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Charles J. Hamilton, Jr.

Lawyer Charles J. Hamilton, Jr. was born on October 16, 1947 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Geraldine Alma Taylor and Charles Jordan Hamilton, Sr. He received his A.B. degree in government from Harvard College in 1969; and then received a Henry Russell Shaw Fellowship to study at the Doxiadis Institute in Athens, Greece. In 1975, Hamilton obtained his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School, where he served on the Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review. He also received his M.C.P. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1983 to 2000, he served as partner at the law firm of Battle Fowler, LLP before joining the law firm of Paul Hastings Janofsky & Walker, LLP following the firm’s merger with Battle Fowler. Hamilton specialized in real estate development and finance, government finance, corporate governance, media and non-profit organizations. In 2010, Hamilton became senior counsel in the New York office of the law firm of Windels Marx Lane & Mittendorf, LLP. Throughout his career, he represented the NAACP Legal Defense Fund; the National Urban League, Inc.; Equity Office Properties Trust; Millennium Partners, L.P.; McFarlane Partners, LLC; Fannie Mae in American Communities Fund; Bessemer Trust Company; and Casden Properties, Inc. He served as outside general counsel to Essence Communications, Inc. and the Freedom National Bank of New York, and special counsel to the Apollo Theater Foundation, Inc.; the Studio Museum in Harlem; the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation; and the Palau Mission to the United Nations. Hamilton was also an impartial arbitrator to the New York City Transit Authority and special fiscal counsel to the New York City Board of Education. In addition, he served on the faculty of the Practicing Law Institute’s program in Commercial Real Estate Financing.

In 2010, Hamilton was named chair of the board of directors of the Harlem School of the Arts. He has served on the boards of the Environmental Defense Fund, the Hudson River Foundation, the National Visionary Leadership Project, the Phoenix House Foundation, Inc., Granite Broadcasting Corporation, the Harvard Club of New York City, and the Ethical Culture Fieldston School. Hamilton was also on the Harvard College Board of Overseers’ Visiting Committee to the College and the Public Policy Committee of the board of directors of The Advertising Council, Inc. Additionally, he was a trustee of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the Harvard Law School Association of New York City, Inc., and the Interest on Lawyer Account Fund of the State of New York.

Hamilton has received numerous awards throughout his career, including being named one of New York’s Most Powerful Lawyers by New York magazine in 1999, the W.E.B. DuBois Medal for Academic Leadership from Harvard University in 2000, named one of America’s Top Black Lawyers by Black Enterprise in 2003, and the National Urban League, Inc. Collins Award in 2006.

Charles J. Hamilton, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 27, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.023

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/27/2019 |and| 6/19/2019

Last Name

Hamilton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

J.

Occupation
Schools

Crescent Elementary School

Westinghouse Academy

Harvard University

Harvard Law School

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Pittsburgh

HM ID

HAM06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Thomas

Favorite Quote

Let's Get Busy

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/16/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Favorite Food

Steak Salad

Short Description

Lawyer Charles J. Hamilton, Jr. (1947 - ) served as senior counsel at the law firm Windels Marx Lane & Mittendorf, LLP and as partner at the law firms of Battle Fowler, LLP and Paul Hastings Janofsky & Walker, LLP.

Employment

Pillsbury , Madison, & Sutro

Battle Fowler, LLP

Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker, LLP

Windels Marx Lane & Mittendorf, LLP

Favorite Color

Green

Will Griffin

Media entrepreneur William Griffin was born on November 25, 1970 in Austin, Texas. Griffin received his B.A. degree from Dartmouth College, where he was a member of the college’s top-ranked debate team and editor-in-chief of the Black Praxis. Griffin then received his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School and authored the Harvard Report on Urban Music. He also completed the Entrepreneurship Curriculum at Harvard Business School and served as director of the Harvard Consultation Project.

Griffin began his professional career as a financial analyst in the Structured Finance Group at Goldman, Sachs & Company. He subsequently worked in the Entertainment and Media Practice Group of McKinsey & Company and then joined News Corp/Fox Entertainment Group, where he was director of the eDirect initiative. In 2000, Griffin was hired as general manager and executive vice president of business development for eUniverse Network, where, in two quarters, he developed and implemented the turnaround strategy that led to profitability for the industry's largest digital entertainment company. Then, after producing films with Reuben Cannon and Bishop T.D. Jakes, Griffin was named president and chief operating officer of Simmons Lathan Media Group, a film and television production and acquisitions company that develops and distributes urban content across a variety of media platforms. In 2005, he founded, in partnership with Russell Simmons and Stan Lathan, Def on Demand (later named Hip Hop On Demand) on Comcast, the industry's only African American owned Video-on-demand channel, where he serves as chairman and chief executive officer.

Griffin’s projects have won numerous awards including two NAACP Image Awards (Run’s House and Bishop T.D. Jakes’ Woman Thou Art Loosed: The Movie) and the IAB/Brandweek Mixx Silver Award for Interactive Television for Hip Hop On Demand.

Will Griffin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 9, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.127

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/9/2014

Last Name

Griffin

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Leverett

Schools

Harvard Law School

Dartmouth College

The Science Academy - Lyndon B. Johnson High School

Pearce Junior High

Harris Elementary

T.A. Brown Elementary

First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Austin

HM ID

GRI09

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Favorite Quote

Right Hand, Black Man.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

11/25/1970

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Austin

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Entertainment chief executive Will Griffin (1970 - ) served as president and chief operating officer of Simmons Lathan Media Group and founded, in partnership with Russell Simmons and Stan Lathan, Hip Hop On Demand, where he acts as chairman and chief executive officer.

Employment

HipHop on Demand

Simmons/Lathan Media

eUniverse Networks

News Corporation

Mckinsey & Company

Goldman Sachs

Favorite Color

Maroon

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Will Griffin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Will Griffin lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Will Griffin talks about his maternal family history, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Will Griffin talks about his maternal family history, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Will Griffin talks about his maternal great-grandmother and grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Will Griffin talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Will Griffin talks about his father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Will Griffin talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Will Griffin talks about his family's role in integrating the dormitories at the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Will Griffin talks about his father's political activity

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Will Griffin talks about HistoryMaker Pluria Marshall

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Will Griffin talks about politics in Texas and shifts in party membership

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Will Griffin describes finding his great-grandfather's dissertation in the University of Southern California's archives in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Will Griffin talks about the value of his family's legacy

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Will Griffin talks about how his parents met and how his mother's young pregnancies affected her life

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Will Griffin talks about his mother's aspirations prior to having children

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Will Griffin talks about his likeness to his parents and his strict upbringing by his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Will Griffin talks about his mother's radio show on KAZI 80.7 FM in Austin, Texas and the toll of his father's lack of support

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Will Griffin talks about his older sister

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Will Griffin describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Will Griffin lists the places he lived from birth to age eighteen

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Will Griffin recalls the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Austin, Texas and his disinterest in school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Will Griffin recalls his early school years and being sent back to kindergarten because of his behavior

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Will Griffin recalls teachers from his elementary school years

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Will Griffin talks about his grades, his learning disability and playing sports

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Will Griffin describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Will Griffin talks about popular culture that his friends consumed as children

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Will Griffin talks about Michael Jackson and dancing in middle school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Will Griffin talks about his mother's musical tastes

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Will Griffin talks about the differences between himself and his older sister

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Will Griffin talks about an influential teacher at Pearce Junior High School in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Will Griffin talks about spending as much time out of the house as possible in his youth

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Will Griffin talks about his high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Will Griffin talks about learning Texas history at Lyndon Baines Johnson High School in Austin, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Will Griffin talks about KAZI, the African American community radio station in Austin, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Will Griffin talks about hosting a radio show at KAZI, working at a grocery store, and his high school years

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Will Griffin talks about his mentors at KAZI, an African American community radio station in Austin, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Will Griffin talks about becoming involved in debate in high school

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Will Griffin talks about his love for debate and other aspects of his life during high school

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Will Griffin talks about debate camp, hoping to attend Harvard University and being stripped of his student body president title

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Will Griffin reflects on getting into trouble with his principal at Lyndon Baines Johnson High School in Austin, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Will Griffin reflects on getting into trouble with his principal at Lyndon Baines Johnson High School in Austin, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Will Griffin talks about his decision to attend Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Will Griffin talks about his arrival at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Will Griffin talks about HistoryMaker Jesse Jackson

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Will Griffin talks about music that was popular in the early 1990s at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Will Griffin talks about Geto Boys, a hip hop group from Houston, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Will Griffin talks about people who supported him while he was a student at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Will Griffin talks about his decision to major in anthropology at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Will Griffin talks about the Nation of Islam and his ethnography of black Muslims in Harlem, New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Will Griffin talks about Spike Lee's 1992 movie, 'Malcolm X'

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Will Griffin talks about the African American Society and the Black Praxis Journal

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Will Griffin talks about The Dartmouth Review

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Will Griffin talks about a controversy between the Dartmouth Review and the African American Society

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Will Griffin talks about black mentors on campus at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Will Griffin talks about working for Goldman Sachs in New York City after graduating from Dartmouth College

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Will Griffin talks about his activities and study habits at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Will Griffin talks about what he learned while working at Goldman Sachs in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Will Griffin talks about rooming with Dan Sparks while working at Goldman Sachs in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Will Griffin talks about being admitted to Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1995

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Will Griffin talks about publishing the Harvard Report on Urban Music his first year at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Will Griffin talks about professors he studied under at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Will Griffin talks about attending Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Will Griffin explains how he was able to work for McKinsey & Company after graduating from Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Will Griffin talks about his work at McKinsey & Company in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Will Griffin talks about working for News Corporation at Fox Studios in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Will Griffin talks about how the 2000 U.S. presidential elections boosted Fox News' viewership

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Will Griffin talks about working with Fox eDirect and transitioning to working at E-Universe

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Will Griffin talks about working for eUniverse for one year

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Will Griffin talks about working as a producer with HistoryMaker Reuben Cannon

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Will Griffin describes how he became president and CEO of Simmons Lathan Media Group

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Will Griffin talks about 'Def Comedy Jam' and 'Def Poetry Jam'

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Will Griffin talks about his involvement with The HistoryMakers DVD series produced by Simmons Lathan Media Group in 2005

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Will Griffin talks about the creation of Hip Hop on Demand and the channel's name change

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Will Griffin describes the type of programming on Hip Hop on Demand

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Will Griffin talks about advocating for more black-owned independent channels

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Will Griffin hopes for an increase in viable black-owned channels in cable

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Will Griffin talks about Netflix

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Will Griffin talks about his consultation and why businesses trust him

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Will Griffin talks about advertising agency UniWorld, founder and HistoryMaker Byron Lewis, and CEO Monique Nelson

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Will Griffin talks about the decline of Jet magazine and advertisers' lack of cultural awareness

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Will Griffin reflects upon his life

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Will Griffin reflects upon what he would have done differently in life

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Will Griffin reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Will Griffin describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Will Griffin describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Will Griffin talks about his family, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Will Griffin talks about his family, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Will Griffin reflects upon his graduation from Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Will Griffin reflects upon how he would like to be remembered

Kenneth Standard

Lawyer Kenneth G. Standard is a prominent lawyer and diversity activist. As a child, civil rights activism was an important part of his family life; his elder sister worked for the national office of the NAACP, and from a young age he heard about and met NAACP lawyers like Thurgood Marshall and Charles Hamilton Houston. Standard graduated from Harvard University with his A.B. degree, and went on to receive his LL.B. degree from Harvard School of Law in 1962.

In 1967, Standard was hired as an attorney with the Bristol-Myers pharmaceutical company. In 1968, he was promoted to counsel of the products division; by 1970, he had been promoted again to become the division’s vice president. Standard continued his legal education, receiving his LL.M. degree from New York University’s School of Law in 1971. In 1988, he began working at the Consolidated Edison Company (Con Ed) as the assistant general counsel for labor relations. In 1999, Standard joined the law firm Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, where he served as special counsel. From 2004 to 2005, he served as president of the New York State Bar Association, and focused on increasing diversity within the legal field. In 2004, Standard joined the law firm of Epstein, Becker & Green as a member in its National Labor & Employment Practice. During this time, he also developed and chaired the firm’s nationwide diversity committee.

In 2006, the New York State Bar Association created the Kenneth G. Standard Internship program in his honor, which is specifically designed to support law students from a diverse range of backgrounds. In 2011, Standard received the American Bar Association’s Alexander Award for Lifetime Achievement in Pipeline Diversity; and, in 2013, he was elected fellow by the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers.

Standard and his late wife, Valerie Ann Salmon, have a daughter, Alison, and two sons, Devin and Trevor.

Kenneth Standard was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 14, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.003

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/14/2014

Last Name

Standard

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widower

Occupation
Schools

P.S. 47

P.S. 44 Marcus Garvey Elementary School

P.S. 45 Horace E Greene School

Boys High School

Harvard University

Harvard Law School

New York University School of Law

First Name

Kenneth

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

STA10

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/4/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Lawyer Kenneth Standard (1936 - ) has been an employment and labor lawyer for over forty years, and served as president of the New York State Bar Association.

Employment

United States Securities & Exchange Commision

New York State

New York Telephone Company

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company

New York City Board of Education

ConEdison

Morgan Lewis & Bockius

Epstein Becker & Green

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Kenneth Standard's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Kenneth Standard describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Kenneth Standard talks about his father's service in the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Kenneth Standard talks about his Bajan heritage

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Kenneth Standard talks briefly about the migration of his paternal aunts from Barbados to Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Kenneth Standard describes his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Kenneth Standard describes his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Kenneth Standard describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Kenneth Standard describes his older siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Kenneth Standard describes his childhood home in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Kenneth Standard describes his childhood neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Kenneth Standard recalls his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Kenneth Standard recalls an experience from his elementary school years

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Kenneth Standard talks about the onset of the Great Depression

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Kenneth Standard describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Kenneth Standard remembers his eldest sister, Muriel

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Kenneth Standard talks about moving to the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard talks about the academic influence of his elder sisters

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Kenneth Standard describes spending time with his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Kenneth Standard describes his family's Christmas holiday celebration

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Kenneth Standard remembers his elder sister, Phyllis Johnson

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Kenneth Standard describes his experience as an Eagle Scout and lifeguard

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Kenneth Standard lists his favorite school subjects

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Kenneth Standard talks about being awarded his Eagle Scout badge as an adult

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Kenneth Standard talks about his family's eviction in 1954

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Kenneth Standard describes his experience at P.S. 44 Marcus Garvey elementary school in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Kenneth Standard describes Boys High School in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Kenneth Standard talks about applying to the Naval ROTC program and explains how he financed his college education

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Kenneth Standard describes the student body demographic at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1954

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Kenneth Standard describes his suitemates in his freshman dormitory at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard remembers his first weeks as an undergraduate student at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Kenneth Standard describes his freshman academic year at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Kenneth Standard explains how he financed his undergraduate and law school education

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Kenneth Standard describes his personal development during his undergraduate years at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Kenneth Standard talks briefly about playing squash with the Harvard Club of New York

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Kenneth Standard describes his introduction and marriage to his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Kenneth Standard remembers his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Kenneth Standard explains how he avoided the draft

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Kenneth Standard describes the class size, faculty and curriculum at Harvard Law School in 1958

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Kenneth Standard talks about the black student population at Harvard Law School, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Kenneth Standard talks about the absence of discriminatory attitudes from Harvard Law faculty

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Kenneth Standard describes the academic environment at Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Kenneth Standard describes the black student population at Harvard Law School, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Kenneth Standard describes his jobs between semesters at Harvard Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard explains the transition from the LL.B. to the J.D. degree within the legal profession

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Kenneth Standard talks about the birth of his daughter in 1962

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Kenneth Standard describes studying for the bar exam

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Kenneth Standard talks about joining the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) as an enforcement attorney in 1962

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Kenneth Standard describes his tenure in the New York State Moreland Act Commission legal department

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Kenneth Standard explains how he became a trial attorney for the New York Telephone Company

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Kenneth Standard describes his experience as a trial attorney for the New York Telephone Company, and his introduction to judge George Bundy Smith

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Kenneth Standard describes his final case with the New York Telephone Company in 1967

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Kenneth Standard describes the legal department at the New York Telephone Company, and joining Bristol-Myers as an assistant staff attorney

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Kenneth Standard reflects upon his career prior to joining Bristol-Myers

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Kenneth Standard describes the size and structure of the legal department at Bristol-Myers

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard talks about the involvement of his children at the Bristol-Myers company

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Kenneth Standard describes his tenure at Bristol-Myers, and his contribution to the organization of the Monarch Crown Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Kenneth Standard describes the Monarch Crown Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Kenneth Standard describes employee demographics at the Monarch Crown Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Kenneth Standard talks about his promotion to division counsel and division vice president at Bristol-Myers

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Kenneth Standard describes the nurturing environment at the Bristol-Myers, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Kenneth Standard describes the nurturing environment at Bristol-Myers, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Kenneth Standard describes his proudest accomplishments as an employee at the Bristol-Myers Company

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Kenneth Standard talks about a management overhaul and company reorganization at the Bristol-Myers Company

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Kenneth Standard talks about his termination from the Bristol-Myers Company in 1984

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard talks about joining the New York City Board of Education as its director of legal services in 1985

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Kenneth Standard describes his tenure at the New York City Board of Education

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Kenneth Standard describes his tenure at Con Edison

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Kenneth Standard talks about resolving an employment discrimination lawsuit filed against Con Edison

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Kenneth Standard talks about joining Morgan, Lewis & Bockius law firm in 2000

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Kenneth Standard describes his volunteer work with BEEP, the Black Executive Exchange Program

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Kenneth Standard talks about his involvement with the Harvard Club of New York

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Kenneth Standard describes working at the Morgan, Lewis & Bockius law firm

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Kenneth Standard describes the Harvard Club of New York clubhouse expansion plans, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Kenneth Standard explains how the Harvard Club of New York clubhouse expansion of 2003 was financed

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Kenneth Standard describes the Harvard Club of New York clubhouse expansion plans, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Kenneth Standard talks about settling a lawsuit in opposition of the 2003 Harvard clubhouse expansion

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Kenneth Standard talks about the additions to the Harvard Club of New York clubhouse and its membership procedures

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard talks about being elected president of the New York State Bar Association

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Kenneth Standard talks about black members of the New York State Bar Association and its first black president, Archibald R. Murray

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Kenneth Standard describes his tenure as president of the New York State Bar Association

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Kenneth Standard remembers an instance of racial profiling against hiim

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Kenneth Standard talks about custodial interrogation and the death of Danroy Henry

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Kenneth Standard talks about joining the law firm of Epstein, Becker & Green in 2004

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Kenneth Standard describes his role as general counsel at Epstein, Becker & Green

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Kenneth Standard considers retirement

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Kenneth Standard considers his influence on his children and grandchildren

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Kenneth Standard reflects upon the role his high-quality elementary education played in his success

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard remembers instances of discrimination in elementary school

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Kenneth Standard describes his hopes and concerns for the African American demographic

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Kenneth Standard talks about contemporary American social justice efforts

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Kenneth Standard critiques the high cost of legal education and suggests reforms to resolve the unmet legal needs of the public

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Kenneth Standard considers the factors that contributed to his success

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Kenneth Standard reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Kenneth Standard narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Kenneth Standard narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

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DATitle
Kenneth Standard explains how the Harvard Club of New York clubhouse expansion of 2003 was financed
Kenneth Standard describes his tenure at Bristol-Myers, and his contribution to the organization of the Monarch Crown Corporation
Transcript
I discovered that we had a painting in the clubhouse [Harvard Club of New York, New York, New York] that was worth in the--in the seven figures. We, we got a--we had talked to some agents, art agents about the possibility of selling it. We found that, that they would sell it for us and then their commission would be--it was 10 or 15 percent; I, I can't recall. Then we--and this is all within the first six months of my taking office. We had retained a lawyer who specialized in representing people who have valuable works of art, and he said that he had been contacted by a gallery that had a client who might want to buy the painting, which was called The Chess Game by [John Singer] Sargent, and that the person wanted to see the painting.$$By John Singer Sargent?$$Yes, wanted to see the painting in his home to see how it went with the decor. So we worked out an agreement for him to get the painting on approval. We didn't know who it was; it was an anonymous person, and the painting was shipped out. A day or two after the painting was shipped out, we started getting calls from some members who said I've seen your painting in the Bellagio in Las Vegas [Nevada]. Why is The Chess Game hanging in the Bellagio in Las Vegas? So we didn't respond right away, but we made inquiries; we had our lawyer make inquiries. And it turned out that the person was Steve Wynn, but he didn't want to see it in his home, he wanted to display it in the Bellagio, which was contrary to the agreement that he had signed with us or that had been signed with us on his behalf because he was on disclose. So we directed them to send it back immediately, so the painting was sent back immediately. But this turned out to be a happy aberrational act because our lawyer then said to us, you know, this reminds me that I have a client I think who might be interested and can afford to buy this painting. Let me approach him and see if he is interested. And this client has a foundation, so he did approach the client, the client was interested. The client agreed to buy the painting, $13,500,000 dollars, no 10 percent commission, so we netted $13,500,000 on this painting, which had been given to us about forty or fifty years earlier. It was hanging in our stairway in the front entrance, very accessible to a thief or thieves, no great security. We had a lot of insurance; we were paying about fifteen to twenty thousand dollars a year in insurance on it, but it was underappreciated. So I said to the board, I think we need to sell it. I got them to agree, so we sold it, $13,500,000 less $20,000 dollars in legal fees for everything the lawyer had done for us. And so that gave us about 40 percent of the cost of the expansions, which meant that the mortgage could be much smaller. Through prudent management, we also had built up reserve funds, so we had a couple million dollars in cash available to us, so I said, well, let's go ahead and explore with architects the expansion, so we did that.$I would say within six, probably six months of my arrival [at Bristol-Myers, later, Bristol-Myers Squibb, New York, New York]--$$And you joined in nineteen sixty--$$I--August of '67 [1967].$$Seven, okay.$$Yeah. Yes, and it was a far more generous company than New York Telephone Company [later, Verizon Communications, New York, New York]. They--Bristol-Myers paid much, much better, and keep--there were a lot of other fringe benefits that were not available at the Telephone Company, available at Bristol. So I joined--they also had a policy that all the new lawyers would be sent to law school to learn the kinds of--to deal with the kinds of issues that the company was facing. So I enrolled at NYU [New York University, New York, New York] at the firm's expense. I went down a couple nights a week and I took food, drug, and cosmetic law. I think that was probably the first course I, I took there, and, and I took a number of other courses over the years. And I, like some of the--my predecessors, elected to stay long enough to get an LL.M. [Master of Laws], so that's how I happened to get an LL--LL.M. degree in trade regulation. And so I was preparing myself to do the work as, as I went along and the company was very supportive. We had a change relatively quickly. The man who had been counsel for the division as well as for another division lost the Bristol-Myers Products division and was counsel for just one division, and the lawyer who had been in between me and him was promoted to be counsel of the division, so there was just the two of us then doing that work. Around the same time, I was also asked to help set up a new [U.S.] Military sales organization of all of the products, not simply Bristol-Myers but the Clairol products and Drackett products to Military installations. And a man who had been vice president of sales for products division by the name of [F.] Harry Fletcher, he was the man who was then made the president of this new division, which was called--or a subsidiary--Monarch Crown Corporation, so I helped him to organize that division. He became a lifelong friend of me and his family and my family also became lifelong friends.$$So let me understand something, so you come in 1967. What division are you assigned--I mean you said that--$$I'm--I worked for Bristol-Myers company--$$Right.$$--I'm on the Bristol-Myers company payroll, but I'm assigned to the Bristol-Myers Products division as their lawyer.$$Okay, so you stayed with it, so--$$I stayed with that division during my entire career.$$Okay. And then so, Mr. Flet--you said--$$Fletcher.$$Fletcher.$$Fletcher had been a vice president of sales of Bristol-Myers Products and because of political issues and so on, he lost that position, and then he was given the opportunity to create this new business, which he did very successfully called Monarch Crown Corporation.$$Okay.