeutic programs. She also started and continues to sponsor the Rochelle Stevens International Track Invitational Meet, which is designed to expose high school students to college recruiters and formal track competitions. The event is certified to qualify runners for the junior Olympics, senior Olympics, and the Olympic trials.

Stevens retired from professional track competitions in 2000, and began substitute teaching and then serving as a behavioral specialist at Cherokee Elementary School, which she once attended. She has worked as a spokeswoman and motivational speaker for many Fortune 500 companies, including Nike, Maybelline, Blue Cross Blue Shield, and the Bank of America. Stevens is a member of the Better Business Bureau, the Black Business Association, the National Speaker Bureau, and the Word of Life Ministry.

Accession Number

A2010.091

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/29/2010

Last Name

Stevens

Maker Category
Schools

Cherokee Elementary School

Melrose High School

Morgan State University

Columbus University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Rochelle

Birth City, State, Country

Memphis

HM ID

STE14

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Monte Carlo, France

Favorite Quote

Make It Happen.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

9/8/1966

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Memphis

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Soul Food

Short Description

Track and field athlete Rochelle Stevens (1966 - ) won the silver medal at the 1992 Olympic Games and the gold medal at the 1996 Olympic Games in the 4x400 women's relay, and now runs her own health center.

Employment

Rochelle Stevens Health and Wellness Spa

Memphis City Schools

Favorite Color

Purple, Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:10790,106:14502,179:28493,372:33473,494:33971,501:39170,525:48121,637:50445,673:53599,744:53931,749:55591,774:61050,831:61530,838:61850,843:62170,848:72478,998:75082,1043:79360,1107:84510,1181:90140,1264:90588,1272:91100,1281:94154,1319:98061,1382:98377,1387:101530,1427:101950,1434:110502,1560:111776,1630:129630,1880:142674,2036:143362,2046:144996,2087:147490,2144:156960,2269:160656,2353:175630,2583:176232,2591:177006,2603:189292,2821:190986,2848:191833,2862:193142,2963:205306,3107:208274,3152:215405,3212:216170,3238:217445,3265:217785,3270:220080,3308:221015,3323:221525,3331:255716,3804:256048,3809:282703,4255:285860,4339:292944,4484:300026,4594:302296,4631:303178,4642:308078,4748:310136,4779:310528,4784:311214,4795:331330,5036$0,0:4898,157:5372,164:14755,304:18583,370:19714,386:20062,391:20932,414:25103,448:25577,455:27710,494:31897,566:41890,698:42202,707:43528,746:47584,850:48130,859:48442,864:52434,891:53120,899:53512,904:59277,984:59681,989:62408,1029:65492,1046:66570,1066:67263,1081:68495,1108:69188,1118:70805,1151:76888,1289:81200,1369:87555,1489:102416,1684:107922,1729:108282,1735:109506,1763:114012,1814:140464,2157:140856,2162:144090,2262:144482,2267:145070,2274:146638,2296:151538,2380:151930,2385:158070,2409:162310,2511:162870,2521:163510,2532:165990,2582:167030,2611:179323,2771:179791,2776:180493,2781:184778,2800:185570,2811:185922,2816:193024,2970:197862,3012:200240,3085:203680,3099:206955,3143:216757,3239:217501,3248:218524,3261:218989,3270:219919,3282:223639,3352:234120,3498:236210,3530:238585,3560:250114,3664:252200,3691
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Rochelle Stevens' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Rochelle Stevens lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Rochelle Stevens describes her mother's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Rochelle Stevens describes her mother, Beatrice Stevens Holloway, as a young woman

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Rochelle Stevens describes her father, John Ollie Holloway

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Rochelle Stevens describes her mother's occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Rochelle Stevens describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Rochelle Stevens describes her sisters

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Rochelle Stevens remembers attending church at Living Word Ministries

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Rochelle Stevens describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Rochelle Stevens recalls living in Memphis' Orange Mound neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Rochelle Stevens lists athlete alumni of Memphis' Melrose High School

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Rochelle Stevens describes her childhood home in Memphis, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Rochelle Stevens describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Rochelle Stevens remembers her elementary and junior high schools

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Rochelle Stevens talks about her study habits in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Rochelle Stevens explains the effects of 'Roots' airing on television

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Rochelle Stevens remembers playing in the Cherokee Elementary School band

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Rochelle Stevens remembers getting involved in running

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Rochelle Stevens talks about Olympic history and popular black athletes in the 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Rochelle Stevens speaks about playing basketball in junior high school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Rochelle Stevens remembers competing in the AAU Junior Olympics

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Rochelle Stevens explains how she became a sprinter

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Rochelle Stevens remembers beating Edward Temple's top recruits

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Rochelle Stevens remembers her experience at Memphis' Melrose High School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Rochelle Stevens explains why she attended Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Rochelle Stevens recalls her studies at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Rochelle Stevens talks about writing skills in her work as a behavioral specialist

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Rochelle Stevens explains why she chose to major telecommunications at Morgan State University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Rochelle Stevens remembers competing in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Rochelle Stevens remembers competing in Yugoslavia and East Berlin

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Rochelle Stevens describes competing in the Penn Relays

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Rochelle Stevens remembers setting track records at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Rochelle Stevens talks about the events she ran

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Rochelle Stevens describes her athletic diet

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Rochelle Stevens remembers Greek life at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Rochelle Stevens describes her social life at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Rochelle Stevens describes her senior year at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Rochelle Stevens remembers the 1988 Olympic trials in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Rochelle Stevens remembers running club track

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Rochelle Stevens remembers her track career picking up

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Rochelle Stevens describes trying out for the 1992 U.S. Olympic team and being trained by her mother

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Rochelle Stevens describes her training regimen

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Rochelle Stevens lists the best European female runners in 1992

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Rochelle Stevens talks about steroid use at the 1992 Barcelona Summer Olympics

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Rochelle Stevens recalls the 1992 U.S. Olympic trials

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Rochelle Stevens describes her experience at the 1992 Barcelona Summer Olympics, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Rochelle Stevens describes her experience at the 1992 Barcelona Summer Olympics, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Rochelle Stevens remembers her fame after the 1992 Barcelona Summer Olympics

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Rochelle Stevens describes Florence Griffith Joyner's style

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Rochelle Stevens describes her injuries in 1992 and 1996

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Rochelle Stevens remembers competing injured in the 1996 Olympic Games

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Rochelle Stevens remembers winning a gold medal at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Olympics

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Rochelle Stevens recalls suffering a career-ending knee injury in 2000

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Rochelle Stevens describes the Rochelle Stevens Invitational Track Meet and sports camp

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Rochelle Stevens talks about her activities outside of track

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Rochelle Stevens reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Rochelle Stevens reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Rochelle Stevens talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Rochelle Stevens describes her hopes and concerns for the African-American community

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Rochelle Stevens describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

6$3

DATitle
Rochelle Stevens describes her experience at the 1992 Barcelona Summer Olympics, pt. 2
Rochelle Stevens remembers winning a gold medal at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Olympics
Transcript
How many roommates did you have [at the 1992 Summer Olympics, Barcelona, Spain]?$$I had, I believe it was eight to our suite. And the rooms had to be about 8 x 6 [feet], smaller than a dorm room. It was just twin-sized beds and that's it. No pictures, no curtains, no nothing--just the mattress and a pillow, and they gave you your sheets. I was like, this looks like prison, you know. (Laughter) It didn't seem like I was going to be staying in a five-star hotel. They don't prep you on things like that. And you got eight suite mates all in this--$$It seems, it sounds as if the Olympic provisions were a lot less than what you were used to on the track circuit?$$Right, because on the circuit you're staying in five-star hotels. But when you're accommodating ten thousand athletes--those buildings were brand new, so it wasn't like they were, you know, too bad. But they built them according to their custom. They didn't really use air-conditioning in Spain, so we were hot. And this coach by the name of John Smith, who trained some other Olympic medalists, gold and world record holders, he said, "Ro [HistoryMaker Rochelle Stevens], they're going through the same conditions you're going through--the Russians, the Germans, everybody. Nobody has special perks or privileges." He said, "So, don't let this hot room get to you. Just know they're going through the same conditions you are." And with him just making that comment I stopped complaining, and it was like okay, they hot, too. But then we were like, "They're used to being hot. They don't have air-conditioning anyway." (Laughter) But I still put that behind me and looked at it as, you're not going to beat me. I'm not going to let this hot room or this hot weather bring me down because you're sleeping in the heat too. You're eating the same foods I'm eating. I just started putting it into that perspective, and I was able to halfway re-focus at the games in Barcelona [Spain]. But I ended up finishing sixth in the open 400 in lane one. And I think the worst I was supposed to finish was maybe third, but I never had lane one. I always had lane six, seven, or eight. And it was, I know I couldn't have been too focused because I actually saw the cameras as we was sprinting around the track. And you've got eighty-five thousand spectators and people taking pictures. I actually saw cameras flashing. I knew I was not focused if I was able to see people flashing those cameras. And it's like, I'm not going to ever catch up those girls. And so I was like, I'll just run for time, not knowing that it was four of us all running for the bronze. And when we all leaned, they had to come back, and those times were so close. All I know is I got sixth place. And my mom [Beatrice Stevens Holloway] was on the practice field waiting on me, and I cried because I was embarrassed. I got sixth place. I went in there with the fastest time in the world. You get sixth place, okay, you're sixth in the world. That sounds so good. But to actually get sixth place, oh, it was horrible (laughter) to tell somebody that.$$That's one race. You ran in how many races?$$We had to run rounds. We had to eliminate athletes every day. Again, we had four rounds, and I was the only American to make the finals. And so, that was a big deal to just make it to the finals.$$Okay. So you got sixth place in the--$$In the finals.$$In the 400 [meter] finals?$$Uh-huh, in the 400 finals.$$Now, you ran the 4 x 400 [relay], too, right?$$And I was the anchor leg for the 4 x 400, and Olha Bryzhina of Russia [Soviet Union] out-powered me the last thirty or forty meters of the race. But the plan was to give me a big enough lead so I could get away from her. But my lead was one step. That's not a lead when this is the same person that Flo Jo [Florence Griffith Joyner] couldn't catch four years earlier. And you know, Flo Jo, she ran like a forty-eight [second] 400 meter split and Olha forty-seven [seconds]. So, forty-seven will catch a forty-nine any day. Give me a big, big, big, lead. I got a one-step lead. (Laughter) I was determined that I was going to run her to the line. You know, I was thinking about Orange Mound [Memphis, Tennessee], I was thinking about where I was from. I'm like, "I'm from Orange Mound, you know." I'd give her that elbow and cut in front of her. Because technically, she was in front of me, but technically I just kind of ran a little dirty and gave her that cute little elbow and got in front of her. And interestingly, she was the person that I had studied for eight months because I was trying to figure out what was her running style, to run forty-seven [seconds]. And when you pull that tape and watch the race with us, we shift gears in the same place. We were the same stride. She was right behind me. It was like as if she was marking me. But in my mind, I had saw her in my mind for six months, and we moved in the same places, except she out-powered me at the end. That was the only thing.$So, what was it like to get the gold medal in the [at the 1996 Summer Olympics, Atlanta, Georgia]--? And now, this, this is strange kind of, because you ran better before, but you didn't get the gold.$$Right.$$And here, you kind of limp into this one, and then get a gold medal. Does it cause you to be philosophical about life, or what?$$Well, the thing is, all I can think is all my life this is what I've been chasing after. This is what I've always wanted, was to win a gold medal for my country. And when my sister Catherine [Holloway] had died in 1989 of a brain tumor, you know, right before she died I had told her I was going to win a gold medal for her. And the press kind of brought that up, like, hey, you won this medal for your sister, and what does it feel like to win a gold medal for your sister and for your family? And it was just the most incredible moment. It was history that night, to be able to win and knowing that you're injured. And you know, it was just incredible. And to mention, I had this cosmetic make-up sponsorship at that time. I was a Posner girl, and they were promoting mascara to see, to make sure the mascara didn't run. And so, it was like I was this perfect model. I was sweating and it was a 100-and-something degrees outside, and my makeup is still flawless. My eye shadow and things were not running. I didn't have purple sweat and blue sweat and things. And I had told the president of the company--I had negotiated a bonus. I said, "If you all pay me this bonus, I can prove that your makeup is not going to run." You know, they was like, "Yeah, yeah, yeah," and they fell for it. And when I was on that award stand, I just thought about all the hard work and the years that was put into it, and I started crying on the awards stand. You know, the tears was just rolling. And the Jumbotron was on, and I'm like rocking. You know, I was all emotional, and no mascara was running. So it was an extra good race for me, considering I got paid the bonus because their makeup didn't run on national television during the awards ceremony. They was like, "Wow, she tricked us," (laughter).$$So what happened? Did they have a bigger parade when you came back to Atlanta [Georgia] this time?$$We had more people from the mid-South to make the Olympic team the second time around. Penny Hardaway was on the Dream Team this time. Nikki McCray was from the suburbs of Memphis [Tennessee], Collierville [Tennessee]. She was on the women's basketball team, and they won a gold. And then we had Cindy Parlow [Cone], who's from the suburbs of Memphis, which was Germantown [Memphis, Tennessee], and she was on the soccer team. So, we came back with four gold medals. And the city just honored all of us at the same time downtown. And the county and city mayors gave us proclamations and keys to the city, you know. But everybody was more excited for them, because that was their first Olympics and they was more like, "You've before, so it's no big deal." I was like, "Shoot, but I got the gold medal." And it is not an easy thing to make the Olympic team. And when you do the history on it, only forty-four or forty-three Americans won gold medals. So, when you have ten thousand athletes and only one hundred and some medals are going to be given out that are gold and you're one of them, it's more than, "You didn't do anything." And so, I had to kind of just overlook, you know, people because they truly don't understand the commitment, the dedication, the hard work, the sacrifice, the pain, the agony, the disappointments, the lack of sponsorship. They just don't have a clue what you go through to achieve a dream.

Antoinette Malveaux

Born March 19, 1958, in San Francisco, California, Antoinette Malveaux has spent most of her career helping others. The youngest of five children, Malveaux attended public schools in San Francisco. In 1981, she graduated with a B.A. in economics from the University of San Francisco. As part of the management track, she worked in the financial analysis and management division, specializing in international markets.
In 1985, Malveaux earned an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and was hired by American Express Bank as director of global marketing and strategic planning.

Malveaux left American Express in 1991 to assume the position of director of operations for the National Black M.B.A. Association. From there, she was named executive director in 1993 and was then promoted to president and CEO. Under her leadership, the National Black M.B.A. Association developed into a multinational organization and its membership tripled. She left the group in 2003 to pursue other interests, including traveling through Europe.

Malveaux is actively involved in the community, serving on the Board of Trustees of the University of San Francisco; the Better Business Bureau; and the Girl Scouts USA, Chicago chapter. She has been listed in Who's Who in American Business; received the Rainbow/PUSH Reginald Lewis Trailblazer Award and served on the Council on Graduate Minority Education.

Accession Number

A2003.198

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/21/2003

Last Name

Malveaux

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Paul Revere Elementary School

Aptos Middle School

Lowell High School

University of California, San Francisco

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Paul Revere College Preparatory K-8

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Antoinette

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

MAL02

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

3/19/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream (Rocky Road)

Short Description

Association chief executive Antoinette Malveaux (1958 - ) served as the director of global marketing for American Express, and in the capacities of director, president and CEO of the National Black MBA Association.

Employment

Bank of America

American Express Bank, LTD.

National Black MBA Association

Favorite Color

Green, Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Antoinette Malveaux's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux shares stories from her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her mother's personality and her family's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about how her parents met and their divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Antoinette Malveaux names her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in San Francisco, California

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls food from her childhood and attending the local Catholic church as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux lists schools she attended in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux explains how developing a racial consciousness affected her academic studies

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her educational mentors in elementary school and high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her family's civil rights activism and recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her experience at Lowell High School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls her mother's decision to teach at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the University of Mississippi's campus atmosphere in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux explains her decision to attend the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her mentors and the curriculum at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about working for American Express Bank after graduating from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the culture and management of American Express Bank in the late 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her relationship with George Carmany, chief administrative officer for American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the corporate citizenship projects she worked on at American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her work as executive director of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her successes as president and chief executive officer of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America
Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director
Transcript
Okay, so, so you were at Bank of America?$$I was at Bank of America. I had started--when I was at univer- when I was at City College [of San Francisco, San Francisco, California], Bank of America was one of the three jobs that I had, and I quit the other two jobs and kept Bank of America. Then, when I went back to school to the University of San Francisco [San Francisco, California] I continued to work at Bank of America. By then I had gotten a promotion. I had moved forward and now I was working in the collections department collecting on credit cards as opposed to processing the payments. So, I worked there in the evenings. Again, one of the strongest, strongest and best individuals in the, in the department and while I was at University of San Francisco my supervisor had, he and I'd had a conversation and he, he was pretty good. He was always looking out for--as opportunities came up he always made sure that he would talk to employees about putting them forward. And an opportunity had come up to be a student loan officer, and he sat down and talked with me and put me forward for that position. I said yes that's something I wanna pursue, and so I became a student loan officer which was a different kind of position then. Bank of America had created a position in this, in two branches in the city where there would be students who were trained to be loan officers and their portfolio would be student loans. They would also carry the title of student relations representatives, very much a community relations representative, and we would represent the bank at college campuses and high schools, and so I would go to high schools and talk to high school students about savings accounts and credit and banking, about student loans and how to pay for your education, how to pay for cars and what you might want for yourself in life, but primarily about savings and investments and loans and then I would also manage the student loan portfolio and, and extend loans to students. And so I was a student loan officer. And so I worked and went to school.$Your involvement with the National Black MBA Association begins to grow in the early '90s [1990s] and--$$Yeah, after the late '80s [1980s] I joined, I joined in '86 [1986], late '86 [1986]. I became the chapter president in '87 [1987] of New York. I went on the board, I think it was in '89 [1989] and, and then came to a crossroads, and I had when I came to the board I was asked because of my background in strategic planning I was asked to take the organization through a strategic planning process. And up to that point, they hadn't had--they hadn't had anybody or too many people that I was aware of who, who was involved in strategic planning, who had discipline in strategic planning or experience in strategic planning, and you typically that's one of those parts of corporate America you typically didn't find African Americans in. You might have your little ghettos, but you, you typically didn't find them there. So, I took the, created a committee and, a strategic planning committee and my committee and I took the organization through a strategic planning process, and we took them through a process from start to finish, so we extended the process into--after we finished with the strategic plan got them into business planning and action planning so that we could really make sure that the, the plan was not just a piece of paper, it was not just something that we could hold up and say okay we got a plan, but we wanted to keep driving the discipline into the organization so that we could really focus and--on what it was we wanted to do and we could understand what it was going to take to do what we wanted to do, so we weren't as much of an organization that was full of talk, but one that could move to action. And when we got to the end of that process, we did some visioning with the executive committee, worked with a gentleman by the name of Horace Smith [ph.] who was an advisor to the group and he, he worked with me to do some visioning and with the executive committee and get them to a place of decision-making around what we were going to do with this plan and how we were going to take this plan forward. And so the decision was made that the organization would change, that it would build its own management capability. At that point, we had a lot of outsourcing managed by an association management firms and had just begun to bring some things in house and so they made a decision to hire an executive director, and they asked me and another person if we would do that and the other person decided--we were supposed to go in together--the person decided that he couldn't do it. He had a family, I didn't. The organization could not meet his expectation and his needs in terms of what he needed for his family. You know, I was either young and dumb or I had the angel sitting on my shoulder and I made the decision to go forth and, and it took us, but it took us about a year and a half to get through that dialogue and that discussion and get to that decision that I would leave corporate America and come head the National Black MBA Association.$$Okay.$$But by the time that I had made that decision, George Carmany had left the bank [American Express Bank, New York, New York]. He was still with American Express; he had gone to another division of American Express in Boston [Massachusetts]. He had asked if I wanted to go, I said no. I was not interested in moving to Boston, and I wanted something different and this opportunity came, so I was at a crossroads and this was the opportunity that was put before for me at the time that, you know, things were moving. You know, they were moving at parallel paths and then they went like that and so.