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Gen. William Ward

U.S. Army General William E. Ward was born on June 3, 1949 in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended Morgan State University and graduated with his B.A. degree in Political Science in 1971. While there, he joined the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and as a Distinguished Military Graduate (DMG) was commissioned as an Infantry Second Lieutenant in 1971. In 1979, Ward received his M.A. degree in Political Science from the Pennsylvania State University. He then went on to attend the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and the U.S. Army War College.

Ward’s military service has included overseas tours in Korea, Egypt, Somalia, Bosnia, Israel, two tours in Germany, and a wide variety of assignments in the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. His command and troop assignments include: Commander of 5th Battalion, 9th Infantry, 2nd Brigade at Fort Wainwright, Alaska; Commander of the 2nd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, New York and during Operation Restore Hope in Mogadishu, Somalia; Assistant Division Commander of the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina; Commanding General 25th Infantry Division and U.S. Army in Hawaii at the Schofield Barracks in Hawaii; Commander of the Stabilization Force during Operation Joint Forge in Sarajevo, Bosnia; and Deputy Commander U.S. European Command. His staff assignments include: Executive Officer to the Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army in Washington, D.C.; Deputy Director for Operations of the National Military Command Center in Washington, D.C.; Chief of the Office of Military Cooperation with Egypt in the American Embassy in Egypt; and Vice Director for Operations of the Joint Staff in Washington, D.C.

In 2005, Ward served as the Deputy Commanding General and Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army, Europe and the Seventh Army. While in this capacity, he was selected by the Secretary of State to serve as the United States Security Coordinator, Israel-Palestinian Authority where he served from March of 2005 through December of 2005. Ward served as the inaugural Commander of U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) Headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany from October 1, 2007 to March 8, 2011. Ward is a member of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., the 100 Black Men of America, and the National Society of Pershing Rifles. He is also an honorary member of the Sergeant Audie Murphy club and was awarded Honorary Doctorate Degrees from Morgan State University and Virginia State University.

Ward’s military honors include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal with Two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Defense Superior Service Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Legion of Merit with Three Oak Leaf Clusters), the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal (with Six Oak Leaf Clusters), the Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Army Commendation Medal (with three Oak Leaf Clusters); the Army Achievement Medal (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Expert Infantryman's Badge, the Combat Infantryman's Badge, and the Master Parachutist Badge.

Ward currently serves as the President and COO of SENTEL Corporation.

U.S. Army General William E. Ward was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 25, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.180

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/25/2013

Last Name

Ward

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Schools

Morgan State University

Pennsylvania State University

Army Command and General Staff College

U.S. Army War College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

WAR16

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Improve The Foxhole.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/3/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Peanut Butter

Short Description

General Gen. William Ward (1949 - ) Commander of the 2nd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division during Operation Restore Hope in Mogadishu, Somalia, Commander 25th Infantry Division, Commander of the Stabilization Force during Operation Joint Forge in Sarajevo, Bosnia, US Security Coordinator in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, the inaugural Commander of U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany from 2007 to 2011. He currently serves as the President of SENTEL Corp.

Employment

United States Army

Stabilization Force, Operation Joint Forge

25th Infantry Division

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gen. William Ward's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward talks about his maternal grandfather's upbringing in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward talks about his mother's upbringing in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward talks about his mother's education and her employment at the Social Security Administration

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gen. William Ward talks about his father's employment and aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gen. William Ward talks about his father's service as a combat engineer in World War II

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gen. William Ward describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Gen. William Ward describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Gen. William Ward talks about his sister, Christina Ward Young

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Gen. William Ward talks about his childhood household

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Gen. William Ward describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Gen. William Ward describes the neighborhood where he grew up in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward talks about his father building their family's home in Baltimore County, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward talks about his father building their family's home in Baltimore County, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward talks about the community's interest in sports in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward talks about the community's interest in doo wop music

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience in the first grade in Baltimore County, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience in an integrated school system in the 1950s, and his family instilling self-confidence in him

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward talks about his interests in elementary school as well as the schools he attended

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward talks about his exposure to the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward talks about his experience in elementary school in Towson, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward talks about his interests while growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward reflects about his non-military oriented childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward talks about attending junior high school in the early 1960s, and meeting his wife in college

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward talks about his interest in political science, playing football, and running track in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gen. William Ward talks about being employed in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gen. William Ward talks about his social experience in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Gen. William Ward talks about the poor career counseling that he received in high school, and his decision to attend Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward describes his decision to attend Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward describes his graduation from Towson Senior High School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward talks about his desire to become a lawyer while studying at Morgan State University, pt 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward talks about the influence of his teachers, Maxwell and Sandye Jean McIntyre, at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward talks about his desire to become a lawyer while studying at Morgan State University, pt 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward talks about the reaction in Baltimore, Maryland, to Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward talks about being employed in college, and his experience in the political science department at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience in the ROTC program at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Gen. William Ward talks about historian Benjamin Quarles and the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Gen. William Ward talks about getting married and being commissioned into active duty in the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. Army in 1971

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward talks about General Daniel "Chappie" James and General Benjamin Oliver Davis

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience on his first commission to the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. Army, where he became a platoon leader

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward discusses disciplinary challenges within the U.S. Army during the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as a platoon leader in the 82nd Airborne Division

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward discusses his assignment to the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea in 1974

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as a lieutenant in the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward talks about becoming a captain, going to graduate school, and teaching at the United States Military Academy at West Point

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward talks about his experience in the advanced infantry career course

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward talks about the Korean axe murder incident in 1976

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward describes his decision to attend graduate school at Penn State University, and to teach at the United States Military Academy

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as a graduate student at Pennsylvania State University

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as an assistant professor of social sciences at the United States Military Academy at West Point

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward describes how he became Commander of the 5th Battalion, 9th Infantry

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as Commander of the 5th Battalion, 9th Infantry in Fort Wainwright, Alaska

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Gen. William Ward talks about being selected for colonel, and becoming the brigade commander of the 2nd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division in 1992

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience with the 2nd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division during relief efforts after Hurricane Andrew in 1992

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as part of the U.N. relief mission in Somalia in 1992

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward discusses the Battle of Mogadishu and Somali Civil War, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward discusses the Battle of Mogadishu and Somali Civil War, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward talks about his experience as the Executive Officer to the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward talks about his experience as the Deputy Director for Operations in the National Military Command Center

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward describes the ceremony where he was promoted to become a brigadier general in 1996

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as Assistant Division Commander for Support at Fort Bragg, North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as Chief of the Office of Military Cooperation in Cairo, Egypt

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward talks about his assignment as the commander of the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward talks about his assignment as the Vice Director for Operations on the Joint Staff and after the 9/11 attack

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward talks about his principle of "improving the foxhole," and his experience at the Pentagon after 9/11

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as Commander of the NATO Force in Bosnia

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience as United States Security Coordinator between the Israeli and Palestinian authority

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward talks about his service as the deputy commander of EUCOM and as the inaugural commander of AFRICOM

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward talks about the formation of the United States Africa Command (AFRICOM)

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Gen. William Ward talks about the goals for the United States Africa Command (AFRICOM)

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward discusses the initial apprehension towards the U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM)

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward discusses the initial reactions to his appointment as commander of AFRICON

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward describes his experience in Africa as the commander of the U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM)

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward describes the highlights of his service as the inaugural commander of the U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM)

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward talks about his engineering leadership experience in the U.S. Army, and receiving the Black Engineer of the Year Award in 2010

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Gen. William Ward discusses his retirement from the U.S. Army

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Gen. William Ward talks about his life after retirement

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Gen. William Ward reflects upon his life and career

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Gen. William Ward talks about his family

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Gen. William Ward describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Gen. William Ward reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Gen. William Ward talks about a lesson of accountability from his service in Korea

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Gen. William Ward talks about his team philosophy

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Gen. William Ward narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$7

DAStory

4$7

DATitle
William E. Ward talks about his interests while growing up
William E. Ward describes the ceremony where he was promoted to become a brigadier general in 1996
Transcript
Okay, now, in light of the fact that you achieved the rank of Four-Star General, were you exhibiting, or did you have--where did you exhibit leadership as a young fellow, growing up? I mean, I know you played sports. But were you in the Boy Scouts or were you in church organizations or, you know--How did you display, you know--?$$Yeah, I think I was--I was a Cub Scout for two years. And then I stopped that. And I don't recall exactly why, but I did stop that. You know, in my little community where we lived, there were probably six or seven of us guys, you know. And we would always play, you know, three-on-three, or four-on-three, football, basketball. I played Little League baseball. And I think, you know, neighborhood activity where we lived--before we moved into our house once my dad [Richard Isiah Ward] finished it--You know, we would do little organized games there, organized--I call them playground sports. Did a lot of that. I think that was my biggest, I guess, set of activities--the largest set of activities I engaged in that would later on culminate into what I eventually did. The YMCA [Young Men's Christian Association], you know, that's where I learned to swim, at the YMCA. You know I'd get on a bus and go downtown in Baltimore [Maryland] by myself to the YMCA on Saturdays and engage in the programs that the YMCA offered. My mom [Phyllis cashen Ward] wanted me--dad wanted me to do that. And I think that's probably the biggest thing. I did sing in a little church choir. But so did a lot of other guys. Obviously, we all did that. So, those are probably the most substantial things. There's really nothing about my childhood, quite frankly, that would automatically point to "Hey, this guy always wants to take charge and be in charge." That wasn't the case at all. I don't think that was, you know, something that was inherent in who I was, you know--anytime I'd get involved in something, I'm going to take charge, I'm in charge. (laughter) That wasn't it. You know--$$Okay. So, you couldn't spot you as a little general.$$No, no. Now, I did like to, you know, I think I've always been pretty organized. I mean, and I've got a cousin who will talk about me playing with little, you know, toy soldiers and things of that sort. I can recall, I used to play with trucks a lot, you know, and what not. In fact, I think, you know, as a youngster, one of the things that I talked about mostly was, you know, I liked to drive trucks, you know. I just was fascinated with trucks.$And being made Brigadier General in '96 [1996]. Now this, this is a big deal. I mean it's a big deal, I think, and we shouldn't gloss over it. What kind of a ceremony is it, and did your parents [Phyllis Cashen Ward and Richard Isiah Ward] get a chance to come in?$$My dad did not. My dad was too ill to make it. My mom was there, and obviously all the rest of my family. But the ceremony was a pretty special one. It was conducted by the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, who was my boss. And done there in the Pentagon. A host of friends who I've known my entire life--family. And I think as I was delivering my comments--Once I'd been promoted, you know, I was evoking my dad. Because a lot, you know, certainly who I am and who I was on that day for sure, was reflective of who he was as a man and what I'd learned from him. And so I really was, you know, evoking all that. He was too ill at the time to be there, though. But I clearly made sure everyone knew that, you know, he clearly was a part of my life that was responsible for me having achieved what I had achieved. And basically, because of what he taught me about how to treat people. Because of--not what he said to me, but what I saw him do, and how I saw him treat people. And then clearly, you know, you acknowledge--you know, your family. And my wife [Joyce Lewis] and kids, you know, my mom's sister and aunts, uncles and cousins, and also friends. But the important--you know, the teammates that I served with over those years--the non-commissioned officers [NCOs], the soldiers, all those folks who have been a part of my experiences in my various units, and what they had done to help the teams that I've been a part of, to be successful. And by acknowledging all of that, it was a big part of it. So, yeah, it's a big deal. It's a big deal, a huge step. One that--you know, when I look back on my days at Morgan [State University, Baltimore, Maryland], even my days as a lieutenant in the 82nd [Airborne Division], you're never thinking that you would achieve that, because clearly I didn't. I know there are some who say, yeah, I just did all these things. But, just never me. I mean, things happen over time and you get selected for a school, and you do it well. And you're able to command a formation. And that happens because you have some great teammates. So, yes, giving thanks for all that. You know, and certainly you're being thankful to the Almighty for all the care that he's provided as you go through all the stages. I talked about being in these various assignments, in Korea. You know, being so cold in Korea as a young captain walking those ridges, checking on my people--I think I'm going to die, I'm so cold. You can't feel your feet, your hands, your ears. Just absolutely, just chilling, chilling cold. You know, being in Germany there before the Cold War hit, you know, there in that mechanized brigade--Knowing that if something happens and the war goes off, your first line is to move, is to march east to stop the invaders that are coming from the east. And you're there, you know, training and preparing for that. You know, in Somalia, as a brigade commander--you know, doing what I did there--knowing that anytime you go out on this mission, you send your soldiers out, you know, they may not come back. You go out, and you're just as vulnerable as they are. And so, when you look at those experiences and you say to yourself, well, why is it that you get through it? Well, you train for it. You have teammates that you count on, that you can depend on, those old stories that you've heard about so much, you know. Why do you do this? You do this for your buddy to your left and to your right. And that is the same true echelon. It doesn't matter how senior you are, or how junior you are. I can recall being in Somalia on one occasion there. And I had a, you know, my driver and my vehicle and, you know a security guard had a machine gun. And we're both under this Humvee, you know, being shot at. And he looks at me, and I look at him. And I said, "I sure hope that machine gun you got got bullets in it." He said, "Sir, this got bullets, and I hope that rifle you got has bullets." "I got bullets, too." He said, "Well, we're both in this thing together." So, that, when you get in those types of situations, it doesn't matter what rank you are, you're still a human being first and foremost. And so, you apply that to all that you do. First and foremost, you start off with human beings. So when I got that, you know, that star--And I'll always remember, I had received a gift from a good friend. And he kind of described to me the points of that star, what each of them meant. And I kind of took that--I said, that's right. This star doesn't belong to Kip Ward. This star belongs to everyone who's been responsible for what Kip Ward is. And each point belongs to one of them. And I talk about my family, my teammates, my God--those things that have contributed to me receiving the star. And then the final one was mine. When you look at it, you know, this star belongs to the combination of all these people--all these events that have gone on in your career to enable you to have achieved this particular milestone. And so, and that's the way I thought about every one of them, you know. Every one--I say these aren't mine. These belong to those who I've been fortunate enough to serve with, and have been fortunate enough and blessed enough so that, you know, the things that I have done have contributed to making the team better. And in doing the best that I could do, to cause what they have done, to make them better as well. And that's what it's about for me. And so, that first ceremony, that first promotion that I had as a brigadier general, that's--those were the things that were, you know, flooding through my mind at that point in time.$$Okay.

Col. Norman McDaniel

Retired United States Air Force Colonel Norman A. McDaniel was born on July 27, 1937 in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The son of sharecroppers Fannie Marie and Clyde Oliver McDaniel, he graduated as the valedictorian of the Armstrong High School Class of 1955. He attended North Carolina A&T State University, participated in the AFROTC program, and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U. S. Air Force (AF) upon receiving his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering in June, 1959.

After entering AF Active Duty, McDaniel completed a series of military trainings. From 1961 to 1964, he served in the 23rd Bomb Squadron at Travis AFB, California, and then, was assigned as a Sub-Systems Program Manager on the F-111 Aircraft Development Program at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. In 1966, McDaniel was assigned to Takhli Air Base (AB) in Thailand, where he flew combat missions over North Vietnam. On July, 20, 1966, McDaniel and four of his five crew members became prisoners of war (POWs) when their plane was shot down. While a POW, he was promoted to the rank of Major and was awarded the AF Silver Star for valor and leadership in the POW camps. As one of over 700 American POWs held by North Vietnam, McDaniel was released on February 12, 1973, as part of Operation Homecoming. After returning from Vietnam, he completed the Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Virginia and graduate school at the Florida Institute of Technology (earning his M.S. degree in systems management). Between 1975 and 1987, McDaniel completed tours of duty as a System Program Staff officer at AF Systems Command, Andrews AFB, Maryland. He also served as Division Chief for Congressional Activities and Acquisition Policy at Headquarters USAF, the Pentagon; commander of AFROTC at Howard University in Washington, DC; commander of the Air Force Survival Training Wing in Spokane, Washington; and as Assistant Deputy to the Deputy Undersecretary of Defense (AD,DUSD) for International Programs and Foreign Disclosure Policy, the Pentagon. During that period, McDaniel also completed the Naval War College, Senior Program at Newport, Rhode Island. After retiring from active duty in 1988, he worked in the defense industry. From 1991 to 2006, McDaniel was a Faculty Member, Department Head, and Associate Dean at the Defense Acquisition University in Ft. Belvoir, Virginia. He currently works for himself as a motivational speaker, and part-time, as a Facilitator of the Transition Assistance Program (TAP) helping men and women separating or retiring from U.S. military services to succeed in their transition from military to civilian life.

On September 18, 1998, McDaniel served as the keynote speaker at the Pentagon's celebration of National POW/MIA Recognition Day in honor of all of the former POWs, unaccounted for service members and civilians, and their families. McDaniel's military honors, include the Silver Star for Valor, three Legions of Merit, Bronze Star with "V" Valor Device, three Distinguished Flying Crosses (the POW medal), the Purple Heart and the Vietnam Service Medal with fourteen bronze stars. McDaniel is married to Jean Carol (Breeze) McDaniel. They have two children, Christopher and Crystal, and four grandchildren

Norman A. McDaniel was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 8, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.052

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/8/2012 |and| 6/18/2012

Last Name

McDaniel

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

A.

Occupation
Schools

Armstrong High School

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University

Florida Institute of Technology

Virginia Technical University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Norman

Birth City, State, Country

Fayetteville

HM ID

MCD06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida, the Beaches, Mountains in the Summer

Favorite Quote

Make the best of today because today is all you have.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

7/27/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Dessert

Short Description

Colonel (retired) Col. Norman McDaniel (1937 - ) served in the United States Air Force for twenty eight and one half years, achieving the rank of Colonel. He was one of the few African American POWs during the Vietnam War and earned (among many decorations) a Silver Star of Valor for his leadership.

Employment

Inverness Technologies Facilitation

Motivation Assistance Corps

Defense Acquisition University

United States Air Force

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Norman McDaniel's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel talks about his grandfather seeing Union soldiers pass through Fayetteville, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Norman McDaniel describes his father's work as a sharecropper

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Norman McDaniel talks about his older siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel talks about his younger siblings, pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel talks about his younger siblings, pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel describes how his parents met and talks about the rural, black school system

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel talks about the break-up of his family

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel describes his earliest childhood memory and the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel talks about his schools

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Norman McDaniel talks about the military as a viable career track for African American men

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel comments on his high school experience and attending church in North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel talks about the revival meetings he attended at his church when he was a boy

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel talks about his interest in engineering and joining the U.S. Air Force ROTC

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel talks about his family members who served in the military and the high school he attended

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel talks about the various jobs he had in high school and his parents' separation

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel talks about where he lived during his parents' separation and graduating from the U.S. Air Force ROTC

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel talks about his teachers and mentors from college, the Civil Rights Movement and going into active duty

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel talks about his training in the U.S Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel discusses the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and his wedding anniversary

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel tells the story of how he and his wife met

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel describes the U.S. Air Force's B-52 bomber planes

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel speaks about his assignments at Travis Air Force Base and Wright Patterson Air Force Base

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel talks about being assigned to Takhli Air Force Base to fly combat missions over North Vietnam

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel describes flying in combat missions on the EB-66C, a medium-sized bomber

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel gives his impressions of Thailand

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel talks about his experience in flight combat on an EB-66B aircraft with a six-person crew, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel talks about his experience in flight combat on an EB-66B aircraft with a six-person crew, pt.2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel explains the purpose of electronic reconnaissance

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel describes being captured by Vietnamese soldiers

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel talks about his survival in a North Vietnamese POW camp, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel talks about his survival in a North Vietnamese POW camp, pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Norman McDaniel's interview

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel describes the Vietnamese soldier's interrogation tactics, pt.1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel describes the Vietnamese soldier's interrogation tactics, pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel talks about how the U.S. Army prisoners at the North Vietnamese POW camp organized themselves

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel explains his position on the Vietnam War

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel discusses the ex-Vietnam POW's review of the U.S. Army Code of Conduct

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel explains how his love for his family helped him withstand torture at the North Vietnamese POW camp

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Norman McDaniel describes his incarceration at the POW camp in North Vietnam

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel describes how he was tortured at the POW camp in North Vietnam

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel comments on how his survival training prepared him for his experience as a POW in Vietnam

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel talks about what happened to his combat flight crew after their plane went down in Vietnam

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel explains the types of information his Vietnamese interrogators wanted

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel discusses the number of African American POWs in the Vietnam War

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel tells a story about black and white prisoners at the POW camp in Vietnam

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel talks about prison life at the Vietnamese POW camp after the Paris Peace Talks

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Norman McDaniel describes the prison facility in Vietnam where he was incarcerated

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel describes the food the prisoners ate at the Vietnamese POW camp. pt.1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel describes the food the prisoners ate at the Vietnamese POW camp, pt.2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel discusses the differences in the way prisoners were treated in North and South Vietnam

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel talks about U.S. soldiers' response to capture in Vietnam and a package mistakenly given to him at the POW camp

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel talks about the photos his wife received of him while he was incarcerated in the Vietnamese POW camp

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel remarks on the length of his captivity in Vietnam

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel discusses the long range effects of his capture and torture in Vietnam

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Norman McDaniel describes how his faith in God helped him survive incarceration in the Vietnamese POW camp

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel talks about the crisis of faith he experienced during his captivity in Vietnam

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel describes his release from the Vietnamese POW camp in 1973, pt.1

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel describes his release from the Vietnamese POW camp in 1973, pt.2

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel talks about his return to the United States from Vietnam

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel discusses his adjustment to civilian life

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel speaks about disciplining his children after being held captive in Vietnam

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel discusses returning to college and his career training U.S. Air Force air crew members, pt.1

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Norman McDaniel discusses returning to college and his career training U.S. Air Force air crew members, pt.2

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel discusses his work as Commander of the U.S. Air Force ROTC at Howard University

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel shares highlights from his career in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Norman McDaniel discusses his professional work and activities, following his retirement from active duty in 1988

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Norman McDaniel recites a poem he wrote during his incarceration in the Vietnamese POW camp

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Norman McDaniel reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Norman McDaniel talks about his experience with post-traumatic stress disorder, pt.1

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Norman McDaniel talks about his experience with post-traumatic stress disorder, pt.2

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Norman McDaniel talks about learning how to manage his post-traumatic stress disorder

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Norman McDaniel describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community and shares how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$2

DATape

4$9

DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Norman McDaniel talks about his training in the U.S Air Force
Norman McDaniel describes his release from the Vietnamese POW camp in 1973, pt.2
Transcript
Alright, so when you were commissioned, uh, you went right to training and you went to California first?$$No, what happened was I, when I went on active duty, I went to, I was going to navigator training. So, I went to Lackman Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas for two weeks for what they call navigator pre-flight training. And once I finished those two weeks at Lackman Air Force Base in San Antonio, I actually took my basic navigator training at James Connelly Air Force Base in Waco, Texas. So, I went up to Waco, Texas and was up there for about ten months. I completed navigator training there and this was then in the spring of 1960. Now, once you complete basic navigator training, at that time you had a choice to either go into navigator work in the transport airplanes as a navigator, or you could go to radar intercept officer training at that time with the Air Defense Command, where you'd be the back-seater of the fighter interceptors that protected the United States at that time. You know, Captain Chaney was the head of that for awhile there in the 70's. Um, or you could go into what they called bombardier upgrade training. That is, you would go to Mather Air Force Base in Sacramento, California and upgrade to the B-52's and those kinds, where you would be the bombardier. Or, the fourth choice was you could go to electronic warfare officer training at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi. Because I had a mechanical engineering background, technical background, I chose to go into electronic warfare. So, in the spring of 1960 I left James Connelly Air Force Base in Waco, Texas and moved to Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi where I stayed for almost a year, well, about nine months going through electronic warfare training. Now, once you completed electronic officer warfare training, you would be assigned to fly in the B-52's and the B-58's, I guess--the B-58's, or the B-47's. They had some B-47's at that time. And depending on where you graduated in the class, they had a certain number of assignments available, but you could get your pick depending on how high you ranked in the class. And I wanted B-52's, so I chose the B-52's. And so, in the spring of 1961, uh, I was assigned to Travis Air Force Base [Fairfield, California] in the B-52-G aircraft. But, by way of going to Travis, we went through about three months of what they call combat crew training at Castle Air Force Base in Merced, California. And after completing that combat crew training in the B-52's, then I moved on to Travis Air Force Base, where I performed as an electronics warfare officer in the B-52-G's, from the summer of 1961 until the summer of 1964. Now, in the B-52's, you had a pilot and a co-pilot up front. You had a navigator, a regular navigator, and a radar bombardier in the back downstairs. And then you had an electronic warfare officer and a gunner position we set up top behind the pilots. And so, that's how I performed. We went on training missions. We, at that time had to pull nuclear alert, because at that time we were afraid that the Soviet Union might try something. And we would spend about ten to twelve days a month--we would be sitting on nuclear alert. And that is where you're in a position, if you've got an emergency war order to launch, you had to launch and be off the ground in two or three minutes. And we had designated targets to hit. Um, we, the plan was to re-fuel while you were in flight, but we had designated targets in the Soviet Union to hit, and you would hit those targets. Now, they told us that we would have enough fuel after we hit our targets to go to a safe landing, but I'm not sure that was the case. I think they just wanted us to hit the targets, because I think we probably would have run out of fuel somewhere along the way. But, um, that was part of our responsibility. And we also flew something we call nuclear alert missions about twice a month, called chrome domes. Those were 24-hour nuclear alert missions, where you'd go up and you would stay airborne, because see, we didn't want the Soviet Union to catch us with all of our planes and weapons and bombs and ammunition on the ground. So, we would fly. And our route, we'd take off from Travis Air Force Base about 5:00 in the afternoon. We'd fly from the west coast to the east coast, fly up the east coast up over Iceland, up across Alaska, back over to the west coast, and fly back down the west coast from Washington State on down, and it was 24-hour missions. That was interesting. One other quick thing about that is that I was sitting on nuclear alert when the late President [John F.] Kennedy was assassinated in 1963.$Okay. We were released in groups of 125 in 1973, between February and April. And, uh, we were released in the order of capture. Those captured first were released first, those captured last were released last. Well, the first release was from Everett Alvarez, August, 1964, the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, to Ken North, an F-105 pilot that was shot down in September of 1966. That put my crew, these five members of my crew, about 12 or so, from the end of that group, from the last part of that group. It turned out when we found out that we were included in that first group, we also discovered that some of the fellow prisoners who had some illnesses or some long-standing things wrong with them who needed to come out with the very first group that came out, were not included in that list. They just took them strictly by the date of shoot down and capture. So, we were a little bold then. We felt we could argue with the captains a little bit. (laughter). So, we started agitating for them to add those people to the list who needed to come out first, um, since a lot of them were not included on that list. So, what the North Vietnamese did, instead of just benevolently adding those to the list, for each person they added to the list, they took one off. So, a couple of days before we were actually released, uh, they had cut my crew in half. Uh, three of us came back with the first group on February 12, 1973. The other group came back, the other two came back about ten days later with the next group. Now, one of the things that upset the pilot, our aircraft commander Bill Means, was that he said "Well, we all went down together, and we all should come back together." But that's the way we came back. Now, when we were released, we were taken from the prison camp, uh, early on the morning of release, to Gia Lam Airport which is the airport there in Hanoi [Vietnam]. And then the United States--uh, North Vietnam allowed the United States military to fly C-141 medical evacuation planes into Gia Lam Airport to pick us up, to take us back. So, we all were bussed from the prison camp to Gia Lam Airport. And then, uh, there was a little exchange table set up. You had the Vietnamese on one side, and the U.S. on the other side. And so, as the Vietnamese would identify us and call our names, and make the marks on the record, then they would hand us over to the Americans. I will never will forget the full colonel, I forget his name, but I never will forget the face. Boy, one of the faces I liked more than anything I ever saw in the world. It was just such a nice thing, to see a friendly face. So, uh, then they handed us over to the U.S., shook our hands, put us on the plane and then we flew out. There were three planeloads that came out in that first group of 125, and, uh, it wasn't until we broke ground heading out of Gia Lam back to the Philippines, that we really felt like we were out of there. Now, when we took off, everybody was quiet. And then when the plane got airborne, everybody just yelled. The nurses and the medics were all happy to see us. Now, again, uh, I participated in the euphoria and all that, and the celebration, but I didn't feel anything. I knew we were coming out, but I didn't feel a thing. So, when we got to the Philippines, what happened was we landed at the Philippines. They kept us at the Philippines, in the Philippines, at the hospital at Clark Air Base, for two, three, four days depending on what your medical situation was. They wanted to check, evaluate you, see if you didn't have any contagious diseases, see that you weren't so crazy that they couldn't bring you back to the States, and all that. And then after two or three days there, depending on the individual, they then flew us on back to the States by way of Hawaii.

Cornell Leverette Moore

Lawyer and bank executive Cornell Leverette Moore was born on September 18, 1939 in Tignall, Georgia to Jesse L. and Luetta T. Moore. Moore was raised in Statesboro, Georgia and graduated from William James High School in 1957. He received his A.B. degree from Virginia Union University in 1961 and his J.D. degree from Howard University School of Law in 1964. During law school, Moore worked as a staff attorney for the United States Department of Treasury.

After receiving his law degree, Moore worked as a trust administrator for Crocker National Bank. In 1966, Moore became a regional counsel for the Comptroller of Currency, U.S. Treasury Department. He then rejoined the commercial banking world as the assistant vice president and legal officer for the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis from 1968 to 1970. Moore continued to work in banking as the executive vice president and director of Shelter Mortgage from 1970 to 1973, a director of Shelard National Bank from 1973 to 1978 and the president of Hennepin County Bar Foundation from 1975 to 1978. He served as president and CEO of Lease More Equipment from 1977 to 1986, director of Golden Valley Bank from 1978 to 2002; and became senior vice president and general counsel of Miller & Schroeder Financial Inc. in 1986. Also in 1986, Moore became part owner of the professional baseball team, the Minnesota Twins. In 1995, he joined the law firm of Dorsey and Whitney, LLP where he has represented major energy and natural resource companies. In 2004, Moore was elected Grand Sire Archon of the Grand Boulé of the Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, the first African American Greek-lettered organization.

Moore has served on the boards of many organizations and universities including William Mitchell College of Law, Howard University, Virginia Union University, Minneapolis Public Housing Authority, Twin Cities Diversity in Practice, the Boy Scouts of America, Johnson C. Smith University and Dunwoody College of Technology. He is the recipient of many awards such as the Legacy Award from the Pan African Community Endowment, the Kappa Alpha Psi Distinguished Citizen Award, the Child of America Award and the Whitney M. Young Service Award from the Boy Scouts of America. Cornell Leverette Moore is married to Wenda Weekes Moore and has three children, Lynne, Jonathon and Meredith.

Cornell Leverette Moore was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 15, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.014

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/15/2012

Last Name

Moore

Maker Category
Middle Name

Leverette

Occupation
Schools

Virginia Union University

Howard University School of Law

William James High School

First Name

Cornell

Birth City, State, Country

Tignall

HM ID

MOO16

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Savannah, Georgia

Favorite Quote

If You Don't Ask Anybody For Anything, You Don't Owe Them Anything.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Minnesota

Birth Date

9/18/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Minneapolis/St. Paul

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Calf Liver

Short Description

Corporate lawyer Cornell Leverette Moore (1939 - ) was a partner in the Dorsey and Whitney, LLP law firm, and was elected Grand Sire Archon, Grand Boulé of the Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity in 2004.

Employment

United States Treasury Department

Northwest National Bank

Shelter Mortage Company

Shelard National Bank

Leverette Weekes and Company

Miller & Schroeder Financial Services

Dorsey and Whitney, LLP

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore narrates his photographs

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Cornell Leverette Moore's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore shares a story about his maternal uncle, Lonnie Leverette

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his maternal aunts and uncles

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Cornell Leverette Moore lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers his early interest in music

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers the integration of the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers segregation in Statesboro, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his watch collection

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his high school graduation

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes the technological advancements during his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Statesboro, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his early impressions of African American attorneys

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers his influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his aspiration to attend college

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers his classmates at Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his experiences at Virginia Union University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his mentors at Virginia Union University

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his activism with the Richmond Improvement Association

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about The Valentine museum in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his graduation from Virginia Union University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls attending Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his experiences at the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his influences at the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his first position in the U.S. Department of the Treasury

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers the March on Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls passing the bar examination

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers moving to San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his interview at the Crocker-Citizens National Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his position as counsel to the national bank examiners

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his position at the Northwestern National Bank in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls campaigning for Hubert Humphrey

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his work at the Shelter Corporation of America, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his civic engagement in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the African American leadership in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his experiences of discrimination in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers founding the Shelard National Bank in St. Louis Park, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his clientele at Robins, Davis and Lyons in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers the film, 'How the Midwest Was Won'

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls representing professional athletes at Robins, Davis and Lyons

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his representation of the National Football League Players Association

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers meeting O.J. Simpson

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls financing the Grande Royale Hometel, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls financing the Grand Royale Hometel, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers becoming a minority owner of the Minnesota Twins

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about the Minnesota Twins baseball team

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his work at Miller and Schroeder Financial, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers Minneapolis Mayor Sharon Sayles Belton

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the election of Mayor Sharon Sayles Belton

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the changing racial demographic of Minneapolis, Minnesota in the late 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls joining the law firm of Dorsey and Whitney LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his experiences at Dorsey and Whitney LLP

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his role on charitable boards

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about the Minneapolis Aquatennial festival

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his involvement with the Boule

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore reflects upon his career

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers being profiled on 'November Magazine'

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his wife's career

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

10$5

DATitle
Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his interview at the Crocker-Citizens National Bank
Cornell Leverette Moore talks about the Minnesota Twins baseball team
Transcript
The interview goes like this. Mr. Emmett Solomon was the chairman of the board of Crocker-Citizens National Bank [San Francisco, California], the fourteenth largest bank in the world in 1964. And I had done some work on a file of theirs in the [U.S.] Supreme Court--in treasury law, some underling work. And so he said, "Would you like to be the assistant to the chairman of the board of the bank? In the mornings, you'll come down to the train with Joe [ph.], the driver, and meet me. And the meetings I don't wanna go to like the audit committee of the chamber of commerce or the finance committee of the museum, I don't feel like being bothered, you go and you report back to me. And certain things I'll ask you to do around the office. Just when we go to meetings, you'll take notes and hand me stuff." I said, "You know, Mr. Solomon, I don't know how to say this to you, but I really don't wanna be in that job. I want to be a management trainee." The man said, "Are you serious?" I said, "Yes, sir. That's what I wanna be." 'Cause I hadn't passed the bar. I couldn't be a lawyer. He said, "Now, I offered you this job, and you didn't take it." And I said, "No, sir. That's what I wanna be, 'cause I heard of white boys being management trainees. That's the job I took in the trust department [U.S Department of the Treasury]." He had me sign a letter that he had offered me this big time job, and I use that in my speeches, along with my genius speech, is that if we don't tell our kids what's going on, they'll never know. Now, they can see it on TV and all kinds of things, but there's still things they don't know. But nobody ever told me, and people ridicule me and say, "Why do you keep telling people that stupid story?" I said, "Because people learn by others' mistakes." And that's a mistake that I try and tell kids all over the country. Know something about the job before you apply for it. So I took the job; turned out not to be very good at it (laughter) because it was with a computer and with a calculating stuff. But I made it through the day. I mean I made it through the training program and what not, but I could see I was going nowhere in this job, and I couldn't find another job 'cause I didn't take the California bar. I knew I couldn't pass it. It was too tough for me, and I had forgotten all the law I knew. So I called the comptroller of currencies. He said, "Come back to Washington [D.C.]."$Let me go back, back track and ask you about, now, I'm, I'm sure there are other pla- players, you know, you know, in the history of the Minnesota Twins. But, but these were World Series, I think, were particularly important. I mean Kirby Puckett was particularly important--$$Kirby Puckett, he was the man. Kirby Puckett was the man, of course, you know, and there's other guys. But as we said, "Touch 'em all," Kirby Puckett, "Touch 'em all, we'll see you tomorrow night when he hits the home run." And then the one time, he climbed the wall and got it. Kirby was the only player that knew, that asked me did I own part of the team. They'd see me, but they didn't know why I was around. In fact, the day they bought, we bought the team and announced it, my son [Jonathan Moore], who is now bigger than I am, was a little boy. And he sat on Mrs. Pohlad's [Eloise O'Rourke Pohlad] knee at the ceremony because there were no more seats available. And no one ever asked why that little boy was sitting on Ms. Pohlad's knee. They always thought that somebody--they knew that Pohlad [Carl Pohlad] had a partner. But they never knew it was me unless they--if they asked me--if they told me they knew, I'd say, yes. But if they asked me, I wasn't supposed--you know, I could fudge it. So that was the first thing. Then we took a lap around the field, Wenda [Moore's wife, HistoryMaker Wenda Weekes Moore] and I, and my friend, Sid Kaplan [ph.], who took the bar exam with me was the only guy I studied with and I took the bar exam. We stayed friends until this day. His wife loved baseball and so they took a round. So they assumed that I was there with Sidney, I guess. Nobody ever assumed that I was the other owner of the Twin [Minnesota Twins] 'cause Woolley [Robert E. Woolley] never came around. He lived in Arizona. He didn't care. See, my theory for Woolley is, he lived in Tampa [Florida] and Phoenix [Arizona], and neither one had a time. I think Pohlad was gonna try and get us to move to one of those places--$$Okay.$$--because it took 60 percent for him to keep the team here. He only had 55. So he was gonna blame it on us. That's my theory. I've never said it publicly, but that's what I'm telling you my theory was. But Kirby, the first trip to the White House [Washington, D.C.], I didn't go. Woolley went. The second trip to the White House I flew with the team--this is '91 [1991]. We're on the plane, and I'm sitting up with the owner and management up in first class. The players had a three seater, one seat between them folded down with the wife against the window or vice versa. And Chili Davis says, "Who's that ol' black guy up there with Pohlad? Is that his driver?" And that's when Kirby said, "That's Mr. C [HistoryMaker Cornell Leverette Moore]. Look at your checks sometimes. He signs the checks every now and then." And said, "Don't you see? He's already got on a ring. You haven't even gotten yours yet." And that's when it came out, the word came out then that we had a--part ownership of the team. And people started, you know, they'd see me at the game, they'd see in a box, but the company I worked for had a box. So they finally just figured that's why I was there. But I'd be in the owner's box, and I'd be in the press box, eating hot dogs with the press and all. And it was, it was a fun time; didn't go on any trips with the team, just wasn't my thing. And I didn't, I had a pass to any ballpark, and I'd go places, and I'd show off every now and then for my friends and say, let's go to the game, and stay for an inning or two and then leave, you know, right from the owner's box and what not. But it was fun, it was a fun time.$$Well, you were around during the right time. For real, yeah (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Oh, yeah, the only two they've got. There're other minority owners of teams in the country, but I don't think anybody's got two World Series rings. Somebody may have one, but I don't think anybody's got two yet.

The Honorable Alford Dempsey, Jr.

County Superior Court Judge Alford J. Dempsey, Jr. was born on March 19, 1947 in Atlanta, Georgia to his parents Alford J. Dempsey, Sr. and Maenelle Dempsey. His father served in the U.S. Army and was assigned to General Eisenhower's honor guard in Europe after World War II. While growing up, Dempsey wanted to join the military to emulate his father. His mother was an educator who worked for the State of Georgia’s Department of Education, developing schools in African American communities throughout Georgia. In 1965, Dempsey graduated from New Hampton School, a boarding school in New Hampshire where he played football, basketball, and baseball. Dempsey entered Columbia University that same year as a pre-med student. While at Columbia, Dempsey participated in the 1968 student protests. He later transferred to Morehouse College in Atlanta where he graduated with honors with his B.A. degree in economics in 1972 and in 1976, Dempsey earned his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School.

Dempsey began his legal career working on Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign. He later became assistant city attorney for the City of Atlanta’s Department of Law. In 1992, Dempsey was named judge of the Magistrate Court of Fulton County/State Court in Atlanta. He was appointed by Fulton County State Court Chief Clarence Coopers. In 1995, Dempsey was then appointed to the Fulton County Superior Court by Governor Zell Miller where he presided over civil and felony criminal cases. Dempsey was also instrumental in the development and implementation of the Fulton County Family Court. Dempsey has presided over many high profile cases throughout his career including the case involving the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and allegations of misspending by its leadership.

Dempsey has served as a member of a number of professional legal organizations, including the American Judges Association, the American Judicature Society, the Atlanta Bar Association (Past Chair Judicial Section), the Bleckley Inn of Court, the Gate City Bar Association (Immediate Past Chair Judicial Section), and the National Bar Association.

Dempsey has also been active in numerous community organizations including serving as the District Chair of the South Atlanta District of the Boy Scouts of America, a Board member and past president of the Board of Carrie Steele-Pitts Home and a Board member of Sisters By Choice, Inc.

Alford J. Dempsey, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 20, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.019

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/20/2011

Last Name

Dempsey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widower

Middle Name

J.

Schools

Oglethorpe Elementary School

Washington High School

New Hampton Community School

Columbia University

Morehouse College

Harvard Law School

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Alford

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

DEM01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

If washing don't get you, the rinsing sure will.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

3/19/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Snapper (Twice-Baked)

Short Description

County superior court judge The Honorable Alford Dempsey, Jr. (1947 - ) has been the presiding judge of the Fulton County Superior Court in Atlanta, Georgia and was instrumental in the development and implementation of the Fulton County Family Court.

Employment

City of Atlanta Deparment of Law

Magistrate Court of Fulton County/State Court Presiding Judge

Superior Court of Fulton County

Favorite Color

Green

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Alford Dempsey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey relates stories from his father

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey talks about his father's education and career in the U.S. Military

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey discusses his father's experience with segregation in the U.S. Army

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey talks about his mother's career, educational background and mother's side of the family in Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Alford Dempsey describes his maternal family in Noonan, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey describes his parents' marriage and his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about his birthplace, his adopted sibling, and the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey describes the neighborhood where he spent his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey talks about the Scott family, owners of the Atlanta Daily World, as well as his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey describes his family's church, First Congregational Church in Atlanta, and his activities as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey talks about his participation in sports and his experience attending Washington High School and New Hampton Boarding School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about the New Hampton Boarding School in New Hampshire

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey talks about his student activities and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey describes his experience at the New Hampton Boarding School

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey discusses how he chose Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey describes his difficulties as a student at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about his academic performance and student activities

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey describes the 1968 Columbia University student protest

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey describes the differences between the two 1968 Columbia student protests

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey describes his band, the Soul Syndicate, and the famous musicians he met in New York and Atlanta

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey recalls his time working at the Bird Cage Restaurant and Lounge in Atlanta

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey discusses meeting his wife, Colleen

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey talks about leaving Columbia University to attend Morehouse College

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey describes his time between graduating from Morehouse College, and attending Harvard Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey talks about his twin daughters, Audrey and Angela, and his grandchildren

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Alford Dempsey discusses attending Harvard University Law School and his job search

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Alford Dempsey describes his work for the Atlanta City Attorney's Office

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey discusses the Minority and Female Business Enterprise Program and Maynard Jackson's impact as Mayor of Atlanta

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about the Atlanta Child Murders in 1979 and his son Alford James Dempsey, III

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey describes his work for the City of Atlanta, teaching at Atlanta University and his private practice

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey discusses his appointment to the magistrate court of Fulton County, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey talks about leaving the City Attorney's Office and his relationship with Hamilton E. Holmes

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey describes his experience as a judge in the Fulton County Superior Court

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about the Olympic bombing in Atlanta and the events of September 11, 2001

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey discusses his wife's battle with breast cancer

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey describes his work with the organization, Sisters by Choice

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey describes his life and projects after the death of his wife

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Alford Dempsey describes the Brian Nichols courthouse shooting incident in Atlanta

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey continues his discussion of Atlanta's Brian Nichols

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about his board affiliations, public service and charitable organizations

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey discusses his legacy, goals and objectives

Rodney Reed

Educator Rodney Reed was born on May 16, 1932 in New Orleans, Louisiana to Ursul and Edgar Reed. He received his B.A. degree from Clark College in 1951, and his M.Mus. degree in music education from the University of Michigan in 1956.

Upon graduation, he accepted a position at Southern University as an assistant professor of music and associate conductor of University bands. In 1961, Reed moved to Oakland, California, where he served as a junior high school music teacher and department head and principal of the summer music recreation program in the Oakland Unified School District before becoming Vice Principal of King Junior High School.

Reed graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 1970 with his Ph.D. degree in educational policy, planning, and administration. He then joined the faculty of the University’s Graduate School of Education, becoming only the second tenure track professorial appointment in the school’s history at that time, and ascended the ranks to become a full professor. In 1973, Reed was appointed as assistant research educator, Program in International Education Finance, during which time he conducted studies in Liberia, West Africa. In 1976, he was appointed as chair of the division of education administration in the school of education, and in 1989, was elected for a three year term as chair of the university’s Graduate School of Education faculty.

While at Berkeley, Reed served on two Academic Senate Committees; was a co-founder of the University’s Professional Development Program; was an initial member of the Board of Directors of the Young Musicians Program; co-director of the University of California/Oakland Unified School District Teacher Corps Project; and founded the University’s Annual Institute for School Administrators.

In January, 1990, he assumed the position of Pennsylvania Professor of Education and Dean of The College of Education at Pennsylvania State University and became that University’s first black senior academic administrator. While at Penn State, he was elected to serve a two-year term as chair of the academic council of deans. In 1994 he officially resigned from the University of California, Berkeley and was named professor emeritus. In 1998 he retired as dean of Penn State and was awarded the title of dean and professor emeritus, College of education.

Reed has published numerous articles examining the education system in America and has served on the editorial boards of a number scholarly journals. From 1991 to 1994 he was host of the television program, Touching the Future. He has served in leadership positions in the American Educational Research Association, and on the board of directors of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, the San Francisco-Bay Area Urban League, and the National Association of Secondary School Principals. He was also a member of the Pennsylvania Governor’s “Pennsylvania 2000” board to chart the future of education in that state.

He has received many awards including resolutions from the California Assembly and the California Senate, the State of California Speaker of the Assembly Willie J. Brown Jr. plaque for his service to the educational system of California, and the 1992 Alumnus of the Year Award from the Black Alumni club of the California Alumni Association. In addition, The Rodney J. and Vernell A. Reed scholarship in urban education has been established in the Pennsylvania State University College of Education.

Reed is married to Vernell Auzenne Reed. They have two adult children: Karen and Ursula.

Rodney Reed was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 8, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.002

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/8/2011

Last Name

Reed

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

J.

Occupation
Schools

Joseph A. Craig School

Gilbert Academy

Clark Atlanta University

University of Michigan

University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Education

First Name

Rodney

Birth City, State, Country

New Orleans

HM ID

REE06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Negril, Jamaica
Florence, Italy

Favorite Quote

The Future Belongs To Those That Believe In The Beauty Of Their Dreams.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

5/16/1932

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Oakland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo (Louisiana)

Short Description

Educator Rodney Reed (1932 - ) served on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Education, and as dean of the Pennsylvania State University College of Education. In 2010 he was elected as Grand Sire Archon of the Boule.

Employment

Southern University Baton Rouge

Havenscourt Junior High School

King Junior High School

University of California, Berkeley

University of Rhode Island in Kingston

Pennsylvania State University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Rodney Reed's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Rodney Reed describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Rodney Reed talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Rodney Reed describes his father's career as a pharmacist

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Rodney Reed talks about his father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Rodney Reed describes his parents' personalities and activities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Rodney Reed lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Rodney Reed lists the places he lived in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed remembers Dooky Chase's Restaurant in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Rodney Reed recalls his early saxophone performances

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Rodney Reed describes his neighborhood in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Rodney Reed remembers Joseph A. Craig Elementary School in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Rodney Reed recalls his experiences at the Gilbert Academy in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Rodney Reed talks about his early aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Rodney Reed recalls his activities at the Gilbert Academy in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed describes his teenage personality

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed remembers matriculating at Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Rodney Reed describes his experiences at Clark College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Rodney Reed remembers the faculty and students at Clark College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Rodney Reed talks about the music department at Clark College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Rodney Reed remembers pledging to the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Rodney Reed recalls enlisting in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Rodney Reed talks about his experiences in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Rodney Reed recalls working as a busser at the University of Michigan student union

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Rodney Reed describes his experiences as a graduate student at the University of Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed remembers the popular music of the 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed recalls playing with the University of Michigan Marching Band, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Rodney Reed recalls playing with the University of Michigan Marching Band, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Rodney Reed remembers being hired at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Rodney Reed talks about the seclusion of Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Rodney Reed describes the development of the Southern University Marching Band

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Rodney Reed remembers his career at Southern University

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Rodney Reed talks about the student demonstrations at Southern University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Rodney Reed describes his courtship with his wife

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed recalls becoming a teacher in the Oakland Unified School District

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed recalls his early career in the Oakland Unified School District

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Rodney Reed describes the formation of his dance band, the Ambassadors

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Rodney Reed describes his community in Oakland, California

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Rodney Reed recalls his decision to pursue a doctorate in education

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Rodney Reed recalls joining the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Education

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Rodney Reed describes his early career at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Rodney Reed describes the findings of his doctoral dissertation

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed talks about his mentors at the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Education

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed remembers the support of Professor Troy Duster

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Rodney Reed describes his work at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Rodney Reed recalls serving as faculty assistant to the chancellor at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Rodney Reed remembers the Loma Prieta earthquake

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Rodney Reed remembers building a house in the San Francisco Bay Area

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Rodney Reed recalls becoming the dean of the Pennsylvania State University College of Education

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Rodney Reed recalls his transition to professor emeritus status at the University of California, Berkeley, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Rodney Reed recalls his transition to professor emeritus status at the University of California, Berkeley, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed talks about the Pennsylvania State University system

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed describes his career at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pennsylvania

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Rodney Reed talks about the end of his deanship at Pennsylvania State University

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Rodney Reed recalls his commencement address at Pennsylvania State University

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Rodney Reed describes his academic research

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Rodney Reed talks about his research on educational finance in Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Rodney Reed talks about his friends from Liberia

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Rodney Reed remembers his experiences at the University of Khartoum in Sudan

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Rodney Reed talks about his international travels

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Rodney Reed talks about his involvement in the Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Rodney Reed describes the Boule Scholars Program

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Rodney Reed talks about the membership of the Boule

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed reflects upon his life, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed reflects upon his life, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Rodney Reed describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Rodney Reed reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Rodney Reed talks about the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco, California

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Rodney Reed remembers his parents' support

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Rodney Reed talks about his daughters and grandson

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Rodney Reed describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Rodney Reed describes his television program, 'Touching the Future: Dialogues on Education'

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Rodney Reed narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Rodney Reed narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
Rodney Reed describes the development of the Southern University Marching Band
Rodney Reed recalls becoming the dean of the Pennsylvania State University College of Education
Transcript
What changes--what did you find and then what change did you institute with the Southern band [Southern University Marching Band]?$$Well first of all let me tell you about my position. It, it was to be the assistant director of the university bands and to teach the woodwinds and percussion instruments. So I taught clarinet and oboe and bassoon. I taught the percussion instruments, and then I was the band director. And in essence I was the band director in charge of the marching band. So what I found when I got there was a group that had been doing stuff. The band director, T. Leroy Davis who is an excellent musician, I have the utmost respect for, pushed them to, to read music, to get a good sound, to be disciplined and all that sorts. So all of that was in place, but my charge was to develop this band in a style of the Big Ten [Big Ten Conference] bands; that's what I took as a personal charge. So what did I have to do? I had to start with the basics and the basics are measuring your steps. We had to get--we had to create a practice field that had the same yard markers as a football, football field 'cause the way bands calculate what they do is so many steps per ten yards, or per five yards so we had to work on that. We had to work on steps, picking up your feet, being sharp, being in alignment, as well as on the musical side of stuff.$$Okay. So they weren't picking them up when you got there?$$No, no.$$Okay. They were just kind of walking sort of?$$Yeah, I mean just military style is you don't (gesture) do all this in the military--kind of military band. So, so, so we worked on all of these basic kinds of things and we practiced you know over and over and over. And then I wrote the scripts, I arranged some of the music that we played because to get the sound that the Big Ten bands get, they had special arrangements that projected those instruments that, that carried best on the, on the field. For example you can hardly hear a flute. If you're in a marching band playing a flute you can't hardly hear a flute, right? So at Michigan [University of Michigan Marching Band] they didn't use flutes. Saxophones carry much louder than flutes. So folks played clarinets and saxophones; they didn't play flutes and piccolos. The drums you know the drumbeats had to be very precise, but it also had to be designed in such a way that, that the drum itself physically didn't get in the way and all that. So some of them you know rolled out drums and all this kind of stuff you know timpani sets. So we worked on all of those kind of basics. It took a while because this was new. And I remember I had worked out a whole show with formations and you know we used diagrams and coordinate the music with the diagrams and the script. And I also was the announcer, so (laughter) I'd be up in the press box announcing: "And now ladies and gentlemen, with great pride we present the Southern University 100 Marching Band," or whatever the script called for. And then we expected them to (makes sound) to come out, right. And I remember the first show we did, it was at night, and I made this big announcement for them to come out and they came out and they got all mixed up (laughter), which, which showed that we hadn't practiced enough because it was at night, it was under the lights. It was in a, in a stadium that you know held about twenty thousand people maybe, there were probably about ten thousand people there. They got excited and they forgot all the stuff they were supposed to do, so it was like a big mess. I mean I, I, I mean I wanted to go home and cry but that was the last time that that happened because we made sure that we practiced enough that the stuff was ingrained that they could get up in the middle of the night and make the maneuvers and do all that sort of stuff. But it was, it was, it was great fun and we were able to accomplish it. We didn't do it the first year, or the second year. But by the third year, we sort of hit our stride. We were doing you know quite well.$All right, in 1990, now you make a--now you retire from University of California--$$No.$$--at--no?$$No.$$Okay, all right. Now (laughter) all right now what happened then? What happened?$$Okay. I had, you know while at Berkeley I mentioned that I'd had all these experiences. I was also head of our department in the school of education. At Berkeley it's called the school of edu- the Graduate School of Education [University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Education, Berkeley, California], so I was department head. So I'd had this administrative experience working with the chancellor, in the school system, in the school of education. I also had you know several elected offices in professional associations. I was very active in a lot of different things. Here in our community with the Urban League [National Urban League] and the United Negro College Fund. I was head of the education unit for the Urban League and for the United Negro College Fund. I was a western region parliamentarian. I was with American Education Research Association [sic. American Educational Research Association], I was on their board. I was, I mean I was on you know lots of editorial boards and other kinds of stuff. Penn State [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania] was looking for a dean and it was at--I didn't apply for the position there. It was at an American Education Research Association meeting that a group of faculty members, three faculty members from Penn State University's College of Education buttoned me off one day and said, "We'd like to have lunch with you." And we sat down for lunch and they said, "We're looking for a dean for our College of Education. We'd be very delighted if you would consider applying for the position." And I said, "Well I don't know," I mean Penn State, I mean I'd never heard of Penn State I mean to be honest with you. And I said, "Well let me think about it," and I did. And they contacted me again to see if I had made up my mind and then I said well you know what do I have to lose? This is something that, it's an administrative position. I've always been interested in administration and leadership positions, why not? So I put together my papers and I sent it to them and their search committee went through this whole process. And I flew up there to be interviewed a couple of times and met with the president [Graham Spanier] and some of the board members and on and on and on. I mean they put me through a--not a rigorous process but it was clear that it was a serious undertaking for them. I finally said yes. They made me an offer that was quite attractive and also appointed me as a--they didn't have endowed chairs in the College of Education, but they had something called the Pennsylvania Professor of Education, which was the nearest thing they had to an endowed chair. So they named me the Pennsylvania Professor of Education as well as the dean of the College of Education. I was the first senior academic black administrator at Penn State. There has not been one since I left.

Etu Evans

Fashion designer and entrepeneur Etu Evans was born on February 2, 1969 in Orangeburg, South Carolina though he spent much of his youth with his family in Harlem and Queens, New York. His mother Rosa was an educator, who helped Evans overcome a learning disability and eventually excel in school. Evans started his first business, in flower arranging, at the age of six. By the time he was thirteen, he began showing interest in fashion and interior design. Evans attended South Carolina State University, where he graduated cum laude with a degree in social work in 1992.

Evans established the design company Etu Evans, LLC in 1993, focusing on jewelry and hats. However, he continued a career outside of fashion and in 1996, earned his M.S. degree in applied behavioral science from Columbia University, graduating with a 4.0 GPA. Evans moved to Europe, where he worked in Italy and France as a behavioral therapist. In a chance meeting on the streets of Paris, Evans met the publicist for Gucci, and decided to leave his job in order to focus on design.

The scope of Etu Evans, LLC has broadened to include accessories and, especially, shoes. Evans became known for his fashion forward footwear designs, which have been worn by celebrities including Tyra Banks, Halle Berry, Erykah Badu, Queen Latifah, Beyoncé Knowles, Danny Glover and Chris Tucker. His work has been featured at New York’s Fashion Week and covered in a broad range of international fashion magazines.

In 1998, Evans founded the Solesville Foundation. This organization collects, repairs, and redistributes new and used shoes and is frequently cited for the effectiveness it had during the Hurricane Katrina disaster in New Orleans, Louisiana. Solesville also coordinated a youth AIDS walk and a shoe repair apprenticeship program for underprivileged youth. Evans’s philanthropic efforts have earned him the Burger King Everyday Heroes National Campaign Honor and the “Citizen of the Year” award from his fraternity, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., and the National Association of Social Workers. Etu was also chosen by Ebony magazine as one of its “30 Leaders of the Future.”

Etu Evans was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 30, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.243

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/30/2007

Last Name

Evans

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Occupation
Schools

Marshall Elementary School

Brookdale Elem

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

South Carolina State University

Columbia University

Fashion Institute of Technology

Parsons School of Design

First Name

Etu

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

EVA03

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Since Greatness Is Achievable, Then Excellence Is Not An Option.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

2/2/1969

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Broccoli

Short Description

Fashion designer Etu Evans (1969 - ) designed shoes for celebrities including Erykah Badu, Halle Berry and Beyonce Knowles. He was also the founder of Solesville: Etu Evans Foundation.

Employment

Columbia University

Delete

Institute of Youth Entrepreneurship

Etu Evans, LLC.

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:19280,332:19730,338:20090,343:30496,440:30848,445:42992,611:76545,1196:80547,1286:83769,1302:101837,1613:123719,2015:137082,2177:137670,2190:149150,2388:149750,2397:151475,2418:161696,2593:162911,2612:176452,2855:177764,2938:185650,3018$0,0:9418,195:10573,209:12113,233:12575,248:14808,311:17734,396:19505,423:22508,542:27821,614:29592,664:37717,717:39376,747:40640,778:47018,830:48346,851:56336,924:56752,929:57480,938:66944,1103:68192,1138:72040,1195:77690,1211:79576,1250:83758,1319:84414,1328:88432,1410:94990,1472:95358,1481:101729,1555:104630,1657:104955,1663:105995,1688:106255,1693:111990,1759
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Etu Evans' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Etu Evans lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Etu Evans describes his mother's family background and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Etu Evans describes his father's personality and profession

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Etu Evans talks about his paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Etu Evans remembers his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Etu Evans describes his early fashion influences

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Etu Evans talks about the significance of footwear in the African American community

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Etu Evans talks about his early memories and entrepreneurship

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Etu Evans remembers celebrating the holidays

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Etu Evans lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Etu Evans describes his community in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Etu Evans describes the sights and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Etu Evans talks about his learning disability

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Etu Evans remembers Brookdale Middle School in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Etu Evans remembers his parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Etu Evans talks about his early business ventures

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Etu Evans recalls developing his taste for luxury fashions

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Etu Evans talks about his interest in interior design

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Etu Evans remembers visiting his relatives in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Etu Evans remembers South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Etu Evans recalls his introduction to social work

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Etu Evans describes his religious influences

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Etu Evans talks about mental health in the African American community

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Etu Evans talks about the history of footwear

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Etu Evans talks about the process of making shoes

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Etu Evans remembers establishing Etu Evans, LLC

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Etu Evans recalls opening Sole Kitchen in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Etu Evans remembers his admission to Columbia University in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Etu Evans describes his graduate studies at Columbia University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Etu Evans remembers the Parsons School of Design in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Etu Evans recalls transferring to the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Etu Evans describes his work as a behavioral therapist

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Etu Evans describes his start in the footwear design industry

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Etu Evans talks about his celebrity clientele

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Etu Evans describes his coursework at the Fashion Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Etu Evans recalls his peers at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Etu Evans recalls working with the Institute for Youth Entrepreneurship

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Etu Evans talks about the Solesville: Etu Evans Foundation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Etu Evans talks about the value of quality footwear

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Etu Evans shares two of his shoe designs

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Etu Evans talks about teaching at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Etu Evans talks about his reputation as a shoe designer

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Etu Evans talks about the invention of the shoe lasting machine

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Etu Evans lists his awards and honors

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Etu Evans describes his public speaking career

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Etu Evans talks about his perspective on religion

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Etu Evans talks about the next generation of shoe designers

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Etu Evans describes his plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Etu Evans reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Etu Evans narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

7$5

DATitle
Etu Evans describes his early fashion influences
Etu Evans shares two of his shoe designs
Transcript
And then, your father [Frederick Evans, Jr.], how would you describe your father if you had to describe him (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Gregarious, very outgoing, very talented printer, everyone comes to him for his printing services. And when I look at all of his pictures, very sophisticated dresser for his--for the times.$$What, what kind of elements were included in your father's style?$$He had a--I remember a picture of him in high school with a white dinner jacket on, some really nicely tailored black slacks, a great black bowtie, kind of sleek European in its silhouette, and a red carnation. Great mock neck sweaters, he just had impeccable taste.$$And what about your mother [Rosa Johnson Evans]. Was she fashionable?$$My mother is (laughter) fashionable and anything that has color in it, it has her name on it. I had to actually a few years ago pull her back from the metallic. I said, "Mom, we're not doing--that's no longer the trend, need to let that go," and I gave her some neutral pointier shoes. But she loves fashion$$And then, of course, your grandmother [Queen Esther Evans] you said is still wearing stilettos--$$Yes (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) can you just describe her fashion for us a bit?$$Yes, well, my mom borrows my grandmother's shoes still to date. She's very fashion forward when it comes to shoes, very pointy, very feminine. And she would sit me on her canopy bed--first of all her room is the ultimate jewelry chest.$$This is your grandmother?$$Yes. It's a treasure chest, it's congested but it's certainly purposeful (laughter). The shoeboxes connected like trains around the top of the ceiling, there are beads of every color cascading off of the dresser, and in another corner there is a, a some archtectrical high-rise of hats, so she loves fashion. Everywhere you move you see something to wear.$$And so did you get an opportunity to observe your grandmother dressing and--$$That's how I got into shoes (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) do you think that influenced your--$$Absolutely, she would sit me in her emporium of fashion and she would say, "Etu [HistoryMaker Etu Evans], what shoes should I wear?" And then I would always select the shoes that she should wear to church. And then I began--that's probably why I'm in behaviorism, 'cause I believe kids become who they are before they're age seven, that's just my personal philosophy, based on what they are exposed to. So, she would sit me on that, on that canopy bed and then I noticed that her body would change, so then I moved from you should wear that shoe or I like that toe or I like this bow to what's making your body change. And I realized the magic of shoes, and ever since then I was smitten, I began tearing my grandfather's shoes apart, running around through the house wearing his shoes. And I discovered how to take his dress shoe and, if I took the sole off of it, it became a driving shoe so that's really what--$$So (simultaneous)--$$--(Simultaneous) sparked my interest.$We were just talking about how a shoe is made and how it makes you feel, can you show us a couple of shoes and talk about the construction (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Absolutely. Impeccable construction, well made last, Italian last, and then this shoe, actually, this is one of the samples that I started working on. I wanted to kind of like when you're saying does she--she loves me, she loves me not, that's where this is inspired from the petals when you pull them apart. And I've discovered that once I completed this shoe design that she would love me. We've gotten a lot of love for this design, so this is one of the designs that I've been playing with in the factory, and just playing with different heels. We've done it without this, in patent leather in the back and metal. And this one, the feminine fanfare continues, you know, with grosgrain ribbon over suede and a lattice of bows, which I think is very sexy and sophisticated, a wider heel.$$And are you doing anything for the person who needs extreme arch support or for people who need a wider shoe, or support in the heel? Some of your common--$$I would say what we are doing is that with what I've found rather is that many women come to us to have their boots spliced because they have trouble particularly in the Latino and the African American community with the calves. So what I've decided to do in my line is I'm creating what I call equity girls, who are larger in size. So you can have the special ordered boot in particular where you have the calf you won't have those problems (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So the shoe can come up high.$$Yes, that seems to be a major problem. We haven't had many problems with shoes not fitting.$$So people are quite comfortable.

Joseph Segars

Joseph Monroe Segars was born on November 6, 1938, in Hartsville, South Carolina. He was raised by his mother's sister and her husband, Walter and Francis Hines, after his parents migrated to Philadelphia in search of better jobs. His uncle was a painter and his aunt worked as a domestic. In 1956, he earned his high school diploma from Butler High School. Upon graduation he joined his family in Philadelphia and worked in a lamp factory before attending college.

Between 1957 and 1961, Segars attended Cheyney University of Pennsylvania where earned his bachelor's of science degree in education. Following his graduation, he taught sixth grade in the Gary, Indiana, public school system until 1967. That year, Segars moved back to Philadelphia where he taught sixth grade in the public schools there. At the urging of a family friend, he joined the Foreign Service in 1970 and was the first African American assigned to Vienna, where he served until 1973.

In 1974, Segars was assigned to the State Department's West African Affairs Department as a desk officer primarily responsible for Liberia and Sierra Leone. In 1976, Segars became one of the first African Americans to be assigned to strife-torn South Africa, and his arrival in Johannesburg coincided with the outbreak of unrest in Soweto. Until his departure from South Africa in 1978, Segars served as Consul General. From South Africa, Segars traveled to Kingston, Jamaica, where he served as Consul General until 1980. The following year, he served as a desk officer in the Office of Southern African Affairs overseeing three African countries. In 1983, Segars was appointed Consul General in Lagos, Nigeria, where he remained until 1986. From 1986 until 1989, he served as Deputy Chief of Mission in Tanzania, where he lobbied successfully to win the country's understanding and support for U.S. efforts to resolve major southern African conflicts. Leaving Tanzania in 1989, Segars worked as a Career Counselor in the Office of Human Resources. From 1992 until 1993, he participated in the State Department's 34th annual Seminar for Senior-level officials. In 1993, Segars received his first ambassadorship to the Republic of Cape Verde, where he remained until his retirement in 1996.

Since his retirement he has served as a consultant on Africa issues. He is a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity and the recipient of several prestigious awards for his foreign service. In 1997, he was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from Southeastern University.

Joseph Monroe Segars passed away on July 20, 2014 at the age of 75.

Accession Number

A2004.124

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/11/2004 |and| 9/23/2004

Last Name

Segars

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Monroe

Schools

Cheyney University of Pennsylvania

Indiana University

Butler High School

First Name

Joseph

Birth City, State, Country

Hartsville

HM ID

SEG01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

If I were doing better, there would be two of me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

11/6/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Sarasota

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Death Date

7/20/2014

Short Description

Consul general and foreign ambassador Joseph Segars (1938 - 2014 ) served as the United States State Department's consul general in South Africa, Jamaica, and Nigeria, and later served as ambassador to the Republic of Cape Verde.

Employment

Gary, Indiana Public Schools

United States State Department

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joseph Segars interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joseph Segars' favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joseph Segars describes his mother and her personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joseph Segars discusses his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joseph Segars remembers the aunt and uncle who raised him

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joseph Segars describes his maternal grandmother and her stories of the past

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Joseph Segars remembers primer school and his early chores in the house and field

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Joseph Segars recalls childhood holidays

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Joseph Segars lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Joseph Segars describes his childhood community in South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Joseph Segars remembers his desire to leave South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Joseph Segars recounts his elementary school years

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Joseph Segars explains his desire to leave South Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Photo - Joseph Segars with his family, South Carolina, ca. 1940

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Photo - Joseph Segars, ca. 1952

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Photo - Joseph Segars with his wife, ca. 1989

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Photo - Joseph Segars with his wife, Elizabeth, at their wedding, June 13, 1964

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Photo - Joseph Segars with his son, Ryan Segars, and wife Elizabeth, ca. 2001

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Photo - Joseph Segars with his wife Elizabeth, Ambassador Carol Hayes and his son, Ryan, 1984

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Photo - Joseph Segars on the cover of 'State,' ca. December 1987

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Photo - Joseph Segars receives an honorary doctorate, Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Photo - Joseph Segars with Bernard Coleman, Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Photo - Joseph Segars with Maureen Reagan, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, ca. 1987

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Photo - Joseph Segars's Ambassadorial swearing in ceremony Washington, D.C., November 22, 1992

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Photo - Joseph Segars with his wife Elizabeth and son Ryan, Washington, D.C., November 1992

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Photo - Joseph Segars' family, Washington, D.C., November, 1992

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Photo - Joseph Segars, Johannesburg, South Africa, June 12, 1976

Tape: 5 Story: 15 - Photo - Joseph Segars, the Republic of Cape Verde, 1995

Tape: 5 Story: 16 - Photo - Joseph Segars with his wife, Elizabeth, and son Ryan Segars, 1992

Tape: 5 Story: 17 - Photo - Joseph Segars with Chief T.O.S. Benson, his mother-in-law Ethel Graham, and others, Lagos, Nigera, ca. 1985

Tape: 5 Story: 18 - Photo - Joseph Segars with Chief T.O.S. Benson, Lagos, Nigeria, ca. 1985

Tape: 5 Story: 19 - Photo - Joseph Segars with Prime Minister Carlos Viega, Fogo Island, the Republic of Cape Verde, ca. 1995

Tape: 5 Story: 20 - Photo - Joseph Segars with Prime Minister Carlos Viega, the Republic of Cape Verde

***FACT CHECKER***

Tape: 5 Story: 21 - Photo - Joseph Segars with Barney Franks and others, Republic of Cape Verde

Tape: 5 Story: 22 - Photo - Joseph Segars with Gary Dahm and Russell Hanks, Republic of Cape Verde

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joseph Segars recalls his childhood church activities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joseph Segars describes his middle school years

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joseph Segars remembers his high school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joseph Segars recounts his interim year between high school and college

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joseph Segars details his college experiences at Cheyney State University

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joseph Segars reflects on his teaching career in Gary, Indiana and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Joseph Segars explains his decision to join the Foreign Service

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Joseph Segars recalls his first Foreign Service assignment in Vienna, Austria

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Joseph Segars recounts his transition to the Office of West African Affairs and South Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joseph Segars talks about his years in South Africa and compares apartheid with U.S. segregation

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joseph Segars recalls the connection between class and skin color in Jamaica while he was Consul General there

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joseph Segar describes disagreements over U.S. policy during the transition from Rhodesia to Zimbabwe

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joseph Segars describes his work as Consul General in Nigeria

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joseph Segars recounts his progression towards becoming an ambassador

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joseph Segars recalls becoming an ambassador to Cape Verde

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joseph Segars recounts his experiences as U.S. Ambassador to Cape Verde

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joseph Segars details his work on the 50th NATO Summit

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Joseph Segars describes his return to Nigeria

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Joseph Segars explains his work with the EDDI African aid program

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Joseph Segars discusses relations between Africans and African Americans

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Joseph Segars details programs underway to aid Sudan

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Joseph Segars laments the lack of African Americans in the Foreign Service

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Joseph Segars ponders his legacy

David R. Duerson

Former NFL player-turned-business owner David Duerson was born in Muncie, Indiana, on November 28, 1960. After graduating from Northside High School in Muncie, Duerson began his promising football career at the University of Notre Dame. Duerson spent the summers from 1979 to 1981 working as a law clerk in Miami, Florida, and during the summer of 1982, he served as legislative aide to U.S. Senator Richard Lugar. Duerson graduated from Notre Dame with a B.S. degree in economics in 1983.

Following graduation, Duerson joined the Chicago Bears, where he played from 1983 to 1989, earning his first Super Bowl ring in Super Bowl XX. In 1990, he joined the New York Giants, and that year the Giants won Super Bowl XXV. He then went on to play for the Phoenix Cardinals from 1991 to 1993. After leaving the NFL, Duerson decided to go into business through franchise ownership. He attended McDonald's Corporation's Hamburger University and in 1994 bought three McDonald's restaurants in the suburbs of Louisville, Kentucky. Selling his franchises in 1995, Duerson became president and CEO of Fair Oaks Farms, one of the primary suppliers of sausage to McDonald's and a number of other companies with an international distribution arm to Japan, Singapore, Turkey and Kuwait. Under his leadership, sales grew from $38 million in 1998 to $63.4 million in 2001. That same year, he earned an executive M.B.A. from Harvard University's Owners and Presidents Management Program.

In 2002, Duerson started Duerson Foods, providing pork and turkey sausage products to corporations such as Burger King, White Castle and SYSCO.

Duerson has earned a number of honors over the years, including being named two-time All-American at Notre Dame and the 1987 NFL Man of the Year. He serves on the University of Notre Dame Board of Trustees and as chairman of the National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame, Chicago Chapter. He is also active with the Boys & Girls Clubs of America, serving as a national trustee. Duerson and his wife, Alicia, have four children.

Duerson passed away on February 17, 2011.

Duerson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 28, 2003.

Accession Number

A2003.210

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/28/2003

Last Name

Duerson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Russell

Schools

Longfellow Elementary School

Oliver W. Storer Junior High School

Northside High School

University of Notre Dame

Harvard University

Northside Middle School

Storer Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Muncie

HM ID

DUE01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Florida, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Never Be Satisfied.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/28/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Catfish, Raw Oysters

Death Date

2/17/2011

Short Description

Football player and corporate chief executive David R. Duerson (1960 - 2011 ) is a former NFL player who is now CEO and owner of Duerson foods, sausage maker to Burger King and others.

Employment

Chicago Bears

New York Giants

Phoenix Cardinals

McDonald's Corporation

Fair Oaks Farms, LLC

Duerson Foods, LLC

Favorite Color

Black, Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of David Duerson interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - David Duerson's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - David Duerson describes his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - David Duerson discusses his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - David Duerson relates his family's history after the U.S. Civil War

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - David Duerson describes his father's career successes

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - David Duerson remembers his hometown of Muncie, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - David Duerson discusses his mother's life

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - David Duerson recalls the Duerson family's interstate travels

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - David Duerson discusses recreation in Muncie, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - David Duerson describes his childhood shenanigans

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - David Duerson recalls his early sports achievements

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - David Duerson details his early educational experience

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - David Duerson remembers influential teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - David Duerson remembers his high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - David Duerson describes his national and international travel during high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - David Duerson details his high school athletic accomplishments

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - David Duerson remembers his college years at the University of Notre Dame

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - David Duerson discusses his continued involvement with the University of Notre Dame

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - David Duerson recalls Notre Dame teammates and their athletic exploits

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - David Duerson explains why he chose football over baseball

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - David Duerson discusses some unexpected setbacks in his professional football career

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - David Duerson remembers 'Papa Bear' George Halas and Bears teammates

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - David Duerson recalls his clashes with Bears defensive coordinator, Buddy Ryan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - David Duerson details how he learned to handle Buddy Ryan's racism

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - David Duerson reveals the inner workings of the Chicago Bears coaching staff

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - David Duerson describes his teammate, Bears quarterback Jim McMahon

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - David Duerson describes Buddy Ryan's coaching skills

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - David Duerson remembers the end of his career with the Chicago Bears

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - David Duerson discusses his career after the Chicago Bears

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

2$7

DATitle
David Duerson remembers 'Papa Bear' George Halas and Bears teammates
David Duerson describes Buddy Ryan's coaching skills
Transcript
Let's talk about the [Chicago] Bears [National Football League team] and when you got to the Bears. This is, what, what did you know about [coach] Mike Ditka and the Chicago Bears. I think George Halas [owner of Chicago Bears] was still alive, wasn't he? 'Papa Bear' was still alive.$$(Simultaneously) George, 'Papa Bear', in fact, he was alive. He passed away that year, my rookie season. Chicago [Illinois] was a short sprint from South Bend. So the four years I was at [University of] Notre Dame [South Bend, Indiana], we'd come over on some Sundays and, and watch the Bears plays. And it was very easy to get tickets to Bear games back in those days because they were, were sorry. They were quite sorry. What I knew of Mike Ditka is that, is that he was a tough guy and that he had just drafted this, this small, middle linebacker, Mike Singletary, that nobody expected a whole lot from and that, you know, but it was a, it was a city that, on defensive side, always talked about its linebackers, but as far as I was concerned, it was a city of, of Gary Fencik and Doug Plank [Chicago Bears players]. And so--.$$Those are two hard-hittin' safeties.$$(Simultaneous) Two very, very hard-hitting' safeties, and, you know, with an incredible reputation. Growing up in Indiana, we got both the, the Bear games and the Cincinnati [Ohio] Bengals. Those were the two teams we saw. So my wife and I, as we were driving across the [Chicago] Skyway coming into Chicago, you know, I'm reporting to the city, and we're looking at the skyline, and I said, "Baby, you see that? Some day we're gonna own this like, like Gary Fencik and Doug Plank." And so I show up at training--at mini-camp. And my very first day, you know, Ditka embraced me and, you know, I was one of his draft picks. Well, I came to find out very quickly that I was [Bears coach] Mike Ditka and Jim Finks's pick. But I was not [Chicago Bears Defensive Coordinator] Buddy Ryan's pick.$[Chicago Bears Defensive Coordinator Buddy] Ryan is, was quite a character as you've already said--,$$Um-hum.$$--but do you, would you consider him a defensive genius at some point?$$Yeah, I would. I, I absolutely considered Buddy a defensive genius. That's without question. He designed and created the '46 Defense', which it was the 46 in that, that was the number that Doug Plank wore, because the defense was designed for the strong safety and, which, of course, was the position I played in the 46. So done right, the strong safety is gonna be the centerpiece of that defense. And certainly, you know, it was genius for Buddy to design the defense, but in order for it to be effective, because he had designed it when he was actually coaching under Weeb Eubanks, with the New York Jets. But the defense was not effective because you had to have two things. You had to have bright players who could understand the X's and O's and be able to, to make multiple shifts before the snap of a ball, and they had to be talented athletically. And it just so happened that that combination came together in '83 [1983], '84 [1984], '85 [1985] with the Chicago Bears. As I said before, I played with ten other, or nine other All-Pros. So it was easy for Dave Duerson to go to the Pro Bowl [National Football League all-star game]. I just simply had to do my job, and if everybody else did their job, there were enough accolades to go around. But then, of course, when Buddy left, Vince Tobin took over as defensive coordinator. And I had even greater success in my career under Vince Tobin. So, so we can't give Buddy too much credit because again, the talent was there with our ball club. But when Buddy left, and after the end of the, of the '85 [1985] season and went to Philly [Philadelphia Eagles football team], we played the, the Eagles the next year in '86 [1986]. And from a defensive perspective, I beat Buddy Ryan by myself. I did things that day that, to this day I cannot explain. I freaked. I did, I had interceptions, I forced fumbles. I had two sacks. And I'll never forget, the game went into overtime. And I grabbed our special teams coach, Steve Kazor, and I told him, I'm, I'm going down on, on the kickoff team. I wasn't even on the kickoff team. And so Steve saw this crazy look in my eyes, he said, "Okay, great, go in at the five position." And so, you know, so I went in and I took some guy out. I don't remember who it was. And on the kickoff, Kevin Butler kicks off, I went down; the return man grabs the ball. I explode into him. He went one way, and the ball went another. We recover. Immediately, Kevin Butler goes onto the field, kicks a field goal, game over. And Buddy Ryan's crying, and that was my vindication. So never had to say a word, beating, simply with work ethic. And at the end of the day, I never had to say a word, and he was the one who broke down--not Dave Duerson.