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Sekazi Mtingwa

Research physicist and physics professor Sekazi K. Mtingwa was born on October 20, 1949 in Atlanta, Georgia. After receiving his B.S. degrees in physics and pure mathematics (Phi Beta Kappa) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1971, Mtingwa enrolled at Princeton University and graduated from there with his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in theoretical high energy physics in 1976. Mtingwa was awarded doctoral fellowships from the National Fellowships Fund and the Ford Foundation. Upon graduation, he was awarded post-doctoral fellowships and research assistantships at the University of Rochester, the University of Maryland at College Park, and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab).

In 1981, Mtingwa joined Fermilab as a research physicist where he, along with James Bjorken, developed a theory of particle beam dynamics, “intrabeam scattering,” which standardized the performance limitations on a wide class of modern accelerators. Mtingwa also played an important role in the design and construction of two of the Antiproton Source accelerator systems at Fermilab that were used in the discovery of the top quark and other particles. During 1988-1991, Mtingwa joined the staff of Argonne National Laboratory where he performed research on a futuristic accelerator concept called wakefield acceleration. In 1991, Mtingwa joined the faculty at North Carolina A & T State University as Chair and Professor of physics. Mtingwa was named J. Ernest Wilkins, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Physics at Morgan State University in 1997 and then returned to North Carolina A & T State University in 1999. He served as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Visiting Professor of Physics at MIT from 2001 to 2003. He joined the faculty at Harvard University in 2003, where he served as Visiting Professor of Physics for two years. Returning to MIT in 2006, Mtingwa was named Lead Physics Lecturer in the Concourse Program in the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Education. He was also appointed as the Faculty Director of Academic Programs in the Office of Minority Education. In 2011, he became Principal Partner of Triangle Science, Education & Economic Development, LLC and he was appointed Senior Physics Consultant at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

In addition to his research activities, Mtingwa is involved in a number of national and international initiatives. He is a founder of the African Laser Centre (ALC) and was the principal author of the Strategy and Business Plan upon which the ALC is based. In 1977, Mtingwa was a co-founder of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) and served as NSBP President from 1992 to 1994.

Mtingwa has been recognized by national and international organizations for his contributions to science. In 1996, he received the Outstanding Service Award for Contributions to the African American Physics Community from the National Society of Black Physicists. The National Council of Ghanaian Associations honored Mtingwa with the Science Education Award in 2007 for advancing science education among African peoples. Mtingwa was inducted into the African American Biographies Hall of Fame in 1994, and he was elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008.

Sekazi Mtingwa is married to W. Estella Johnson; they have two daughters.

Research physicist and physics professor Sekazi K. Mtingwa was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 6, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.076

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/6/2013

Last Name

Mtingwa

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Kauze

Occupation
Schools

Princeton University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Henry McNeal Turner High School

Alonzo F. Herndon Elementary

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sekazi

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

MTI01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Town, South Africa

Favorite Quote

Stay yourself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

10/20/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hillsborough

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sea Bass (Mediterranean)

Short Description

Nuclear physicist Sekazi Mtingwa (1949 - ) contributed to the design and construction of the accelerator systems used in the discovery of the top quark at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Mtingwa is a founder of the National Society of Black Physicists and the National Society of Hispanic Physicists, and he has made significant contributions to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education.

Employment

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Harvard University

North Carolina A&T State University

Morgan State University

Argonne National Laboratory

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

University of Rochester

University of Maryland, College Park

Favorite Color

Salmon

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sekazi Mtingwa's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sekazi Mtingwa lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his stepfather

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his schools

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes when he first decided to become a physicist

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his high school extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his high school mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about transitioning from high school to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about the formation of the black student union at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about the black student union at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about why he chose physics as his field

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his mentors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Princeton University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about Alexander Pushkin pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about Alexander Pushkin pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his time at Princeton University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his doctoral dissertation

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about changing his name

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes assisting in the establishment of a university in Tanzania

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes what he did after receiving his doctoral degree from Princeton University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his work at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sekazi Mtingwa explains the Higgs boson, dark matter, and dark energy

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his involvement in the Harold Washington Campaign

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes why he joined the group at Argonne National Laboratory

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about being featured in several magazines

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his involvement in various African organizations

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his physics research as an exchange scholar in the Soviet Union

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about racial prejudice in the field of physics

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about the International Linear Collider

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his time as the Chair of the Physics Department at North Carolina A & T University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his involvement in the African Laser Centre

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes how the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has changed since he was a student

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about visiting Russia for a nuclear waste disposal examination

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sekazi Mtingwa reflects on his awards and recognitions

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his study 'Readiness of the U.S. Nuclear Workforce for Twenty-first Century Problems'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his involvement in President Barack Obama's campaigns

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about being the chair of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his visit to Tanzania

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his involvement with organization that provide access to scientific instruments

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his involvement in the African Physical Society

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his work on textbooks

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sekazi Mtingwa describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sekazi Mtingwa reflects on his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Sekazi Mtingwa reflects on his life

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Sekazi Mtingwa talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

1$5

DATitle
Sekazi Mtingwa talks about the black student union at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sekazi Mtingwa describes his study 'Readiness of the U.S. Nuclear Workforce for Twenty-first Century Problems'
Transcript
Tell us about the beginnings of the black student union at MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts]?$$Okay. So we had a group, maybe about ten students, who would get together informally to meet. And you have to understand that the context of that period, with the Vietnam War, protests going on all over the place, you know, the Black Liberation Movement was in full swing. So, some of us, you know, were a part of that type of way of thinking, and we wanted to try to move MIT ahead. So we formed around 1968, probably the fall of '68 [1968]. The first co-chairs were Shirley Jackson, and I think The HistoryMakers did an interview of her. She's now president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [Troy, New York]. And James Turner, who was a graduate student--in fact, at that time, they were both graduate students. Shirley was three years ahead of me. So my sophomore year, she was a first-year graduate student. James Turner, I think he must have been about a third or fourth-year graduate student in physics; they were both in physics. And James Turner actually most--he went on to become a top official at the Department of Energy, and most recently, I think, he's been at the Department of Commerce. But he had quite a career at the top levels of federal government. But, yeah, we basically met and we decided, "Hey let's just do this." And so we formed. And we tried to--one of the biggest initiatives was to get more black students into MIT. So we worked hard on that. And so, at the end of my sophomore year going into the junior year, that entering class went from the typical five-ish to fifty-three. And so the numbers have been big ever since. And, in fact, to this day MIT, again, admits only out of a thousand, eleven hundred students; about 20 percent of those are African Americans; and another 20 percent or so are Latino-Americans. So that we've (simultaneous)--$$(Unclear)--$$--come a long ways. Yeah. But it's interesting. One of the interesting things that helped the African American presence is the students who are immigrants or who are children of African Caribbean immigrants, because that's one thing that you note from the names when you meet many of the students. So that has really helped us intellectually. The black community in this country intellectually has been tremendously enhanced by immigrant students. They come here with a parent wanting a better life for their children, and so they come with that, you know, "Go to college, get your degree," and all that. And you can see the pay off. I don't think we could hit 20 percent of the students, African American students, if we didn't have the immigrants.$$They have a good observation.$$Yeah. It's a great thing. I tend to be a Pan-African, is to me, whether you're from the Caribbean, the continental of the U.S., we're all African peoples.$$Is this something you learned at home or something that you--$$No. I got so much at home, but just as I developed as a graduate student--really as a graduate student, I really became, you know, convinced that, you know, we're all the same. And then having traveled to Africa, you know, so many times. I think that the way people colonize, it's just--it's very similar to--the stories you hear are very similar to the stories of people like me out of Jim Crow South.$$Okay. Just in a different location.$$Just in a different location.$$Similar situations.$$Similar situations, yeah. Yeah.$$And--now. All right. So, the BSU [black student union] really made some gains (unclear).$$Oh, yeah. Definitely. Definitely.$$And I know it still exists actually.$$It still exists. It still exists.$$Shot a picture of it when I was there (simultaneous) (unclear)--$$Oh, you did? All right. That was great.$$--I was walking down the hallway and I saw it. And I said, "Oh, this is the famous BSU at MIT." And I thought--I shot it on my phone (simultaneous) (unclear)--$$Oh, really. Okay.$$--as to--yeah.$$(unclear), you know, it's still alive and well.$$Yeah. Yeah. So many of the people we met were a part--$$It was a part of that, yes.$Now, you were on the Nuc-- the 'Readiness of the U.S. Nuclear Workforce.'$$Okay, yeah. So that was a study I did because I'm--we have a real problem with training, you know, the next generation of nuclear scientists and engineers. And at one point, the Department of Energy, DOE, was cutting back funding the university programs, so I was concerned. You know, if you start cutting back, who is going to operate? Who's going to design the next generation of nuclear reactors if the people are not being educated? So we did this study, and we pointed out to them, you know, how many people are graduating, how much money is going into the university programs. And this report turned out to be extremely important in convincing DOE to turn its attitude around toward university education. And so since this report, their 20 percent of the nuclear fuel--Research and Development Budget--nuclear fuel cycle, Research and Development Budget is going to universities. So, I mean, that's like a big flip from not wanting to give in until now, 20 percent of your funding is going to universities. And that's important. Most of the money goes to the National Laboratories to work on the big problems of nuclear waste storage and so forth. But you need to have university professors and students working on new ideas. You know, turn them loose and let them dream and pursue blue-sky research, because you don't know what major revolution they may start up; what major breakthrough. And so that was the point of that whole story, to try to get more money going to universities to promote students and new ideas.

David B. Wilkins

Legal scholar and law professor David B. Wilkins was born on January 22, 1956 in Chicago, Illinois. His father, attorney Julian Wilkins, became the first black partner at a major law firm in Chicago in 1971. Wilkins graduated from the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools in 1973. He received his A.B. degree in government with honors in 1977 from Harvard College and his J.D. degree with honors in 1980 from Harvard Law School. While in law school, Wilkins was a member of the Harvard Civil Rights Civil Liberties Law Review, the Harvard Law Review, and the Harvard Black Law Students Association.

Upon graduation, Wilkins served as a law clerk to Chief Judge Wilfred Feinberg of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Wilkins then clerked for United States Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall from 1981 to 1982. In 1982, Wilkins worked as an associate specializing in civil litigation at the law firm of Nussbaum, Owen & Webster in Washington, D.C. He then joined the faculty of Harvard Law School in 1986 as an assistant professor. Wilkins was appointed as Director of the Program on the Legal Profession in 1991 and received tenure in 1992, making him the school’s fourth African American tenured professor and the sixth in the history of the school. He served as the Kirkland and Ellis Professor of Law from 1996 until 2008, when he became the Lester Kissel Professor of Law. In 2009, Wilkins was appointed as Vice Dean for Global Initiatives on the Legal Profession and Faculty Director of the Program on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School.

As a legal scholar, Wilkins authored over sixty articles on the legal profession, and co-authored, along with Andrew Kaufman, Problems in Professional Responsibility for a Changing Profession. In addition, Wilkins served as a Senior Research Fellow of the American Bar Foundation and a member of the Faculty Committee of the Harvard University Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics. Wilkins has also lectured on various issues in legal studies internationally as well as in the United States. Harvard Law School honored Wilkins with the Albert M. Sachs – Paul Freund Award for Teaching Excellence in 1998 and the J. Clay Smith Award in 2009. He received the Order of the Coif Distinguished Visitor Fellowship in 2008 and was honored as the American Bar Foundation Scholar of the Year Award in 2010. In 2012, Professor Wilkins was elected as a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2012, Wilkins was honored with an Honorary Doctorate of Laws degree from Stockholm University in Stockholm, Sweden, the Distinguished Visiting Mentor Award from Australia National University, and the Genest Fellowship from Osgoode Hall Law School.

Wilkins and his wife, Ann Marie WIlkins, live in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

David B. Wilkins was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 29, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.109

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/29/2013 |and| 10/18/2016

Last Name

Wilkins

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Brian

Occupation
Schools

Harvard University

Harvard Law School

University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

WIL63

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Just Do It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

1/22/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Macaroni and Cheese

Short Description

Lawyer and law professor David B. Wilkins (1956 - ) was the Lester Kissel Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He also served as the vice dean for global initiatives on the legal profession and faculty director of the program on the legal profession and the Center on Lawyers and the Professional Services Industry.

Employment

Harvard University Law School

Harvard University

American Bar Association (ABA)

Nussbaum, Owen and Webster

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Court of Appeals, Second Circuit

Kirkland and Ellis LLP

McDonald's

Commonwealth Edison Company

Covington and Burling LLP

Morrison and Foerster LLP

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of David B. Wilkins' interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins talks about his sister's research on their family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins recalls his family's connection to the United Methodist Church

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - David B. Wilkins talks about his paternal uncle, J. Ernest Wilkins, Jr.

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - David B. Wilkins describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins talks about his father's education and U.S. military service

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins recalls how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins describes his paternal family's legacy at the Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins remembers his paternal grandfather's tenure in the U.S. government

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins talks about the founding of Seaway National Bank in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins talks about his father's transition to Jenner and Block in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - David B. Wilkins describes his father's tenure at Jenner and Block, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins describes his father's tenure at Jenner and Block, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins talks about the creation of Lafontant, Wilkins and Fisher in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins remembers his father's death

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins describes his father's personality

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins recalls a family trip to South America

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins remembers his mother

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins recalls graduating from Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - David B. Wilkins talks about his father's and paternal uncle's legal careers

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins describes his siblings

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins talks about his brothers' international travels

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins recalls his childhood on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins remembers moving to Chicago's Hyde Park neighborhood

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins describes the racial demographics of the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins remembers his classmates at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins talks about his friendship with Arne Duncan

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins describes his family's relationship with the Bowman family

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins recalls his interest in debate at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins talks about the environment of the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins talks about the environment of the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins remembers his high school debate coach, Earl Bell

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins recalls the gang activity on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - David B. Wilkins remembers the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins talks about the segregation of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins describes his father's political affiliations

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins talks about his paternal family's prominence

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins describes his decision to attend Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins recalls the political climate of the early 1970s

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins remembers the African American community in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins describes the founding of the Black Students Association at Harvard University

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - David B. Wilkins remembers the African American faculty members at Harvard University, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - David B. Wilkins remembers the African American faculty members at Harvard University, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of David B. Wilkins' interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins talks about his father's experiences at the Harvard Law School, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins talks about his father's experiences at the Harvard Law School, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins describes his father's influence on his career

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins remembers the African American community at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins recalls his classmates at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins remembers meeting Al Haymon at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - David B. Wilkins talks about the increase of African American students at Harvard University

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins talks about the Black Students Association at Harvard University

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins describes his involvement in theater and radio at Harvard University

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins talks about his experiences of racial discrimination in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins remembers Anthony R. Chase and his wife at Harvard University

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins describes his summer position at the Commonwealth Edison Company

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins recalls his decision to attend Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins remembers his professors at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - David B. Wilkins recalls meeting his wife, Ann Marie Wilkins

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins talks about his father's decision to leave Jenner and Block in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins recalls joining the Harvard Law Review

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins describes his experiences clerking at Kirkland and Ellis, LLP in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins describes his experiences clerking at Kirkland and Ellis, LLP in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins talks about the emergence of critical legal studies at Harvard Law School

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins talks about his clerkships

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins describes his experiences on the Harvard Law Review

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - David B. Wilkins remembers working with Harold Hongju Koh at the Harvard Law Review

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins remembers his colleagues at the Harvard Law Review

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins talks about his paternal uncle's thoughts on his career

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins describes his clerkship for Justice Wilfred Feinberg

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins remembers clerking in the U.S. Supreme Court for Thurgood Marshall, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins remembers clerking in the U.S. Supreme Court for Thurgood Marshall, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins describes his position at Nussbaum, Owen and Webster in New York City

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins remembers his Harvard Law School professor, Clarence Clyde Ferguson, Jr.

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins remembers being approached to teach at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins recalls the controversy surrounding Jack Greenberg's course at Harvard Law School

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins remembers his interview at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins talks about the different levels of professorship at the Harvard Law School

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins recalls the first African American professors at Harvard Law School

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins describes his initial faculty presentation at Harvard Law School

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - David B. Wilkins recalls his first year of teaching at Harvard Law School

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - David B. Wilkins talks about the first class he taught at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - David B. Wilkins describes his position as a graduate assistant at Harvard Law School

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - David B. Wilkins remembers his transition to teaching at Harvard Law School

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - David B. Wilkins talks about Charles Ogletree's career at Harvard Law School

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - David B. Wilkins talks about the faculty and students of Harvard Law School

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - David B. Wilkins remembers Derrick A. Bell, Jr.

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$10

DAStory

4$4

DATitle
David B. Wilkins remembers his paternal grandfather's tenure in the U.S. government
David B. Wilkins remembers clerking in the U.S. Supreme Court for Thurgood Marshall, pt. 1
Transcript
So Wilkins, Wilkins and Wilkins in Chicago [Illinois].$$Yes.$$That's the law firm.$$That's the law firm.$$Okay.$$And it was a typical you know black law firm of its day. Meaning it served primarily, if not almost exclusively, a clientele of black individuals and small black businesses. My grandfather [J. Ernest Wilkins, Sr.] had built it up over the years at the time in which there were very few black lawyers in Chicago. He'd become well known in the Chicago legal circle. He was one of the few black lawyers who had gone to a prestigious law school [University of Chicago Law School, Chicago, Illinois]. He was active in Republican politics. This was at the time in which it was still the party of Lincoln [President Abraham Lincoln] and so most blacks were Republicans. That--it was through that combination of being prominent in the legal community, he was prominent--he was the head of the Cook County Bar Association, which was the black lawyers association, and also was a member of the ABA [American Bar Association] and of the Chicago Bar Association, again for black lawyers was very unusual, and I think it was that combination plus his role in politics which brought him to the attention of the Eisenhower administration [President Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower]. That's why he got selected for that position and when he left to go to Washington [D.C.], my father [Julian Wilkins] took over the law firm and very quickly thereafter, and I can't quite get the chronology, it might have even been before my grandfather went to Washington, my uncle [John R. Wilkins] also left the firm. First, to go to be a law clerk to William Hastie [William H. Hastie] who by that time was now a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals of the Third Circuit [U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit]. Although he could have been when he was a district judge. Actually I should look that up to make sure. But he was Hastie's first law clerk and I'm pretty sure it was on the Third Circuit. Then my uncle went on to government service where he worked in the Agency for International Development [United States Agency for International Development] living in India for several years and eventually became--was appointed by President Kennedy [President John Fitzgerald Kennedy] to be the general counsel of the Agency for International Development, where he became the first black general counsel of that organization. And until, I think this is fair to say, until the Obama administration [HistoryMaker President Barack Obama] or certainly until the Clinton administration [President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton], the only black general counsel. There has now been at least one more and maybe two more. Then he left there to become a professor at the University of California law school at Berkeley [University of California Berkeley School of Law, Berkeley, California], the Boalt school of law, where he became the first black professor of that law school and only the second black faculty member in the entire Berkeley campus [University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California]. So he joined there '63 [1963] or '64 [1964] shortly after Kennedy was assassinated.$$Okay.$$My grandfather, in a history that actually is chronicled very well in my sister's book ['Damn Near White: An African American Family's Rise from Slavery to Bittersweet Success,' Carolyn Marie Wilkins], was--held his position for something like two or three years but eventually resigned in the course of a power struggle controversy around the direction of the labor department [U.S. Department of Labor] particularly, (cough) excuse me, in international affairs. So my grandfather had been the delegate to the International Labour Organization, which was a very important hotbed of controversy in the 1950s during the Cold War. And my father's--and my grandfather's appointment there was seen as a kind of way for the United States to blunt the criticism of the Soviet Union, that the U.S. was hostile to labor and particularly to black labor. So he was very much a symbol of his race in that organization and in a story that we still don't fully understand, he got into a power struggle with a new--Eisenhower had a new secretary of labor [James P. Mitchell] who was brought in the second term, I think so in nineteen fifty--fifty- no it was during the first term, it must have been in '55 [1955] or something like that, '54 [1954], '55 [1955]. Eventually my grandfather resigned and it was a big controversy about the resignation. There were lots of stories in the paper. My sister [HistoryMaker Carolyn Wilkins] writes about this in the book. But my grandfather stayed living in Washington as he decided what he was going to do and he died very tragically of a heart attack in his, he was in his mid-fifties. And, so he never came back to the firm.$So is it an easy thing once you work on the law review [Harvard Law Review] to clerk? Is it (simultaneous)--?$$(Simultaneous) It's an easy thing to get--almost everybody gets a clerkship--$$Clerkship.$$--but then it's incredibly competitive about which clerkships you get, and the most prestigious ones are on the D.C. Circuit [U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit] or on the Second Circuit [U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit], and particularly those which were thought to be quote feeders for the [U.S.] Supreme Court. Meaning that they send--judges who sent a lot of law clerks up to clerk on the Supreme Court.$$So Feinberg [Wilfred Feinberg], he was a feeder?$$So he was--I didn't fully realize it at the time, but because he was sitting in Thurgood Marshall's seat and Thurgood Marshall was the circuit justice for the Second Circuit. He would take often a Feinberg clerk, not always, it wasn't quite like a Skelly Wright [J. Skelly Wright] and Brennan [William J. Brennan, Jr.], where Brennan would just take all of Skelly Wright's clerks. But it was a very--it turned out to be a very advantageous clerkship for me to get, my ultimate dream was to clerk for Thurgood Marshall which was an incredible experience (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So, so can you talk about that?$$So, you know people ask me--$$'Cause at that point what age is he?$$So, he's old, he's like seven- well, I mean he's getting younger every day because now as I turn sixty, seventy-eight I think he was or seventy--he was in his seventies, it doesn't seem all that old to me actually. But I think seventy-eight sticks out in my mind. And when people ask me what he was like I say he's kind of like your grandfather, meaning he had a lot of--your grandfather lived an amazing life. So he was really smart and he had lots of wisdom, but he also didn't have a lot of patience and he pretty much knew exactly what he was going to do and what he wasn't going to do and he really didn't put up with much. We'd be arguing with him and we'd be--the law clerks would be saying, "Judge, you have to do this," or, "You have to do that," and he would say, "You know, I only have to do two things; stay black and die" (laughter). That would kind of be the end of the argument. Or he'd turn around and he would point to the wall and he'd say, "President Johnson [President Lyndon Baines Johnson] signed my commission. Who signed yours?" (Laughter) So again that was sort of the end of the argument, right. People say, "What do you remember most?" And, "What's the best thing?" And of course there were these amazing arguments and I saw these amazing lawyers including--Larry Tribe [Laurence Tribe] came and argued a case. Walking up the steps to work in this marble building [Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C.] was just incredible. But the best part had nothing to do with the law, although I realized it had everything to do with the law, because the best parts were the stories. Everyday about four o'clock, just like your grandfather, he would kind of walk into the office, so he--the way the office worked was each of the justices has a kind of a suite. It's a really weird building, so basically each of them occupies a kind of corner of the building and there are all these separate stairways and elevators and stuff. So actually they hardly ever see each other and you hardly ever see another human being walking in the halls, 'cause there are only nine people that live there and it's a building that's as big as an enormous city block. Most of the people who aren't justices work in the interior of the building, like the clerks and the clerks' office, and then the rest of it is just for these nine what were guys until my first--the year I clerked it was Sandra Day O'Connor's year and so then it wasn't just nine guys anymore, and they stopped calling them Mr. Justice, which I always regretted. I always thought the coolest thing in the world would be to be called Mr. Justice (laughter). So it was a weird building, but anyway Marshall's office was on the--the justice's office was on the corner of course, and then there was a middle office where he had--there were two secretaries and a messenger and then the far office was where the law clerks sat. And there was a big overstuffed chair at the corner by the door and--by the interior door and everyday about four o'clock the judge would kind of walk in and he'd sit down in the chair and he would just start telling stories. He was a master storyteller. All kinds of stories, stories about Brown [Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 1954], stories about escaping lynchings. But also stories about his son, John [John W. Marshall], who is a Virginia State trooper and how they would set speed traps for people, or stories about the custodians who he knew the names of every single custodian who was in the building, or about his marshal who had been with him since the solicitor general's office. His name was Mr. Gaines [ph.]; we called him Gaines. When I first started telling people, I was always kind of sheepish about--I should be talking about the great decisions that were there. I don't even remember--if you press me I could remember one or two cases that were decided and one or two cases that I worked on that I'm proud of. But we only wrote dissents and when we got majority opinions they were like stupid cases, you know that were nine nothing because by that time Burger [Warren E. Burger] was in charge, and it was the Burger court and Marshall and Brennan were totally marginalized.

Arlene Maclin

Physicist and education administrator Arlene P. Maclin was born in Brunswick County, Virginia on June 7, 1945 to parents Otis Armstead and Alice Matthews Maclin. Maclin attended Hickory Run Elementary School and Rawlings Elementary School, and graduated from James Solomon High School in 1963. Upon graduation, Maclin enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University, where she graduated with her B.S. degree in engineering physics in 1967. Maclin went on to earn her M.S. degree in theoretical nuclear physics from the University of Virginia in 1971, and her Ph.D. degree in theoretical solid state physics from Howard University in 1974.

Throughout her career, Maclin has served as a researcher and educational administrator for several major institutions. She served as a research physicist at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory and as a visiting scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In 1980, Maclin was appointed program director for the National Science Foundation, and from 1981 to 1983, she was the Senior Applied Research Physicist at the Central Intelligence Agency. Her academic service includes more than fifteen years of teaching at the levels of associate and full professors, and with administrative experience at the level of associate dean and director or of research. From 2002 to 2009, Maclin served as professor of optical engineering and director of the Intelligence Community Center for Academic Excellence at Norfolk State University, where she received research grants totaling $10 million and developed graduate programs in optical engineering and electronics engineering. In 2011, Maclin was appointed as the executive director of the MAC-CAE Program and adjunct professor of physics at Morgan State University.

Maclin is a member of American Physical Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Materials Research Society. She served as the primary program staff for the Materials Science and Engineering Report and the International Survey of Atomic and Molecular Science, which were published by the National Research Council. For her many contributions and accomplishments, Maclin was selected for inclusion in Who’s Who Among Black American, International Who’s Who of Women, and Who’s Who in America.

Arlene Maclin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers in January 14, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.001

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/14/2013 |and| 1/19/2013

Last Name

Maclin

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Paige

Schools

University of Virginia

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University

James Solomon Russell Middle School

Rawlings Elementary School

Hickory Run Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Days, evenings, and weekends

First Name

Arlene

Birth City, State, Country

Rawlings

HM ID

MAC03

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Youths, teens, college students, graduate students

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Expenses plus $500 minimum in most cases

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Town, South Africa

Favorite Quote

Take care of yourself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/7/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Physicist and academic administrator Arlene Maclin (1945 - ) has served as professor and research administrator at Norfolk State University, Howard University, and Morgan State University.

Employment

Morgan State University

Norfolk State University

Howard University

Mnemonic Systems

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center

Hampton University

National Research Council (NRC)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Central Intelligence Agency

National Science Foundation (NSF)

United States Congressional Office of Technology Assessment

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Arlene Maclin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin talks about Brunswick Stew

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin talks about her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Arlene Maclin talks about her mother's interest in plants

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Arlene Maclin describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Arlene Maclin talks about her father

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Arlene Maclin describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin talks about her childhood and being born with clubbed feet

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin describes her childhood home

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Arlene Maclin talks about being teased as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Arlene Maclin describes playing games with her nieces and nephews

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Arlene Maclin describes her early education

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Arlene Maclin talks about her seventh grade teacher, Maude Mays

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin talks about her interest in books, radio and television growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin talks about James Solomon Russell High School and the plight of African Americans during the 50s and 60s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin talks about her family's food growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin describes her family's involvement in church

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Arlene Maclin describes her experience at James Solomon Russell High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Arlene Maclin talks about her math and science education at James Solomon Russell High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Arlene Maclin describes the racial climate of Brunswick County, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Arlene Maclin describes her extracurricular activities at James Solomon Russel High School

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin describes her interest in Bennett College

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin talks about Alexander "Buddy" Gardner (part 1)

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin talks about North Carolina A&T University and the physics college bowl

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin talks about Alexander "Buddy" Gardner (part 2)

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Arlene Maclin describes her experience at the University of Munich

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Arlene Maclin describes her experience in Munich, Germany

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin talks about her senior year and graduation from college

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin talks about her Ford Foundation Post-baccalaureate Fellowship

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin talks about reactions to Dr. King's assassination

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin describes her experience at the University of Virginia (part 1)

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Arlene Maclin describes her experience at the University of Virginia (part 2)

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Arlene Maclin describes her teaching experience at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Arlene Maclin describes her doctoral research on liquid metals

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Arlene Maclin talks about her Lincoln Labs colleague, Alex Animalu

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin describes her work as Associate Dean at Morgan State University

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin describes her work with the National Science Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin describes her work with the Central Intelligence Agency

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin describes her experience in Japan

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Arlene Maclin describes how she inspired Horst Stormer to resume research on high speed devices

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin talks about Bell Laboratories

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin compares U.S. funding of science to that of other countries

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin describes her work at Oak Ridge National Laboratories

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin describes her work at the National Research Council

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Arlene Maclin describes her experience as a Howard University professor

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Arlene Maclin talks about her decision to move to Hampton University

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Arlene Maclin talks about other scientists from Virginia

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Slating of Arlene Maclin's interview (part 2)

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin talks about her work at the NASA Langley Research Center

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin talks about her work on optics at Hampton University

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin talks about her work at Mnemonic Systems

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin talks about her return to Howard University as a technical consultant

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Arlene Maclin talks about Y-2K

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Arlene Maclin describes her work at Norfolk State University

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Arlene Maclin talks about the lack of female minority physics professors

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Arlene Maclin describes her efforts to encourage minority students to pursue careers in science

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin talks about her professional collaborations with Camilla Opodu

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin talks about her experience in Nigeria

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Arlene Maclin talks about the Mid-Atlantic Consortium Center for Academic Excellence

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Arlene Maclin talks about her mentorship of African American students and reflects on her legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Arlene Maclin reflects on her career

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Arlene Maclin shares her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Arlene Maclin talks about her future plans

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Arlene Maclin talks about the importance of faculty research

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Arlene Maclin talks about her husband

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Arlene Maclin tells how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Arlene Maclin describes her photos

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Arlene Maclin talks about her seventh grade teacher, Maude Mays
Arlene Maclin talks about Alexander "Buddy" Gardner (part 1)
Transcript
All right, so we were talking about your teacher.$$Maude Mays.$$Yeah, Maude Mays.$$Yeah, well, she challenged me. I was, I really--that was a very, very productive year for me. And all the reports that my parents had been getting about my being disruptive in third, fourth and--well, it would be the fourth, fifth and sixth grades, disappeared 'cause you never heard any more. I never, she was just, she kept me busy. She gave me things to do. She was interesting. And she was challenging. So I was challenged.$$Now, did she teach science at all?$$No, she didn't teach science. It was, again, it was just an elementary school. But she taught, well, they had the normal science that you would have, but the math. She was good at math, but we had all the subjects, the science. I don't even remember what science we might have had in the seventh grade. But it wasn't, she wasn't--she was just an elementary school teacher. She was not a specialist in any area. But I do know that she gave me challenging things to read and to, the math, I was challenged by that. She knew I was interested in mathematics. And so she gave me extra work. So I was challenged, and I kept very busy. I was just so fascinated that here, this person would take time to introduce me to things that I had no idea about before. So she was a great teacher.$$Okay.$$And, in fact, her daughter is a teacher here in the Vineyard, just got a award several years ago.$$Here in Washington [D.C.]?$$She's in the Washington area. She teaches in some school in Virginia.$$Okay.$$But I saw the award in the newspaper. But she was a, she was just a naturally, just a great teacher, one of my memorable ones and mentor.$$Okay, this is seventh grade, right?$$Seventh grade, seventh grade, changed my life. I think it changed my whole path. I probably, had I not had her, would not have been--'cause I was, you know, I didn't have anybody to guide me academically, necessarily, 'cause my parents couldn't do that. And she did that. She was the first to give me that direction in terms of academics. These are the things you need to be doing. This is what you should be reading, that kind of thing.$Okay, so North Carolina A and T, now, so did you major in physics at--$$Absolutely. I majored in physics. I was a physics major, and that was the first, the first physicist that I had ever met, I met, and he became my long, life-long mentor, and who was Dr. Alexander Gardner, Alexander "Buddy" Gardner was my--I met him my freshman year.$$Because later on, he would be at Howard [University] too, right?$$Yes, he moved from A and T to Howard, yes.$$So his nickname was Buddy?$$Buddy, yeah. That was his middle, that was his real name. That was his middle name.$$Was it? Okay, all right, his real name.$$His name, Alexander Buddy Gardner. His close friends called him Buddy.$$Now, he is a celebrated figure--$$Absolutely. He, Dr. Gardner influenced. He was the first person, black person to get a PhD at North Carolina, University of North Carolina. He got his degree in 1964, even though it was awarded 1965. He had, he had finished pretty much his degree work when, and he was teaching at A and T, which is where he had graduated college. And I met him my freshman year. And he really influenced a whole generation of black students to do physics. We had the, we had fifty majors under Dr. Gardner at A and T. He also was Ron McNair's mentor. He was the Loews' brothers mentors. He was just, and his students went on--Elvira Shaw Williams. I don't know whether you are interviewing her or not. But he influenced a whole generation of young blacks to major in physics, and to do physics, and, in fact, when he finished--and he tells this story. When he finished North Carolina, University of North Carolina as a first black to get a PhD in physics there, and he told them that what he was going to do, he said, I'm going back to North Carolina A and T, and I'm going to influence more black students to join, to study physics. They looked at him like he was absolutely crazy. And they said, well, why aren't you going on to do research 'cause he had done, his PhD research was in metals, cadmium, and he'd done some other--and he's a very good experimentalist. He was a, just a magician almost in the laboratory. And his advisors told him that he should not do that, that he should go on into a world of research. But he decided that he really wanted to do, to teach. He was a great teacher. He taught, when he talked about physics, the physics sort of jumped off the page because he made physics come alive. He related it to our lives and what we could do with it. And he really was a master teacher, and he taught physics contextually. And here is a man who had, again, his, growing up, his early years, he left school. And he went and joined the Merchant Marines for several years, and then he got into--I never, he never told me what the problem was, but he got into some serious trouble and was in prison for a while. And he, from prison, he wrote to North Carolina A and T and asked them to please admit him to college, let him come, when he got out, when he finished, whatever his--I don't know what his crime was. He never told me. And, but North Carolina A and T admitted him, and he became the, he graduated from North Carolina A and T as the top student, summa cum laude, with an eighth grade education. And he actually came from New Burn, North Carolina originally. Again, but he influenced large numbers of people in my generation to study physics.$$And his name is--$$He was a great influence. He had, for, at one point in the '80s [1980s], more than 10 percent and there were only about, at that time, about 400 blacks with PhDs in physics, Dr. Gardener had been a mentor to forty or fifty of them. So he was a great influence for thirty years of people going on into physics. If you talked to many students my age and fifteen to twenty years younger, and you ask them when did you meet Dr. Gardener. You didn't ask where. You say, when because you know, you can tell his students. But he was a very, very instrumental mentor for a large number of students, a very large number. And he clearly was an influence on me, a large influence. And, in fact, I think I was one of his favorite students. And he was my mentor for life.$$Yeah, the African American physicists have erected a plaque to him--$$Oh, yes, absolutely.$$--on a couple of campuses, I think.$$Yeah, and he also was, in fact, after he died--he died in 2001. I went down to Alabama with his wife, his widow, and received another--they devoted a whole session to him, and his life's work and I gave a talk about him and his influence and all that. So, really, you know, it's amazing how you can have centers of influence. And I call 'em that because--and he clearly, in the black physics community, I would say Dr. Gardener clearly was a center of influence for 30 years, from 1965 till 1995. And that work was done at North Carolina A and T and at Howard [University]. He was actually recruited from A and T by President Cheek to Howard [Howard University] 'cause he wanted him to do what he had done for physics at A and T, at Howard. So he came to Howard.$$So did he establish the PhD program in physics at Howard?$$No, the PhD program at Howard was established in the '50s [1950s] before that. There was a chemistry, physics, math, were all--the PhD programs were all established about the same time. And so, no, he was, that was in the '50's [1950s] that their PhD program had actually been established at Howard.$$Okay.$$Yeah, earlier.$$All right, so this, so you came along in time to meet, to have this great mentor?$$Absolutely.$$And--$$And influence throughout my life. In fact, I'm not a very good godmother, but I'm the godmother to his two children, two of his children, who are now grown and, but, yes, he was a life--you know, it's interesting that in my life, my mentors have also become mentors and friends and lifelong. These are lifelong relationships that I established. And I think that's extremely important in a student's life, that here are people that you can go to for anything. And he was that kind of person. I mean you could pretty much, you could go to him and tell him--it didn't have to be about school. It could be about anything, and he would be willing to sit there and talk to you about that. And I think that's what good mentors do. And so mentors become friends and become collaborators and then I have this theory that mentoring is an art. It's not, it cannot be taught. It's really an art. And that's what many students miss. I tried to do that and as much as I can, and I think I've been, in some ways, a very effective mentor in that regard. But I've learned, I learned that from the people who mentored me. It's a learned behavior.

Linneaus Dorman

Organic chemist and inventor Linneaus C. Dorman was born on June 28, 1935 in Orangeburg, South Carolina to schoolteachers John Albert Dorman, Sr. and Georgia Hammond. Raised in the Jim Crow South, Dorman’s parents sent him to the historically black South Carolina State College laboratory school. The state college afforded him a better education than he would have received otherwise and nurtured his nascent interest in science. As a child, Dorman became fascinated with his friend’s chemistry set and the idea of creating new things. When he entered Wilkinson High School in 1948, his teachers immediately recognized his natural talent in science and encouraged him to take more science courses. This led him to declare chemistry as his undergraduate major after he graduated from high school.

In the fall of 1952, Dorman enrolled at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. Because his father was a World War I veteran, having served in France, Dorman received a scholarship from the small, private institution and its scholarship program for the children of World War I veterans. After receiving his B.S. degree in chemistry in 1956, Dorman enrolled in the organic chemistry Ph.D. program at Indiana University. During the summers, he traveled back to Peoria, where he gained invaluable research experience as a chemist for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory. In 1961, he earned his Ph.D. degree and took a position as a research chemist at the Dow Chemical Company in Midland, Michigan.

While Dorman has garnered a reputation for publishing many research articles in premier research journals, he has become most known for creating over twenty inventions and patents in organic chemistry and biomaterials. Many of his earliest patents involve synthesis methods in organic chemistry. In 1985, he invented a chemical compound that functioned as an absorbent that removed formaldehyde from the air. In 1992, Dorman invented a calcium phosphate biomaterial that was used in hard tissue prosthetics such as bone prosthetics in 1992. Between 1992 and 1993, he developed a new process for the controlled release of herbicides, this method became critical to crop rotation.

He joined the American Chemical Society (ACS) in 1957 and served in a number of administrative positions such as secretary, councilor, and director. Named Inventor of the Year by Dow Chemical Company in 1983, Dorman has been credited with over twenty inventions and patents in organic chemistry and biomaterials. He received the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers’ most prestigious award, the Percy C. Julian Award in 1992. Although he retired in 1994, Dorman continues to work in the scientific community as a mentor. He and his wife, Phae, live in Michigan and have two children, Evelyn and John.

Linneaus Dorman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 24, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.174

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/24/2012

Last Name

Dorman

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

C.

Occupation
Schools

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

Bradley University

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Linneaus

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

DOR06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

I will study and prepare myself, then maybe, my chance will come.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

6/28/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Midland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Watermelon

Short Description

Chemist Linneaus Dorman (1935 - ) has twenty-six inventions and patents in organic chemistry and biomaterials. He also served as a research chemist at the Dow Chemical Company.

Employment

Dow Chemical Company

Northern Regional Research Laboratory

Comerica Bank

Dow Corning

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Linneaus Dorman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman talks about his father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman talks about his parents and his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Linneaus Dorman describes the neighborhood where he grew up in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Linneaus Dorman describes the sights and sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman describes growing up in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman describes his elementary school experience at Middle Branch School and Felton Training School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman shares his childhood memories of World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman describes his introduction to chemistry and his early interest in mathematics

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman talks about the prominent speakers who visited South Carolina State College

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman talks about the first African American chemists

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman describes how his early thoughts about segregation served as a motivating force

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Linneaus Dorman describes his decision to attend Bradley University in 1952

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Linneaus Dorman describes his experience as a busboy at Carter Hotel in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman talks about the founder of Dow Chemical Company

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman describes the differences between the black communities in Orangeburg, South Carolina and in Peoria, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman describes how he met his wife, Thae

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman talks about Robert Lawrence, Jr. at Bradley University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman describes what influenced him to attend graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman talks about Robert Lawrence, Jr.'s death and his legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman describes his extracurricular activities at Bradley University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Linneaus Dorman describes his experience as a doctoral student in the chemistry department at Indiana University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Linneaus Dorman talks about getting married and starting a family while in graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Linneaus Dorman describes his summer research experience at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Linneaus Dorman describes his work for his Ph.D. dissertation on heterocyclic compounds

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman describes his decision to work at Dow Chemical in Midland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman describes his experience in Midland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman describes his early work on pharmaceutical compounds

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman describes his work on synthesizing artificial bone material

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman describes thermoplastic elastomers

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman talks about Percy Julian, one of the first African American research chemists

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman talks about his activities in the community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman talks about travel

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman talks about the importance of documentation and communication at the workplace

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman talks about his children

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman describes how he dealt with the frustrations of science

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Linneaus Dorman describes his decision to work at Dow Chemical in Midland, Ohio
Linneaus Dorman describes his early work on pharmaceutical compounds
Transcript
All right, also in our outline, it mentions here that you considered at one time teaching for a historically black college?$$Yes. But I, something told me I didn't wanna teach because that's what so many of my friends and relatives had done, not because they wanted to, but that was the only job open to them. So I wanted to do something other than teach.$$Now, did you believe that Dow [Chemical Company] would hire you?$$At the time?$$Um-hum.$$I didn't think Dow would hire me because some of my friends in graduate school had told me that Dow would not hire me, because they, some of them who had gone, who worked at Dow, (unclear) come back to Indiana University [in Bloomington, Indiana] to do further study, they told me that Dow would not hire me. But I went up to, to the Dow interview because I had a Dow fellowship. And I felt out of respect for the department [of chemistry], I should at least go up for the interview. Well, it turns out that Dow was desperately trying to get a black person, preferably one who had a Ph.D. who could come to work and be standing on your foot, on your feet alone, somebody who was strong enough, educated enough to not just be a laboratory worker, but to be an independent laboratory worker. So I discovered the chairman who was eager to hire, to talk to me and try to get me interested in Dow, much to my surprise. And I still didn't think it would happen, and I also got an offer from Ex-, it wasn't Exxon. It was Esso at the time out in Linden, New Jersey. And I thought that was a real possibility because Dow wouldn't, you know, because of the fact that this was an all-white town, Dow wouldn't probably hire me. And I'll never forget, my wife said to me, "Ah, I'll bet you get the job at Dow and not at Exxon." And that, I went out to Exxon and I followed all the people who were, with their heads in the clouds, who were not very sympathetic to a graduating black person. And sure enough, they didn't offer me a job. But Dow, I came out to Dow, and they were all very nice to me, and encouraging to me and recognized that Dow was trying to get blacks to come to work there. And it was encouraging enough that we had to make up our minds whether we were gonna take a chance on living in an all-white community. And we took a chance, made up our minds to do that and not stay a while and go someplace else because I could have done that after staying around. My telephone rang for a period of time, almost every six months, some other company wanting me to come, stop Dow and come work for them. They were offering me all kind of incentives. So I got to a point, I asked them what can you do for my retirement? They could never do anything to--I would be giving up those years working for, towards retirement. So that was always a no-no, and I had a feeling that they were trying to hire people just like Dow was trying to hire people. So I said, no, no, no. So I stayed here, and that, we decided to retire and live here. And we're happy with that decision.$Okay, all right. Now, during the course of your career, your research changed focus at different times. In the '60s [1960s] and '70s [1970s], you were focused on, from what I understand, peptides, right?$$Pharmaceutical compounds.$$Okay, and--$$And later to, when I got here, one of the things that Dow [Chemical Company] did was to become involved in the pharma--in some pharmaceutical business, thought it was a good venture because the return on pharmaceuticals is like 20 percent, which chemicals are around 10 percent. So Dow was gonna, Dow was very, always into agricultural compounds, and its agricultural compounds were tested for medicinal chemistry by somebody else. We had something called a K-List which every compound we made, you sent a sample of it, and it got a number, a K-number. And those are, one of the things the K-List did was to check it for various, for biological activities. But that was all agricultural until we got into the chemistry, to the drug business. And I was, just so happened to be in position at that time to also become a part of the drug business by synthesizing compounds here in Midland [Ohio]. We had a pharmaceutical group here in Midland. And, well, they later asked me to get into peptide chemistry because that, that was--peptides are like small proteins, and they were becoming more, more prominent because there's a guy by the name of Muirfield who devised a way to make peptides using a solid phase that would cut out a lot of the steps involved in make a peptide. Peptides are made from about twenty-five amino acids in different combinations, but to make a simple peptide, di-peptide, it's many steps, [to] make a tri-peptide, many more steps. So I became involved in the solid phase peptides chemistry, which I made some contributions to the field when I was doing that. And later on, the pharmaceutical business, we had the group here in town which was a part of the pharmaceutical effort, moved down to Indianapolis [Indiana]. And I didn't move with them, so I started something else. And that was diagnostic, latex diagnostic gauges.$$About what year is this?$$How's that?$$About what year is this when you start with the latex diagnostic gauges?$$Oh, ghez, I don't, '74 [1974]--$$Is this in the '70s [1970s] or--$$It's in the '70s [1970s], yeah.$$Okay, that's good enough.$$And we worked on developing a pregnancy test, and I worked in, in that area for a while. And from there we went to control, control release technologies. And from that to plastics.

James Andrews

Media entrepreneur James Andrews was born in San Jose, California. Andrews graduated from Palo Alto High School in Palo, Alto, California in 1988. After attending Ventura College, Andrews transferred to University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) from 1990 and 1992. After leaving UCLA, Andrews worked for Immortal Records, a defunct independent record label based in Los Angeles. In 1994, Andrews was hired as senior director of marketing for Columbia Records, developing the careers of established musical acts.

He was the executive vice president of marketing for the Ecko Unlimited clothing company before being named executive vice president for Urban Box Office in 1999. A year later, Andrews founded his own marketing company BrandInfluence. After working for global digital media company Isobar Global and global communications firm Ketchum, Andrews went on to co-found Everywhere and found Social People in 2009 and 2010, respectively. With Social People, Andrews’ clients include the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences’ 53rd Grammy Awards. He also launched Famous People LLP, a celebrity representation division that manages digital and social media assets on behalf of clients. Through Famous People LLP he worked with celebrities such as Jane Fonda and Chaka Khan. Additionally, Andrews served as a regular contributor to CNN and has appeared on the CNBC cable news network. He has been featured in Black Entreprise and Fast Company magazines.

He is married to his wife Sherrelle and has two children. Andrews resides in Atlanta Georgia.

James Andrews was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 18, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.096

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/18/2012

Last Name

Andrews

Maker Category
Schools

University of California, Los Angeles

Ventura College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

San Jose

HM ID

AND12

Favorite Season

Winter

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rio, Brazil

Favorite Quote

Dream big, trust more.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

5/12/1970

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Media company entrepreneur James Andrews (1970 - ) one of the nation’s leading experts in social media, has launched two digital media companies, working with celebrities clients such as Jane Fonda and Chaka Khan.

Employment

Social People

Everywhere

Ketchum Inc.

Isobar Global

Brand Influence

Urban Box Office Network

Ecko Unlimited

Columbia Records

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue, Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:38154,599:39386,620:40178,630:41146,647:59186,859:64962,1185:73931,1254:74595,1263:75508,1292:92305,1538:96031,1579:97408,1757:110520,1915:115277,2118:117762,2300:175962,2922:181782,3023:191882,3177:196640,3276:197264,3285:197654,3291:197966,3296:198902,3321:208936,3444:210093,3471:211072,3484:211428,3489:214187,3574:215255,3594:221585,3766:248790,4083:251906,4164:270992,4446:273050,4499$0,0:15654,237:16002,249:17481,283:25152,412:28680,502:44424,791:45864,831:52428,905:52872,924:57682,1016:59014,1061:67704,1173:68166,1180:70861,1225:72555,1261:73633,1290:74172,1301:78692,1378:86510,1477:88336,1507:88917,1516:90826,1568:96138,1707:96885,1716:98047,1743:103760,1776:107720,1886:111536,1958:112544,1977:114920,2017:121860,2083:122490,2091:123390,2119:123840,2136:127440,2201:136282,2357:139170,2438:141070,2480:141906,2496:143958,2547:149015,2688:157727,2820:158123,2825:158816,2833:181292,3085:182241,3179:195396,3368:198280,3436
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Andrews' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Andrews lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Andrews describes his mother's family background, pt.1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Andrews describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Andrews talks about growing up with his aunt and the history of blindness in his family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Andrews talks about his mother's aspirations to be a doctor

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Andrews describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Andrews describes his father's involvement with the Black Panthers

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Andrews discusses possible catalysts for his parents' activism

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James Andrews talks about meeting his father at age nine

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - James Andrews describes his parents' personalities and who he takes

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - James Andrews talks about his younger brother, his step father, and accidentally burning down his house at age six

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Andrews describes being accused as an arsonist and his life as a 'latchkey' kid

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Andrews describes his earliest memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Andrews describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Andrews compares and contrasts Oakland and Alameda, California

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Andrews describes his experience at Thousand Oaks Elementary in Berkley, California

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Andrews describes his experience at Donald Lumm Elementary and Lincoln Junior High School in Alameda

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Andrews describes the positive impact his coaches had upon his childhood development

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Andrews talks about growing up and being comfortable in a predominantly white community and family

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - James Andrews talks about his childhood interest in history and World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - James Andrews describes his childhood fascination with vinyl records

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - James Andrews talks about the rich music scene in California in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Andrews describes how Alameda, California shaped his taste in music

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Andrews describes moving to Palo Alto to live with his Aunt, who became a second mother, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Andrews describes moving to Palo Alto to live with his Aunt, who became a second mother, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Andrews describes some of his heroes in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Andrews talks about attending Stanford lectures as a high school student

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Andrews talks about playing high school basketball and his favorite basketball and baseball players

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Andrews describes his struggle with drugs and school in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Andrews talks about the emergence of hip hop

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - James Andrews talks about attending Utah Valley Community College to play college basketball

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - James Andrews describes his experience living in Provo, Utah, while attending Utah Valley Community College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Andrews talks about his passion for religion and his decision to quit doing drugs

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Andrews describes his decision to return to California to attend Ventura College in 1989

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Andrews talks about his friendship with David Warwick and his decision to enter the entertainment industry

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Andrews talks about his decision to attend UCLA and the love that he developed for the city

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Andrews describes the atmosphere and his activism during the Los Angeles riots

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Andrews talks about his educational experience as a history major at UCLA

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Andrews talks about how he met his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Andrews talks about how his wife helped him start down his career

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - James Andrews talks about his first job as Senior Director of Marketing at Immortal Records

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - James Andrews describes his experience as an intern for Columbia Records

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - James Andrews talks about his learning experiences at Wild West Records and Immortal Records

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Andrews describes working for Happy Walters at Immortal Records

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - James Andrews talks about producing his first record, 'B Ball's Best Kept Secret', for Immortal Records

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James Andrews talks about MC Hammer and other rappers from Oakland, California that inspired him

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James Andrews talks about the emergence of a more confrontational rappers like Tupac Shakur

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James Andrews talks about moving to New York City to work as Director of Marketing for Columbia Records

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James Andrews talks about his mentor at Columbia Records, LeBaron Taylor

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - James Andrews talks about marketing emerging acts like Destiny's Child by using the Internet

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - James Andrews talks about the importance of video for marketing in the music industry

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - James Andrews talks about his project with DJ Jazzy Jeff and his first encounter with the Philadelphia music scene

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - James Andrews talks about his newsletter, Soul Purpose, and leaving Columbia Records to work with Mark Ecko

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - James Andrews describes his proudest accomplishment at Ecko

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - James Andrews describes his decision to sell Soul Purpose and leave Ecko to work at Urban Box Office

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - James Andrews talks about Silicon Alley in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - James Andrews talks about Brand Influence, the impact it had upon his family life, and his religious awakening

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - James Andrews talks about his social media practices at Isobar and Ketchum

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - James Andrews describes a social media mishap while on a business trip in Memphis, Tennessee, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - James Andrews describes a social media mishap while on a business trip to Memphis, Tennessee, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - James Andrews describes his working relationship with Jane Fonda

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - James Andrews talks about his work with the social media startups

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - James Andrews discusses his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - James Andrews describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - James Andrews describes the burgeoning entrepreneurial atmosphere in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - James Andrews talks about his children and his family's lifestyle

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - James Andrews reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - James Andrews talks about what he would change about his past

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - James Andrews talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
James Andrews describes the atmosphere and his activism during the Los Angeles riots
James Andrews talks about marketing emerging acts like Destiny's Child by using the Internet
Transcript
Now this is the last--$$This is, this is, this is '91 [1991] I think or '90/'91 [1990/1991].$$Now were you in L.A. then when the riots hit [unclear].$$Yeah that's a big part of my story. Yeah I was right there, yeah. So I go to UCLA and I was dating my girlfriend who was my wife at the time--and actually I was living with her at the time. And the, you know the riots happened right there. We all went to UCLA, we were activists, you know we were involved as Black students, you know. And, but it was an interesting moment where you know the--we were there to, to create a statement and to do something and to say something about, you know, injustice and Rodney King and I just saw a bunch of football players like stealing stuff out of the store. I saw people getting over and I was like wait a minute, like I grew up like you know, Panther, you know what I mean? Like we're not doing anything, we're just--cats is running in there, you know taking things and it was a real defining moment for me that I was like wait a minute. Like where is the activism? This is--a lot of talk but you know this is not activism, this is people stealing stuff, you know. And I do remember that. I remember it being a very tense moment, you know. There was National Guard at the Ralph's grocery store. A White girl spilled a soda on my wife by accident and the White girl said when my wife was looking for an apology, don't be such a bitch. And my wife and I chased this girl throughout the campus. And it was a very, very tense moment. There was some interesting moments that, that shaped me. But yeah I was right there in L.A.$$Just for those who are watching this and don't know what happened, Rodney King [unclear].$$Sure, so Rodney King, Rodney King like so many of us was a victim of Los Angeles Police brutality. I mean it was, it was my world. I lived through Oakland Police brutality and then also Los Angeles Police brutality consistently being, you know, pulled out of cars. And Rodney King, you know was beaten, you know, sense, sense--you know like a, like a, like a piece of meat by the Los Angeles Police Department.$$This was on the--$$It was on the news, it was on video, it was pre-social media, you know. It was on video cam, it was the first social media moment, ironically that really, you know went everywhere and shaped and, and turned to riots. You know it was, it was crazy in Los Angeles, all over this country.$$Okay so national [unclear] incident and--$$Yes national incident.$$Were you, you a part of the different forums, I know Jim Brown, Ted Koppel from Nightline was involved in meetings with the Crypts and the Bloods and the different gangs about the--and community leaders in L.A.$$No I wasn't. You know I was a student, I was neither a gangbanger nor was I an activist. I was kind of in the middle. I was, I was just getting to L.A. and I was trying to, you know, get out of college and figure out who I was. I wasn't involved really. My wife, you know we were activists in that I lived in this apartment building. I lived with my wife, with a neighbor whose name was Chris Madison, he was very active. Went to Howard and was always you know, looking for a conspiracy and, and we were definitely, you know we were definitely thinking about what should we do, what's our place. My best friend in college was Sir Bailey, his father is Phillip Bailey and so we actually had like a, sort of a, a salon that we used to meet together and talk about you know, what's happening in, you know, in Los Angeles, what's happening with Black people in Los Angeles. And so you know it definitely, it definitely--there were a lot of conversations that we had but we were not a part of any famous forums. We were our own forum. There was a, a teacher on campus named Mogla [ph.] Malekai Eesy [ph.] and Mogla was, was helping to organize a lot of the African students. But, but you know there's so much history in, in--that I also being a history major, and being, you know a child of the Bay area and the Panthers, there was so much history in UCLA's campus and the Black Panther party and I was looking for something, I was looking for the jump-off. I was looking for the--and what I saw was just silliness, right and I wish I would have found those, those activisms. But we created our own activism, we really--when I look back on it, we really created our own forums, you know our own moments where we talked about Blackness in Los Angeles in that moment.$Now tell us about how you marketed the Destiny Child.$$Yeah, in all of our acts, you know we had to you know, get these acts on the road. We had to get exposure. We had to, you know, no one cared about these Black acts initially. You know no one really, you know, you know no one really you know was putting a lot of emphasis on the Fugees, you know. So what was the change, I mean at this time because it's also the beginning of the Internet. This is the beginning of forums, right. This is the beginning of AOL coming into emergence. And one thing I didn't share about my background in Palo Alto is I grew up writing code. Like I programmed in Basic. The only thing is about living in Palo Alto is we learned how to write to code, you know, in eighth grade. I was normal. I had friends who were thugs who were writing code. You know whose, whose parents worked at Hewlard Packard. So I was always technology, technology is my bones. I mean technology--Palo Alto shaped me. So when I got to Columbia Records you know as an executive, I realized that you know, this thing called the Internet was going to be extremely important. And that we were not paying enough attention in the Black Music Division to our artists' Web presence. And yet the White acts were writing them into their contracts. They were actually a big part of their deal. And our Black acts actually didn't even know about it. I mean they weren't really thinking about it. So I would sit down with, you know a then 15 year old Beyonce, which sounds crazy today, you know and her father Mathew Knowles and the group and I would tell them about how important the Web is and how important the Internet is. And I was the first to really educate our artists about you know, the Web and, and what it was about to become. So we did lots of things. You know we did college tours, we did a college tour that started here in Atlanta and went all the way up to Howard where we actually talked to kids during the day in like panel style format, then we had concerts at night. And these were relatively unknown acts that we actually broke with the help of local radio stations, WPGC in D.C. and you know, a local station here and we broke a lot of acts just by putting them on the road, you know and getting out there in the streets. You know Maxwell was a live act, you know that had to see him live. There's no dat [ph.] tape. You've got to see Maxwell live. You know we, and I worked directly with Maxwell to help, you know, shape his vision. To help get his vision out to the world.$$It seems as though these acts are typified, at least the ones you've named here, are typified by actual music, you know [unclear].$$Yeah, absolutely.$$Not just rapping and beats.$$That's right, absolutely. Yeah Fugees and Lauryn Hill, that was a very special moment. You got to, you know the beauty of those groups are they really needed a live show. They thrived off a live show. And so we as a group really pushed getting out there and getting on the road and we didn't just rely on radio. So much of the business at that time was like if you didn't have a radio, you didn't have a record. We were like forget it, we're going to make radio play these records. And we really [unclear]. There weren't a lot of record labels doing this type of approach at this time period. We were very much, we were doing real marketing, it wasn't just relying on radio.

Richard Love

Prominent newspaper publisher Richard Love was born on June 24, 1938, in Hahira, Georgia. Recruited by the Los Angeles Dodgers following high school, Love declined an invitation to their farm team to pursue a college degree. Love attended Kentucky State University, but left following his freshman year to join the military.

Prior to withdrawing from Kentucky State University, Love was involved in a racially charged protest. Objecting to the school's policy of admitting whites into the all-black college, Love and several classmates staged a demonstration that led to the torching of the school gym. In 1958, Love opted to leave Kentucky State University for the military. Love spent three years in the service, and spent considerable time at Fort Devers in Boston and Bavaria, Germany, where he became the battalion photographer. Love left the military in 1961 and returned to his home in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Love worked as an orderly at a V.A. hospital for several years until 1964, when he was recruited to work on vice president Hubert Humphrey's personal defense team. The next year, Love became a real estate appraiser for World Savings, where he also worked as a housing consultant for the Urban League. Love worked in real estate for nearly a decade, primarily as a housing coordinator of land-based properties in Dade County, Florida. There, he acquired his first experiences in journalism as an editor for the community newsletter.

Love moved to Westwood, California, in 1985. There, he continued working in real estate and also became an advisor for black businesses. Encouraged by the success of the African American Denver Times, Love surveyed the community to gauge support for a black newspaper. After receiving largely positive responses, he established The Long Beach Times. Singlehandedly writing, editing and publishing the newspaper, Love focused on giving African Americans a voice by including the names of political representatives and city council members and listing their contact information in each issue.

Love continues to publish The Long Beach Times and each edition of the bi-weekly newspaper reaches an estimated 30,000 readers. In the early 1990s, he founded the Long Beach Chapter of African American Commerce. A member of the NAACP and advocate of black business development, Love is a devoted leader of the Long Beach community.

Accession Number

A2002.210

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/19/2002

Last Name

Love

Maker Category
Schools

Kentucky State University

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Richard

Birth City, State, Country

Hahira

HM ID

LOV04

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Petersburg, Florida

Favorite Quote

We Can't Do It Without You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

6/24/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Tampa

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Red Snapper

Short Description

Newspaper editor and newspaper publishing chief executive Richard Love (1938 - ) was an advocate of black business development and a devoted leader in his community where he founded The Long Beach Times.

Employment

World Savings Bank

Long Beach Times

United States Army

Mercy Hospital

Don CeSar Veterans Administration Hospital

Department of the Interior

Northeast Housing Center

Eleventh Coast Guard District

Dade County, Florida

Favorite Color

Black, Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:13863,193:23726,311:30368,478:30778,484:68212,1111:101694,1525:111590,1711:148772,2085:150746,2175:158630,2272:162605,2469:167105,2590:176048,2700:176418,2715:181598,2838:184706,2898:195260,2994:195584,3140:199472,3249:205896,3339:215600,3555:225070,3703$0,0:13987,257:22891,353:28784,459:29139,465:40837,639:53165,875:65480,1055:66005,1063:66380,1069:82518,1357:83222,1371:86486,1450:101134,1696:107726,1855:166802,2572:169645,2592:181420,2709
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Richard Love's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Richard Love lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Richard Love describes his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Richard Love talks about his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Richard Love talks about his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Richard Love describes Hahira, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Richard Love describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Richard Love talks about his father's experiences being a postman in St. Petersburg, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Richard Love talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Richard Love talks about his parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Richard Love talks about traveling to Hahira, Georgia to help with summer harvesting as a youth

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Richard Love describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Richard Love describes his admiration for his older brother

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Richard Love describes his childhood interests and activities

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Richard Love talks about being offered a scholarship to become a librarian

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Richard Love talks about being recruited by the Los Angeles Dodgers farm team

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Richard Love reflects upon completing all four years of his high school education

Tape: 1 Story: 18 - Richard Love describes why his mother kept him from playing with the Los Angeles Dodgers farm team and made him finish high school

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Richard Love talks about the teachers that influenced him as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Richard Love describes how he came to attend Kentucky State College in Frankfort, Kentucky

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Richard Love talks about attending Kentucky State College in Frankfort, Kentucky

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Richard Love talks about integration at Kentucky State College

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Richard Love talks about racial inequality in the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Richard Love describes his experiences training for the Army Security Agency in Fort Devens, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Richard Love describes his experiences being stationed in Germany while serving in the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Richard Love talks about being a battalion photographer while serving in the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Richard Love describes his spearheading a feasibility study for determining consumer interest in a black newspaper in Long Beach, California

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Richard Love describes being hired to work at Don CeSar Veterans Affairs Hospital in 1961

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Richard Love talks about serving on U.S. Vice President Herbert Humphrey's security detail during the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Richard Love reflects upon the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Richard Love talks about his career from 1968 to the mid-1980s

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Richard Love describes how he fell into newspaper publishing

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Richard Love describes how he started the Long Beach Times, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Richard Love describes how he started the Long Beach Times, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Richard Love states the mission of the Long Beach Times

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Richard Love talks about founding the Long Beach Black Chamber of Commerce

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Richard Love describes the issues with the Long Beach branch of the NAACP

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Richard Love describes the issues he sees in the black community, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Richard Love describes the issues he sees in the black community, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Richard Love describes the issues he sees in the black community, pt. 3

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Richard Love talks about applying his parents' advice to his life

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Richard Love describes the ways in which he taught his children to manage their priorities

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Richard Love describes the demographics in Long Beach, California

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Richard comments on the changing demographics of the neighborhoods in Long Beach, California

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Richard Love comments on how people perceive black identity

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Richard Love talks about the value of inclusive, rather than exclusive, mindsets

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Richard Love describes why culturally specific chambers of commerce are necessary

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Richard Love comments on the black community's need for economic viability

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Richard Love comments on the "democratic slave mentality" of some blacks

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Richard Love describes the issues he had with the Black Church

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Richard Love talks about how black people are intimidated by one another

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Richard Love reflects upon the legacy of The Long Beach Times

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Richard Love talks about his parents

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Richard Love talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Richard Love narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

1$4

DATitle
Richard Love describes how he started the Long Beach Times, pt. 1
Richard Love talks about founding the Long Beach Black Chamber of Commerce
Transcript
Alright, let's continue the story of how you got started with the paper.$$Okay, I'll be happy to. So, when I arrived in 1985 in Long Beach [California], I noticed there was not a media from a black perspective. I did a windshield feasibility study. They said, sure we would support it. And there again, not knowing anything about journalism, but I knew that you need to tell people who, what, where, why, when and how, and that kind of thing. And you get that in eighth or ninth grade, you know, in English doing essays. So, we went out and--meaning 'we,' I always talk in the plural; but nobody but me. And I got the IBM justifiable typewriter and got some legal sized stacks of paper, which is eight and a half by fourteen [8.5 x 14], and I named it The Long Beach Times. And I went out and I started telling people where jobs were, who was having babies, what kind of opportunities in certain areas, what was going on in the churches, and other information I felt they needed--how to contact their City Councilperson, their county representatives, state, local and federal. And as I proceeded to do that, in a very short time, maybe two or three months, somebody said, "Hey, is that a newspaper?" I said, "Yeah." And people began to come and say, "How much would you charge me to put my real estate card in?" I'm saying, "Oh, maybe I can keep this thing going." And I'd charge them some ridiculous low fee. Then about a year later, a gentleman walked into my office and said, "You need a computer." And his name is Mr. Robinson. He was working at UCLA [University of California, Los Angeles] as a custodial engineer, if you want to call it. And we decided after about an hour's conversation that a computer would cost about seventy-eight eight hundred dollars with, you know--$$Seventy-eight hundred dollars?$$Yeah, seventy-eight... seven thousand eight hundred dollars. And this was '87' [1987], '88' [1988]. And of course, that's what computers cost then.$$Okay.$$And we said, "Yeah." And he said, "You need about eight thousand dollars." I said, "Oh, boy... that would be a blessing." And he looked at me and said, "Mr. Love, I'm going to get you that." And I said, "Okay." And every week Mr. Robinson would stop by and stick his head in the door and say, "Its coming." And in the newspaper business, there's a lot of flies on the wall, you might say. And, but I always respected people and never, you know, put them down or anything; I just tolerated it. And the third week went by; he'd stick his head in and say, "Its coming." It took about five or six weeks he did that. And I just said, "Yes, Sir, Mr. Robinson." About the eighth week, the mailman brought an eight thousand dollar check in, in the mail. And I thought it was one of these, you know, Ed McMahon--$$McMahon-- (Laughter)$$Yeah, thin checks. You know, I'd never seen one.$$Publishing Clearing House.$$Yeah, right, Publishing Clearing House. And it was very thin; I never saw a check like that. And I just put it on my desk. And it laid there for about three or four days, until a friend of mine named Willie Glover came in. And he looked at it, and he said, "Mr. Love, why do you leave your valuables there?" I said, "Willie, that's not a check, feel it." He says, "Oh yes, it is." And he said, "You go and deposit it." And I looked at it, and I said "Okay." And I went to the bank and I deposited it. And I was waiting for the bells to ring and the doors to lock and the guards to pull their guns out, and nothing happened. And the teller said, "Is there something else I can help you with?" I said, "No, Ma'am." And I'm saying... I slowly walked out of the bank, and nothing happened.$In addition to The Long Beach Times, we, I founded and started the Long Beach Black Chamber of Commerce here in Long Beach [California], which is a twelve or thirteen year old organization here. And we're moving and we're now doing, through the Long Beach Black Chambers, some economic and entrepreneurial skills and seminar training to help blacks in business prosper. And it's amazing though as we go out, white Chamber members ask us, "Why do you have a black chamber?" And I say, "For the same reason that the strongest chamber in America is the Korean chamber." It's that Koreans have different issues than white folks have. And black folks have a different issue than other chambers. We have no great grandfathers or no uncles who's going to die and leave us thirty, forty, fifty, sixty thousand dollars. We have no connections to the financial, you know, world that we can walk in and say, you know, "I need a thirty or forty or a hundred thousand dollar loan." And the rules of the game, regardless of how they may be printed, is that the average black person in America--I'll give you a good example. Mr. John Johnson, who owns Ebony and Jet, after he'd been in business almost ten or twelve years and had a gross income of maybe three or four million dollars, still could not walk into a bank and get a hundred thousand dollar loan. So, these are the issues that are different, as why we start black groups. However, I do believe that all groups should collaborate with each other for the totality of each area's own economic growth and welfare. I don't believe in separatism, I don't believe that we should--you know, this is my area and this is your area. I do believe we should be sensitive enough to realize that there are some certain things in the Cambodian culture and community that are Cambodian, and should be relevant and that kind of thing. But at the same point and view, when we had, for example, this reception for--that's not the one--reception for Mr. Langston, who is the Deputy Director for U.S. Business Bureau out of Washington, D.C. We had a reception for him, and we had all segments of the community--black, white, Hispanic, Cambodian, Korean, to come into this reception to acknowledge Mr. Langston. And as long as we can bring together, you know, people of all ethnic groups for the benefit of the whole, that's what we're about.$$Okay. That's... similar reasons a lot of black organizations get started, and people do often ask why they get started. But, you know, there are specific interests that black people have that others may not have. And as long as I guess we're a group, we should organize ourselves--$$Uh-huh.$$--and be considered as a group.