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Shirley Kinsey

Art collector and educator Shirley Pooler Kinsey was born on February 7, 1946 in Lake City, Florida to Erma and Eddie Pooler. She grew up in St. Augustine, Florida, and was raised by her paternal grandmother, Susie Plummer Pooler. Kinsey attended the Richard J. Murray High School, where she was valedictorian of her graduating class. She then went on to attend Florida A&M University, where she married her husband, Bernard Kinsey, and graduated in 1967 with her B.A. degree in English.

Upon graduation, Kinsey moved to California, where she was hired as an elementary school teacher for the Compton Unified School District. Then, from 1973 until 1982, Kinsey worked as a trainer and training manager for Xerox Corporation. She also went on to receive her M.A. degree in multi-cultural education from Pepperdine University in 1976. From 1985 to 1995, Kinsey served as a project manager for KBK Enterprises, Inc., a real estate development firm.

Kinsey and her husband are known for their collection of African American art, books and manuscripts that document and tell the story of African American triumphs and struggles from 1604 to the present. Their exhibit, entitled “The Kinsey collection: Shared Treasures of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey – Where Art and History Intersect,” has been on national tour since 2006, and has been on exhibit in fourteen museums, including the Smithsonian National Museum of American History and Epcot at Walt Disney World. In 2009, Kinsey, with her husband, co-authored The Kinsey Collection: Shared Treasures of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey, a companion book to their exhibit, which was adopted by the Florida Department of Education as part of their African American history curriculum for grades K-12 statewide.

In 2008, Kinsey co-founded the Bernard and Shirley Kinsey Foundation for the Arts and Education to promote education and understanding of African American history and culture through the exhibition of their personal treasures. Additionally, she has helped raise over twenty-two million dollars for charitable and educational institutions, including Florida A&M University. Kinsey has also received numerous awards, including the Spelman Alumni Humanitarian Award, the Distinguished Alumni Award from Florida A&M University, and a Living Legend Award from ESPN.

Kinsey resides with her husband and son in Pacific Palisades, California.

Shirley P. Kinsey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 18, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.340

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/18/2013

Last Name

Kinsey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Rose

Occupation
Schools

West Augustine School #6

Excelsior Elementary

Richard J. Murray High School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Pepperdine University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Shirley

Birth City, State, Country

Lake City

HM ID

KIN18

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy, Kenya

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

2/7/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Eggplant Parmesan

Short Description

Art collector, educator, and Shirley Kinsey (1946 - ) and her husband, Bernard Kinsey, were the owners and curators of an extensive collection of African American art, books and manuscripts. She coauthored The Kinsey Collection: Shared Treasures of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey, which was a companion book to the exhibit of the same name.

Employment

Kinsey Collection

Delete

KBK Enterprises, Inc.

Xerox Corporation

Compton City Schools

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Shirley Kinsey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Shirley Kinsey lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Shirley Kinsey describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Shirley Kinsey describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Shirley Kinsey talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Shirley Kinsey describes her likeness to her parents and paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her home life

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Shirley Kinsey describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her neighborhood in St. Augustine, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Shirley Kinsey describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Shirley Kinsey describes her early experiences of religion

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her paternal grandmother's first visit to California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Shirley Kinsey recalls her influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Shirley Kinsey remembers the all-white school near her home in St. Augustine, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Shirley Kinsey recalls her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Shirley Kinsey describes her paternal uncle, James Webster

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her mentor, Rosalie Gordon-Mills

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Shirley Kinsey remembers the Excelsior School in St. Augustine, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Shirley Kinsey talks about the schools in St. Augustine, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Shirley Kinsey describes segregation in St. Augustine, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Shirley Kinsey remembers Richard J. Murray High School in St. Augustine, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Shirley Kinsey recalls her decision to attend Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Shirley Kinsey remembers joining the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Shirley Kinsey remembers being arrested during a CORE demonstration, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Shirley Kinsey remembers being arrested during a CORE demonstration, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Shirley Kinsey remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Shirley Kinsey remembers James N. Eaton

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her first teaching jobs

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Shirley Kinsey remembers the notable figures at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Shirley Kinsey describes her education at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her marriage to Bernard Kinsey

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Shirley Kinsey remembers teaching in Compton, California

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Shirley Kinsey recalls the start of her art collection

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Shirley Kinsey describes her financial planning

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Shirley Kinsey recalls developing an interest in black art and culture

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Shirley Kinsey remembers the birth of her son

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Shirley Kinsey recalls collecting Ernie Barnes' paintings

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Shirley Kinsey recalls the start of her historical document collection

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Shirley Kinsey talks about her educational outreach

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Shirley Kinsey talks about her time at the Xerox Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Shirley Kinsey talks about moving frequently

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Shirley Kinsey recalls her start in the real estate business

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Shirley Kinsey describes her real estate business

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her early art shows

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Shirley Kinsey talks about her fundraising events

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Shirley Kinsey remembers sharing her collection with young people

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Shirley Kinsey remembers her dinner parties for Tom Bradley and Rosa Parks

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Shirley Kinsey recalls lending her collection to the California African American Museum

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Shirley Kinsey describes the growing interest in her art and history collection

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Shirley Kinsey remembers the digital exhibition of the Kinsey Collection

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Shirley Kinsey recalls publishing 'The Kinsey African American Art and History Collection'

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Shirley Kinsey remembers creating an exhibit for Black History Month

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Shirley Kinsey describes her partnership with Wells Fargo and Company

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Shirley Kinsey describes her exhibit at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Shirley Kinsey describes her plans for a documentary film

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Shirley Kinsey reflects upon her museum career

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Shirley Kinsey describes her favorite pieces in the Kinsey Collection, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Shirley Kinsey describes her favorite pieces in the Kinsey Collection, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Shirley Kinsey describes her son's involvement in the Kinsey Collection

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Shirley Kinsey reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Shirley Kinsey describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Shirley Kinsey reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Shirley Kinsey shares a message to future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Shirley Kinsey describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Shirley Kinsey narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Shirley Kinsey narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

1$5

DATitle
Shirley Kinsey remembers her early art shows
Shirley Kinsey recalls lending her collection to the California African American Museum
Transcript
So you said some events took place in this house that led to (simultaneous)--?$$(Simultaneous) Yes and actually I should go back a little bit. You know we've been talking about some of the artwork and collecting and stuff. One of the things that we started doing early on once we started collecting art and paintings particularly was that we wanted to introduce artists to our friends. And so we started having, we'd have an art show at the house. [HistoryMaker] Ed Dwight who's, who's a wonderful sculptor who was the first--he's, his whole life is historic too. I mean he was the first black astronaut trainee under Kennedy [President John Fitzgerald Kennedy] and then went and turned on the other side of his brain. His passion is sculpting. And so we did an art show for him in 1987 at our second house in the Palisades [Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, California] frankly and that was our first big show and--because we didn't know about him initially. In 1986 I think it was we were in Hawaii and saw his work in a gallery there. And so the, the gallery owner was telling us who he was and he had been an astronaut trainee. We literally both looked at each other and said how come we don't know about him? He is African American and we don't know this about him? And so Bernard [Kinsey's husband, HistoryMaker Bernard Kinsey] literally--found out he was in Denver [Colorado], called him up, invited him to come to L.A. [Los Angeles, California] and what we do? The Urban League dinner was going on. We invited him to that and became friends and started having--so we had two shows for him. One there and had one here. Each time he sold like really, really well you know because people just, they love his work but nobody--don't know him. Matter of fact Debbie Allen and Norm Nixon became very, very big collectors of his and they've had art shows for him since you know since that time. And it's just been a real pleasure seeing, that, that, that work. His I think was one of the first shows we did. Then we did another one for [HistoryMaker] Jonathan Green and that was in this house. That was like the early, late--mid-'90s [1990s] or so. Jonathan Green. I have some abstracts on the wall back here. Bill Dallas lives in Oakland [California] kind of an unknown artist, but we really like his work and so we had a show with him. [HistoryMaker] Phoebe Beasley is a good friend of ours now and we've done stuff with her and it's just been great to be able to promote you know their work, not only for us to have it but for other people to have the pleasure of meeting them and of having it in their homes. So that's been a big thing.$So then in 2005 when L.A. Times [Los Angeles Times] called, one of the ladies had been here I think when we had the photographers here and she was a writer with L.A. Times. So she knew the house so she was now working for the home section and so she called and said, you know wanted to know if we would be interesting in letting them do a feature on the house, the architecture of the house and the whole bit. And we said, "Yeah, well, okay come out we'll talk about it." And she wanted to bring her editor with her. When she did and they got here and they saw all the artwork, they said, "Oh no, this is more than just the style of the house, this is," (gesture). And by this time California African American Museum [Los Angeles, California]--she sort of knew sort of what we had but you know we hadn't really talked about doing anything. And when they came by here from the L.A. Times the article wound up being with this huge spread and it was the house and the artwork and the whole bit so then the California African American Museum contacted us. One of the women on the board was a friend and she said, "You know we're trying to get the museum--get African American collectors to share their exhibits. The museum needs to have content and so we'd love it if you guys would be a part of that," you know.$$Is this the museum in--$$Here. Locally here.$$--Los Angeles [California]--$$In Los Angeles.$$--the one near the old stadium?$$Um-hm, yeah Exposition Park [Los Angeles, California], over there right. And so they came out and we talked and they said you know, "It, it would jumpstart it for us because if you guys do it you know we think we can get other collectors to do it and stuff too." So we couldn't start right away and they found somebody in San Francisco [California] to do it and they, he did his and it went over very well and then ours went in. Well in the meantime--oh I can't remember who--someone referred us to [HistoryMaker] Bill Whitaker at CBS and told him that this was a story that he should look at. He's with 'CBS Sunday Morning' and so he talked to Bernard [HistoryMaker Bernard Kinsey] on the phone. Bernard was in Florida, he talked to Bernard on the phone, we had never met him, talked to Bernard on the phone I guess he did his research now this is before we, we'd set up that it's gonna go to the museum so the story was gonna be about it going to the museum I guess so Bernard called me and said, "Bill Whitaker's coming out on Thursday and they're gonna do a story on us with the art exhibit, about the art exhibit." I said, "What do you mean? Don't they have to come by here and see what this is all about before they decide this?" He said, "No they're coming with the cameraman and with the producer and with somebody else or whatever and they'll be there on Thursday." That's what they did. So they came out, they did you know the whole interview and stuff here, then they said, "We're not gonna run it right away, we wanna wait until," that was in August of '06 [2006]. The article had come out like November of '05 [2005] and so this was August of '06 [2006] so they came out and they said, "Okay we're gonna wait until it opens at the museum because we're gonna follow you, wanna be at the museum when it's opening." So they came out when it opened that weekend and they followed us in the museum and talked to people and you know got input on it and all that stuff and then they ran the article on 'CBS Sunday Morning,' Martin Luther King weekend in 2007 that Sunday, which was really pretty special, pretty special, pretty special.

Andrea Meigs

Talent agent Andrea Nelson Meigs was born on October 30, 1968 in Bellflower, California. Her father, David Nelson Jr., was a principal in the Los Angeles Unified School District; her mother, Dorothy Nelson, a college professor. Meigs spent her early childhood in the Compton area of Los Angeles and attended a private Christian school before entering the public school system in the fifth grade. After graduating from high school in in Palos Verdes, Meigs enrolled in Tufts University and graduated with her B.A. degree in English and Spanish in 1990. While there, she studied at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia as well as the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in Madrid, Spain. Meigs went on to earn her J.D. degree in entertainment law from the Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina in 1994.

In 1994, Meigs was hired to work with Congresswoman Maxine Waters in the Los Angeles District Attorney’s office. Meigs joined Creative Artists Agency (CAA) in 1996 as a mailroom clerk where she was promoted to motion picture talent agent. She was then hired as a talent agent at International Creative Management (ICM). Throughout her career, Meigs has worked with major talent in the music, television and film industries including Christina Applegate, Halle Berry, Ellen Burstyn, Beyoncé Knowles, and John Voight, Mark Salling, Cristina Saralegui, and the multi-talented power couple Mara Brock Akil and Salim Akil.

Meigs is a member of the State of California Bar Association, the Los Angeles County Bar Association, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. In 2003, she served on the steering committee for the American Black Film Festival. In addition, Black Enterprise magazine recognized Meigs by including her in the 2003 “Hot List” and the 2004 “Brightest under 40” list. She also appeared in Honey magazine as one of the “25 Hottest Women in Entertainment.”

Meigs is married to John V. Meigs, Jr., a partner at the entertainment law firm Home Page for the law firm of Hansen, Jacobson, Teller, Hoberman, Newman, Warren & Richman, LLP. They have four daughters: Avery N. Meigs; the late Alexandra N. Meigs; and twins, Isabella Alexa and Calla Alexis Meigs.

Andrea Nelson Meigs was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 18, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.301

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/18/2013

Last Name

Meigs

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Nelson

Occupation
Schools

Duke University

Tufts University

Brethren Christian School

Naples Elementary School

Malaga Cove Intermediate School

Palos Verdes High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Andrea

Birth City, State, Country

Bellflower

HM ID

MEI01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bora Bora

Favorite Quote

If Given A Lemon, Make Lemonade

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

10/30/1968

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Media executive Andrea Meigs (1968 - ) was a high-profile talent agent at Creative Artists Agency and International Creative Management, where she represented stars like Idris Elba and Beyonce Knowles Carter.

Employment

ICM Partners

Creative Artists Agency

Los Angeles Unified School District

Los Angeles District Attorney

Office of Congresswoman Maxine Waters

KEET

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Andrea Meigs' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Andrea Meigs lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Andrea Meigs describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Andrea Meigs describes her maternal grandmother's decision to leave the South

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Andrea Meigs describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Andrea Meigs describe her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Andrea Meigs talks about her father's reasons for leaving St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Andrea Meigs describes her father's occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Andrea Meigs describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Andrea Meigs describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Andrea Meigs describes her homes in Compton, California

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Andrea Meigs describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Andrea Meigs talks about her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Andrea Meigs talks about her father's support for his relatives

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Andrea Meigs describes her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Andrea Meigs recalls her experiences as a child actor

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Andrea Meigs recalls some of her acting work

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Andrea Meigs talks about her decision to stop acting

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Andrea Meigs remembers her parents' decision to leave Compton, California

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Andrea Meigs recalls an influential elementary school teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Andrea Meigs remembers her aspirations during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Andrea Meigs describes her brother's secondary education

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Andrea Meigs talks about her Spanish language studies

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Andrea Meigs describes her experiences at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Andrea Meigs describes her mentors at Tufts University, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Andrea Meigs describes her mentors at Tufts University, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Andrea Meigs remembers her rejection from law school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Andrea Meigs talks about returning to Los Angeles, California

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Andrea Meigs remembers the Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Andrea Meigs recalls her graduation from the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Andrea Meigs remembers working for Congresswoman Maxine Waters

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Andrea Meigs recalls her transition to the entertainment industry

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Andrea Meigs describes the Creative Artists Agency's training program

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Andrea Meigs describes the Creative Artists Agency

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Andrea Meigs recalls what she learned in the mailroom of the Creative Artists Agency

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Andrea Meigs remembers her promotion to assistant agent

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Andrea Meigs reflects upon her experiences as the only black woman at the Creative Artists Agency

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Andrea Meigs talks about the pay structure for talent agents

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Andrea Meigs talks about her mentors at the Creative Artists Agency, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Andrea Meigs talks about her mentors at the Creative Artists Agency, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Andrea Meigs describes her training at the Creative Artists Agency

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Andrea Meigs remembers her promotion to agent at Creative Artists Agency

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Andrea Meigs remembers representing Cedric The Entertainer

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Andrea Meigs talks about her clientele at the Creative Artists Agency

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Andrea Meigs remembers representing the members of Destiny's Child

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Andrea Meigs describes her experiences of pay discrimination at the Creative Artists Agency

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Andrea Meigs recalls leaving the Creative Artists Agency for ICM Partners

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Andrea Meigs reflects upon her departure from the Creative Artists Agency

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Andrea Meigs recalls moving her clientele to ICM Partners

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Andrea Meigs talks about her new clients at ICM Partners

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Andrea Meigs describes her work with Mara Brock Akil and Salim Akil

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Andrea Meigs talks about her clientele at ICM Partners

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Andrea Meigs talks about the process of identifying talent

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Andrea Meigs lists the African American talent agents in Hollywood

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Andrea Meigs talks about the experiences of minority talent agents

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Andrea Meigs describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Andrea Meigs reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Andrea Meigs reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Andrea Meigs describes her family

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Andrea Meigs talks about the challenges of balancing life and work

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Andrea Meigs remembers pledging to the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Andrea Meigs describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Andrea Meigs narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Andrea Meigs narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

4$2

DATitle
Andrea Meigs talks about returning to Los Angeles, California
Andrea Meigs remembers representing the members of Destiny's Child
Transcript
(Simultaneous) Now is the Houston program [Charles Hamilton Houston Pre-Law Institute] at the Howard law school [Howard University School of Law, Washington, D.C.], or at Georgetown [Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C.] (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) It was at Georgetown. It was Georgetown.$$Okay, all right.$$Yeah, and so I took that for the summer. And at the conclusion of it, which was extremely helpful and enlightening, I was not lifted off the waitlist; I was not taken off the waitlist at Georgetown. And so I stayed, trying to find a job on Capitol Hill [Washington, D.C.], and also considering reapplying to the school. And about, I don't know, September-ish, I got a phone call from my dad [David Nelson, Jr.] who said that the money was not going to be coming in the mail for my rent. And without a job and without being in school, there was one thing left for me to do, and that was to come back home. And I was shocked, because I was like, "What do you mean, you're not going to send money?" Like, I had no concept of what that meant. Like, "You're not going to send money? Well, how am I going to live?" And of course, that was his point, exactly. And he did not send a check. So, (laughter) I had to pack up and come home. And so what I did is, I applied for a job when I got home to L.A. [Los Angeles, California], and I got a job working at Channel 13, which was KCOP [KCOP-TV, Los Angeles, California] at the time. And I, my job was working as a production assistant for two programs. One was, I think it 'L.A. Now.' No, it was called 'Children Now.' It was a children's advocacy program that was nominated for an Emmy [Emmy Award], and it was in conjunction with L.A. Unified [Los Angeles Unified School District]. So it was kind of, actually to be honest it was the perfect job for me because it was entertainment, and yet educational. It was, we would have a different school come to the set every week. So, there would be anywhere from, you know, forty to fifty kids bused to the set; they would fill the audience. And I was in charge of coming up with guest speakers and presentations for them. So, we would have somebody come from the zoo and talk about, you know, caring for animals. Or we might have somebody come from a museum to talk about being a curator. And it was, it was a lot of fun. I'd have to keep the audience going and keep the kids engaged and excited, and interview the hosts. And there was another program that I worked on called 'L.A. Today,' I believe it was called something like that. And that was just a current events show about what was going on in Los Angeles.$$Okay.$$So I did that for a year. And when I was at KCOP I quickly looked around and realized that everybody that seemed to be really influential and really making--being in a position of influence and decision making--they were people who had either gone to law school or they were people who had gone to business school. And at that time I realized I, I need to go back to school. It's time for me to go back to school. So I reapplied, and that's when I got into Duke [Duke University School of Law, Durham, North Carolina].$Before we go there, it seems like an odd time to break this flow up. But--$$Yeah.$$--did you represent Beyonce [Beyonce Knowles Carter] and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes.$$--Halle Berry at CAA [Creative Artists Agency]?$$Yes.$$Okay. That one, I think we should talk--talk about first before we--$$Okay, sure.$$--move on.$$Sure, sure, sure.$$But--$$Sure.$$--those were the two biggest stars in the African American community.$$Right. Yeah, well, at the time--again, I--Halle was a client, and I was asked to be part of her team. I didn't sign her, but I was asked to be part of her team. I was involved with--when she got Monster's, the--$$'Monster's Ball.'$$'Monster's Ball,' for which she went on to win an Academy Award [Oscar]. I remember that process very distinctly. And I remember, you know, the feedback when she was auditioning really for it. And clearly the feedback was there was no way she could play this role. She's much, much, too pretty and attractive and, you know, we're looking for somebody that, you know, can really, you know, play it raw and gritty and beat up, you know, average, which she is not. And she really, you know, would accept nothing but, "You've got the job." And they'd gone out to a few people who passed, and ultimately she got the job and it carried her to the Oscars. And I remember that night, you know, so many of my friends on the East Coast calling me and saying, "Congratulations! This is amazing. This is so--." And I remember calling home and my parents [Dorothy Clay Nelson and David Nelson, Jr.] said, "Oh, how was your day?" I said, "Fine." And they said, "Oh, so what did you do today?" I was like, "You know today is the Oscars right?" And they said, "Oh, is that today? Is that today?" I'm like, "My client was nominated and won an Academy Award." And they said, "Oh, that's wonderful, that's wonderful. Now, who is she again?" You know, like my parents, you know, are very simple people, very humble people. They were not caught up in the, you know, celebrity--star struck--of it all. You know, they may have known who Robert De Niro was, or is, but yeah, they did not know. But that was really, really exciting, being part of that. And you know, at the time also, you know, Destiny's Child was coming up, and they were a hot group. And you know, they were kind of just at the heels of Aaliyah, you know, the artist who ended up passing away. And I remember very distinctly meeting with my colleagues who were representing them on the music side. And they said, "Look, you know, at some point they're going to be interested in acting. Are you interested in handling them on the acting side?" I said, "Of course, sure." And I, I started, I sat down with them at the time with their manager, Mathew Knowles. And the plan was after Destiny's Child kind of finished that- their final, you know, their final album and they were going to embark upon solo careers, we were going to start with--we were going to--Michelle [Michelle Williams] was going to work on her gospel album and Kelly was going to--Kelly was going to start working on her acting, and Beyonce was going to work on her solo album as more of a, you know, R and B pop artist. And so, Kelly was the first one up for acting. As it turns out, you remember that song, 'Dilemma,' that she did with Nelly. It got leaked and it hit the airways, and it was the hottest thing. And so, it immediately propelled her. It's like, "Okay, well, you're going to be the first one that's out with your solo album." So, she ended up being the first out on the solo album. And so we kind of shifted gears and then we said, "Okay, well, Beyonce, we'll work on her, you know, right now for her acting." So, she ended up being the first one that we started working with on the acting side. And we got her the MTV movie, 'Carmen: A Hip Hopera,' which she did with Mos Def, and that was the first acting gig. I did her deal on her first major studio movie, 'Austin Powers Goldmember' ['Austin Powers in Goldmember'] for New Line [New Line Cinema]. And then, you know, we just kept building from there, you know. I put Kelly in, Kelly Rowland in a New Line movie, 'Freddy vs. Jason' which did extremely well. And then once Michelle's gospel album was underway, she started acting and we put her into theater. So she did 'Aida' on Broadway, and then went on to do 'The Color Purple,' and has gone on to several other productions, 'Chicago,' and 'Fela!' ['Fela!: A New Musical,' Bill T. Jones and Jim Lewis] and so forth. But, yeah, with Beyonce we went on to do--after 'Austin Powers' we got a big deal to do a movie for Paramount [Paramount Pictures Corporation], 'The Fighting Temptations' which she did with Cuba Gooding [Cuba Gooding, Jr.]. And then 'Dreamgirls' came about, and that was, that was a highlight, definitely, that was definitely a highlight. She got nominated for a Golden Globe [Golden Globe Award] for both the song and for acting. And there was--you know, it was something that she was extremely proud of, and really, really dedicated herself to giving her best performance. She's such a committed and hardworking individual and, you know, all up to this point she had been focused on her music career, both as in the group and then, you know, subsequently with a solo career. And that was the first movie that she really carved out a significant amount of time and, you know, recorded the music and worked with the acting coach, and, and, and really dedicated herself to working on the movie.

Col. Christine Knighton

U.S. Army Colonel Christine B. Knighton was born in Cuthbert, Georgia in 1957. After graduating from Randolph County Comprehensive High School in 1975, she attended Tuskegee Institute and graduated with military honors in 1979. Knighton’s military education includes the Aviation Officer Advanced Course, the UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter Qualification Course, the Combined Arms Staff and Services School, and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Knighton also received her M.A. degree in national security and strategy from the National War College at National Defense University.

Upon graduation from college, Knighton was commissioned a second lieutenant and served briefly in the Quartermaster Corps and the Transportation Officer’s Corps. In 1980, she became the second African American woman in the U.S. Department of Defense and the first woman from the State of Georgia to complete aviation training. Knighton then reported to the U.S. Army V Corps in West Germany where her assignments included that of flight section leader of the 205th Transportation Battalion; platoon leader of the 62nd Aviation Company; and logistics officer of the 11th Aviation Battalion. In 1988, she assumed command of Delta Company, the 227th Aviation Regiment – 1st Cavalry’s Combat Aviation Company, and then served a tour of duty at Camp Stanley in Uijeongbu, South Korea with the 2nd Infantry Division as the Aviation Brigade logistics officer.

Knighton reported to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in 1990 and was assigned as an aviation logistician for the Combat Structure for the Army Study Group. She then was deployed to Operation Desert Storm with the Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL) to assess aviation units positioned in Saudi, Kuwait and Iraq. In 1993, Knighton was appointed as commander of Hotel Company in the 159th Aviation Regiment (AVIM) and deployed to Mogadishu, Somalia in support of the United Nations “Operation Continue Hope.” Knighton became the first woman in the U.S. Army to command a tactical combat arms battalion on November 3, 1996 when she was assigned as commander of a Blackhawk Helicopter Battalion in the 1st Cavalry Division and deployed to Tulza, Bosnia-Herzegovina to conduct aviation operations.

Knighton is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., the Tuskegee Airmen Association, and served as vice president of the Bessie Coleman Foundation. Knighton was nationally recognized by Glamour Magazinein 1989 as one of its “Top 10 Outstanding Working Women in the United States” and appeared on the cover of USA Today. In 1999, Knighton’s Blackhawk Helicopter Battalion was named U.S. Army Aviation Unit of the Year. Her military decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Achievement Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, the Southwest Asia Service Medal, the NATO Medal, the Kuwait Liberation Medal, and the Army’s Senior Aviator Badge. Knighton is also authorized to wear the Office of the Secretary of Defense Staff Badge, and received the Order of Saint Michael which recognized outstanding contributions to U.S. Army Aviation.

U.S. Army Colonel Christine B. Knighton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers in July 26, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.187

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/26/2013

Last Name

Knighton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

B.

Occupation
Schools

The Broad Academy

Georgetown University

U.S. Army War College

Randolph County Comprehensive High School

Tuskegee University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Christine

Birth City, State, Country

Benevolence

HM ID

KNI01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

I can do all things through Christ that strengthens me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

11/23/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potatoes

Short Description

Colonel Col. Christine Knighton (1957 - ) , the second African American woman in the U.S. Department of Defense and the first woman from the State of Georgia to complete aviation training, became the first woman in the U.S. Army to command a tactical combat arms battalion on November 3, 1996.

Employment

Soldier Support Institute

2nd Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, Blackhawk Helicopter Battalion

Army Personnel Command

Hotel Company, 159th Aviation Regiment (AVIM)

8th Aviation Battalion (AVIM), 101st Airborne Division

Aviation Requirements for the Combat Structure for the Army (ARCSA-V) Study Group

United States Army

1st Cavalry Division’s Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Company (AVIM

Favorite Color

All Colors

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Christine Knighton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Christine Knighton describes the town of Benevolence, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Christine Knighton describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Christine Knighton describes her mother's growing up in Benevolence, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Christine Knighton describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Christine Knighton describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Christine Knighton describes her father's growing up in Georgia, his migration to Philadelphia, and his towing business in New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Christine Knighton describes how her parents met, and talks about their relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Christine Knighton describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Christine Knighton describes her father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Christine Knighton talks about her maternal grandfather going from sharecropper to landowner in Benevolence, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Christine Knighton talks about the first home that her maternal family bought and the lack of amenities in the South during the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Christine Knighton talks about President John F. Kennedy's assassination a few days before her own and Caroline Kennedy's sixth birthday

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Christine Knighton talks about her maternal grandparents' home in Benevolence, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Christine Knighton describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Benevolence, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Christine Knighton describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Benevolence, Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Christine Knighton talks about starting school in Stewart County, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Christine Knighton describes her experience in elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton talks about the Civil Rights Movement in Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton talks about her family's first television set, and riding the bus to elementary school in Lupton, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Christine Knighton talks about visiting her father in Philadelphia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Christine Knighton recalls Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Christine Knighton talks about her experience in middle school in Cuthbert, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Christine Knighton talks about state-funded colleges in Georgia while she was growing up, and attending college in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Christine Knighton talks about her experience in high school in Cuthbert, Georgia, and her interest in home economics

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Christine Knighton talks about the Knighton family's talent for basketball

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Christine Knighton talks about her performance in high school and her decision to attend Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Christine Knighton talks about being accepted to Tuskegee Institute, and her first visit to the campus with her family

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Christine Knighton talks about the integration of schools in the seventh grade in Cuthbert, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton talks about her experience at Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton describes her decision to join the Army ROTC at Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Christine Knighton talks about Lionel Ritchie's relationship with Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Christine Knighton talks about her experience in classes at Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Christine Knighton describes her experience in the Army ROTC at Tuskegee Institute, and her training for the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Christine Knighton describes her desire to go to flight school in the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Christine Knighton talks about her branch transfer to the U.S. Army Transportation Corps

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Christine Knighton talks about flying helicopters, and doing Ground School Training with Chief Alfred C. Anderson

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Christine Knighton talks about flight training at Fort Rucker, Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Christine Knighton describes her experience at primary flight training

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton describes her experience as an African American woman in advanced flight training at Fort Rucker, Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton talks about the Bell Huey helicopter and her experience flying them

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Christine Knighton talks about graduating from flight school and attending the Tuskegee Airmen Convention in Atlanta in 1980

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Christine Knighton talks about her assignment to the Fifth Corps at Fliegerhorst Kaserne in Hanau, Germany

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Christine Knighton talks about her colleague Marcella Ng's career

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Christine Knighton talks about her reassignment to the 11th Aviation Battalion and her promotion to the ranks of first lieutenant and captain

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Christine Knighton talks about her assignment as the Battalion S4 in the 11th Aviation Battalion

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Christine Knighton describes her experience in the 1st Cavalry at Fort Hood, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Christine Knighton describes her experience as an Aviation Brigade Logistics Officer with the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Christine Knighton talks about her tour in Korea in 1988

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton talks about her service during the Gulf War

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton talks about the challenges posed by a desert environment during the Gulf War

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Christine Knighton talks about women serving in the U.S. Army during the Gulf War

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Christine Knighton talks about the living conditions for military service members during the Gulf War

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Christine Knighton talks about Scud missiles used by the Iraqis during the Gulf War, and their eventual surrender

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Christine Knighton talks about women serving in combat missions and the repeal of "Don't ask, don't tell" policy in the U.S. Army

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Christine Knighton talks about her service with the 101st Airborne Division

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Christine Knighton talks about her assignment as Company Commander of Hotel Company, 159th Aviation Regiment in Somalia

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Christine Knighton talks about her service at the Army Personnel Command as the assignments officer for Aviation majors and lieutenant colonels

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton talks about getting married and starting a family

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton talks about becoming the first woman in the history of the U.S. Army to command a tactical combat arms battalion

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Christine Knighton talks about the 2nd Battalion, 227th Aviation being selected as the Army's Aviation Unit of the Year

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Christine Knighton talks about her service as Assistant Director of Officer and Enlisted Personnel Management in the Office of the Secretary of Defense

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Christine Knighton talks about attending the Army War College

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Christine Knighton talks about becoming a full colonel and her experience in the Office of the Secretary of Defense

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Christine Knighton recalls her experience at the Pentagon during the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Christine Knighton recalls her experience at the Pentagon during the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Christine Knighton reflects upon lessons learned from the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the U.S.

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Christine Knighton talks about the Army Married Couples Program, and her assignment to Fort Jackson, South Carolina

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Christine Knighton talks about the changes in policy that allowed women to serve in Ground Combat

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton talks about her service as Chief Learning Officer for the Army Officer Corps

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton talks about retiring from the U.S. Army and attending a Superintendents Training Program

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Christine Knighton describes her service as Chief of Human Resources for Prince George's County Public Schools

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Christine Knighton talks about her experience in leadership coaching and executive coaching

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Christine Knighton describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Christine Knighton reflects upon her life and career

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Christine Knighton reflects upon the large percentage of African American women joining the U.S. Army

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Christine Knighton reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Christine Knighton talks about her family and about balancing her family needs with that of her career

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Christine Knighton discusses her concerns about the legacy of African American women in aviation

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Christine Knighton shares how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Christine Knighton describes her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$7

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
Christine Knighton describes her desire to go to flight school in the U.S. Army
Christine Knighton recalls her experience at the Pentagon during the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, pt. 1
Transcript
So, you were assigned as a Second Lieutenant in the [U.S. Army] Quartermaster Corps, right?$$Right. Exactly. So when I got commissioned--when you are in the ROTC [Reserve Officers' Training Corps], you have to choose your branch at the beginning of your senior year. You choose your preferences for a branch. What do you want to do and what do you want to be. And, you know, so by this time, we had cadre at Tuskegee [Institute, Tuskegee, Alabama], which was a first for us. We had some white cadre members. So, this was new, I think in my junior year is when we got our first Commission Officer, Caucasian instructor, right. And we still keep in contact today, right. He was an Army aviator, right. Our PMS, Professor of Military Science was an Army aviator, and we also had another instructor that was--black instructor that was an Army aviator also.$$Now, wait a minute. Now, did they influence you to (laughs)--$$Oh, yeah. Yeah. (laughs)$$--think about aviation?$$Right. Well, what influenced me, when I went to summer camp--you mentioned summer camp, which was at Fort Riley, Kansas, is where we went to summer camp, and that, for me, that was the first time I would have gone--gotten on a commercial airline, right, exactly. So Columbus, Georgia, to Atlanta [Georgia] was one of the small aircraft, right. And I swore I would never get back in an aircraft again if I ever got my feet on the ground just because of the turbulence, right, from Columbus to Atlanta, right. Much larger plane, of course, going into Kansas City, Missouri, out of Atlanta, right, had a much smoother ride, so, okay; we may be able to do this. But at summer camp we were introduced, you know, different branches, right, the artillery, you know, the infantry, which females couldn't go into at that time; but you got an introduction of all the other branches, right. And I got my first ride on a helicopter, right, which was the Chinook CH-47, in the back of that helicopter. So by the time summer camp was over, I came back, and I told my mom [Annie Lee Knighton] I wanted to go to flight school. And she was like, "Okay. This is the person who was not going to get back on the airplane in Atlanta." (laughs) Right. Exactly Right. "And you're telling me now that you want to fly?" Yeah. Exactly. So she said, "If that's something you want to do, then you need to go for it, you know, do it." So with her encouragement, right, and her thumbs up, or seal of approval--when it came to selecting branches, we had--they also said, "Well, what additional training do you want?" And at time, aviation was a branch. It was an additional skill identifier, right, just like airborne. So, "Who wants to go to airborne school? Who wants to do this and who wants to go to flight school?" So when the flight school--when he asked for flight school, my hand went up, right. And everybody else was like, yeah, right (laughs). Exactly. So you would think with the Tuskegee Airmen coming out of Tuskegee you would have had more hands going up. But I think you did on the Air Force ROTC side, just not on the Army ROTC side, yeah, 'cause most people wanted to fly, kind of wanted Air Force ROTC. Right. So, right, the instructor, Major Marshal Ed (ph.) said, "Hey, Ms. Knighton, I need you to stay afterwards." And so I stayed afterwards, and he says, "Don't waste my time." (laughs) Right. "If this is something that you really want to do, you know, I'll help you and we'll pursue it. But, you know, if you're not serious about it, then don't waste my time." So I didn't waste his time.$$Okay. Now history has shown that you have not wasted his time.$$Right (laughs).$Okay, so were you in the Pentagon on 9-11 [September 11th, 2001; terrorist attack on the Twin Towers in New York City, and the U.S. Pentagon]?$$I was in the Pentagon on 9-11; yes, I was.$$Okay.$$Right.$$Tell us your story, what happened?$$I had come to work on, you know, September 11th, just like, you know, every other day. We had--but you know, Tre wasn't--yeah, Tre was still in pre-school then, so he wasn't in school actually. So, right. Every year before that, you know, every year, when--before then, we would visit my in-laws and my dad [Clarence Brown, Sr.] in New Jersey, and we always spent some time in New York. So we had just left the World Trade Center, like, the week before, right, Labor Day Weekend, right, exactly, you know, just doing our normal New York out-and-about touring. So that day was like any other day; come to work, right, at the Pentagon, right, go to your cubicle, drop your stuff; and on this particular day I had a dental appointment, right. So I left my desk, right, went to--was going to my dental appointment, right, was walking by the lab and they had the television on, and you see smoke coming from the World Trade Center. So, you know, I kind of stopped, you know, like, "Okay. Are they showing from the World Trade Center from when, you know, the bomb--." There was a bomb that had gone off there earlier, right, like, a year or so before, right. And then I see 'Live'. This is CNN live. So, it's like, no, this is happening right now. So I go on to my dental appointment, right, and I'm like, you know, the television is on back there, and I'm like, "Oh, my God, you know, what just happened?" And so at this time you didn't know what type of plane had hit the building, so you're thinking maybe it was something smaller than a commercial jetliner. Right, but the commentator is saying--is "No, it was larger than a private plane. It was actually a commercial jetliner. I heard the noise of the plane." Right. And that's what got my attention because we don't have those size planes going, you know, flying over the city. And so my thoughts were, you know, I hope it's not terrorism. And I communicated that to the lady behind the counter, and she's like, "You think it would be terrorism?" But everyone, I think, after [Timothy] McVeigh, and what happened in Oklahoma City [bombing], right, when everyone jumped to the conclusion that it was terrorism right away--nobody wanted to do that because it could have been domestic in nature. So I think everybody was very sensitive about calling stuff terrorism, right, exactly, before you could validate it. And so I said, you know, hey, this is--this is not good. And so I go and I start filling out this--and I--in the meantime, I called my husband [Bennie Williams, Jr.] saying, "Hey, go turn on the television." I called back to my office and said, "You guys need to go next door to the conference room, turn the television on, a plane just flew into the side of, you know, one of the buildings at the World Trade Center." And then I go to filling out my form. And at the same time with the ear on the television, and you hear, "Oh, my God, oh, my God. Here comes another one." Right. And that was where we witnessed on television a second plane flying into the second building. Right. And you're thinking, like, this is probably not a good time to be in a government facility or government building right now, right. But operations continued. This was a short--this was just an annual checkup. I wasn't getting any dental work done. So it's like, okay, let me get this out of the way so I can get back to my building. So I--and I was talking to the dentist, and I'm like, "You know, all right, I think, you know, that this is, you know deliberate. I think that there are more buildings that probably are going to come under attack," not knowing that the Pentagon was a target, right. "And it probably would be a good idea to evacuate government facilities right now." And he's like, "You think so?" (laughs). Yeah. I was like, "Yeah, I think so. Right. I was like, "Well, hurry up so I can get out of here." Right. So we finish up my appointment, and I'm headed back out, and there's a nurse running down the hall, it's like, "Oh, my God. Oh, my God. You guys didn't hear." And I said, "Hear what?" Because the dental clinic is kind of underground, right, in the Pentagon, so you wouldn't hear what happens on the other side of the building. And she says, "We're evacuating the building." I'm like, okay. Good idea. I was like, well, let me go back to my office 'cause my cell phone is there, my purse is there. All I had was my Pentagon badge, right, you know, no head gear or nothing, right, 'cause I was in the--I'm in the building. All right. So I get ready to go back out and the Security Guard is saying, "Nope. Everybody go this way." Right. "Go this way." And, you know, at this time, I'm still thinking we're evacuating because of a precaution. And then there was this lady runs by me and she is like, you know, smoke, right, the clothes are dirty and the whole works, and she's hyperventilating, and I'm like, you know, "What just happened?" And she says, a bomb went off on the other side of the building." Right. Right. So that was my first indication that the Pentagon had actually been hit as we were exiting the building, right.

Mollie Belt

Newspaper CEO and publisher Mollie Finch-Belt was born on August 7, 1943 in Dallas, Texas. Finch-Belt’s mother, Mildred, was a mathematics instructor; her father, Fred J. Finch, Jr., founded the Dallas Examiner in 1986. But after publishing only one issue, Belt’s mother and father were murdered in their home. In 1961, Finch-Belt graduated from Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas. After briefly attending Spelman College, she enrolled at the University of Denver where she graduated with her B.A. degree in sociology and psychology in 1965.

Upon graduation, Finch-Belt began working as an employment counselor for the Texas Employment Commission. She then held positions in the Harris County Manpower Program and for City of Dallas where she administered the Title IV program. Between 1977 and 1997, Finch-Belt was a branch chief in the Civil Rights Compliance Department for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In 1997, Finch-Belt and her husband, attorney James C. Belt, Jr., invested their personal resources to revitalize the Dallas Examiner. In 1998, with a grant from AT&T, she started Future Speak, a publication aimed at developing young minority journalists. Finch-Belt has also used the Dallas Examiner to increase HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention by publishing numerous articles and supplements, including “PROBE,”  “Battling AIDS in Our Communi ty” (2003) and “Innocence Lost” (2004). Finch-Belt also hosted public programs such as an HIV/AIDS town hall meeting at the Inspiring Body of Christ Church in Dallas, Texas. She also co-hosted the Youth Angle luncheon on World AIDS Day with Paul Quinn College. Since assuming editorial responsibilities of the Dallas Examiner, Finch-Belt has continued her father’s dream of providing the Dallas African American community with its own news service.

Finch-Belt is a member of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. She has led the the Dallas Examiner to win numerous national, state and local awards, including the prestigious Katie Awards. The Dallas Examiner was named “Best Weekly Newspaper” in 2002 by the Texas Publisher’s Association awarded; and, in 2004, it received twelve awards from the regional chapter of National Association of Black Journalists, including “Best Newspaper” and “Best Practices.”

Finch-Belt lives in Dallas with her husband, attorney James C. Belt, Jr. They have two children, James C. Belt, III, advertising manager at the Dallas Examiner, and Melanie Belt, M.D.

Mollie Finch-Belt was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 29, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.023

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/29/2013

Last Name

Belt

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Finch

Schools

George Carver Elementary

Lincoln High School

Spelman College

University of Denver

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Mollie

Birth City, State, Country

Dallas

HM ID

BEL06

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Padre Island, Texas

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

8/7/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Newspaper publishing chief executive Mollie Belt (1943 - ) , daughter of Dallas Examiner founder Fred J. Finch, Jr., has been CEO and publisher of the Dallas Examiner since 1997.

Employment

Texas Employment Commission

Harris County Manpower Program

City of Dallas

United States Department of Health and Human Services

Dallas Examiner

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:9492,147:22830,287:31062,420:34572,462:35188,515:79008,1180:85318,1338:129168,1816:134064,1922:147420,2030:156827,2230:160185,2300:165076,2573:179154,2729:204910,3017:213385,3193:213685,3275:237428,3517:246050,3594:246589,3602:248437,3649:248745,3657:253558,3720:254244,3728:278430,4094$0,0:5025,94:5718,104:10312,172:27168,531:27424,536:45702,832:47014,866:47342,871:48654,895:50048,928:50868,942:51196,947:51524,952:56386,1045:64028,1116:64538,1123:71372,1249:79534,1355:88840,1530:89800,1550:92920,1602:93320,1608:98040,1755:111698,1989:140249,2342:141118,2391:143567,2604:144278,2612:144752,2661:176720,2949:186320,3092:189920,3183:194940,3196
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Mollie Belt's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt describes her mother's family background, pt.1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt talks about her mother's experiences growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt describes her father's work for the Department of Defense and his joining the Air Force

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Mollie Belt describes her childhood experiences in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Mollie Belt describes her experience in Cambridge, Massachusetts while her father attended Harvard Law School

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Mollie Belt describes her similarities to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt talks about attending school in Tuskegee, Cambridge, Massachusetts and Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes going to the library with her mother and meeting Eleanor Roosevelt in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt describes her mother's teaching school and her attending schools in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt talks about the integration of schools in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt talks about her experience at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Mollie Belt describes her reasons for attending Spelman College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Mollie Belt describes her reasons for not wanting to return to Spelman College after her freshman year

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt describes the atmosphere at Spelman College in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt describes her experience at the University of Denver

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt describes her post graduation search for employment in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes her experience in Harlingen, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt describes her experience living and working in Houston for the Manpower Program and her move to Dallas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt describes the changes in Dallas from the 1960s to the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt describes working in Dallas for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Mollie Belt describes how her father started The Dallas Examiner

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt talks about her father's role in starting The Dallas Examiner

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt talks about the murder of her parents during a home burglary

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt describes taking over ownership of The Dallas Examiner after her parents' death, pt.1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes taking over ownership of The Dallas Examiner after her parents' death, pt.2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt describes the demographics of Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt describes the changes she made to The Dallas Examiner after her father died

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt talks about Future Speak program for area youth, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt talks about Future Speak, pt.2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt describes the key issues covered by The Dallas Examiner Newspaper

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt talks about The Dallas Examiner's coverage of HIV/AIDS, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt talks about The Dallas Examiner's coverage of HIV/AIDS, pt.2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt describes The Dallas Examiner's coverage of the arts, and its editorial section

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt reflects upon her legacy and the legacy of The Dallas Examiner

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt talks about what she might have done differently

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Mollie Belt describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Mollie Belt talks about the future of The Dallas Examiner

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Mollie Belt talks about the relevance of print media

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Mollie Belt talks about her children

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Mollie Belt describes the state of Texas politics, pt.1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Mollie Belt describes the state of Texas politics, pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Mollie Belt talks about The Dallas Examiner's freelance employees

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Mollie Belt talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Mollie Belt describes her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$4

DATitle
Mollie Belt describes taking over ownership of The Dallas Examiner after her parents' death, pt.1
Mollie Belt talks about The Dallas Examiner's coverage of HIV/AIDS, pt.2
Transcript
So you're working at this time and you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--I'm working at the federal government.$$So you could have, you know, kept working and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--I did for a while; I did continue working for a while and I'd come over here to the office at night and we'd--well, no. When that happened, you remember, I took a year's leave of absence, so I was over at the paper every day; that was kinda like my therapy. My whole thing was my father's vision, he'd worked so hard to start this paper that I just had to see it continue, and so it was at it's very infant stages. In order to join like NNPA [National Newspapers Publishers Association] or API [Amalgamated Publishers Incorporated], you had to join--you had to print 52 issues, so I had to make sure that 50--that--and it's hard printing 52 issues. I know advertising. And it was hard then and it's hard today to get advertising in black newspapers. So I stayed there at the office, I wasn't a publi--I wasn't a publisher that was going out; I didn't even put my name on the pa--on the (unclear) of the paper. I owned the paper but I didn't--Charles was the editor. And so I sat there and we worked, made sure we joined API, NNPA and, you know, I would help assign stories and things. We had freelance writers and, you know, stuff like that, but I did not go out to events and things; I just kinda stayed locked up in that building like--go there to--so after--I guess I took a leave maybe a year, a year and a half, may have been two years and--that I went back to work, and it was just--my son was here, you know, going to college, and he was like distributing the paper part time; you know, distribution's a part-time job, and he would run over there to my office downtown and, you know, I'd have--to get me to sign stuff and do stuff. And I loved the work that I was doing; I'm very interested in health care but I just could not continue to do the paper and that job. And because I supervised people, it's very difficult when you supervise people for the federal government; you can't fire 'em (laughter). You know, you can't fire them, so you know, you have to develop them. And, and, and I guess they thought I was a good manager because they always gave me some really hard employee to deal with, so that meant you gotta work--do the employment development plans and all that kinda stuff, you know? They don't have satisfactory evaluation; it just was a--so that stress plus, you know--my supervisor would say things to me like, 'Well Mollie, do you realize that you want off just about every Friday?' 'So-what? I'm the highest performer in the office; so-what if I take off every Friday, I have the leave.' At that time, when I was taking off every Friday, my kids were in college and so my, my, my husband and I--he--I had a good friend and a little boy got him put out of his home; he was a high school student at Desota (ph.) High School, so she called me and asked me did I know of some family that could take him in and he could live with 'cause he was living with the coach and his coach's wife was pregnant and he was sleeping on the sofa in the living room and that just wasn't good. And I told my husband, I said, 'Do you know somebody?' And he said, 'Well how come he can't come stay with us?' Well, I guess he could, you know. We had plenty of room, so we took him in and he ran track, so we'd go to track meets every Friday, you know. But I just got tired of that, you know, that, that structure of having to ask somebody can I be off on Friday. And I just decided that, you know, the best thing for me to do is just to work at the paper full-time, so I took an early retirement and started working at the paper. My husband and I had contributed just--I don't even wanna add up the money that we put into the paper from the time my father died because the paper, it just--it was not sustaining itself.$$Now was your husband a partner with your father before?$$No.$$Okay.$$Well, no--yeah, a law partner--$$Yeah.$$--in the law office, but not with the paper.$It's not just gay men disease.' He say, 'Okay,' he say, 'you can have it here.' It was on a Wednesday night. He say, 'You can have it on one condition.' I say, 'What's that?' He said, 'I wanna meet Danny Glover.' I say, 'Okay.' I say, 'I'm supposed to go out there and meet him at the airport at 6:00.' And I told him the morning I'm gone' meet him and--because with--I took--arranged to take him to all the radio--black radio stations so that he could go on and tell people to come to the Town Hall meeting, you know, and talk about AIDS. So Rickie [Reverend Ricky Rush] met me out there at the hotel and he ended up riding with me to all the venues to take Danny [Glover] so he could get out and go in and talk. And he asked me, he said, 'Well, what you gone' do about feedin' him?' He say, 'I'll have my people at the church fix dinner.' I say, 'Well that will be wonderful.' He said, 'And I'll get my people to help park the cars that night.' I said, 'That's fine.' He said, 'Well Mollie, what do you think I oughta wear?' I said, 'What you oughta wear? I don't know, whatever you wanna wear.' He's a real little man, you know. So--then I thought; he had been wearing fatigue wear with boots, to fight drugs, you know, in the community. And he wore the fatigue like a war on drugs. I say, 'It's a war on AIDS so wear your fatigue tonight,' and he say, 'Okay.' So he wore his fatigue and he stood up there in the pulpit and he told--we had about a thousand people in the church and he told them to go get tested. We had the County Health Department; all these AIDS agents had their testing stuff, we had rooms inside the church and mobiles outside. He say, 'Go get tested now,' and they went and got tested; we tested about 200 that night, and then a lotta people got tested after then. I would go in a restaurant, and I'd see people and they'd say, 'I want you to know I heard it on the radio and I went and got tested,' 'cause we had it broadcast live on the black radio stations. So then the next year we did PROBE, you know. We did--that was another health--AIDS supplement. You know, it's kinda like--and you know when I think about it, we never got money to publish the--to, to, to pay for the printing--The Dallas Examiner, we incurred those costs. Because it is so hard getting advertising. The thing that helped me with the first supplement was one company and one man I met who worked for Pfizer and he was in governmental affairs, and he got it; he called the people up in New York at Pfizer and told them to buy a full-page, full-color ad and, and, and I had that in there. But it's--we did the supplements. We've done other supplements, too--$$Okay.$$--we do.$$So when you deal with a story, you rally the community around--you do education forums and all, you know (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--Yeah, with AIDS we did; we, we had several programs with AIDS; we had one out at Paul Quinn College, with a nurse, to get--we did the same thing, had the mobile unit out there to get those students tested. We don't do that with everything; it just depends on what the issue is--$$Okay.$$--you know. I don't wanna say we're known for those events.

Eleanor Jones

Mathematician and professor of mathematics, Eleanor Jones was born on August 10, 1929 in Norfolk, Virginia. Her mother, Lillian Vaughn Green, was a domestic worker, and her father, George Herbert Green, was a letter carrier. She attended Booker T. Washington High School where her favorite subject was mathematics. Jones graduated as valedictorian of her class at the age of fifteen and received a scholarship to attend Howard University. Jones received her B.S. degree in mathematics in 1949. She studied under Elbert Cox, the first African American to receive his Ph.D. degree in mathematics. Jones remained at Howard University where she received her M.S. degree in mathematics in 1950. Then, she returned to Booker T. Washington High School as a mathematics and science teacher for two years.

Jones was hired in 1955 as an associate professor of mathematics at Hampton University. When schools in Norfolk, Virginia were closed in 1958 due to forced integration, Jones helped tutor students in a local church. That same year, she also became vice chair of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) in Virginia. By 1962, Jones left Hampton to study mathematics at Syracuse University under the tutelage of Dr. James Reid. In 1965, she was elected to the Sigma Xi science honor society and went on to graduate from Syracuse University in 1966 as the eleventh African American woman to earn her Ph.D. degree in mathematics. Her thesis, entitled, “Abelian Groups and Their Endomorphism Rings and the Quasi-Endomorphism of Torsion Free Abelian Groups,” examined advanced abstract algebraic concepts. In 1967, Jones rejoined the faculty at Hampton University. One year later, she became professor of mathematics and chair of the department at Norfolk State University.

Jones retired as professor emeritus from Norfolk University in 2003. She served on the Committee for Opportunities for Underrepresented Minorities of the American Mathematical Society, the Executive board of the Association for Women in Mathematics and the Board of Governors for the Mathematical Association of America. Jones also held the position of vice president of the National Association of Mathematicians. She raised three sons, Everett B. Jones, Edward A. Dawley and the late Herbert G. Dawley.

Eleanor Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 7, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.024

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/7/2012

Last Name

Jones

Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Green Dawley

Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Syracuse University

Douglass Park Elementary School

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Eleanor

Birth City, State, Country

Norfolk

HM ID

JON26

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

All is well that ends well.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

8/10/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Virginia Beach

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fruit, Vegetables

Short Description

Math professor and mathematician Eleanor Jones (1929 - ) was the eleventh African American woman to receive her Ph.D. degree in mathematics and served as professor of mathematics at Norfolk State University for over thirty years.

Employment

Booker T. Washington High School

Hampton University

Norfolk State University

ECPI College of Technology

Hampton Institute

Syracuse University

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:4356,70:20894,299:21362,304:21674,309:24716,352:34090,450:51692,655:65536,783:70599,842:71844,872:75247,919:77820,931:91600,1117:101716,1216:102111,1222:103533,1252:117150,1441:118050,1461:119700,1470$0,0:12376,97:14725,134:15373,143:15940,151:16750,162:17317,171:18127,186:23480,254:59966,572:60426,586:85808,886:96873,1025:97197,1030:98007,1043:98331,1048:99400,1055:101710,1092:103250,1118:116130,1278:125832,1475:128652,1528:148546,1728:149701,1754:160856,1896:170775,2019:172725,2051:173025,2056:175125,2096:177300,2136:192256,2282:207525,2495:208045,2510:208305,2552:217252,2605:217608,2610:218231,2621:226202,2674:226530,2679:227432,2693:228334,2707:229728,2731:230630,2743:231532,2755:232270,2766:235714,2811:236780,2826:240374,2847:240902,2861:241628,2873:242486,2888:249004,3011:255884,3105:256898,3121:273280,3242:273940,3258:274468,3267:275260,3280:288537,3435:289880,3458:297935,3577:307265,3668:307565,3673:330725,3957:331250,3965:332225,3975:333575,3992:338838,4039:339786,4056:344684,4147:370560,4338:383886,4468:401724,4715:412089,4768:421291,4909:533823,5916:544014,5988:560970,6137
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Eleanor Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Eleanor Jones lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Eleanor Jones describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Eleanor Jones describes her mother's background - part one

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Eleanor Jones describes her mother's background - part two

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Eleanor Jones describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Eleanor Jones talks about her father's service in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Eleanor Jones talks about her grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Eleanor Jones describes her father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Eleanor Jones describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Eleanor Jones describes Norfolk, Virginia as she grew up

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Eleanor Jones talks about her parents' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Eleanor Jones describes her family

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Eleanor Jones describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Eleanor Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Eleanor Jones talks about her interests as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Eleanor Jones talks about Douglas Park Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Eleanor Jones describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Eleanor Jones talks about her experience at Booker T. Washington High School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Eleanor Jones describes her social activities at Booker T. Washington High School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Eleanor Jones talks about her decision to attend Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Eleanor Jones talks about pledging Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Eleanor Jones talks about the mystery surrounding her maternal grandfather

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Eleanor Jones describes the faculty at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Eleanor Jones talks about prominent people who spoke at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Eleanor Jones talks about Dr. Mordecai Johnson

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Eleanor Jones talks about her fellowship and her work with the census bureau

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Eleanor Jones talks about William S. Claytor and Jeremiah Certaine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Eleanor Jones talks about her marriage to Edward Dawley, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Eleanor Jones talks about the Norfolk 17

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Eleanor Jones talks about Rosa Parks

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Eleanor Jones discusses her involvement with the Congress of Civil Rights (CORE)

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Eleanor Jones describes her divorce from Edward Dawley

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Eleanor Jones describes her experience at Syracuse University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Eleanor Jones describes her doctoral research

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Eleanor Jones talks about sports and her experience at Syracuse University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Eleanor Jones discusses her experience teaching math

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Eleanor Jones describes her publication in American Mathematical Monthly

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Eleanor Jones talks about the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM)

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Eleanor Jones describes her efforts to attract female students to math and science

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Eleanor Jones talks about her retirement

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Eleanor Jones talks about her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Eleanor Jones shares her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Eleanor Jones reflects upon her career

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Eleanor Jones talks about her divorce from Everett Jones

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Eleanor Jones talks about her children

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Eleanor Jones talks about her hobbies

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Eleanor Jones talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Eleanor Jones describes her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
Eleanor Jones describes her doctoral research
Eleanor Jones describes her efforts to attract female students to math and science
Transcript
All right. Now I was trying to get you to explain the nature of your dissertation. Now you--$$Well, okay. Well I was going to say that--well it starts off in the first one saying all the groups considered (unclear) abelian. Now what do we mean by abelian? That's one, that's a concept that you know some operations in arithmetic are abelian. For example, if you multiply, if--well abstractive, you say if AB is equal to BA, in other words what operations? If you multiply 2 x 3, you get the same thing if you multiply 3 x 2, that's in abelian operation. Addition is one. But on the other hand, subtraction is not in abelian operation because for example, if you take, if you have $3.00 and spend $2.00, you're left with $1.00. But on the other hand, if you have $2.00, and spend $3.00, you're in the hole. So that's not in abelian operation. But it so happens that the groups that I always deal with in the operations, that is involved, they are abelian which you can go both ways and get the same result when you do that.$$Okay. So that's what your dissertation was about?$$Um-hmm, dealing with abelian groups and elements and that.$$Okay. All right, so when you finished your Ph.D., now were you the first black woman to get a Ph.D. in mathematics in Syracuse?$$Yes, so they say.$$Okay.$$Um-hmm.$$All right. So I guess we have to believe it.$$That's why they, yeah they put a picture in the paper saying I paved the way for those who have come after me.$So you became the state, you were the state representative for it and it says here in '76 [1976] also you were the co-director of the National Science Foundation Women in Science Career Workshop Grant.$$Um-hmm.$$Now what was that about?$$All right. Now schools, now sometimes schools are interested in building up departments and getting students. Now I found a very useful way was to bring students from high school on your campus and show them some of the things. And I tried to get some of the students to want to come there. But now to have those--what I did, the first person, woman to get a Ph.D. in mathematics was by the name of Sonia Kovalevsky [Kovalevskaya], where--she was in Russia. But right now, so we could--so the people who would grant the money for you to have a Sonia Kovalevsky day would--dealt with other institutions. So now that was one reason too we find that you get to meet them and if you were on committees with them and they respect you and you apply for money, they give you money. Well that helps you at your school when you have finance, you bring 300 people on from the buses, from the--on the campus and you're able to feed them and have the bus pick them up but you have gotten the money--but they have given you enough what we call a grant. Now while I was at Norfolk State, I had six of them right, from--they hadn't had anyone--see, now that's something too they don't notice. People who are active in the field will do things that the others don't do. It's more to it than just teaching your classes. I would write for the grants, I would get the money. I never had anyone saying we don't have money for you. And they gave me (unclear). So we have them, they come up on the campus. And then some of them, I'm not going to say they were the brightest one necessarily, but some of the students you--they all women, would decide to come to the school and all. And then you get some of them and talk to them, some of the others who live nearby maybe in the (unclear) section of Norfolk or something like that could commute there and they think they could be quite happy there. So we start to getting students from other schools and all that can go there. They were very useful tool for recruiting. We say we want to gain their interest in mathematics, but really it's aimed at recruiting. And I think the school at which we worked, they reward you even though the student may not come in your field. But if you bring in a lot of students from a certain high school and they go, they come to the school and pay their fees, I don't think it, I think they still will credit you with being a good person.$$Okay. Now you were also, now you served on the committee for improving mathematics remediation efforts in college of the, Committee of the Mathematics Association of America. You were a member of the Mathematics Association of America as well?$$Board of Governors.$$Board of Governors.$$Uh-huh, yeah uh-huh.$$Okay.$$Yeah, Virginia--I represented the State of Virginia there.$$Okay.$$They picked them.$$So did--now did you get--when did you get involved in the Association for Women in Mathematics?$$Right after I got my Ph.D. there and during there, um-hmm.$$Okay. And is that an offshoot of the American Mathematical Society or is it--?$$Not really, no. It's not really but what it is, you belong to all of those. Now the American Mathematical Society, remember in grad school the departments sponsored all of us in the society, paid our dues for us and we invited them to join. But I think it's very important that you belong to them. You can serve your school better if you have contacts outside of your school. Now, like now if a state did not have, do graduate work in mathematics, but if you got contacts there you can use sometime and you really have a good, have a student that won't embarrass you, you can get funds for them to attend there.$$Okay. Now in '91 [1991] you wrote an article called 'A Minority Woman's Viewpoint and Winning Women into Mathematics,' published by the Mathematics Association of America, right?$$Yes.$$So what was the gist of that basically?$$Well I talk--one reason why they--now see, I was just trying to see what the focus of that article really was. Well I said on why people go into mathematics and all. But I mention the fact that too, most of the students that I got though were male and then of course I mentioned that, the fellow Charlie Yates, which I said something about earlier to you there. He was one of my favorite students when high--when I was a high school teacher there. And I do think that's one thing too, a lot of people do not encourage people to go in mathematics. I find minority people don't. Now, and I don't know about the other group if not--they encourage them or not. Which I think of course now I can see the reason why though because you figure if you would spend that much time in school you supposed to go to medical school. You're not supposed--I mean really they figure. But sometimes if mathematics is somehow better. I think being happy and enjoying what you are doing although you might not can pay as much for your car or your suit that the person did there, but you enjoy doing what you're doing and driving a lesser car to do that job can be just as rewarding in certain respects because you spend so many hours a day working. And if you're not--and if it's drudgery, you have to spend much more time to amuse yourself when you're not working and all. So that's what I think if you let people see the joy of doing mathematics, some of them will decide to make it a lifetime thing. And then too if there are some of them now that say a man like Blackwell, he will probably get income very close to what a lousy doctor's position might get. See, when people and schools have him come speak, well they give him I don't know what kind of fees that they are, what kind of fees they give people. I was at the stage, I never got to that fee stage. They give me a plaque when I go [laughter] speak to them now. But some of the people you know well they get nice fees I understand.

Charlestine Fairley

Academic administrator and social activist Charlestine Romelle Dawson Hickson Fairley was born on July 24, 1938 in Greenville, Mississippi to Ida Harris Dawson and Kemp Dawson. She was educated in Gulfport, Mississippi, where she graduated from 33rd Avenue High School in 1956. She briefly attended Tougaloo College in Tougaloo, Mississippi before transferring to Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. During a summer break she met William F. Hickson, Jr. a dental student at Meharry Medical College. After a year of courtship, Fairley dropped out of college to move to Nashville, Tennessee to marry Hickson. After the birth of the couple's three children--Nina, Franklin, and Oneal-- Fairley returned to college, completing her B.A. degree in sociology at Delaware State College in 1963. Following her graduation, Fairley worked for the Burlington County, New Jersey Welfare Department as a case worker. Fairley returned to school, earning her M.Ed. degree in counseling from South Carolina State College in 1969 and her Ph.D. degree in education from the University of South Carolina in 1990.

Fairley taught and worked as a special services counselor at Claflin College from 1968 to 1973, when she became coordinator of its Upward Bound and Special Services program. Fairley then directed Claflin's Special Programs for Disadvantaged Students until leaving in 1986 to direct the Upward Bound program at the University of South Carolina. Because Fairley shared the same disadvantaged background as her students, she was especially effective in connecting with them. Her programmatic innovations with Upward Bound's TRIO Achievers were incorporated into the program at the national level. Fairley married Richard L. Fairley in 1989, the same year that she was appointed as a consultant for the U.S. Department of Education Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education (FIPSE). Fairley then shifted her career focus to the administration of government substance abuse prevention services, joining the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 1990 as a program officer in the Office of Substance Abuse Prevention. Two years later, Fairley and her husband moved to Annapolis, Maryland, where she directed Prevention Services for the Anne Arundel County Department of Health until 1997. She coordinated the Anne Arundel County Executive's Criminal Justice Drug Intervention Program from 1998 to 1999. She worked concurrently as a trainer for Maryland's Office of Education and Training for Addiction Services. During this time, she was also an adjunct professor at Nova University and Bowie State University's College of Business, and part-time coordinator of the Annapolis campus of Sojourner-Douglass College. Fairley has served as the full-time director of the Sojourner-Douglass College, Annapolis Campus since 1993.

Fairley is a life member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, the National Council of Negro Women, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the American Association of University Women. She is also a member of The Links, Inc., Annapolis Chapter and the 21st Century Club of Annapolis. Fairley belongs to the First Presbyterian Church of Annapolis.

Charlestine Fairley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 25, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.162

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/25/2007

Last Name

Fairley

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Schools

Gaston Point Elementary School

33rd Avenue High School

Tougaloo College

Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

Delaware State University

South Carolina State University

University of South Carolina

First Name

Charlestine

Birth City, State, Country

Greenville

HM ID

FAI03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Everybody Can Be Great Because Everybody Can Serve.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

7/24/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood, Vegetables

Short Description

Academic administrator Charlestine Fairley (1938 - ) dedicated her career to improving education, substance abuse prevention, and counseling services to the disadvantaged.

Employment

Sojourner Douglass College

Bowie State University

Anne Arundel County (Md.)

Maryland. Addiction Services Administration

Nova University

United States Department of Health and Human Services

United States Department of Education

Upward Bound Program (U.S.)

Claflin College (Orangeburg, S.C.)

Burlington County Welfare Department

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charlestine Fairley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charlestine Fairley lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charlestine Fairley describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charlestine Fairley describes her mother's personality and how she takes after her

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charlestine Fairley recalls her family's slave history

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charlestine Fairley describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charlestine Fairley talks about her father's education and occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charlestine Fairley recalls being raised by her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charlestine Fairley describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Charlestine Fairley describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Charlestine Fairley remembers her paternal grandmother, Rosie Farmer Dawson

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charlestine Fairley recalls moving to Gulfport, Mississippi with her paternal grandparents

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charlestine Fairley describes her community in Gulfport, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charlestine Fairley recalls the influence of Little Rock Baptist Church in Gulfport, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charlestine Fairley talks about her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charlestine Fairley recalls attending 33rd Avenue High School in Gulfport, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charlestine Fairley describes holiday celebrations with her family

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charlestine Fairley remembers her childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charlestine Fairley recalls her early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charlestine Fairley remembers the librarian at 33rd Avenue High School

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Charlestine Fairley describes her college aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Charlestine Fairley recalls attending Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charlestine Fairley recalls segregation in Gulfport, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charlestine Fairley describes segregation in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charlestine Fairley remembers meeting her first husband, William F. Hickson, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charlestine Fairley recalls attending Delaware State College in Dover, Delaware

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charlestine Fairley remembers her position with the welfare department in Burlington County, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charlestine Fairley describes her teaching position at Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charlestine Fairley talks about the TRiO programs

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charlestine Fairley recalls her experiences at Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charlestine Fairly recalls working at Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charlestine Fairly describes her role with the Special Services for Disadvantaged Students program

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charlestine Fairly talks about the TRiO Achievers program

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charlestine Fairly recalls working at the University of South Carolina in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charlestine Fairly describes the TRiO programs at the University of South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charlestine Fairly recalls meeting her second husband, Richard Fairley

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Charlestine Fairly describes her educational consultant work at FIPSE

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Charlestine Fairly recalls her work with the substance abuse prevention program in Anne Arundel County, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charlestine Fairley describes Sojourner-Douglass College in Edgewater, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charlestine Fairley describes Sojourner-Douglass College in Edgewater, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charlestine Fairley remembers the challenges she faced at Sojourner-Douglass College

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charlestine Fairley describes her civic involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charlestine Fairley talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charlestine Fairley reflects upon her trip to Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charlestine Fairley describes her consulting firm, CRF and Associates, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charlestine Fairley reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Charlestine Fairley shares her advice for future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Charlestine Fairley describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

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DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Charlestine Fairley recalls segregation in Gulfport, Mississippi
Charlestine Fairley remembers the challenges she faced at Sojourner-Douglass College
Transcript
Growing up in a segregated society had to be a little difficult. Did you--would you speak to that?$$At the time, it didn't seem all that difficult because there were boundaries and parameters in there in order to protect us, us meaning children, that our parents had us to know what we could and could not do, and they set, although the state had these restrictions, our parents also set boundaries so as to protect us from these restrictions. We knew, for instance, if after going to the movies that we would go separately, that Negroes or colored people went upstairs. You bought your ticket, you went upstairs. White people bought their tickets, they went downstairs. Now, I will say, and that was just one, that was just one movie house where, where black people went. There was the Paramount Theatre [Gulfport, Mississippi] on another street that seemed to have all of the best movies that just didn't allow black people to, to, to buy a ticket to go in. So, it was kind of you knew that you weren't supposed to do that, first of all, you weren't supposed to do what your parents told you not to do. There were, we were aware of slights, when you went to the shops to shop, there were some shops where we could go and try on clothes, and then there were some of the most exclusive shops that you couldn't. You just stood out and you could see what they had. I'm not even sure that they sold merchandise to black people. I can remember, it was, if you were going to the movie, you made sure that you went to the bathroom, going downtown to shop, you did all of those things because you knew that there was nowhere that you could go except maybe to the train station, to the rest room in the colored side, and of course that was not--the station was not always clean, so you tried to not have to go but if you had to go, that was the place during the time, and I left home around, I guess, after high school graduation [from 33rd Avenue High School, Gulfport, Mississippi]. During that time, we were just accepting. Leading up to '56 [1956], we were just accepting things the way they were and we were not questioning our parents' instruction about how we should behave and what we should or should not do, and living in the segregated community, we didn't have that much contact with white people. I will say that it's almost like in the back of where we live that it was not a street, but almost like an alley. There were some little houses there where some white people lived, but, of course, they were poor white folk. But although they were poor, we still did not mix. We would sometimes look over the fence and we'd see them there, but it never occurred to me to walk over there or to even to try to play with those children. It was just a kind of understanding that you had and your parents and community people went out of the way to protect you, to instruct you in terms of what you could and could not do.$Now you mentioned some people did not want you to be here. Was, was this the people in the community? What people didn't want to have a higher education, institution (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Well, this is the--that's hard to imagine, isn't it? But, South River Colony [Edgewater, Maryland] is a planned community with multimillion dollar houses on one side of us and then some other very expensive places on the other side. Now, one of the property owners in South River Colony decided that it wasn't a good idea. He attempted to get his community association to join in a suit against us. They refused, so what he did, he went across the community, across Mayo Road, and he was able to solicit the London Towne Association [London Towne Property Owners Association, Edgewater, Maryland] to file suit against us, and their position was that we had not fulfilled the covenant for this property. Our position was that we had, and it's my thinking that they really did underestimate us to think that we would embark upon such a project without understanding what our rights were; but, nevertheless, it did cause trouble for us and I think that they thought perhaps we would give up. Many people in the community on both sides believe that it was racial. Now, many reporters have attempted to get me to say that it was. I refused, and I refused on the basis of these things. People, both black and white, had helped us acquire this land and to build this building. Tom Schubert is white. We are an African American institution [Sojourner-Douglass College, Edgewater, Maryland]. I did not want to say racism, because the moment you say that then you divide the community. You just divide it, that's, and you know. And then the other thing is that I'd say to them, well you know I'm from Mississippi, and I am accustomed to working in racist situations, and it never stopped me and I don't intend this to stop me and I don't intend to spend the time to address whether or not it's racism. We know that we did the right thing. We know that there's no reason for us not being here, and so we continued to work. We continued to do what we needed to do. We continued to recruit and have classes. They even, at one point, wanted to have us torn down. That was to be the remedy. And, of course, all of this was a distraction and, but we continued and we prevailed and we feel good about being here.

Gwendolyn E. Boyd

Mechanical engineer and civic leader Gwendolyn Elizabeth Boyd was born on December 27, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama to Dora McClain. Boyd’s mother passed away when Boyd was thirteen years old, and her godmother, Emzella Mapson, raised her. Boyd's teachers, at the all-black McDavid Elementary School, nurtured her love of math from a young age. Boyd was one of five black students to integrate Jefferson Davis High School in Montgomery, Alabama. In high school. she helped establish a student interracial council, was a member of the math honor society, and performed choir before graduating as valedictorian in 1973. Boyd attended the historically black Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama on a scholarship, graduating summa cum laude with her B.S. degree in mathematics and minors in music and physics in 1977. She received a fellowship to attend Yale University's School of Engineering in New Haven, Connecticut, becoming the school's first African American woman to receive an M.S. degree in mechanical engineering in 1979.

Following her graduation, Boyd worked briefly as an engineer at IBM in Kingston, New York. In 1980, she was offered a position as a submarine navigation systems analyst at the Applied Physics Laboratory at John Hopkins University. Boyd was later appointed to high-level administrative positions, first as the assistant for development programs in 1998 and then the as executive assistant to the chief of staff in 2004.

Boyd has been an active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., rising through the ranks of the sorority's leadership since joining as a student at Alabama State. In 2000, Boyd was elected for a four-year term as the national president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Boyd also serves on the board of directors of Leadership Greater Washington, the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., Bennett College and the National Partnership for Community Leadership. She is a member of The Links, Inc., the National Council of Negro Women and Ebenezer A.M.E Church in Fort Washington, Maryland where she serves on the ministerial staff. In 2007, Boyd received her M.Div. degree at Howard University and is an ordained itinerant elder in the A.M.E. Church. She has also received honorary doctorates from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and Bennett College in North Carolina. In 2010, President Barack Obama nominated Boyd to the board of trustees of the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation.

Gwendolyn E. Boyd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 25, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.161

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/25/2007

Last Name

Boyd

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Schools

McDavid Elementary School

Jefferson Davis High School

Alabama State University

Yale University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Gwendolyn

Birth City, State, Country

Montgomery

HM ID

BOY02

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

The Lord Is My Light And My Salvation. Whom Shall I Fear?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alabama

Birth Date

12/27/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Montgomery

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken, Collard Greens

Short Description

Civic leader and mechanical engineer Gwendolyn E. Boyd (1955 - ) was the first African American woman to receive her M.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Yale University. In 2000, she was elected national president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Boyd became the president of Alabama State University in 2014.

Employment

International Business Machines Corporation

Johns Hopkins University. Applied Physics Laboratory.

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:3500,16:4716,39:7452,94:12620,195:14900,239:15432,247:16724,270:17256,278:17712,285:20904,337:21436,346:21968,354:22500,366:22956,373:23716,385:30150,412:30940,425:32283,452:32678,458:33942,474:34890,487:37892,523:38208,560:38998,571:42711,636:46503,699:47135,722:49505,764:58930,836:59270,841:59695,847:61565,880:74066,1060:74885,1070:80955,1119:81550,1127:82060,1134:83675,1160:84270,1169:86565,1206:88860,1244:92198,1267:92494,1272:94640,1308:95602,1325:96638,1350:97156,1358:97452,1363:97748,1368:100042,1394:101300,1415:110880,1522:113890,1590:114730,1604:116620,1636:116900,1641:119980,1696:122780,1752:123200,1759:123690,1782:126980,1832:129570,1885:130060,1893:140600,1956:141880,1976:144912,2004:147096,2046:147486,2052:148188,2063:148500,2068:157750,2208:160504,2267:164311,2331:164635,2336:164959,2341:168442,2399:168928,2407:170548,2437:171034,2445:171439,2451:172087,2461:173140,2479:179296,2565:188882,2612:192236,2665:198372,2736:199308,2756:200010,2770:200400,2776:202896,2818:209472,2893:218493,3038:219237,3047:225840,3137:229095,3193:243916,3368:248130,3456:252736,3516:257480,3527:257720,3532:258080,3539:263475,3624:264276,3636:265344,3650:270854,3720:271340,3728:277334,3839:279278,3874:287030,3933:290267,3987:291014,3998:292093,4013:292923,4026:293421,4035:300366,4117:302070,4153:302638,4162:303419,4183:306250,4206$0,0:735,3:1163,8:1912,16:4435,23:4839,35:10394,86:11101,95:11707,102:13121,121:14939,144:15343,158:15747,163:16151,168:16858,176:22290,203:24840,261:25740,275:27165,324:27840,335:28365,344:31440,411:31890,419:32265,426:33165,441:40920,458:41886,466:42852,474:48150,506:48890,514:49482,523:51036,551:51332,556:52220,571:52960,583:59028,667:63960,709:64260,715:64710,722:68668,758:71048,796:71388,802:72884,830:75520,847:79390,904:80380,914:81460,931:81910,938:84700,982:85420,992:86500,1006:88840,1047:89920,1063:90730,1073:96760,1178:97390,1187:104440,1192:108700,1282:113812,1323:115990,1351:116386,1356:117475,1370:120883,1396:124231,1440:128842,1487:129222,1493:130590,1523:131426,1549:131806,1555:141914,1783:148830,1928:156060,1942:156558,1949:161123,2033:161538,2039:167431,2170:167763,2175:168261,2183:168842,2192:170834,2221:174584,2227:175102,2235:175620,2244:176138,2252:176656,2260:178432,2289:178802,2295:179394,2310:183464,2417:184278,2431:188065,2445:188585,2456:191965,2524:192355,2532:192615,2537:204470,2683:206390,2713:206950,2721:208310,2741:208630,2746:209030,2752:209350,2757:211050,2763
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gwendolyn Boyd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gwendolyn Boyd lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her upbringing and the role of God in her life

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gwendolyn Boyd remembers her mother's death and her last words to her

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about not knowing her father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her elementary school experience

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about growing up in the Tulane Courts projects of Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her childhood friends and her interest in math

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gwendolyn Boyd describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about overcoming her hardships and being independent from an early age

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience in junior high school during integration

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her role on an integrated council with black and white students at Jefferson Davis High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about protesting the song "Dixie"

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the social and political activities during the 1950s and 1960s and their influence

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her decision to attend Alabama State University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her transition to Alabama State University and her community activities

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her interest in math, and about being recruited to pursue her graduate studies in engineering at Yale University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about being accepted into Yale University's School of Engineering

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about transitioning from Alabama to Connecticut, finding Varick AME Church, and funding her education

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience at Yale University's School of Engineering

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience working at IBM, and her decision to leave IBM and join Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience at Johns Hopkins University and her experience in submarine school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about becoming the president of the Washington, D.C. chapter and the millennial president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her leadership initiatives in South Africa as the president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her leadership initiatives as the president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the Project SEE initiative

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the mission of the Delta Homeownership Initiative for Financial Fortitude program

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the Leadership Delta program

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her faith and her admiration of HistoryMaker Bishop Vashti McKenzie, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her faith and her admiration of HistoryMaker Bishop Vashti McKenzie, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her board appointments with Leadership Washington, the Children's National Medical Center, and United Way

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the National Partnership for Community Leadership, The Links, Inc., and her other professional affiliations

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her faith in God

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Gwendolyn Boyd shares her message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gwendolyn Boyd describes her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

9$4

DATitle
Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her interest in math, and about being recruited to pursue her graduate studies in engineering at Yale University
Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience working at IBM, and her decision to leave IBM and join Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory
Transcript
So did you know what you were going to become or what you would do?$$I didn't know what I was going to become but whatever it was, I knew it had to involve math.$$Okay.$$I just knew it had to be something that involved math, that involved problem solving, that involved putting things together. Again, it goes back to my love of sewing, which is putting pieces of a puzzle together to make a garment, my love of music, which involved, you know, notes, which have, you know, mathematical connotations to them. So everything that I did, not knowing it then, but everything that God ordained for me had mathematical background in it. So I knew whatever career I wanted, it had to involve math. Alabama State [University] was traditionally and still is, traditionally known as a teachers' college. It was founded as a teachers' college. So just about everybody who came through there became a teacher. That's what, that's what you went there for. But somewhere in my spirit, the Lord said, no, I don't think you're gonna be a teacher, didn't know what, but I knew something that had to do with math. So as I matriculated I started taking Physics, and really loved Physics, which, you know, combined my love of math and problem solving to real-life situations. We did not have Physics, as a major. We had it as a minor at Alabama State. So I took all the courses that were available to me for, as a Physics minor. I was also a Music minor. Again, my love of music, but knowing in my mind or telling myself in my mind I did not have the talent that would take me to the Metropolitan Opera, and I wanted to eat every day. So I wanted to stick with something that would put food on the table. So I was a music minor. I had to do two recitals and all the other things that, you know, were a part of that discipline. But somewhere towards my junior, the latter part of my junior year, I started talking with my advisor and he said to me, "You need to start thinking about going to grad school". And I said, "To do what?", you know, and he said, well, just start looking at some things and start reading, you know, look at some ways you can use your talent and your skill. And I just started reading about engineering, never met an engineer in my life. No engineers were on our campus, so I had no point of reference as to what, you know, to talk with someone. But in reading about what engineers did, I said, this is what I want to do. I wanna be able to solve problems, using my math and using my physics and solve world-life problems. This is what I wanna do. And so as my senior year approached, I took the GRE and did well on that and then I started applying to graduate school. And my advisor said, you know, just apply to a broad number of schools and the --I said, well, I don't have any engineering as an undergraduate. What will happen if I apply, you know, for graduate school for engineering without an engineering undergraduate major? And he said, well, let's just try it and see, and so I did. And so I applied for grad school and had actually been accepted at the University of Illinois and had talked to the dean there and was, you know, ready, had my apartment all set, getting ready to graduate, and graduated top of my class at Alabama State. So, and then I got this phone call from Yale [University]. I have to be perfectly honest. I thought it was one of my friends playing a joke on me (laughter). They said, this is, you know, Dr. Aptful (ph.) from Yale University. And I said, yeah, right. Okay, and we understand that you're interested in pursuing graduate work in engineering. I said, yes. Well, we'd like to offer you a fellowship to come to Yale. And I said, okay, who is this? (Laughter). He says, no, this is actually, you know, I'm the associate professor, you know, here in the School of Engineering, and we'd like to talk to you about applying to Yale because, of course, I had not applied, applying and coming here as--and being a part of our graduate program. So without an application or anything, he said, if you're willing to come, yeah, if you have them send us your transcript, and we'll work through the details. And I was accepted into Yale's graduate school for engineering.$So what happens next?$$Well, I now have to get a job (laughter). And needless to say, having a degree from Yale opened a number of doors, doors that I didn't even know existed before, and companies were calling me and saying, we wanna, you know, we want you to California to work for such and such, and, you know, and I was flying all over the place. This was wonderful. I said, this is nice, you know, but you have to make a decision to go somewhere. And I started working with IBM in Kingston, New York, another shocking transition (laughter). Now, I've learned how to live in New Haven [Connecticut], which is, you know, Metropolitan kind of a city. Kingston, New York is in the Catskills. It's where, you know, people kind of go for meditative--there is nothing in Kingston except IBM. And I think even now they've closed the plant there. So, again, I'm in an environment where I am the only African American, female, and, you have a sense of, this is why they've hired me. But there was absolutely no fulfillment in the assignment that I was given. IBM is a wonderful company, and I don't want to disparage it in any way, but I, the assignment that I was given was not one that was very enlightening, encouraging, whatever word you wanna use for it.$$What was the assignment?$$Actually, nothing. I was to read through some manuals and comment on some pieces, but I wanted to do engineering, didn't really want to read manuals and give comments and so I became impatient and said, I don't think I'm going to be able to stay here. And so some of those people who I had flown on the planes with and, you know, done interviews with, before I decided to come with IBM, I called them back, and said, "Remember me?" (Laughter) And that's when my godmother's advice of "Don't burn your bridges and be careful how you treat people and how you talk to people". They said, oh, yes, yes, we remember you very well. And so, I said, I'm interested in coming back or, you know, at least talking with you again about an opportunity. And one of those opportunities was at Johns Hopkins at the Applied Physics Laboratory. And the gentleman who had interviewed you said, oh, we would just love to have you here. We can't offer you IBM money because that was another mistake that I made and which I tell young people all the time. I know that this, in this environment, in this society we live in, everybody goes for the money. But going for the money in that case was a mistake for me. I should have gone with the kind of assignment, the kind of work that I really wanted to do. So he said, we can't offer you IBM money, but we can offer you a great job and a great assignment. And so, in 1980, I came to Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and I've been there ever since.

Monica Cost

Real estate broker Monica Diane Cost was born on January 18, 1971 in Atmore, Alabama to Veronica Mason Hairston and Chalmers Hairston, III. Growing up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Cost attended Samson Freedman Pre-School, Anna Blankston (A.B.) Day School, Abington Friends School and Baldie Middle School. Studying and working at Seafood America, Cost graduated fifth in her class from Lankenau College Preparatory School in 1988. At Hampton University, where she attended college for three years, Cost studied accounting and held internships at Mellon Bank and Prudential Insurance. Cost graduated in 1994, from Temple University with her B.S. degree in accounting and finance.

Hired by Prudential Insurance first as a healthcare benefits analyst then as an auditor, Cost traveled the country studying and correcting Prudential’s systems and controls. In 1996, Cost moved to Boston, Massachusetts, and joined TJX Companies as an auditor. Cost, while serving as TJX’s associate human relations officer, started diversity groups for women and people of color in 1998. In 1999, Cost was appointed finance analyst and in 2000, accounting supervisor. Accepting a job with Reebok in 2000, Cost was mentored by Jimmy Jones in human relations, and served as financial analyst, senior financial analyst and compensation analyst; she also participated in The Partnership, a leadership program to support aspiring people of color in the corporate world. In 2004, Cost joined Cushman and Wakefield and became the first African American and one of the youngest individuals to hold the operations manager position within that organization. Cost also became the first African American broker in the New England area for Cushman & Wakefield and the first African American female broker in a major real estate firm in Massachusetts.

Cost served on the boards of The Partnership and the Crittendon Women’s Union; she also was a participant on the advisory board of the Epiphany School and the planning committee for the Paul and Phyllis Fireman One Family Campaign, mentoring one of their scholars. Cost served as president of The Partnership Alumni organization and chaired the Girl Scouts’ Leading Women Awards. In 2006, Cost was a Leading Woman herself; in 2000 she was a YMCA Black Achiever; and in 2004 the Chamber of Commerce Future Leader. "The Boston Herald" named Cost one of The Hub’s Future Leaders. Cost counsels young professionals on how to succeed in business through her consulting firm, Evidently Assured (www.evidentlyassured.com). She has also been featured as a motivational speaker at Northeastern University, Boston University and the University of Suffolk.

Cost is the author of the blog "Out of Living in the Land of Make Believe."

A longtime resident of the Boston area, Cost is married to Donald M. Cost with two sons, Christopher and Cameron.

Monica Diane Cost was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 10, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.130

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/10/2007

Last Name

Cost

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Temple University

Hampton University

Lankenau High School

Abington Friends School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Monica

Birth City, State, Country

Atmore

HM ID

COS01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Adults, college students, young professionals, minorities, women

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium Specifics: $500-$2,000
Preferred Audience: Adults, college students, young professionals, minorities, women

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Aruba

Favorite Quote

Failure is Not an Indication of Your Ability but Just a Need to Adjust Your Strategy.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

1/18/1971

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon, Mashed Potatoes

Short Description

Real estate broker Monica Cost (1971 - ) was the first African American female real estate broker for a major real estate firm in Massachusetts.

Employment

Cushman & Wakefield of Massachusetts

Reebok International Ltd.

TJX Companies

Favorite Color

Burgundy

Timing Pairs
0,0:111810,1912$0,0:166240,2522
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Monica Cost's interview, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Monica Cost's interview, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Monica Cost lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Monica Cost describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Monica Cost describes her mother's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Monica Cost describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Monica Cost recounts her father's disappearance

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Monica Cost describes her parents and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Monica Cost describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Monica Cost describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's Mount Airy neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Monica Cost describes the roles of music and church in her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Monica Cost describes her personality as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Monica Cost recalls the schools she attended in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Monica Cost describes her extracurricular activities at Lankenau High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Monica Cost recalls her early aspirations of becoming a businesswoman

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Monica Cost recounts how she became a real estate broker

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Monica Cost recalls influential teachers and mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Monica Cost describes Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia and Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Monica Cost recalls her African American studies professor at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Monica Cost recounts her time at the Prudential Insurance Company

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Monica Cost recalls moving to Boston, Massachusetts in 1995 and race relations there

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Monica Cost describes working at TJX Companies in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Monica Cost describes working in finance and human resources for Reebok

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Monica Cost talks about HistoryMaker Benaree P. Wiley, The Partnership, Inc. and joining Cushman & Wakefield

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Monica Cost recounts how she became the first black female real estate broker at a major firm

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Monica Cost describes how she negotiated the predominantly white male field of real estate brokering

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Monica Cost describes her work as a real estate broker

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Monica Cost describes her biggest agency deal and how she connects with clients

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Monica Cost talks about her image consulting company, Evidently Assured

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Monica Cost talks about her desire to write a book and to help individuals and firms network with one another

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Monica Cost provides her advice for aspiring brokers

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Monica Cost describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Monica Cost recalls obstacles she has overcome in her life

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Monica Cost reflects upon her life and what she would do differently

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Monica Cost reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Monica Cost describes her family

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Monica Cost describes her late friend Daynese Jimerson-Forsey

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Monica Cost describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Monica Cost narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Monica Cost narrates her photographs, pt.2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

3$6

DATitle
Monica Cost recalls her early aspirations of becoming a businesswoman
Monica Cost describes her work as a real estate broker
Transcript
Now when you were--when you were in high school [Lankenau High School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], did you think about business at all as a--as a occupation or did you read books about business or any of those, those, like Og Mandino's books or any of the, the self-improvement kinda, you know, the, those kinds of things--(simultaneous)--$$I didn't read them and I don't think I knew to read them, but I knew that I wanted to be a deal maker, if that makes sense. When my sister [Tiffany Hairston Lindsey] and I--I think maybe when I was twelve, you know how they used to have the carbon copies at the bank? You fill out your deposit form, you keep one and give one to the teller. We would take a stack of those, you know, home, and we'd use our [Coleco] Quiz Wiz as our computer and we'd use those as our paperwork, and our closet in our bedroom was the elevator, and we were business women. And we--you know, we'd type up on the Quiz Wiz and make it beep and do all this stuff, and we'd fill out the paperwork and we'd hand it to each other and say, can you take this to accounting? Can you take this here? Can you take this there? It was--it was the funniest thing. And I always had a--I always had a vision of wearing a suit. I don't know what I was doing. And then there was also on the way to my grand aunt's house, there was a public accounting firm on the East River Parkway [East River Drive, now Kelly Drive, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], and I don't remember the name of it, but it's a very neat, stuccoed building, and it said something, something, CPA, something else. And every time I rode by that building, because once I saw women and men coming out of that building in suits, and I said, that's what I wanna do. So I thought I wanted to be an accountant because it felt like it was--felt like the business and the paperwork that I--and the suit-wearing that I dreamed of, of having.$Walk us through how, how a deal is made and is (laughter)--okay.$$The amazing thing is that I didn't believe when I heard, a deal can come from anywhere at any time. It could fall out of the sky, meaning, you could go to Starbucks and overhear someone talking about outgrowing space, or you can sit on a board at a nonprofit and--I don't know, just every person you touch has the ability to create a deal. But basically, it could come from a lot of different ways. We represent landlords and we represent tenants, so on the landlord side, for instance, myself and two other team members represent the John Hancock Tower, which is the tallest building in Boston [Massachusetts], and for our landlords, we leased a building. So we go out and we find tenants to lease the building and we negotiate on the best terms for the landlord, helping them to make their underwriting, and to maximize their value on the building so that when they actually sell the building, they can get the most money for it; so that's on the landlord side. On the tenant side, we take every day nonprofits, financial institutions, anybody you can name. Let's say a financial institution, we--if someone came to me--if you were the head of a financial institution and you said, hey listen, I'm starting in--I'm based in Chicago [Illinois], I'm starting a new branch in Boston, we're gonna have about twenty people, I need ten offices, five cubes, dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, ten thousand square feet. You basically take them out on a tour, so--our, our value is really in our knowledge of the market, so being able to help them be strategic about their real estate decisions. What do you need? Do you need public transportation? Do you need amenities? Who do you need to be close to? Where do you wanna be? So you go through this process of understanding who they are and what makes sense for them, take 'em out on a tour. They find a couple buildings they love, you submit a request for proposal. They come back, you evaluate your best option, negotiate the best terms, sign the lease, off they go.$$Okay. But--$$To put it simply.$$Yeah. Now does this match the--your vision of deal-making when you were a kid?$$On every level. My sister [Tiffany Hairston Lindsey] and I laugh about it. From the fundraising events that I go to, to sitting on boards, to talking the market with people in private equity firms, like--it, it absolutely hits on every cylinder. I think I've arrived (laughter) for this phase of my life anyway.$$Okay.$$Yeah.

Antoinette Malveaux

Born March 19, 1958, in San Francisco, California, Antoinette Malveaux has spent most of her career helping others. The youngest of five children, Malveaux attended public schools in San Francisco. In 1981, she graduated with a B.A. in economics from the University of San Francisco. As part of the management track, she worked in the financial analysis and management division, specializing in international markets.
In 1985, Malveaux earned an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and was hired by American Express Bank as director of global marketing and strategic planning.

Malveaux left American Express in 1991 to assume the position of director of operations for the National Black M.B.A. Association. From there, she was named executive director in 1993 and was then promoted to president and CEO. Under her leadership, the National Black M.B.A. Association developed into a multinational organization and its membership tripled. She left the group in 2003 to pursue other interests, including traveling through Europe.

Malveaux is actively involved in the community, serving on the Board of Trustees of the University of San Francisco; the Better Business Bureau; and the Girl Scouts USA, Chicago chapter. She has been listed in Who's Who in American Business; received the Rainbow/PUSH Reginald Lewis Trailblazer Award and served on the Council on Graduate Minority Education.

Accession Number

A2003.198

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/21/2003

Last Name

Malveaux

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Paul Revere Elementary School

Aptos Middle School

Lowell High School

University of California, San Francisco

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Paul Revere College Preparatory K-8

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Antoinette

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

MAL02

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

3/19/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream (Rocky Road)

Short Description

Association chief executive Antoinette Malveaux (1958 - ) served as the director of global marketing for American Express, and in the capacities of director, president and CEO of the National Black MBA Association.

Employment

Bank of America

American Express Bank, LTD.

National Black MBA Association

Favorite Color

Green, Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:11861,282:16759,403:21736,498:29564,557:38502,715:49720,865:52008,885:53152,899:54032,910:54736,922:55088,927:65629,1040:67021,1107:74242,1206:75025,1218:78592,1272:79201,1282:80245,1294:87536,1349:88768,1362:89216,1367:90336,1386:93112,1399:93532,1405:94288,1415:99916,1510:100252,1515:102604,1565:103024,1571:108005,1593:108600,1601:109790,1614:110130,1619:111320,1649:111660,1654:124952,1812:126070,1830:126500,1836:129682,1883:130542,1895:131746,1911:146850,2056:149700,2082$230,0:570,5:10430,193:26138,365:26794,377:27204,383:27942,397:30566,445:33190,496:36962,561:38274,581:68340,1033:69620,1056:70340,1066:70980,1075:71940,1091:72260,1096:72740,1111:73300,1119:73620,1124:74180,1133:85184,1302:86680,1336:87156,1345:87904,1368:88516,1378:90080,1422:98007,1498:98469,1506:98854,1512:102011,1574:102781,1585:103628,1606:105476,1656:105938,1667:114468,1769:114796,1774:117748,1824:118814,1842:136316,2106:140192,2156:141256,2174:141788,2183:142700,2196:143080,2202:145610,2210:146108,2218:148100,2249:149096,2265:150756,2293:153578,2342:154242,2356:154574,2361:155155,2370:155570,2376:155902,2381:161335,2416:167880,2527:173235,2632:179350,2678:184470,2780:188390,2852:194575,2885:195903,2909:196401,2917:196982,2928:198227,2948:198559,2953:199638,2971:207274,3113:207938,3139:212480,3149:215363,3246:218525,3299:219269,3308:225795,3422:226862,3436:227444,3443:228317,3453:229384,3467:229772,3472:230839,3484:237046,3593:246480,3701
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Antoinette Malveaux's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux shares stories from her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her mother's personality and her family's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about how her parents met and their divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Antoinette Malveaux names her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in San Francisco, California

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls food from her childhood and attending the local Catholic church as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux lists schools she attended in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux explains how developing a racial consciousness affected her academic studies

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her educational mentors in elementary school and high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her family's civil rights activism and recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her experience at Lowell High School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls her mother's decision to teach at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the University of Mississippi's campus atmosphere in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux explains her decision to attend the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her mentors and the curriculum at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about working for American Express Bank after graduating from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the culture and management of American Express Bank in the late 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her relationship with George Carmany, chief administrative officer for American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the corporate citizenship projects she worked on at American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her work as executive director of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her successes as president and chief executive officer of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America
Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director
Transcript
Okay, so, so you were at Bank of America?$$I was at Bank of America. I had started--when I was at univer- when I was at City College [of San Francisco, San Francisco, California], Bank of America was one of the three jobs that I had, and I quit the other two jobs and kept Bank of America. Then, when I went back to school to the University of San Francisco [San Francisco, California] I continued to work at Bank of America. By then I had gotten a promotion. I had moved forward and now I was working in the collections department collecting on credit cards as opposed to processing the payments. So, I worked there in the evenings. Again, one of the strongest, strongest and best individuals in the, in the department and while I was at University of San Francisco my supervisor had, he and I'd had a conversation and he, he was pretty good. He was always looking out for--as opportunities came up he always made sure that he would talk to employees about putting them forward. And an opportunity had come up to be a student loan officer, and he sat down and talked with me and put me forward for that position. I said yes that's something I wanna pursue, and so I became a student loan officer which was a different kind of position then. Bank of America had created a position in this, in two branches in the city where there would be students who were trained to be loan officers and their portfolio would be student loans. They would also carry the title of student relations representatives, very much a community relations representative, and we would represent the bank at college campuses and high schools, and so I would go to high schools and talk to high school students about savings accounts and credit and banking, about student loans and how to pay for your education, how to pay for cars and what you might want for yourself in life, but primarily about savings and investments and loans and then I would also manage the student loan portfolio and, and extend loans to students. And so I was a student loan officer. And so I worked and went to school.$Your involvement with the National Black MBA Association begins to grow in the early '90s [1990s] and--$$Yeah, after the late '80s [1980s] I joined, I joined in '86 [1986], late '86 [1986]. I became the chapter president in '87 [1987] of New York. I went on the board, I think it was in '89 [1989] and, and then came to a crossroads, and I had when I came to the board I was asked because of my background in strategic planning I was asked to take the organization through a strategic planning process. And up to that point, they hadn't had--they hadn't had anybody or too many people that I was aware of who, who was involved in strategic planning, who had discipline in strategic planning or experience in strategic planning, and you typically that's one of those parts of corporate America you typically didn't find African Americans in. You might have your little ghettos, but you, you typically didn't find them there. So, I took the, created a committee and, a strategic planning committee and my committee and I took the organization through a strategic planning process, and we took them through a process from start to finish, so we extended the process into--after we finished with the strategic plan got them into business planning and action planning so that we could really make sure that the, the plan was not just a piece of paper, it was not just something that we could hold up and say okay we got a plan, but we wanted to keep driving the discipline into the organization so that we could really focus and--on what it was we wanted to do and we could understand what it was going to take to do what we wanted to do, so we weren't as much of an organization that was full of talk, but one that could move to action. And when we got to the end of that process, we did some visioning with the executive committee, worked with a gentleman by the name of Horace Smith [ph.] who was an advisor to the group and he, he worked with me to do some visioning and with the executive committee and get them to a place of decision-making around what we were going to do with this plan and how we were going to take this plan forward. And so the decision was made that the organization would change, that it would build its own management capability. At that point, we had a lot of outsourcing managed by an association management firms and had just begun to bring some things in house and so they made a decision to hire an executive director, and they asked me and another person if we would do that and the other person decided--we were supposed to go in together--the person decided that he couldn't do it. He had a family, I didn't. The organization could not meet his expectation and his needs in terms of what he needed for his family. You know, I was either young and dumb or I had the angel sitting on my shoulder and I made the decision to go forth and, and it took us, but it took us about a year and a half to get through that dialogue and that discussion and get to that decision that I would leave corporate America and come head the National Black MBA Association.$$Okay.$$But by the time that I had made that decision, George Carmany had left the bank [American Express Bank, New York, New York]. He was still with American Express; he had gone to another division of American Express in Boston [Massachusetts]. He had asked if I wanted to go, I said no. I was not interested in moving to Boston, and I wanted something different and this opportunity came, so I was at a crossroads and this was the opportunity that was put before for me at the time that, you know, things were moving. You know, they were moving at parallel paths and then they went like that and so.

Dorothy Height

Social activist Dorothy Height was born in Richmond, Virginia, on March 24, 1912. At an early age, she moved with her family to Rankin, Pennsylvania. While in high school, Height was awarded a scholarship to New York University for her oratory skills, where she studied and earned her master's degree.

Height began her career working as a caseworker with the New York City Welfare Department, but at the age of twenty-five, she began her career as a civil rights activist when she joined the National Council of Negro Women. She fought for equal rights for both African Americans and women, and in 1944 she joined the national staff of the YWCA. She remained active with the organization until 1977, and while there she developed leadership training programs and interracial and ecumenical education programs. In 1957, Height was named president of the National Council of Negro Women, a position she held until 1997. During the height of the civil rights movement of the 1960s, Height organized "Wednesdays in Mississippi," which brought together black and white women from the north and South to create a dialogue of understanding. Leaders of the United States regularly took her counsel, including First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and Height also encouraged President Dwight D. Eisenhower to desegregate schools and President Lyndon B. Johnson to appoint African American women to positions in government.

Height has served on a number of committees, including as a consultant on African affairs to the secretary of state, the President's Committee on the Employment of the Handicapped and the President's Committee on the Status of Women. Her tireless efforts for equal rights have earned her the praise and recognition of numerous organizations, as well. She has received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Freedom From Want Award and the NAACP Spingarn Medal. She has also been inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame. Height passed away on April 20, 2010.

Accession Number

A2003.245

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/13/2003

Last Name

Height

Maker Category
First Name

Dorothy

Birth City, State, Country

Richmond

HM ID

HEI01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

African American women are very special women. We seldom do what we want to do, but we always do what we have to do.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

3/24/1912

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potatoes

Death Date

4/20/2010

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive and social activist Dorothy Height (1912 - 2010 ) was the president of National Council of Negro Women for over forty years. Leaders of the United States regularly took her counsel, including First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Employment

Little Red Schoolhouse (NYC)

Negro World

New York Department of Welfare

Greater New York Federation of Churches

Harlem YWCA

National Council of Negro Women (NCNW)

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dorothy Height interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dorothy Height's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dorothy Height describes her parents' backgrounds

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dorothy Height recounts her childhood Rankin, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dorothy Height describes her childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dorothy Height reviews her childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dorothy Height details her pursuits during her school years

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dorothy Height describes her parents' affiliations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dorothy Height recalls a racial encounter from her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dorothy Height remembers her mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dorothy Height recalls an episode from her early oratorical career

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dorothy Height discusses her college choice

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dorothy Height details her extra-curricular endeavors in New York

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dorothy Height describes her affiliations while in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dorothy Height remembers an artist community in 1930s Harlem

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dorothy Height recalls her social service work as a student

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dorothy Height discusses her involvement with the National Black United Front

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dorothy Height describes her involvement in various organizations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dorothy Height recalls meeting Mary McLeod Bethune

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dorothy Height describes her early work with the Harlem YWCA

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dorothy Height discusses her advocacy efforts during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dorothy Height remembers Eleanor Roosevelt

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dorothy Height recalls a threat from the Ku Klux Klan, part 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dorothy Height recalls a threat from the Ku Klux Klan, part 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dorothy Height discusses the aims of the National Council for Negro Women

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dorothy Height illustrates the employment opportunities for African Americans post-World War II

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dorothy Height discusses the Mary McLeod Bethune Monument, Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dorothy Height reflects on the legacy of the Brown v. the Board of Education decision

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dorothy Height reviews black women's contributions to the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dorothy Height remembers U.S. presidents

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dorothy Height remembers the United Civil Rights Leadership

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dorothy Height recalls law enforcement's abuse of black women during the Civil Rights Movement, part 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dorothy Height recalls law enforcement's abuse of black women during the Civil Rights Movement, part 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dorothy Height discusses black women's participation in Civil Rights activities

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dorothy Height recalls Civil Rights efforts in Mississippi

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dorothy Height remembers the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dorothy Height considers the legacy of the National Council for Negro Women

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dorothy Height reflects on her legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

6$3

DATitle
Dorothy Height remembers an artist community in 1930s Harlem
Dorothy Height recalls meeting Mary McLeod Bethune
Transcript
Harlem [New York] was, was alive with art and creativity, and some of it was popular art and some of it was fine art. Now, who were some of the musicians in Harlem that you knew or--?$$Well, first there was Duke Ellington, Sy Oliver, Cab Calloway. For a while, I lived next door to the Mills Brothers, and there was Lena Horne, Count Basie. The interesting thing is that, at that time, many of the musicians had little work, but they would work downtown and then come to Harlem--there was a restaurant on Seventh Avenue, where sometimes the peo--they would be helping and waiting tables and singing with three (unclear). And, you know, it was, it was a remarkable kind of experience. It was also a time when Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen and John [Oliver] Killens and all of them were very much a part of life and Paul Robeson, of course. So, and I worked for Paul Robeson on what he called a Housing Coordinating Committee cause he was trying to do more about housing for the poor, as well as doing his singing. So it's, Harlem was just a marvelous place for me to grow up.$$Now, I read that one of your--that you lived close to W. C. Handy?$$I lived next door to W. C. Handy. And we would spend holidays together. His daughters, particularly, Catherine [Handy Lewis] and, and they--we were friends together. And whenever we were with Mr. Handy, he always played the 'St. Louis Blues.' I do have to say that it was his song, but other people played it better, but he certainly was the creator. And we always--I always loved to hear him tell about it.$$Okay, did he have a story about it, about the 'St. Louis Blues'?$$Well, he would just, you know, he would just say how he took the feelings of people and put them into music, and say "I hate to see the sun go down". It's almost, it's, it's almost like saying, the close of day makes me sad. And he would, he had all kinds of stories about some of his work that he did. And he loved to play the, the saxophone and stuff like that.$Also in 1937, and this is a big year because you meet Mary McLeod Bethune and Mrs. [Eleanor] Roosevelt in '37 [1937], am I right?$$Yeah, 1937 was quite a year for me because when I came back, and I was working there at the Harlem Y [YWCA, Young Women's Christian Association], I had the assignment to escort Eleanor Roosevelt into a meeting Mrs. Bethune was holding. And it turned out to be the meeting of the National Council of Negro Women [NCNW]. And as I was leaving to take Mrs. Roosevelt, I--Mrs. Bethune asked me my name, and when I told her, she said, come back. We need you. And I've been back ever since. And even then, before I could get back, she had put me on the resolutions committee. And the first resolution that I ever wrote in my life had to deal with child welfare for the National Council of Negro Women.$$Now, what was Mrs. Bethune like? Tell us something about her.$$(No audible response).$$What was Mary McLeod Bethune like?$$She was a magnificent human being, a deeply spiritual person; a person who was both no-nonsense and had a very good sense of humor. She had an understanding of issues and it was she who came up with the idea, "Leave no one behind" cause she really felt that we needed to organize our efforts and that, as a--as, as really a basic purpose, more than a slogan. In 1935, she founded--she had founded the National Council of Negro Women as an organization, a national organization. And this was two years later that I met her. But I've been very active in it ever since.