The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon

Search Results

Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Sidmel Estes

Media consultant and executive television producer Sidmel Estes was born on November 27, 1954 in Marysville, California, to Emellen Estes and Sidney Estes. Estes attended elementary and high school at public schools in Atlanta. She earned her B.S.J. degree in 1976, and her M.S.J. degree in 1977, both from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism in Chicago, Illinois.

In 1979, Estes returned to Atlanta and was hired at WAGA-TV/Fox 5, where she served as the executive producer of numerous programs. She was the co-creator and executive producer of Good Day Atlanta, which became the number one show in its market, and won seven Emmy Awards under her direction. In 2006 Estes left WAGA-TV in order to found and serve as CEO of BreakThrough Inc., a media consulting firm whose clients include the Frederick Douglass Family Foundation, the McCormick Tribune Fellows Foundation, the Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation and the Atlanta Center for Creative Inquiry. She has also taught as an adjunct professor at Emory University and Clark Atlanta University.

In 1991, Estes was elected the first woman president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). Under her leadership NABJ increased its membership to over 2,000 journalists and was included in Ebony’s list of Top 100 Black Organizations. In 1994, she was a leader and co-creator of the first Unity Conference, an alliance of journalists of color, and was instrumental in the release of their report Kerner Plus 25: A Call For Action, which outlined steps the media industry should take to improve racial diversity.

During her prolific career in television and journalism, Estes has been recognized numerous times. Atlanta’s Mayor Andrew Young proclaimed “Sidmel Estes-Sumpter Day” on November 18, 1988 after she was named Media Woman of the Year by the Atlanta Chapter of the National Association of Media Women. She was featured in Ebony’s 100 Most Influential Black Americans in 1993, and in More Magazine’s book 50 Over 50. Estes was honored with the Silver Circle Award from the Television Academy and has won several Emmy Awards. She received Northwestern University’s Alumni Service Award after being elected as president of the Northwestern Black Alumni Association in 2004.

Estes married B. Garnett Sumpter in 1983, and they had two children, Joshua and Sidney.

Sidmel Estes was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 17, 2014.

Sidmel Estes passed away on October 6, 2015.

Accession Number

A2014.065

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/17/2014

Last Name

Estes-Sumpter

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Karen

Schools

M. Agnes Jones Elementary

Northside High School

Northwestern University

Frank L. Stanton Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sidmel

Birth City, State, Country

Marysville

HM ID

EST02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

New Orleans, Louisiana; Miami, Florida; Beaufort, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Everybody Needs A Breakthrough

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/27/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Honey Baked Ham

Death Date

10/6/2015

Short Description

Media consultant and television producer Sidmel Estes (1954 - 2015 ) was the founder and CEO of BreakThrough Inc. and the first woman president of the National Association of Black Journalists. She worked as an executive producer at WAGA-TV, where she created Good Day Atlanta.

Employment

BreakThrough, Inc.

WAGA-TV (Television station: Atlanta,Ga.)

KUAM-TV

Chicago Daily News

Chicago Defender

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:2472,63:4322,171:7504,263:8096,272:10094,331:13202,397:18900,507:24560,525:25120,535:26800,568:28200,594:35200,773:35620,780:47830,955:51637,1034:52123,1041:71198,1305:74206,1343:74582,1348:75522,1364:81350,1470:82572,1493:83324,1505:89305,1533:90835,1566:98995,1707:99420,1713:99845,1735:111584,1878:112128,1889:119054,1969:123464,2055:128868,2104:155647,2604:169159,2755:170761,2774:171473,2784:176036,2856:193107,3150:194186,3169:198253,3228:198585,3233:204618,3342:204942,3347:205509,3356:216670,3538$0,0:3655,40:4985,57:5745,66:10210,128:12585,170:15435,210:20090,302:23450,317:24890,349:25210,354:25610,360:26010,366:26890,379:27290,385:27850,394:31918,438:32450,446:36174,510:36478,515:40681,562:42175,587:46491,683:46823,688:49894,766:50724,777:51139,783:51637,790:53214,837:55206,875:55953,887:56368,893:57032,902:57613,910:58360,921:62842,1001:63257,1007:74434,1107:75666,1120:76226,1125:79987,1171:80532,1177:92668,1286:93124,1291:94834,1308:96202,1320:96772,1326:98368,1343:98824,1348:107149,1388:108227,1405:108920,1415:109921,1430:113732,1534:117956,1630:118436,1636:118820,1641:120548,1676:120932,1681:134190,1793:134890,1808:136780,1842:137200,1849:137550,1855:138670,1875:139020,1881:140210,1899:140770,1910:141120,1916:142100,1935:149765,2023:151140,2033:165786,2250:166220,2258:171410,2352:173020,2359:174220,2374:179300,2429:179840,2436:180740,2446:181100,2451:183170,2473:185310,2484:185884,2492:188918,2563:189738,2577:190476,2588:196516,2642:196804,2647:209444,2885:209888,2892:210184,2897:236375,3210:237007,3219:237876,3232:238271,3238:238587,3243:239061,3252:239456,3258:240483,3274:241510,3291:241905,3297:242221,3302:243090,3311:243564,3318:243880,3323:244512,3332:245065,3340:245460,3346:259574,3498:264782,3619:266042,3637:267470,3659:271760,3670:272360,3676:287305,3822:287660,3828:288015,3834:291472,3859:293344,3898:293890,3911:295762,3953:298336,3998:299194,4010:300286,4026:305545,4062:306070,4070:309140,4167:310500,4190:312180,4216:313540,4237:317140,4375:317620,4381:321140,4534:321860,4544:323700,4576:335460,4707:339970,4780
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663615">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sidmel Estes' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663616">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sidmel Estes lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663617">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sidmel Estes describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663618">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sidmel Estes remembers her maternal grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663619">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sidmel Estes talks about the Collier Heights neighborhood of Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663620">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sidmel Estes describes her mother's education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663621">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sidmel Estes remembers her first experience of racial discrimination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663622">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sidmel Estes describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663623">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sidmel Estes lists her siblings, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663624">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sidmel Estes describes her likeness to her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663625">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sidmel Estes lists her siblings, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663626">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sidmel Estes talks about her siblings' professions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663627">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sidmel Estes describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663628">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sidmel Estes talks about her early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663629">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sidmel Estes remembers the advice of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663630">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sidmel Estes talks about the community organized busing in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663631">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sidmel Estes recalls her decision to become a journalist</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663632">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sidmel Estes describes the community on Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663633">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sidmel Estes remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663634">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sidmel Estes recalls her decision to attend Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663635">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sidmel Estes remembers the student activism at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663636">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sidmel Estes talks about her internship at the Chicago Defender</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663637">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sidmel Estes remembers prominent black journalists from the start of her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663638">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sidmel Estes recalls her experiences as an intern at the Chicago Defender</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663639">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sidmel Estes remembers her internship at the Chicago Daily News</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663640">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sidmel Estes describes her experiences at the Medill School of Journalism in Evanston, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663641">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sidmel Estes remembers becoming a television reporter in Guam</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663642">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sidmel Estes describes her experiences at KUAM-TV in Guam</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663643">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sidmel Estes remembers joining WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663644">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sidmel Estes talks about the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Children cases, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663645">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sidmel Estes talks about the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Children cases, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663646">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sidmel Estes talks about the changes in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663647">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sidmel Estes describes her reaction to the Janet Cooke scandal</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663648">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sidmel Estes remembers meeting her former husband</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663649">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sidmel Estes talks about her involvement in the National Association of Black Journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663650">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sidmel Estes talks about her civic engagement in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663651">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sidmel Estes recalls the major events of the late 1980s in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663652">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sidmel Estes talks about the FOX takeover of WAGA-TV</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663653">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sidmel Estes remembers developing the 'Good Day Atlanta' morning news show</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663654">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Sidmel Estes remembers her election as president of the National Association of Black Journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663655">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sidmel Estes describes her tenure as president of the National Association of Black Journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663656">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sidmel Estes talks about FOX's management of WAGA-TV in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663657">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sidmel Estes talks about Paula Walker Madison</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663658">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sidmel Estes remembers founding BreakThrough Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663659">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sidmel Estes describes her book projects</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663660">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sidmel Estes talks about the future of journalism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663661">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sidmel Estes describes the services offered at BreakThrough, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663662">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sidmel Estes talks about her teaching activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663663">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sidmel Estes describes the documentary 'Kerner Plus 40: Change or Challenge'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663664">Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Sidmel Estes describes her hopes and concerns for African American journalists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663665">Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Sidmel Estes remembers her proposal to buy Ebony and Jet</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663666">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sidmel Estes talks about the UNITY: Journalists of Color organization</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663667">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sidmel Estes describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663668">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sidmel Estes reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663669">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sidmel Estes reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663670">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sidmel Estes talks about her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663671">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sidmel Estes describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663672">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sidmel Estes narrates her photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/663673">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sidmel Estes narrates her photographs, pt. 2</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
Sidmel Estes remembers the advice of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Sidmel Estes describes her tenure as president of the National Association of Black Journalists
Transcript
Now, you had an incident when y- when you were in, I guess the third grade [at M. Agnes Jones Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia], when you were eight?$$Um-hm.$$You took ballet--$$Um-hm.$$--with Yoki King [Yolanda King], you were telling us.$$Right.$$There's an historic moment that you experienced here. Tell us what happened.$$Well, like I said, Yoki and I were both sort of the little chunky girls in ballet, because they like you to be (gesture) this thin, being a ballerina. But to Atlanta Ballet's credit, they were trying to reach out to the community. So, they would send their top teachers. And I will never forget, a woman named Madame Hildegarde [Hildegarde Bennett Tornow] would always come to Spelman College [Atlanta, Georgia] to teach. And so, we were taking ballet. Like I said, we did 'The Nutcracker' [Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky] every Christmas. But these little skinny girls decided to make fun of me, and they pulled a chair out from up under me. And fortunately, we were practicing in the gym, so it was a wooden floor, not a concrete floor. So, I wasn't seriously hurt, but my feelings were hurt more. So, Yoki and I after class were outside waiting on our ride. And here drives up Dr. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] in a, I will never forget it, a black, big black car. And when he--I sat in the back seat, and I was just crying, crying. He said, "Child, what's wrong with you?" And I told him what had happened. And to this day, I will never forget. He said, "Child, if that's the worst thing that's going to ever happen to you, you are a blessed child." And I never forgot that. And I had--my tears went away then, because I just sat there and I would think about it: that wasn't really that bad, especially some of the things that I have faced later on in life. But he was being prophetic to me then, at eight years old, that I was going to go through stuff in life, and I had to get used to it.$$Hm, okay. So, what kind of car did he have? Do you remember?$$It was a Buick. I remember the big, black Buick.$$Now, this is 1962, I guess, right, when you were eight?$$Yeah, something like '61 [1961], '62 [1962].$$Did he have a new car, or it was an old, older car?$$It was sort of used, it wasn't brand new. It wasn't fancy. It wasn't huge. You know, it was a regular old car.$$Okay, okay. And do you remember the color? I'm just, I'm just thinking--$$Black.$$Black, okay. I'm thinking it was black in my head, but I don't--$$Um-hm, um-hm. Yeah, black on black. I will never forget that (laughter).$$Well, that's something. So, that's, that is--now he's picking her up himself from--$$Yeah, and that was the only time I ever remember him picking her up. And very rarely did he make our recitals. Because we're now talking, you know, the height of the Civil Rights Movement. So, he was never there.$$Yeah, things really got--$$Yeah, '62 [1962], '63 [1963] (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) involved. Yeah, '63 [1963], Birmingham [Alabama], '64 [1964] was, you know, leading into Selma [Selma to Montgomery March] and all that.$$He was never home, never home.$$Yeah, the March on Washington was the next year.$$Right, right.$$So, he was very busy. And, did your parents [Emellen Mitchell Estes and Sidney Estes] know him, I mean, know Dr. King?$$They knew him cursorily, they were not close to him. But they trusted him enough to pick up their daughter and get me home. And then we did, you know, vice versa. So, I guess it's a mutual trust society going on there.$Well, tell us. What was your agenda as president of the National Association of Black Journalists, what--in 1991? What--where were you going to take the organization?$$Well, people tease me. The night I was inaugurated and they announced that I had won and tears were just streaming down my face, I stood up and I told the industry, I said, "You have never dealt with a black woman from the South before." And I meant that, you know, because sometimes they would take advantage of NABJ, a lot of these big news organizations. So, my agenda--$$In what way? What do you mean?$$Well, people who were supposed to get promoted weren't getting promoted.$$Okay.$$Our numbers were not very high at the time (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Not organizationally, but as individual black people working in the--$$Right, in the newsroom.$$The members of NABJ.$$Now, remember I had from two to three thousand members across the country. It started out at two thousand. By the time I finished, it was up to three thousand. But one thing I did do, we had what we call the Pierre summit. And it was at The Pierre hotel in New York City [New York, New York]. And it was me and every president of journalists of color organizations. There was four of us. And I'm the only woman. But we sat down with the CEOs of every major media company and told them what we had--from Knight Ridder, to the president of the Newspaper Association of America [News Media Alliance], to you know, the Tribune Company [Tribune Media Company], to the Gannett Company [Gannett Company, Inc.], to The New York Times, Washington Post [The Washington Post]. These guys came to that meeting. And for two very long days, and very difficult days, we sat down and we told them why we have a problem in the industry--how the stories aren't being told properly--because your people don't know how to go into these communities. So, that was a major accomplishment. I also think that we did have a significant number of people who entered the business. I even have people now who run up and tell me, kind of embarrasses me, and say, "I remember you when I was in college, and you came to speak. And you inspired me so much." I was like, "Thank you." And now, they're in--they're working journalists, or they're on the air, and doing things like this. So, that was number one, was jobs. Number two was justice in terms of telling the story like it is. And number three was fair representation of the community, because that was not being shown. Merv Aubespin [Mervin Aubespin] used to say that, "Unless people see themselves in the newspaper, they can't use it." And most newspapers, you don't see yourself, you don't see your neighbors, you don't see people of achievement out there. So, people aren't going to buy the papers. And they wonder why there's a problem. So, and we were very, very successful. People were scared, as they put it, of Sidmel [HistoryMaker Sidmel Estes].$$Okay, okay. So, did you get, you know, compliance generally from--I mean were they, did things change any?$$Yeah, it changed. And it--and we did have--even though it was a different administration--we did have the power of the law. You know, the fairness doctrine was still very strong. Equal opportunity and equal hiring was still very strong. People were actually talking about racial issues in the community. And so, that's what I think made the big difference from then, and as--instead of right now.$$Okay. So, anything else from your tenure? Did--as president?$$Well, we created the Ethel Payne scholarship [Ethel Payne Fellowship], which is a scholarship where journalists can go to Africa and spend time there and follow stories from there. And that was a big accomplishment. We su- supported and strengthened the Ida B. Wells Award, which is still being given out to- today. We also put the organization--not only in terms of the number of members, but the--our financial position was tremendous. We were giving out scholarship money right and left. I remember we did one at The Kennedy Center [The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, D.C.], where we gave out scholarships. So, the fact that--and we started both broadcast short courses during my administration--one at FAMU [Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, Florida] and the other one at North Carolina A and T [North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina]. And those two programs just celebrated their twentieth anniversary. I'm very proud of that.$$Okay, okay. So, you were president from '91 [1991] until--$$Ninety-three [1993].$$Okay.$$And then I was the immediate past president. I was on their board longer than (laughter) than I ever knew.

Sheila Brooks

Broadcast journalist and entrepreneur Sheila Dean Brooks, Ph.D. was born on June 24, 1956 in Kansas City, Missouri to Gussie Mae Dean Smith and Stanley Benjamin Smith. She received her B.A. degree in communications from the University of Washington in Seattle in 1978. Brooks paid for her final two years of college while serving in the Advanced Placement Program of the United States Navy Reserves from 1976 to 1978. She went on to receive both her M.A. degree in political science in 2003, and her Ph.D. degree in communication, culture and media studies in 2015, from Howard University.

In 1978, Brooks joined KCTS-TV in Seattle, Washington as a reporter and producer, where she worked until 1981. From 1981 to 1983, she worked for KREM-TV in Spokane, Washington, as a reporter and anchor. Brooks was then hired as a news director and anchor for KAMU-TV/FM in College Station, Texas, working until 1985, when she accepted a management trainee position at the Dallas Morning News in Dallas, Texas. She moved to Washington, D.C. in 1988, and worked as a senior producer at Vanita Productions in Baltimore, Maryland. From 1989 to 1990, Brooks served as executive producer for special projects and the documentary unit at WTTG-TV Channel 5 in Washington, D.C. She founded SRB Communications in 1990, a full-service advertising and marketing agency specializing in multicultural markets, serving as founder, president and CEO.

Brooks has served as a board trustee on the Federal City Council in Washington, D.C., on the boards of ColorComm and Morgan State University’s Global School of Journalism and Communication. She also served as chair of The Presidents’ RoundTable, a board member of the Greater Baltimore Committee and on the boards the Capital Region Minority Supplier Development Council and the Center for Women’s Business Research.

Brooks has won more than 150 entrepreneurial, marketing and journalism awards. She was inducted into the National Academy of Television Arts and Science Silver Circle, an Emmy Award Hall of Fame by the National Capital/Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. She was the first National Association of Black Journalists’ member to receive the President’s Award three times.

Her other honors include the 2016 Top MBE Award, 2015 Advocate of the Year Award, and 2012 and 1995 Supplier of the Year Awards from the Capital Region Minority Supplier Development Council; the 2014 Women in Business Champion from the D.C. Chamber of Commerce; the 2011 Pat Tobin Entrepreneurial Award from the National Association of Black Journalists; the 2011 Shining Star Award from the National Organization of Black Elected Legislative Women; the 2011 Entrepreneurial Trailblazer Award from Howard University’s School of Communications; the 2009 Black Rose Entrepreneur Award from New York State Black Women Enterprises; the 2005 Enterprising Women of the Year Award from Enterprising Women Magazine; and the 2002 and 1998 Women in Business Advocate of the Year Award from the U.S. Small Business Administration, among others.

Dr. Sheila Brooks was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 30, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.043

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/30/2014

11/2/2017

Last Name

Brooks

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Dean

Schools

University of Washington

Howard University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sheila

Birth City, State, Country

Kansas City

HM ID

BRO58

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Stop selling what you have, sell what your client wants.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/24/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Broadcast journalist and entrepreneur Sheila Brooks (1956 - ) was the founder, president and CEO of SRB Communications. She received 47 national Telly Awards; a national Gracie Award; three Emmy Awards; and the inaugural Pat Tobin Entrepreneurial Award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

Employment

SRB Communications

KCTS-TV

KREM-TV

KAMU-TV/FM

Dallas Morning News

Vanita Productions

WTTG-TV

Favorite Color

Purple

June Baldwin

Entertainment executive June M. Baldwin graduated from Stanford University with her B.A. degree in psychology. She went on to receive her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1975.

Following graduation, Baldwin served as clerk for the jurist Luther Swygert on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, Illinois. She then moved to Los Angeles and was hired as an executive for NBC, where she was responsible for, among other things, the day-to-day business transactions for The Tonight Show and Carson Productions, the television and motion picture production company founded by the late talk show host, Johnny Carson. At NBC, Baldwin became one of the first African Americans to enter the executive ranks of the entertainment industry. She then worked for Norman Lear, Quincy Jones and Aaron Spelling, where she held the position of head of business affairs at their independent production companies.

Baldwin went on to be hired as vice president of business affairs at United Paramount Network. She also worked in a similar capacity at Columbia TriStar Television from 2000 until 2001. In 2004, Baldwin was hired as director of business and legal affairs at KCET, the nation’s largest independent public television station. Then, in 2010, she was promoted to vice president and general counsel of KCET. Baldwin has negotiated a variety of production deals, and has worked on such critically acclaimed productions as Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State, A Place of Our Own, Los Ninos En Su Casa, Wired Science, and SoCal Connected.  In addition, for seven years she managed business and legal affairs for the PBS late-night talk show Tavis Smiley, and the primetime series Tavis Smiley Reports.

Baldwin has served on numerous boards, including the Hollywood Women's Political Committee, the Hollywood Policy Center, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, the California Women's Law Center, Planned Parenthood, the Archer School for Girls, Women in Film, Women in Film Foundation, Artists For A New South Africa, The Coalition for At-Risk Youth, NBC Credit Union, the Minority Health Institute, and the Black Entertainment and Sports Lawyers Association.

June M. Baldwin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 18, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.310

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/20/2013

Last Name

Baldwin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Michelle

Schools

St. Madeline Sophie

Ancilla Domini Academy

Shipley School For Girls

Stanford University

Harvard Law School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

June

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

BAL04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

Everything In Its Time

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/4/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Vegetables

Short Description

Entertainment executive June Baldwin (1950 - ) became one of the first African Americans to enter the executive ranks of the entertainment industry when she worked for NBC.

Employment

KCET

Columbia Tri Star TV

United Paramount Network

Spelling Television

Quincy Jones/David Salzman Entertainment

NBC

Favorite Color

Blue, Greens

Timing Pairs
0,0:5476,133:6064,141:6820,153:13605,184:15345,198:17820,208:18124,213:18808,223:19644,235:20252,246:20632,252:21696,266:22304,275:22836,284:23140,289:38964,416:39332,421:39884,429:40620,440:41080,446:41540,458:49811,539:50523,551:54617,619:58358,654:59320,669:59690,677:62730,715:63490,730:65300,735:69150,812:69430,817:69990,826:73490,934:74190,947:75520,982:76640,1012:77410,1025:78670,1047:82730,1059:83185,1069:83575,1076:88902,1151:89286,1158:90118,1178:91270,1205:94004,1215:94872,1249:95926,1271:103425,1385:103899,1393:104689,1404:105005,1409:106032,1430:106348,1435:106743,1441:107296,1449:109113,1486:109587,1494:114549,1528:115713,1543:128328,1775:130264,1801:131672,1820:132112,1825:138308,1899:142137,1955:143532,1978:143997,1984:147523,2027:148282,2043:149386,2065:150076,2081:153244,2147:153678,2156:153988,2162:155834,2172:157044,2184:159464,2208:163361,2245:164025,2256:164523,2264:164855,2269:165270,2275:173040,2312:173502,2324:175504,2360:175812,2365:176120,2370:176505,2376:176890,2382:179970,2395:180410,2400:186382,2456:186994,2468:190532,2512:191140,2522:191520,2528:193260,2536:193900,2546:194300,2552:194860,2561:195180,2566:200996,2632:202004,2648:204002,2669:204206,2674:204461,2680:204818,2689:205124,2697:205379,2703:205583,2708:207317,2775:215410,2822:220563,2888:223960,2917$0,0:5152,111:5888,130:6532,139:6992,145:7820,160:12492,183:14156,202:19044,276:19980,284:28924,464:40605,602:44368,641:46290,695:46848,705:47654,729:48832,759:50568,800:52676,874:53172,885:53730,895:54598,918:54846,923:58810,938:59290,945:61050,986:65012,1006:65740,1015:67142,1053:67646,1062:68006,1068:68870,1082:70958,1179:72758,1226:73334,1240:74342,1307:75062,1324:75494,1331:78302,1395:78878,1404:79886,1426:80318,1434:80966,1445:81470,1453:81830,1459:88126,1526:88470,1531:91566,1589:105392,1764:105784,1769:107156,1785:107842,1794:108332,1800:112530,1848:113234,1860:113586,1865:113938,1870:114554,1877:115082,1884:117546,1919:118074,1929:128986,2046:132770,2075:133640,2086:135293,2111:135815,2118:138427,2131:140389,2150:140825,2155:146234,2202:147296,2225:148299,2253:150069,2306:151249,2341:159058,2484:159594,2489:160532,2498:163810,2526:164290,2535:165686,2545:173813,2636:174643,2652:175058,2658:175556,2665:176220,2674:180619,2758:181864,2807:186400,2828:187318,2838:193835,2913:198247,2973:203654,3040:204694,3055:206566,3078:207294,3102:207710,3107:217324,3226:220882,3255:235454,3567:236882,3586:237806,3599:239066,3618:239402,3623:240662,3652:249765,3732:250105,3737:256920,3796:259608,3815:261576,3854:270443,4012:270687,4017:273124,4034:274068,4061:276664,4138:281888,4203:282192,4208:282724,4217:286738,4276:292432,4398:295552,4456:309223,4618:315471,4676:315763,4681:318330,4732
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670400">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of June Baldwin's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670401">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - June Baldwin lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670402">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - June Baldwin describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670403">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - June Baldwin talks about her mother's education and profession</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670404">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - June Baldwin describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670405">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - June Baldwin talks about her father's young adult years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670406">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - June Baldwin describes her parents' personalities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670407">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - June Baldwin talks about her parents' civic activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670408">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - June Baldwin describes her early household</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670409">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - June Baldwin describes her earliest childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670410">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - June Baldwin describes the sights and sounds of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670411">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - June Baldwin remembers the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670412">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - June Baldwin talks about her early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670413">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - June Baldwin recalls her decision to attend the Shipley School for Girls in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670414">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - June Baldwin describes her early interest in acting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670415">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - June Baldwin remembers race relations at the Shipley School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670416">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - June Baldwin describes her religious experiences at the Shipley School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670417">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - June Baldwin talks about the prominent figures who inspired her</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670418">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - June Baldwin recalls developing her racial identity during the late 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670419">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - June Baldwin remembers her teachers and guidance counselor at the Shipley School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670420">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - June Baldwin reflects upon her time at the Shipley School for Girls in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670421">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - June Baldwin talks about creating a scholarship at the Shipley School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670422">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - June Baldwin recalls attending the March on Washington</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670423">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - June Baldwin remembers studying psychology at Stanford University in Stanford, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670424">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - June Baldwin talks about Eldridge Cleaver and Timothy Leary</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670425">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - June Baldwin recalls visiting the Black Panther Party in Algeria</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670426">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - June Baldwin talks about the Black Power movement at Stanford University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670427">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - June Baldwin recalls her decision to attend Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670428">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - June Baldwin remembers her classmates and experiences at Harvard Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670429">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - June Baldwin remembers her challenges at Harvard Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670430">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - June Baldwin recalls clerking for Judge Luther M. Swygert</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670431">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - June Baldwin talks about her early legal career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670432">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - June Baldwin describes her experiences at Morrison and Foerster LLP</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670433">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - June Baldwin recalls working for Silverberg, Rosen, Leon and Behr</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670434">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - June Baldwin talks about joining Women In Film</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670435">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - June Baldwin recalls her entry into the entertainment industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670436">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - June Baldwin describes her initial experiences at NBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670437">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - June Baldwin recalls working on 'The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670438">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - June Baldwin remembers the black television executives in the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670439">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - June Baldwin talks about Michael Jackson's award at the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670440">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - June Baldwin recalls her proudest moments as a television business affairs executive</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670441">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - June Baldwin remembers working at Norman Lear's company, Act III Productions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670442">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - June Baldwin talks about working for Quincy Jones Productions, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670443">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - June Baldwin recalls working with Aaron Spelling Productions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670444">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - June Baldwin remembers her music publishing venture with George Butler</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670445">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - June Baldwin recalls working at United Paramount Network</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670446">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - June Baldwin describes her work at Columbia TriStar Television</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670447">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - June Baldwin describes her position at KCET in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670448">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - June Baldwin talks about the merger of KCET and Link TV</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670449">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - June Baldwin describes the growth and changes at KCETLink</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670450">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - June Baldwin talks about her board memberships, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670451">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - June Baldwin talks about her board memberships, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670452">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - June Baldwin shares her plans for the future</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670453">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - June Baldwin reflects upon her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670454">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - June Baldwin reflects upon her legacy in the entertainment industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670455">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - June Baldwin talks about her dating life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670456">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - June Baldwin describes her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670457">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - June Baldwin talks about her international travels</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670458">Tape: 6 Story: 11 - June Baldwin describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670459">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - June Baldwin narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
June Baldwin reflects upon her time at the Shipley School for Girls in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania
June Baldwin recalls visiting the Black Panther Party in Algeria
Transcript
Well, tell us the Shipley [Shipley School for Girls; The Shipley School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania] story.$$So obviously Shipley was a seminal event in my life. And for all of the, the challenges, I developed some wonderful friendships with a few girls there who are lifelong friends, like sisters. And they saw me; they--it didn't matter to them that I came from a different background or that I was black. And so they were my rocks, and we're still very, very close today. Also in 2003, Shipley gave me the distinguished alumna award, which was a huge shock to me because I had not had much contact at all with the school since I left. And I had an opportunity to tell my story, which I had never done. But I wanted them to know that I loved and appreciated the education that I got and that I saw it as a very positive thing. It was very difficult for my mother [Audrey McLaughlin Harris] to decide to send to me to Shipley. That was not something that we did in the black culture. You don't send your daughter off during her adolescent years to be part of a social experiment. And I'd never really realized how much that had weighed on my mother because, of course, that shaped the rest of my life. So they gave me the award, which was very lovely, and they honored and acknowledged my mother. And the school official said, "I don't think I would have had the courage to send my child away like that." And so I was very happy because although it's been my journey it was also my mother's. So fast forward, I ran into a Shipley classmate at Stanford [Stanford University, Stanford, California] whom I hadn't even been friends with at Stanford. Again, when I left Shipley I sort of didn't wanna have anything to do with Shipley. Fast forward, I run into this classmate, and she's a, a writer for The New York Times and she said, "I ha- it's great to see you. I have an idea and I'm wondering if you'd be interested." And the idea was to create a school sca- a class scholarship for an underprivileged girl of color. And she wondered if I thought that was a good idea, and if I would work with her on it. And I said oh, I think that's a great idea. So last May we went to our forty-fifth reunion, and we proposed this to the class, and that is what we're going to do. And sh- they have said that it was because of knowing me, and it was a time when their lives changed that that inspired her to want to do this scholarship. And so it just was so overwhelming for me to come out of the blue after all these years. Because I think when you make personal sacrifices--I mean I did it willingly and gratefully. I appreciated the opportunity. But at some point when you look at where race relations are today, and you say was it worth it--you know, was it worth it? And so this validates that. It was worth it. I mean, I decided it was worth it, but this is a, a, a really gratifying validation.$Now who was in the Panther [Black Panther Party] entourage, I guess, in Algeria besides Eldridge Cleaver?$$The names of the other people I don't know. I don't remember. What--I was very excited to be there. Eldridge Cleaver was extremely nice to me, very respectful. As I said he wanted to--me to stay on because I spoke French and be a translator. And I think as a result of my Shipley [Shipley School for Girls; The Shipley School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania] experience and my own sense of identity, I had the big Afro, very much wanting to claim my identity, and wanting to have a quote, unquote revolutionary experience. I was a big supporter of the Panthers. You know, they were doing wonderful work; they were feeding children; they were educating children; they were providing healthcare services. I mean, they were being portrayed as terrorists, but they were doing many wonderful things. And they were just really seeking social justice for a lot of oppression that was going on. And so I wrote my mother [Audrey McLaughlin Harris]. I also was still interested in being the actor, so I had tried out for 'Hair' ['Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical']. There was a--in Marseille [France]. And I was finished with school [Stanford University, Stanford, California], and so I was a quarter ahead of myself because I had gone a year straight through. And I didn't wanna graduate early, so I wanted to stay in Europe for another three months. And I thought I'll try out for this play. Maybe I'll get this role. And then I went to Algeria and was asked to be the translator and it--and at first really wanted to do that. And so I said to him, "Well, you'll have to write my mother." And so he did, and my mother still has the letter in pale blue stationary with the Black Panther insignia that jumps out at you. And he wrote her a very nice letter asking permission for me to stay on for a couple of months and be a translator. And by day three, there used to be--everyone would be upstairs in a room and listening, talking, and the--there were concentric circles and I was in the second circle. And someone got up and went down to do kitchen duty, and I--who was in the first circle--and so I moved up to be in the first circle. And then the person came back, and I wasn't aware the person was going to come back, and so I said, "Oh, I'm sorry I took your seat." And he said, "Oh no, sister, you didn't take my seat; it's the people's seat." And in that moment I realized, hm, everything is communal here, and there weren't--there weren't any women. I wasn't seeing any women. And all of a sudden I realized, hm, I might become communal property (laughter) if I didn't affiliate or associate with someone. And of course that wasn't what I was wanting. You know, I was wanting to have this political experience. And so I decided that I didn't wanna stay, and so I did not. Meanwhile, I would have come--had I gone back--I would have still gone back to France and then come back. In the meantime, my mother got the letter, and she and my brother [William James] were quite horrified. And they admired the Panthers. It's not that they, they didn't, but they didn't want their daughter there in Algeria with--$$Now this is--$$--Eldridge Cleaver.$$I mean 'Soul on Ice' [Eldridge Cleaver] had been published in 1960 [1968]--well, I know I read it in '67 [1967], so it was already out. And he was--he made some remarks about women that weren't really very--$$Misogynistic.$$--encouraging.$$Yes, yes, but that's what I'm saying. That's what was so fascinating, because he was not like that at all with me. He was just this amazing gentleman and intelligent and just lovely, lovely. Now I was only there three days, but that was my experience. And when my mother decided--my brother was, "You tell her to get on a plane and come home." And my mother was like, "No, no, I'm just going to use the truth and, and add something." And so she told me she was going to have to have surgery, and she really would like me to be there for the surgery and so would I mind coming home. I still hadn't heard about the play. And she said, "And if you get in the play, then I'll send you back;" so I went home. And she was having surgery, but it wasn't, you know, as serious as I had thought (laughter), and they just wanted to get me home so. And then I did not get into the play so I did not go back.$$Now did you--did you happen to talk to Timothy Leary?$$No, I did not.$$Or see him even?$$I got a glimpse, but no.$$And was he (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) They, they had him in a room. You know, we were staying at a hotel, and we would come over and be there during the days and the evenings.

Hamilton Cloud, II

Television producer and talent agent Hamilton Cloud, II, was born on November 30, 1952, in Los Angeles, California. His father, Hamilton Cloud, Sr. was one of a few African Americans trained at the Northwestern University Dental School at the time of his graduation. Cloud grew up in Los Angeles but pursued his education at Yale University, where he earned his B.A. degree for his studies in “Communications: Mass Media and Black America,” a concentration that he originated.

Working with radio programs in Los Angeles for fifteen years, Cloud established himself within the media industry. His interests then turned to television programming, producing children’s and public affairs programs. In 1978, Cloud joined the network programming department at the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), and he became the vice president of Current Comedy Programs in 1982. In this role, he supervised the weekly production of a number of well-known comedy series, including Cheers and Family Ties. Cloud began his work in producing the NAACP Image Awards in 1987. The 19th Annual NAACP Image Awards, when broadcasted on NBC, marked the first time the show was aired on a national television network. Cloud served as the producer of the annual show for fourteen more years.

In 1990, Cloud supervised and developed programming for Playboy Entertainment Group’s cable, home video and television divisions. Within three years, he was chosen serve as the vice president of Quincy Jones/David Salzman Entertainment (QDE), supervising first-run television, special events and interactive programming. After creating Thundercloud Productions in 1995, Cloud became the senior vice-president of Letnom Productions the following year. He continued to produce television shows such as The Montel Williams Show and events like Game of the Century, a baseball event to recognize the legacy of the Negro Baseball Leagues.

Cloud has served on a number of boards, including the Hall of Fame and the Prime Time Emmy Award Committees of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. He has also been a member of the WGA and The Caucus of Producers, Writers and Directors.

Cloud is married to Fukue Yamaguchi. The couple has one daughter.

Hamilton Cloud was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 29, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.036

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/29/2011

4/30/2011

Last Name

Cloud

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

S.

Schools

Yale University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Hamilton

Birth City, State, Country

Los Angeles

HM ID

CLO03

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Maui, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Everything's going to be alright.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/30/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Peanut Butter

Short Description

Talent agent and television producer Hamilton Cloud, II (1952 - ) produced the NAACP Image Awards from 1987 to 2000. In 1987, the Image Awards were broadcast on a national television network for the first time. Cloud has worked with a number of other companies, including NBC, Playboy Entertainment Group, and QDE.

Employment

NBC

Imaginary Entertainment

Quincy Jones/David Salzman Entertainment

Letnom Productions

Thundercloud Productions

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:1586,12:2333,25:2748,31:4325,83:7396,137:12542,206:12874,211:14202,229:14617,238:14949,243:17439,293:18020,304:18352,309:24942,344:25266,349:29397,410:30288,419:33366,465:41060,538:43062,562:44427,586:53163,701:53527,706:54437,717:55438,732:66190,823:68710,861:70330,885:70780,891:73300,943:73840,950:82146,995:88176,1135:88846,1146:89784,1166:90119,1172:90387,1177:91325,1193:92598,1219:106420,1415:106980,1423:107860,1437:108500,1447:113972,1493:114248,1505:116318,1550:118250,1589:118733,1597:119423,1609:119768,1615:121079,1639:121700,1650:122045,1656:122942,1671:126805,1688:127260,1695:128716,1738:129444,1747:130354,1758:138089,1878:143562,1915:144714,1936:148314,2001:148818,2009:149106,2014:149466,2020:152562,2078:152994,2085:153642,2099:154002,2105:155082,2126:159985,2147:169383,2288:181796,2550:185540,2618:185930,2624:186476,2633:195578,2695:196154,2705:196586,2712:197954,2737:199538,2771:199970,2778:200762,2797:201626,2811:203210,2831:209042,2939:209906,3007:210698,3044:211346,3054:211706,3060:217749,3090:221214,3158:221676,3165:222446,3177:224063,3212:225141,3237:225449,3242:225911,3249:226296,3255:228529,3298:229222,3309:237038,3392:239026,3421:239310,3426:241298,3469:249179,3702:249605,3709:249889,3716:250244,3722:250599,3728:253581,3823:265885,3923:267585,3946:271380,3992$0,0:804,4:2130,25:5406,161:5796,167:7668,191:8292,204:8682,210:13752,269:14142,274:14454,279:14766,284:21211,306:21733,313:22603,324:31825,444:32347,451:36620,456:37244,465:38024,478:38882,484:39272,490:40520,509:49642,615:51364,630:54316,673:56448,712:61942,805:63172,826:63582,832:64156,840:66370,868:72650,899:73770,913:75370,941:75850,948:78010,988:78730,996:79290,1004:86606,1077:88286,1097:88874,1106:94768,1164:99046,1248:103324,1327:103807,1338:104083,1343:104635,1354:105808,1369:106429,1381:112312,1414:116536,1500:117526,1519:117790,1525:118780,1546:119308,1555:120034,1568:120562,1577:120826,1583:122542,1609:122872,1615:123334,1623:125116,1657:125446,1663:133113,1732:133608,1738:136380,1781:136776,1793:148218,1980:154234,2030:156960,2071:157618,2080:161671,2094:162595,2110:165213,2156:165752,2164:166291,2173:169756,2240:170218,2247:177752,2310:178104,2318:178456,2323:181888,2376:189380,2459:195206,2519:198796,2544:199136,2550:199816,2570:200496,2577:200972,2585:202060,2610:202400,2616:202672,2621:202944,2626:203216,2631:203828,2641:208724,2752:209064,2758:210832,2786:217240,2839:219160,2875:219640,2883:220280,2893:222440,2923:223800,2951:224120,2956:225880,3001:226200,3056:229400,3084:230520,3107:231000,3115:231320,3120:232040,3132:240631,3213:240976,3219:247807,3354:248152,3360:248911,3375:249670,3389:250222,3397:265213,3621:268057,3665:268531,3674:269005,3681:269400,3687:273034,3743:286856,3870:287626,3877:288088,3884:292970,3932
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40163">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hamilton Cloud's interview, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40164">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40165">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40166">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his maternal grandmother's Moravian cookies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40167">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his mother's aspirations, and how his parents met and married</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40168">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40169">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about tracing his paternal ancestry to Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40170">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hamilton Cloud talks about tracing his paternal ancestry to Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40171">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hamilton Cloud talks about meeting a relative in Knoxville, Tennessee, and visiting his great-grandparents' graves</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40172">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his paternal great-grandfather, Peter Cooper Cloud's death</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40173">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his paternal grandparents, Lillian Strawbridge and Frank Herman Cloud</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40174">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his father's service in World War II and the Korean War and his training to become a dentist</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40175">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about HistoryMaker Leo Branton, who was his father's friend</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40176">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his father's and African American service in the Korean War, and his father's anti-war sentiment during the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40177">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his birthplace home of Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40178">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his siblings, and his likeness to his parents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40179">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his family's interest in music and dance</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40180">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his favorite memory of his maternal grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40181">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his paternal grandfather's photography</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40182">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Hamilton Cloud talks about the neighborhood where he grew up in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40183">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his home and neighborhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40184">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Hamilton Cloud describes his experience in school in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40185">Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Hamilton Cloud talks about race relations in Los Angeles, California while he was growing up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40186">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about the Los Angeles Police Department's (LAPD) reputation in the black community in the 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40187">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his interest in television and radio, and his parents exposing he and his siblings to the arts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40188">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his parents' involvement in the Civil Rights Movement and playing football near Ray Charles' home in Los Angeles</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40189">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his mentors in school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40190">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his favorite movie as a child, 'The Magnificent Seven'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40191">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about high school and his decision to attend Yale University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40192">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his extracurricular activities in high school and graduating in 1970</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40193">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hamilton Cloud describes his experience at Yale University in the 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40194">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about prominent African Americans who studied at Yale University while he was there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40195">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud describes his experience working at WYBC radio station at Yale University and the programming that it offered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40196">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about Yale University's radio station, WYBC, as a cultural focal point in New Haven, Connecticut</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40197">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about how he got his first job at a mainstream radio station in New Haven, and later in television at NBC in Los Angeles</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40198">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about taking a semester off from Yale University, his father's skill and income as a dentist, and paying his way through college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40199">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his experience working at radio stations and teaching in Los Angeles, and his move to television at KABC, Channel 7</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40200">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his experience at NBC in Los Angeles, California and his involvement with the production of 'Shogun'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40201">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hamilton Cloud talks about the Japanese American community's reception of the television mini-series, 'Shogun'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40202">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Hamilton Cloud describes his involvement in the production of the television movie, 'Grambling's White Tiger'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40203">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his mentor at NBC, Brandon Tartikoff, and his experience as Vice President of Current Comedy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40204">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about the popular sitcoms that aired on NBC in the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40205">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks about why he left NBC in 1984</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40206">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud describes how the NAACP Image Awards began, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40207">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud describes how the NAACP Image Awards began, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40208">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud describes his experience producing the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40209">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about the honorees of the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40210">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about planning a tribute to Oprah Winfrey as part of the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40211">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about introducing 'Name that Tune' at the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40212">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks about why he left the NAACP Image Awards, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40213">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about why he left the NAACP Image Awards, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40214">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his responsibilities as the producer of the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40215">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud discusses some of his proudest moments as the producer of the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40216">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about the NAACP Image Awards demographics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40217">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his production and personal management company, Imaginary Entertainment</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40218">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Hamilton Cloud's interview, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40219">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks co-founding Imaginary Entertainment, and having Miriam Makeba as a client</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40220">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his work with Paul Simon's 'Graceland' tour, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40221">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his work with Paul Simon's 'Graceland' tour, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40222">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about Paul Simon's 'Graceland' tour, and the initial reception that it received from anti-Apartheid activists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40223">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about Paul Simon and other prominent artists giving credit to artists who worked with them, and inspired their work</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40224">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about Miriam Makeba and Nelson Mandela's birthday concert in London</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40225">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Hamilton Cloud talks about Nelson Mandela's release from prison, and working with Stevie Wonder to create the Martin Luther King Day Holiday</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40226">Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Hamilton Cloud talks about working with Jon Hendricks of the vocalese group, 'Lambert, Hendricks and Ross'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40227">Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his radio show, 'Innervisions', pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40228">Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his radio show, 'Innervisions', pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40229">Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his radio show, 'Black Spectrum'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40230">Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about going to Bob Marley's concerts in California in the 1970s and honoring him posthumously at the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40231">Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about organizing a gala for President Bill Clinton and the Heads of States of the western hemisphere, with Quincy Jones, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40232">Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about organizing a gala for President Bill Clinton and the Heads of States of the western hemisphere, with Quincy Jones, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40233">Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his work on the mockumentary, 'The Compleat Al'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40234">Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his work with Quincy Jones/David Salzman Entertainment (QDE), pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40235">Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his work with Quincy Jones/David Salzman Entertainment (QDE), pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40236">Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his decision to work at Playboy Entertainment</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40237">Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud describes his experience working at Playboy Entertainment</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40238">Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about how he met his wife, and their marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40239">Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about working with Montel Williams, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40240">Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks about working with Montel Williams, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40241">Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Hamilton Cloud talks about Montel Williams and Montel's struggle with multiple sclerosis (MS)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40242">Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his former assistant, Stacy Milner, her husband Ted Milner, and their business</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40243">Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his work with 'Game of the Century', a salute to the Negro Baseball Leagues at Dodger Stadium, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40244">Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his work with 'Game of the Century', a salute to the Negro Baseball Leagues at Dodger Stadium, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40245">Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about organizing a beauty pageant show for historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40246">Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about the success of the beauty pageant show for HBCUs and the step-dance competition, "Stomp"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40247">Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about producing a tribute to Maynard Jackson at the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40248">Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about producing a tribute to African American organizations at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40249">Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud talks his interest in producing a record album with the artist, D Knowledge</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40250">Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Hamilton Cloud talks about producing a record album with the artist, D Knowledge, and working with him on other projects</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40251">Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his involvement in the opening of the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40252">Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud describes his role as the Director of Special Projects for Congresswoman Maxine Waters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40253">Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud talks about age discrimination in the entertainment industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40254">Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud talks about the shortsightedness of attempts to abolish unions, and age discrimination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40255">Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about Congressman Maxine Waters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40256">Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud reflects upon his life and career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40257">Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40258">Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud reflects upon the African Americans community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40259">Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud reflects upon African American ownership of their community, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40260">Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud reflects upon African American ownership of their community, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40261">Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Hamilton Cloud reflects upon dwindling African American representation in Hollywood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40262">Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Hamilton Cloud talks about not having political ambitions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40263">Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his staff's role as Congresswoman Maxine Waters' media representative</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40264">Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Hamilton Cloud describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40265">Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Hamilton Cloud describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40266">Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Hamilton Cloud talks about his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40267">Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Hamilton Cloud talks about how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/40268">Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Hamilton Cloud describes his photographs</a>

DASession

1$2

DATape

4$6

DAStory

2$1

DATitle
Hamilton Cloud describes his experience working at WYBC radio station at Yale University and the programming that it offered
Hamilton Cloud talks about introducing 'Name that Tune' at the NAACP Image Awards
Transcript
My favorite professor is still there [Yale University], a gentleman by the name of Willie Ruff who you guys should interview cause he's, he's a treasure trove. He--yeah he's fantastic, music professor and jazz musician. Spends half the year teaching at Yale and the other half traveling the world as a jazz musician. And he exposed us to so many things. I, I literally got to, to meet Duke Ellington and I hosted a radio broadcast of a concert that Willie Ruff organized with Ellington and his orchestra. He, he funded the Ellington Fellowship at Yale, and that was the kickoff of that and I actually hosted the radio broadcast of it. Just brought through Honi Coles and B.B. King and, and, and just incredible folks that you know, I was exposed to while I was there. And, and yeah, great time, great time to, to be there. And so I, I fell in love with radio. I walked in the radio station and it was like the lightning bolt. I knew that's what I wanted to do and ended up--Yale had a commercial FM license. And so we broadcast to all of New Haven [Connecticut], and it was a very rare for a college radio station to have a commercial license. And so we could sell commercials and support the radio station that way. And we weren't paid but we were able to you know keep the electricity on and, and all of that. So the university didn't pay for the radio station, it was self supporting. So we had a program called 'Black Spectrum' that was on the air five hours a day and then most of the weekends. I forget what the total number of hours were per week. And I became the program director of Black Spectrum and it was the number one radio station in New Haven at, at the time. Because New Haven had this sizable African American population that didn't have its, its own radio. So we became that and before Black Spectrum there was a, a, a group of pioneering folks who did a program called 'Soul Sessions'. And they created that programming in the '60s [1960s] and then we carried forward with Black Spectrum and we were so far ahead of our time in terms of mixing genres of, of black music and, and Latin music. Because back then you know, you couldn't mix R&B [rhythm and blues] with jazz or gospel or Latin. But that's what we did. And--$$I've always found that curious that, that black people will, will you know--$$Yeah, well, well--$$--well that's not you know--$$Exactly.$$R&B was all you heard on most of the black radio stations around the country.$$Yes.$$And that was it and if you put jazz or anything else on it--$$Which, that always struck me as very strange too because it, it all comes from the same roots. And you know I suppose there are purists, but we created a format where we did mix all the music and it worked. And we were really proud, and we were following the lead of WHUR in, in Washington, D.C. [District of Columbia] which is again, a very pioneering--$$I was going to mention them as that's the only other station I've heard that mixed the genres like that.$$Yes.$$WHUR.$$And, and we were following their lead. And I got to meet Tony Brown and, and, and go to some conferences in D.C. and, and we were really inspired by what they did. And so we did this programming in New Haven that people still remember and, and you know I, I've met and heard from people who you know, still remember the programming that we did and, and the show, Black Spectrum, lived on for many years.$$Did you intersperse some political content as well?$$Yes.$$Like Malcolm's [Malcolm X] speeches and Dr. [Martin Luther] King.$$Yes, yes, yes. That's exactly what we did. So we would play snippets of King and of Malcolm and there was a great album called "Guess Who's Coming Home?" about black fighting men in Vietnam [war] that we would pull snippets out of that. I'm glad you mentioned that cause again, that's what WHUR was doing. And so we--it was, it was really culturally rich and sophisticated and, and musically, and we were very, very proud of it.$All right. Now, we were talking about the [NAACP; National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] Image Awards, some of the stories, and you have a Roger Ebert story.$$Yes. And what made me think about it was when--I feel that throughout my career and my life I've been really blessed with a higher power, you know, looking out for me. And in the Image Awards, during the fourteen years that I did them, we put a lot of time and energy into thinking about how we would honor people. And, as I said, we try to do it in a way that would be very memorable. But I also know that we had some great luck along the way, because some things broke our way that you just couldn't have predicted. So, one example is we were going to honor the Isley Brothers one year, and we were in the production office with--I had a large writing staff, and the reason I did that is that the brainstorming process in my mind was as valuable as the actual writing. And so, I made sure to have a diverse writing staff; you know, age-wise, experience-wise, background-wise. And so, my policy was that any idea was welcomed and--which I learned from Brandon Tartikoff--and that anybody could throw out an idea and we would bat it around. And I always felt that my skill was determining the good ideas from the bad ones, and then maybe taking the good ideas up a notch. So, we were in the office and we were brainstorming about what could we do to pay tribute to the Isley Brothers. And we were just--I had bought a 'Greatest Hits' package, and we were bouncing through 'The Greatest Hits' package, and I'd play the first fifteen seconds of a song, and my writers would shout out the name of the song, you know, just naturally, because it would bring back so many memories for us. So, I said, "Wow, what if we did 'name that tune,' you know, and did it with the audience?" And so, one of the members of the staff said, "Well, why don't we use Steve Harvey to do this segment?" And we said, "Okay. Let's have Steve Harvey go into the audience and we'll play 'Name that Tune' with the audience, and we'll see if it works. And if it doesn't work, that's okay," because then the Image Awards wasn't live, it was videotaped. So I knew that if it didn't work, you know, I could cut it out. But, we picked, you know, four or five songs, and we told Steve, who was going to be in the audience, but we didn't tell him necessarily who to pick. And we didn't' tell the audience it was going to happen. So, he goes down into the audience, and I remember Chris Rock was one of the people that he asked, and you know, you could tell they were reluctant because he was literally picking him up out of the audience and they didn't know what was going to happen. So Chris Rock got all of the answers correctly, and then we picked somebody else, I can't remember who it was. But Steve was doing a great job with it. And he--by the way, before we did it, he wasn't even sure it was going to work. He said, "You're sure you want to try it?" And I was like, "Yeah. And you're so good on your feet that, you know, you'll make it work even if the person doesn't get the right answer." So, I don't what made him decide to go to Roger Ebert. And, you know, I guess he thought Roger Ebert, who has this image of being, you know, pretty square. And none of us knew that Roger happened to be married to an African American woman and that she was sitting next to him. But none of us knew that at the time. And so, Steve goes over to Roger Ebert and we play the song and we'll all thinking, "Oh, boy. He's never going to get this." And Roger turns to his wife and, of course, she gets the answer right away. And Steve turned it into a really funny bit. So that to me was an example of how, you know, pure luck, and sort of, I guess, good karma would be the best way to describe it. Things almost always worked for us on the Image Awards.$$Okay.

Sheila Frazier

Actress and producer Sheila Elaine Frazier was born on November 13, 1948, in the Bronx, New York, to Dorothy Dennis and Eugene Cole Frazier. Frazier lived on the Lower East Side of New York City until the age of ten, when she moved with her mother to Englewood, New Jersey. In Englewood, Frazier’s neighbors included stars and future stars like Clyde McPhatter, Van McCoy, The Isley Brothers and Dolly and Jackie McClean. Frazier attended P.S. 97 in New York City and Liberty School in New Jersey. At Englewood’s Dwight Morrow High School, her classmates were Margaret Travolta and Hazel Smith. Inspired by Susan Hayward’s performance in the film, I’ll Cry Tomorrow, Frazier longed to be an actress but was hampered by a speech impediment. Graduating in 1966, Frazier moved to New York City where she served in various clerical positions with Allied Stores, Boutique magazine and the United Negro College Fund.

Recruited by the noted Negro Ensemble Company photographer Bert Andrews, Frazier became acquainted with the New York arts community. Frazier studied acting at HB (Herbert Berkoff) Studios in New York, under the direction of Bill Hickey and Uta Hagen. Eventually actor Richard Roundtree encouraged Frazier to take acting lessons from Gilbert Moses at the Negro Ensemble Company which led to additional training with Dick Anthony Williams at the New Federal Theatre. Frazier, then working for a real estate company, had done some industrial films and commercials before Roundtree helped her get an audition with Gordon Parks, who was casting for a new film, Super Fly. In the film Frazier plays Georgia, the sultry girlfriend of the hustler Priest, who was portrayed by Ron O’Neal. The tremendous box office success of Super Fly along with her instant street recognition surprised Frazier; from that point on she was admired as an iconic beauty in the black community. She appeared in Super Fly T.N.T., the sequel to Super Fly and other Blaxploitation films of the 1970s including Three The Hard Way with Jim Brown and The Super Cops. Frazier appeared in the 1978 film, California Suite, with Bill Cosby and Richard Pryor and The Hitter with Ron O’Neal and Adolph Caesar in 1979. Frazier was cast with Louis Gossett, Jr. in the television series, The Lazarus Syndrome, in 1979; other television appearances include Lou Grant, Dallas, The Loveboat, Cagney and Lacey, Gimme A Break and 227. Frazier appeared on The West Wing in 1999 and The District in 2001; she has also appeared as herself in television biographies of Jim Brown and Ron O’Neal. Frazier’s 2008 documentary film on African American intergenerational wisdom transmission is entitled You Don’t Get Old by Being A Fool.

By 1980, Frazier was hosting a community affairs show on KNXT-TV in Los Angeles. In 1982, she was hired as a story editor by Richard Pryor’s Indigo Productions. In 1985, Frazier was coordinating producer for Essence magazine’s television series and produced Black Entertainment Television’s (BET) Live from L.A. with Tonya Hart. Frazier worked with the talent on BET’s Screen Scene from 1992 to 1999 and headed up the Talent Department for BET for thirteen years. As the founding director of Frazier Multimedia Group in 2003, Frazier provides talent grooming and field production.

Frazier lives in Los Angeles and has one son, music producer, Derek McKeith.

Accession Number

A2007.240

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/24/2007

Last Name

Frazier

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

HB Studio

Dwight Morrow High School

P.S. 97 Mangin School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sheila

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

FRA07

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

U.S. Cellular

State

New York

Favorite Quote

Praise the Lord.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/13/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chicken (Jerk)

Short Description

Actress and television producer Sheila Frazier (1948 - ) is the founding director of Frazier Multimedia Group. Her acting credits include Super Fly, California Suite, 227, The District, and The West Wing.

Employment

Allied Stores Corporation

Boutique Magazine

United Negro College Fund

NEC

BET

Essence Magazine

Frazier Multimedia Group

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Orange, Peach

Timing Pairs
0,0:1892,24:2948,40:22190,241:27231,370:71032,1055:104774,1480:113995,1588:115996,1628:123655,1842:142578,2067:189277,2586:192439,2614:196252,2681:205780,2828:206120,2834:206460,2842:215708,2939:225132,3129:225460,3134:247040,3398$0,0:11009,116:50014,496:70120,752:78869,832:83322,898:88432,986:103918,1185:107584,1235:108286,1245:120194,1391:135925,1662:145240,1792
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122790">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sheila Frazier's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122791">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sheila Frazier lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122792">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sheila Frazier describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122793">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sheila Frazier talks about her mother's upbringing in Yonkers, the Bronx, and Harlem, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122794">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sheila Frazier describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122795">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sheila Frazier talks about her father's World War II service and post-traumatic stress</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122796">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sheila Frazier recalls her earliest childhood memories from the Lower East Side of New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122797">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sheila Frazier talks about her father's World War II service in the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps and his personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122798">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sheila Frazier remembers her childhood on New York's Lower East Side, and her uncle Jackie McLean and aunt Clarice "Dollie" McLean</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122799">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sheila Frazier recalls the roles of music and church during her childhood on New York City's Lower East Side</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122800">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sheila Frazier contrasts her earlier childhood on New York's Lower East Side and her adolescence in suburban Englewood, New Jersey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122801">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sheila Frazier describes her neighborhood growing up in Englewood, New Jersey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122802">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sheila Frazier talks about her aunt, Clarice "Dollie" McLean</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122803">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sheila Frazier describes her elementary school years at P.S. 97 on New York City's Lower East Side</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122804">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sheila Frazier talks about her speech impediment</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122805">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sheila Frazier lists the actors and movies that inspired her growing up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122806">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sheila Frazier talks about her favorite TV shows growing up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122807">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sheila Frazier talks about her interests at Dwight Morrow High School in Englewood, New Jersey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122808">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sheila Frazier describes seeking employment after graduating from Dwight Morrow High School in Englewood, New Jersey in 1966</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122809">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sheila Frazier recalls being asked to model and working for HistoryMaker Vy Higgensen's 'Boutique' Magazine in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122810">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sheila Frazier describes the racial issues she experienced while working as a secretary in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122811">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sheila Frazier describes visiting the Black Panther Party at their headquarters in Harlem, New York in 1968</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122812">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sheila Frazier describes volunteering with the Black Panther Party and working for the United Negro College Fund</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122813">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sheila Frazier recalls her first acting job, a L'Eggs hosiery commercial</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122814">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sheila Frazier describes joining the Negro Ensemble Company and studying at the HB Studio in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122815">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sheila Frazier describes friend, mentor, and fellow actor Adolph Caesar</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122816">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sheila Frazier describes the Negro Ensemble Company, the New Federal Theatre, and her audition for 'Superfly' (1972)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122817">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sheila Frazier recalls playing the role of "Georgia" in 'Super Fly' (1972)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122818">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sheila Frazier compares the blaxploitation films 'Super Fly' (1972) and 'Shaft' (1971)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122819">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sheila Frazier reflects upon the social implications of blaxploitation films like 'Super Fly'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122820">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sheila Frazier describes the relationship between her character "Georgia" and Ron O'Neal's "Priest" in 'Super Fly T.N.T' (1973)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122821">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sheila Frazier reflects upon the effect 'Super Fly' had on her and Ron O'Neal's careers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122822">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sheila Frazier reflects upon 'Super Fly's impact on the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122823">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sheila Frazier talks about black female action stars Tamara Dobson and Pam Grier</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122824">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sheila Frazier describes starring opposite HistoryMaker Louis Cameron Gossett, Jr. on 'The Lazarus Syndrome'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122825">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sheila Frazier talks about working with Bill Cosby and Richard Pryor on 'California Suite'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122826">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sheila Frazier describes her friend Richard Pryor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122827">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sheila Frazier lists projects she has worked on alongside Jim Brown, Fred Williamson, Jim Kelly, Ron O'Neal, and Adolph Caesar</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122828">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sheila Frazier talks about working as a producer for Richard Pryor's Indigo Productions in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122829">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sheila Frazier describes hosting a community affairs talk show in Los Angeles, California, and then becoming a producer in 1982</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122830">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sheila Frazier talks about producing 'Live from LA with Tanya Hart' for BET</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122831">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sheila Frazier reflects upon her time at BET</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122832">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sheila Frazier describes the projects she worked on at BET</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122833">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sheila Frazier describes her documentary, 'You Don't Get Old Being a Fool'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122834">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sheila Frazier talks about her concerns for young people, and what can be learned from older generations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122835">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sheila Frazier talks about the people she interviewed for her oral history documentary 'You Don't Get Old Being a Fool'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122836">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sheila Frazier talks about producing 'Bobby Jones Gospel' for BET</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122837">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sheila Frazier talks about her son and his love for music</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122838">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Sheila Frazier talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122839">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sheila Frazier reflects upon her life and what she would do differently</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122840">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sheila Frazier talks about her future plans, the type of role she would like to perform, and about her faith</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122841">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sheila Frazier reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/122842">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sheila Frazier talks about how she would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

7$4

DATitle
Sheila Frazier talks about working as a producer for Richard Pryor's Indigo Productions in Los Angeles, California
Sheila Frazier describes her documentary, 'You Don't Get Old Being a Fool'
Transcript
Now you got involved in production at a certain point. Right? Well, tell us about that? How did you--(simultaneous)--$$Yeah. I--well, when Richard Pryor formed his company, Indigo Productions, it was a company--it was the first time ever that a studio had financed a production company headed up by minorities. And I think it was something that Jim Brown encouraged Richard to, like, do. And so, he was the president. And during that time, I was raising my son, I was so broke. I was so broke. And I remember I ran into Jim at the Comedy Store [West Hollywood, California], you know. And so I said, you know, if you're hiring, you know, I really need a job, blah, blah, blah." He said, "No problem." This is the angel part of this man, Jim. And so, like he hired me as a story editor, which was my first behind-the-scenes" role. And in the story editor position, my job was to read the scripts and then write a synopsis on it, and they would--and then pitch the idea if I thought that there was a great story. Probably, the greatest failure that we had was, was we had an opportunity to do 'Purple Rain,' you know. And I don't--I can't remember if Richard didn't want to do it or what happened.$$Did you like it? Were you in it?$$I'm trying--I don't think that was one of the scripts I read, you know. But we all collectively--there were two story editors, you know. I was the first one, and then they bought another young lady in. And then we would talk with, like, Jim and then we'd kick it around. I'm not certain in the end we didn't do it, because I know Jim was very astute and understood. I mean, he really has such an ear for music. So he immediately identified with Prince. He knew Prince's work, you know. And, like, he said, this guy is a real genius. So, but I'm not sure why we didn't do that one. But, that one kind of fell through the cracks, you know. But it was great experience, because although Richard was not as much a hands-on, it had real potential. And then there was a breakdown between Richard and Jim, you know, that they decided just to kind of sever their relationship. And in any administration, you wind up getting rid of the whole cabinet, you know. And so that's what happened. Richard and my relationship, you know, remained intact, but, you know, it distanced-you know, because he wanted to distance himself from that whole--from our group and the group that he would bring in after, whatnot. But, you know, there was no love lost between he and me, you know. We were still friendly.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$Is there a project there that you look back at that you really like the most?$$With Indigo?$$Yeah.$$Well, I liked that we did Richard Pryor on Sunset Boulevard [sic., 'Richard Pryor: Live on the Sunset Strip], you know. That was my favorite, because it was, I think that, I think Richard was our greatest commodity, and it was smart to, like, use him, you know, in doing something. See the stutter come? Did you see that stutter come back just then (laughs)? Yeah. But it was a great experience. I mean, I look back--I don't have one bad experience that I look back and, you know, and say, "Oh, I'm sorry I did this," or "I'm sorry, you know, for this experience." Every last one of them was a building block in, you know, in my history making. You know, that was just--I mean, it was great. It was great. I feel blessed.$What did you do next?$$I formed my own company, Frazier Multimedia Group.$$Okay.$$And what my company does is books talent on shows, grooms talent; independent production kinds of things, you know, field producing. Kind of what you're doing, you know. And I'm working on a documentary. I've started that.$$Okay. Can you tell us what it's about?$$Yeah. It is--it takes the--it's called 'You Don't Get Old Being a Fool.' And what it does is, it juxtaposes how our grandparents, people eighty years old and above, approach life, love and the pursuit of happiness; how the baby--I mean, how the buppies did it, you know, in our generation; and then in how the young people, you know, address it. And it's not to cast any judgment on either one, but along that way, there's been a breakdown in family; there's been a breakdown in what love is, you know; dating, you know, it is; you know, how we deal with problems and struggles; how our grandparents dealt with it, and how the young people, you know, dealt with it; how we deal with anger, you know. I mean, how we deal with work or, you know, and how we do it raising, you know, fam--everything has just kind of shifted, but they didn't get old being a fool. You know, they knew something that would be of value to the young people, you know. So the hope is that, you know, we can just kind of take a look at one another and just see what we can gleam and how far we've come or how far we've--you know, how much ground we've lost or how much ground we've actually gained; and be able to, like, you know, gleam some of the pearls of our grandparents and grandparents and maybe incorporate that. Maybe our children will look at that and incorporate some of that in their lives, you know. And maybe all of us can learn from one another.

Mike Glenn

NBA guard and television sports analyst, Michael Theodore “Stinger” Glenn was born on September 10, 1955 in Rome, Georgia. Growing up in Cave Springs, Georgia, his father taught and coached at the Georgia School for the Deaf while Glenn’s mother taught him at E.S. Brown Elementary School. Glenn became the top rated high school basketball player in Georgia, averaging 30 points per game when he graduated from Rome’s Coosa High School, third in his class, in 1973. An All Missouri Valley Conference college basketball player, Glenn graduated from Southern Illinois University with honors and a B.S. degree in mathematics in 1977.

Drafted twenty-third overall by the NBA’s Chicago Bulls in 1977, Glenn broke his neck in an auto accident and was released from the team. Later that year, he was signed by the NBA’s Buffalo Braves (now the Los Angeles Clippers). In 1978, Glenn signed with the New York Knicks, playing with Ray Williams, Michael Ray Richardson and the legendary Earl “The Pearl” Monroe. Known for his shooting accuracy, Glenn was named “Stinger” by his teammates. In New York, Glenn attended graduate business classes at St. John’s University and Baruch College and earned his stockbroker’s license. Moving on to the Atlanta Hawks, Glenn became the team’s all-time shooting accuracy leader – making better than half of his shots. In 1984, Glenn, a six-foot, three inch jump shooting guard, shot an astounding 58% from the field. Between 1985 and 1989, Glenn, as a Milwaukee Buck, shared backcourt duties with Sidney Moncrief, Ricky Pierce and Craig Hodges.

During the 1991-1992 NBA season, Glenn served as a sports analyst for ESPN and the Atlanta Hawks on WGNX SportSouth and during the NBA playoffs for TNT and CNN. During the 1992-1993 season, Glenn served as a sports analyst for two weekly shows on CNN, This Week in the NBA and College Basketball Preview. He continued to serve as the Hawks TV analyst until 2003, broadcasting an average of 70 games per year. In 2004, Glenn was appointed Commissioner of the new World Basketball Association, a developmental league that sends players to the NBA and professional teams abroad. Active in community service, Glenn recently celebrated the 25th Anniversary of his All-Star Basketball Camp for the Hearing Impaired, where he was honored with the NBA Walter P. Kennedy Citizenship Award. An avid collector of rare African American books, Glenn is the author of From My Library, Volume 1 and 2 and Lessons in Success from the NBA’s Top Players.

Glenn was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 9, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.108

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/9/2006

Last Name

Glenn

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Coosa High School

E. S. Brown Elementary School

Southern Illinois University

St. John's University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Mike

Birth City, State, Country

Rome

HM ID

GLE01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

Feed Him And Fan Him.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/10/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Television sports commentator and basketball player Mike Glenn (1955 - ) played in the NBA and was a television basketball analyst, author, and commissioner of the World Basketball Association.

Employment

National Basketball Association

Merrill Lynch

Atlanta Hawks

World Basketball Association

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:468,16:2730,76:12090,340:15912,408:17394,439:17862,446:19344,509:26926,552:27458,561:28218,579:28902,589:32018,636:33310,683:36502,730:36882,736:37262,742:40378,820:44254,890:55036,1004:59846,1088:60512,1098:61104,1107:61622,1115:62510,1128:74868,1386:75164,1391:75682,1400:84932,1492:85228,1497:87152,1530:91740,1614:104192,1750:104736,1762:105008,1767:105756,1780:107320,1805:107932,1816:112488,1931:113100,1941:113780,1955:117792,2046:122008,2141:124660,2207:132928,2279:134169,2306:135921,2361:136213,2366:136724,2374:140739,2447:141542,2462:148802,2548:149450,2558:152114,2634:152474,2660:152978,2668:155282,2715:155930,2726:164354,2920:165866,2955:173180,2989:173570,2996:174285,3010:176040,3047:176300,3052:176690,3062:178315,3170:178835,3179:179160,3185:179810,3196:182215,3249:182475,3254:186115,3330:187610,3361:188260,3375:189040,3390:191380,3444:191705,3454:192095,3461:194825,3515:195215,3522:201160,3534$0,0:540,84:16920,411:17910,491:34558,631:36910,679:37666,690:41026,763:41530,770:43714,923:47578,1044:68660,1327:68956,1332:69548,1341:70510,1373:71250,1384:78724,1538:89909,1671:91988,1755:92373,1762:94606,1799:94914,1804:98071,1861:99303,1906:99611,1911:100458,1924:103461,1998:109313,2064:117036,2211:119848,2369:132692,2571:135048,2646:135352,2651:136264,2679:136644,2686:137176,2695:151062,2927:158286,3042:159126,3058:159882,3068:161898,3114:165510,3185:172280,3270:176824,3373:177392,3390:177889,3407:179735,3447:183711,3551:184492,3561:188468,3641:188965,3649:190172,3679:202354,3853:203146,3876:206026,3937:206530,3946:207898,3970:213082,4081:215970,4102
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369845">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Mike Glenn's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369846">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369847">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369848">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn describes his mother's upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369849">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369850">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes his parents' personalities and occupations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369851">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369852">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Mike Glenn describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369853">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Mike Glenn describes his grade school experiences in Georgia, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369854">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn describes his grade school experiences in Georgia, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369855">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn remembers the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369856">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn recalls his childhood passion for basketball</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369857">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn describes his experiences at Coosa High School in Rome, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369858">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn remembers playing basketball at Coosa High School, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369859">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes his relationship with the Georgia School for the Deaf</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369860">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn remembers playing basketball at Coosa High School, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369861">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Mike Glenn recalls his decision to attend Southern Illinois University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369862">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn describes his experiences at Southern Illinois University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369863">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn recalls being drafted by the Chicago Bulls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369864">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn remembers recovering from a spinal injury</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369865">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn describes the beginning of his professional basketball career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369866">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn remembers his teammates on the New York Knicks</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369867">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes his tenure on the New York Knicks team</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369868">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn recalls leaving the New York Knicks to sign with the Atlanta Hawks</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369869">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn describes his teams with the New York Knicks and the Atlanta Hawks</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369870">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn recalls memorable games from his professional basketball career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369871">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn describes his social life as a professional basketball player</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369872">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn talks about founding basketball camps for deaf children</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369873">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn recalls playing for the Milwaukee Bucks</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369874">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes Craig Hodges, his former teammate</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369875">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Mike Glenn's interview, session 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369876">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn remembers retiring from the National Basketball Association</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369877">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn describes conflicts between coaches and players in the National Basketball Association</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369878">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn remembers giving his jump shot the name Candace</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369879">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn describes his career as a stockbroker</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369880">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn talks about working on television as a basketball analyst</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369881">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn describes his commissionership of the World Basketball Association</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369882">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Mike Glenn describes the social factors that hold back talented basketball players</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369883">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn recalls how he began collecting first edition books</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369884">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn describes his book, 'Lessons in Success from the NBA's Top Players'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369885">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn talks about his historical book series, 'Lessons From My Library'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369886">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn talks about meeting Charles Blockson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369887">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn talks about 19th century African American boxer Tom Molineaux</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369888">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369889">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369890">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Mike Glenn describes his family life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369891">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Mike Glenn describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369892">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn narrates his photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/369893">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn narrates his photographs, pt. 2</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Mike Glenn describes his relationship with the Georgia School for the Deaf
Mike Glenn recalls memorable games from his professional basketball career
Transcript
I know that you were considered at one time, was it, one of the best or the best basketball player in the state, I think--$$Um-hm. And that's pretty interesting, too. Yes, I was. Mainly 'cause of growing up at the deaf school [George School for the Deaf, Cave Spring, Georgia] and practicing and all this legacy that I had. I was voted number one player in the State of Georgia. I was in the top ten my junior year, and number one my senior year [at Coosa High School, Rome, Georgia], and had choices of colleges all over the country. So, it was really a wonderful time, a wonderful experience for me to go to that level that you recognize where it had come from. It had come from deaf kids, basically. It had come from a place where people didn't even want to go down to the deaf school and couldn't even--were afraid of these deaf kids, and I had so much joy and opportunity that came through my experience with deaf kids. So, I do that as a basis of my talk a lot of times, too. When I talk about having friends from all diverse cultures that all of the blessings I received basically emanated from my relationship with deaf kids.$$Could you sign?$$Oh, yeah. Of course I could sign before I could talk, you know. The girls really started teaching me first. I remember dad [Charles Glenn, Sr.] had this one girl on his team. Her name was Mildred, M-I-L-D-R-E-D, and her last name was Nelson, N-E-L-S-O-N. She was the best player on his team. Matter of fact, Mildred was the best player in the history of Georgia School for the Deaf. Mildred was a beautiful girl. She had smooth, dark beautiful skin. At that time, I thought she looked like a Hershey's bar (laughter). So, Mildred would start teaching me my ABCs and she started teaching me sign language and lessons on inclusion and lessons on sharing, and I would go to the games and I would clap for Mildred. Mildred was knocking down those jump shots and everybody always talked about Mildred Nelson. She was such a great player. And there was another player on dad's team named Lois Smiley. Now, these were the girls on his girls team, obviously. Lois was his best student. Lois was a brilliant math student. He'd teach her separately. Dad--I would go to dad's classes and do the multiplication tables before I started to school and I would do 'em in sign language and I would just compete with his students, and--but Lois was his brightest student by far and he would take her separately and teach her. And he really encouraged and pushed Lois, and Lois went to Gallaudet College, and now it's Gallaudet University [Washington, D.C.]. She was the first student from, black student from Georgia School for the Deaf, a segregated school and less of everything, to go to Gallaudet College, and dad was so proud of her and I was so proud of Lois 'cause she was a great student, great math student, went to Gallaudet, represented Georgia School for the Deaf. So, all that education and basketball was just coming together, and even today, I've had those ladies to come back to a basketball camp [Mike Glenn's All-Star Basketball Camp for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing]. I've started the nation's first basketball camp for deaf kids, and I've had Lois and Mildred to come back now, and I tell all of the young deaf kids, "This is why I'm here now, because of these deaf girls." This is how I learned how to play and I want them to respect them and love 'em and learn the legacy from them and carry forth the message that I got onto future generations.$Of all the people you've named and some you may not have named, is there any player that in a game where you just couldn't believe what they did? I mean, you know, you played in an era with Dr. J, [Julius Erving], [HistoryMaker] Dominique Wilkins comes in later, but like--is there any story about just--$$There are just--there's a lot of 'em (laughter). There's a lot of 'em. You know, once or twice a year you're going to have those kind of phenomenal games, experiences that some--you have some yourself and you see other players have it. I've seen--oh man, I've seen a lot of them. I've seen--of course Dominique had some tremendous games where he just gets on fire and nobody can stop him. I've seen Larry Bird have a tremendous game where he went for almost sixty on us and we're trying to put everybody on him, and it got to the point that it got comical, you almost cheered for the guy because you're putting everybody on him and the ball keeps going in and it's always funny. It's never funny to the coach, but you just realize that he's in that bubble, and I remember Cliff Levingston was laughing so hard that Bird was hitting all these shots falling out of bounds. I mean, Antoine [Antoine Carr], Kevin [Kevin Willis], me, everybody guarding him and actually it was funny because there's nothing you can do when somebody gets like that. I can remember situations where even like Albert King would get red hot on us, and Don Nelson who is one of my favorite coaches would just look on and say, "We got anybody who can stop him? Anybody can guard him." I mean, he just guarded (unclear) (laughter)--ask anybody, can anybody stop him? I mean, I like that creativity. It was fun at those kinds of times, you know. You try to come up with a strategy, a double team or something like that to stop him, but there were a lot of instances like that. Bernard King would get on a roll, and just knocking out shots, and you kind of forget about some of 'em. But there were a lot of great performances, and players live for that to get in that what they call a zone where they're hot and the basket just gets big and all you want is the ball. You don't even have to look, you just catch and you just let it go and it's gonna go (laughter).$$Now you being a great shooter already--I mean, do you have--is there any like particular game that you remember that you--you know, where you really impressed yourself?$$(Laughter) Yeah, yeah, yeah. There were a few of them, man. I remember a game particularly with the Knicks [New York Knicks], we were playing Cleveland [Cleveland Cavaliers]. I always shot good against Cleveland for some reason. They had some stat that I have the highest field goal percentage against them for a career. Even maybe today, higher then Kareem [Kareem Abdul-Jabbar] and everybody. I don't know, something about Cleveland that I would have these outstanding games, and they were a couple when we needed a big win in our playoff push and I had one of my best games maybe like--I don't know, maybe fourteen out of seventeen shots, and Red [Red Holzman] was just calling plays for me and the teammates trying to get you the ball. That's the most fun time you can have when at a timeout they're asking you, "Where you want the ball? What do you want?" So, that was a play there. There was another big game in Atlanta [Georgia] where it was the last game of the season. We needed this win to make the playoffs and we were playing the Bucks [Milwaukee Bucks] and I came off the bench. Ted Turner was the, always on courtside and had twenty-five off the bench that game, and again they were just running plays for me and the ball was just going in and Ted was just jumping up like a cheerleader, but it was the most important game of the season 'cause we needed that win to make the playoffs, and we won the game and I was able to come up with the twenty-five points that really propelled us into the playoffs which was very significant for the whole organization, so there were some games like that that really, really stand out in my mind, very memorable.