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Freddi Evans

Children’s book author Freddi Williams Evans was born on February 13, 1957 and grew up in Madison, Mississippi. As a child, her parents, Reverend R. L. and Carrie Cotten Williams, traveled frequently across the United States. Evans studied piano from an early age and graduated from Tougaloo College with her B.A. degrees in music and psychology. While at Tougaloo, she also was able to travel to West Africa where she studied the traditional music of Ghana. Her love of travel and the arts influenced her desire to write her stories. She continued her education at Hahnemann University in Pennsylvania where she received her Masters degree in creative arts therapy with an emphasis in music.

Evans worked in Philadelphia before marrying and moving to New Orleans, Louisiana where she began working as a music therapist. She was a Fulbright Scholar twice, going to Zimbabwe in 1995 and South Africa in 2000. In addition to working as an arts educator and administrator for the Jefferson Parish Public School System, Evans worked as an independent consultant for various organizations including: Orleans Parish Public Schools, the Amistad Research Center at Tulane University, Louisiana State Department of Education and the Mississippi Arts Commission. In 2003, she authored her first children’s book, Bus of Our Own which received many accolades including the 2004 Mississippi Book Award. Her second and third books followed in 2005 and 2008 with The Battle of New Orleans: The Drummer’s Story and Hush Harbor: Praying in Secret. Her fourth book, Come Sunday: New Orleans’ Congo Square, a history book for general audiences, is due in 2010.

Evans has received several awards for her work in education including the Mazie Malveaux VSA Award in 1998 for her service to Louisiana students with disabilities and the Special Congressional Recognition for Outstanding Contributions to the Arts in 2002.

Freddi Evans was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 9, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.053

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

6/9/2010

Last Name

Evans

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Williams

Occupation
Schools

Tougaloo College

Hanhnemann University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Freddi

Birth City, State, Country

Jackson

HM ID

EVA05

Favorite Season

Fall, Winter

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa

Favorite Quote

Pursue purpose with a passion.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Louisiana

Interview Description
Birth Date

2/13/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New Orleans

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Author and music therapist Freddi Evans (1957 - ) writes children's books based on African American history and has won several awards for her work including the Special Congressional Recognition for Outstanding Contributions to the Arts.

Employment

Jefferson Parish Public Schools

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Green, Pink

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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37237">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Freddi Evans' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37238">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Freddi Evans lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37239">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Freddi Evans describes her mother's growing up in Madison County, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37240">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Freddi Evans talks about her maternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37241">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Freddi Evans talks about her great-grandfather's and her grandfather's land ownership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37242">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Freddi Evans talks about her relationship with her maternal grandfather, Edward David Cotton</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37243">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Freddi Evans talks about her maternal great-grandfather being a slave and his life after Emancipation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37244">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Freddi Evans talks about her father's growing up in Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37245">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Freddi Evans talks about her paternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37246">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Freddi Evans talks about her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37247">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Freddi Evans describes the home where she grew up in Madison, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37248">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Freddi Evans describes her neighborhood in Madison, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37249">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Freddi Evans describes her experience in elementary school in Madison, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37250">Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Freddi Evans talks about playing the piano as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37251">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Freddi Evans describes the sights, sounds and smells of elementary school in Madison, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37252">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Freddi Evans talks about her favorite teachers and her interest in math in elementary school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37253">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Freddi Evans talks about the integration of her school in Madison, Mississippi in the early 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37254">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Freddi Evans talks about her extracurricular activities in school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37255">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Freddi Evans describes her experience in a newly-integrated high school in Madison, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37256">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Freddi Evans talks about graduating from high school, and being accepted into Tougaloo College as part of early admissions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37257">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Freddi Evans talks about the discrimination she experienced in her newly-integrated high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37258">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Freddi Evans talks about her family's involvement in civic life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37259">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Freddi Evans talks about her family's involvement with church in Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37260">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Freddi Evans talks about graduating from high school in 1973</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37261">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Freddi Evans talks about her social life in school, attending summer programs, and traveling with her family during the summers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37262">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Freddi Evans talks about traveling with her family in the segregated South, and her parents' jobs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37263">Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Freddi Evans talks about attending Tougaloo College, where she majored in music and psychology</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37264">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Freddi Evans talks about the music department at Tougaloo College and her trip to Ghana while she was there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37265">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Freddi Evans talks about the similarities between the religious practices of African Americans in the South and in Africa</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37266">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Freddi Evans talks about her senior year at Tougaloo College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37267">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Freddi Evans describes her experience in graduate school at Hahnemann University and the field of music therapy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37268">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Freddi Evans talks about her marriage and her children</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37269">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Freddi Evans talks about her work at the Juvenile Court Services in New Orleans, Louisiana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37270">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Freddi Evans describes her role as an artist administrator</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37271">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Freddi Evans talks about her Fulbright Scholarships and her trips to Africa and Japan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37272">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Freddi Evans talks about her inspiration for her first book</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37273">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Freddi Evans describes her uncles' school bus business in Madison, Mississippi, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37274">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Freddi Evans describes her uncles' school bus business in Madison, Mississippi, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37275">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Freddi Evans talks about her children as her inspiration to publish her first children's book</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37276">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Freddi Evans talks about her first book getting published</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37277">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Freddi Evans talks about her second book, entitled, 'The Battle of New Orleans: The Drummer's Story'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37278">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Freddi Evans describes her experience during Hurricane Katrina in 2005</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37279">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Freddi Evans describes her experience in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37280">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Freddi Evans talks about her third book, entitled, 'Hush Harbor: Praying in Secret'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37281">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Freddi Evans describes the story of her book entitled, 'Hush Harbor: Praying in Secret'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37282">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Freddi Evans discusses the history of Congo Square in New Orleans, Louisiana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37283">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Freddi Evans discusses her civic activities and the awards that she has received for her books</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37284">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Freddi Evans talks about her decision to major in classical music and her research role model from the University of Ghana at Accra</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37285">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Freddi Evans shares her message to future generations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37286">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Freddi Evans reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/37287">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Freddi Evans reflects upon the history of her family in Mississippi</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

3$9

DATitle
Freddi Evans talks about the integration of her school in Madison, Mississippi in the early 1970s
Freddi Evans talks about her inspiration for her first book
Transcript
And as you moved on, you stayed at that school [Rosa Scott Elementary School, Madison, Mississippi] until you graduated?$$No, I stayed there until integration, until full integration because--$$But what year was that because 'Brown vs. The Board of Education'--$$I know, right.$$--was a long time [1954]. This is, we're already--if you're in first grade, 1961--$$Exactly.$$So, I mean integration should have happened, which it didn't, so--$$It didn't.$$--what year are you speaking of?$$Let me see, maybe around '70 [1970]. I'm not really sure exactly. I went to Tougaloo [College, Jackson, Mississippi] in '73 [1973], and I was there two years. So maybe '71 [1971] or--$$You were in--$$--'70 [1970] or '71 [1971].$$What grade?$$You know, I didn't go to twelfth grade, so I think it must have been tenth grade or something like that, tenth grade because I was there two years in the integrated school.$$Okay, so you went to Rosa Scott until the tenth grade?$$Probably to the ninth grade.$$Ninth grade, okay.$$And I went there for tenth and eleventh grade, yeah. And that was what we call full integration, of course, because then we could go to the school. Before that, we had "Freedom of Choice," and you could select. So some of the black children opted to go to the school, to the white, predominantly white school. But then after the Freedom of Choice opportunity passed, then it was like, okay, we have one high school. And so that high school became the white, predominantly white high school. And Rosa Scott ended up being maybe an elementary school or something. Right now, it's a middle school in Madison. But that was the norm, is that, if there's only going to be one high school, it would be the school that was the white high school. And things were very, very different because at Rosa Scott, we had band, we had choir, we had all of the sports. We had library. It was just, had a rich, rich extracurricular, extra curriculum activities, opportunities for students. But when we went to the school that became the high school, the white high school, all of those activities were stopped. They didn't allow band nor choir. Sports continued, you know, there was still a basketball team, still a football team, but nothing that the students could interact, you know, with, or during or any kind of extracurricular activities for students.$When did you decide to write your first book?$$Oh, I decided to write my first, I first started off with poetry, and I know the first manuscript that I attempted to write was based on my aunt who--was that the first one? I think that was the first one, who was like my grandmother [Geraldine Foster Cotten]. She kept my grandfather's [Edward David Cotten] home, the Cotten home, house. Do you remember me talking about the land? And as, when I grew up, I thought that she was my grandmother because she lived there with my grandfather. And, you know, we just--she just had the presence of a grandmother, you know, always accepting, and always had food for you, teacakes and milk. It was clabbered milk, but it was, you know, what we knew.$$It was what kind of milk?$$Clabbered milk. Now, I don't know--well, she milked cows, right? So for clabbered milk, you don't put it in the refrigerator. And it develops clabber, I guess, is what it's called. But, you know, I ate it all my life, and then when I went to Philadelphia [Pennsylvania], and I started eating yogurt, I said, you know, this is clabbered milk. So it's basically yogurt. But she always had cake or either teacakes for us to eat along with it. So, she was the grandmother figure to me. And when I found out that she had cancer, and I wanted to write about her. I wanted to write something. And so I started writing something about her teacakes. And she did read my draft, one or two drafts, but, you know, that book has not developed yet. And I believe it will, you know, but I did write poems about her. As a matter of fact, one was published in her funeral program, maybe two. Yeah, one was published in her funeral program, and I did a separate tribute to her on her, at her funeral. And then at my uncle's funeral, who's my oldest uncle on that side, I heard about the bus because, see, in rural Mississippi, when there's a funeral, there is a program. But there's also a section on the program where people whose names are not on program can get up and say something (laughter). So, during that time period, when anybody could get up and talk and make a tribute, someone said, well, I would like to thank Mr. Cotten for bringing the first school bus to the colored children. And so I started asking on the way to the graveyard, what about this school bus, you know? Tell me about the bus, riding in the car with my brother [Ray Williams], who is totally different from me. You can already know because he was Stokely [Carmichael], right? And so he knows and socializes and talks to everybody, quite different from me. And he goes, you don't know nothing. That bus stayed in the pasture for years, you know. We just cut it up for scrap metal a couple of years ago. So, okay, the bus stayed there until I became interested in it, right? And then I started interviewing my relatives about this bus, you know. Who, why, how, you know, how did he get it, when, and all of that. And so I developed the storyline, and it was called "The Bus for Us."

Marie Brown

Literary agent and publishing consultant, Marie Dutton Brown was born on October 4, 1940 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Josephine and Benson Dutton. Brown attended a Catholic elementary school and a public high school. She graduated from Germantown High School in 1958 and went on to Penn State University where she received her B.S degree in 1962.

Brown became a teacher for the Philadelphia Public School System in 1963. In 1965, as a multicultural coordinator, she helped to introduce multicultural education into the school system, which included African American history.

In 1967, Brown decided to take a different direction in her career. She took a position as a general publishing trainee at Doubleday Book Publishing in New York City, but in 1969, she married and relocated with her husband to California. There, from 1969 until 1972, Brown worked in bookstores and did freelance work. Then, she returned to New York City and to Doubleday Book Publishing as a senior editor.

Brown went on to become the Editor-In-Chief of Elan magazine in 1982 and sales manager and assistant buyer for Endicott Booksellers in 1984. At a time when publishers were no longer accepting unsolicited manuscripts, Brown decided to take her expertise and open her own literary agency, Marie Brown and Associates in Harlem, New York, becoming one of the few African American agents in the book world. Her agency provided marketing, promotions and consulting along with publishing. In 1990, Brown began to concentrate on book publishing because she cherished the idea of working creatively and developmentally with the authors. Brown has represented authors Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Randall Robinson, Dr. Johnetta Cole, Susan Taylor and Van Whitfield.

Brown is on the Board of Directors of the Caribbean Cultural Center, To Be Continued Kids Theater and Frank Silvera Black Theater.

Brown was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 8, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.003

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/8/2007

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Schools

Germantown High School

George P. Phenix School

St. Vincent de Paul School

Washington Junior High School

Ford Green Elementary School

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

Pennsylvania State University Abington Campus

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Marie

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

BRO40

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

This Too Shall Pass.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/4/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Literary agent, magazine editor, and book editor Marie Brown (1940 - ) opened her own literary agency, Marie Brown and Associates in Harlem, New York, becoming one of the few African American agents in the book world. Brown represented authors Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Randall Robinson, Dr. Johnetta Cole, Susan Taylor and Van Whitfield.

Employment

Gen. Louis Wagner Junior High School

Philadelphia Public Schools

Doubleday Publishing Company

Endicott Booksellers

Marie Brown Associates

Favorite Color

Earth Tones

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363159">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marie Brown's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363160">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marie Brown lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363161">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marie Brown describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363162">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marie Brown describes her maternal grandmother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363163">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marie Brown describes her paternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363164">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marie Brown describes her parents' jobs during college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363165">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marie Brown describes her grandparents' property ownership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363166">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marie Brown describes her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363167">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marie Brown describes her parents' college education and occupations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363168">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Marie Brown describes her parents' social activities at Hampton Institute</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363169">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Marie Brown describes her early childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363170">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Marie Brown describes the sounds of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363171">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marie Brown describes her elementary school experiences in Hampton, Virginia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363172">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marie Brown describes the May Day festivities at Hampton Institute</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363173">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marie Brown describes her childhood activities in Hampton, Virginia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363174">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marie describes her family and their move to Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363175">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marie Brown describes the assemblies at Ford Greene Elementary School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363176">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marie Brown recalls attending Nashville's St. Vincent de Paul Catholic School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363177">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marie Brown describes her early love for reading</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363178">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marie Brown describes her childhood activities in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363179">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marie Brown describes her neighborhood in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363180">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Marie Brown recalls her experiences as a Girl Scout</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363181">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Marie Brown recalls attending George E. Washington Junior High School in Nashville</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361423">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marie Brown describes her favorite music as a teenager in Nashville</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361424">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marie Brown recalls her parents' involvement in the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361425">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marie Brown describes Nashville's country music</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361426">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marie Brown recalls her academic experience at George E. Washington Junior High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361427">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marie Brown recalls attending Nashville's Pearl High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361428">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marie Brown describes her teachers at Nashville's Pearl High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361429">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marie Brown recalls moving to Philadelphia in her late teenage years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361430">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marie Brown recalls adjusting at Philadelphia's Germantown High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361431">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Marie Brown recalls her decision to attend Pennsylvania State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361432">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Marie Brown recalls her transition to college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363182">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marie Brown recalls pledging Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363183">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marie Brown recalls adjusting to Pennsylvania State University's campus life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363184">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marie Brown recalls studying psychology at Pennsylvania State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363185">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marie Brown recalls teaching at General Louis Wagner Junior High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363186">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marie Brown recalls working as education coordinator in Philadelphia's public schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363187">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marie Brown remembers President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's assassination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363188">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marie Brown remembers the integration of Philadelphia's public schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363189">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marie Brown recalls being offered a position at Doubleday and Company Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363190">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marie Brown recalls the trainee program at Doubleday and Company Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363191">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Marie Brown recalls working as an editorial assistant for Loretta Barrett</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363192">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Marie Brown recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361586">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marie Brown describes her work experiences in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361587">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marie Brown recalls her husband's cartoon work and their life in Los Angeles</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361588">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marie Brown recalls returning to Doubleday and Company Inc. as an editor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361589">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marie Brown describes the books she edited at Doubleday and Company Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361590">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marie Brown explains the role of a book editor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361591">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marie Brown describes the process of publishing a book</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361592">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marie Brown recalls working with Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis at Doubleday and Company Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361593">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marie Brown recalls becoming editor in chief of Elan magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361594">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Marie Brown recalls her unemployment after Elan magazine ceased publication</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361595">Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Marie Brown remembers working at New York City's Endicott Booksellers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363193">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Marie Brown recalls her experiences as a literary agent</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363194">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marie Brown talks about the authors she represented as a literary agent</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363195">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marie Brown explains how she built her clientele as a literary agent</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363196">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marie Brown describes her lifelong friends</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363197">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marie Brown reflects upon her life, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363198">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marie Brown shares her message to future generations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363199">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Marie Brown describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/363200">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Marie Brown reflects upon her life, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/361604">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Marie Brown narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$5

DAStory

1$7

DATitle
Marie Brown recalls her experiences as a literary agent
Marie Brown recalls working with Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis at Doubleday and Company Inc.
Transcript
It's 1983, I guess, I think--$$Um-hm.$$--we're in '83 [1983] 'cause you, you stayed there until '84 [1984].$$Um-hm.$$At the Endicott Booksellers [New York, New York] and you're having a hard time getting a job as an editor.$$Um-hm.$$Okay. So tell me about Endicott. How do you, you stay there for another year and then what happens?$$I stayed at Endicott for a year, I was, and I became assistant buyer and assistant manager. And one of my young mentees, Gerald Gladly [ph.] who was an editor at Doubleday [Doubleday and Company Inc.; Knopf Doubleday Publishing Company, New York, New York], called me and asked me if I would consider agenting one of the authors that he was taking on and that author was Randy Taraborrelli [J. Randy Taraborrelli], who has now since become, you know, a mega writer of celebrity bios. And Randy at the time was, I think, the president of the Diana Ross Fan Club or something like that. He was very young then and he was, so he wanted to do a Diana Ross fan book ['Diana: A Celebration of the Life and Career of Diana Ross,' J. Randy Taraborrelli] and Gerald wanted to publish that. And he also later did a book on the history of Motown ['Motown: Hot Wax, City Cool and Solid Gold,' J. Randy Taraborrelli]. So he needed an agent because this was in a period where now the publishers were really requiring most of the books that they acquired to be agented because so many manuscripts were being submitted because technology had changed the picture with the copying machines people could make many copies (laughter) of their manuscripts and send them to many publishers and there was a lot more submission of manuscripts happening than publishers could really handle so they found that okay, we can require that there be agents to represent these writers so at least they'll be some kind of, you know, filtering process. So I told Gerald, "Oh, well, okay," reluctantly, I will agent, you know, these manuscripts. And so I took on Randy for the first two or three, two projects. And then he wanted to switch over and write more critical kinds of books, well, where, you know, he could really get into their lives, he was no longer the fan, he was gonna really go into, you know, all of the other aspects of their lives, not just the good but the bad and the ugly. And so I felt like I couldn't represent those kinds of books, I don't know where my head was then but that was where it was and so. But eventually I started acquiring other clients because as I mentioned, you know, the publishers were requiring people to have agents so people were sending me manuscripts and I started out, you know, just representing a very few authors but I was able to do this because I had worked at Doubleday and one of the reasons that one can agent somewhat successfully is that you have editorial contacts in other houses. And by this time there had been, you know, a lot of turnover in publishing so I knew at least one person in every publishing house 'cause I had worked with them when they were editors at Doubleday, so I was able to at least have someone to submit to. And then from those people you find out others and when they move around, so that's how my business got started, you know, I would submit to the editors I knew and then subsequently meet other editors or those editors would acquire some of the authors that I was representing. And I was able to sustain myself through, you know, those tough times also doing freelance editorial work, putting together a newsletter for the National Minority Supplier Development Council which I did right here on this place, we did newsletters, we packaged books, I did books, you know, how to books on how to raise your pet, how to raise your dog, how to raise your cat, how to, you know, enter the stock market, whatever was necessary, I mean, I did it as it was, as it related to, you know, packaging and producing or selling books. And those were the early days of Marie Brown Associates [New York, New York].$During the time that you were at Doubleday [Doubleday and Company Inc.; Knopf Doubleday Publishing Company, New York, New York], I'm just stepping back a few--$$Um-hm.$$--cause I, I just thought of something. Well, I, I, I don't know, I guess, this is the question but Jackie Onassis [Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis] worked at Doubleday, didn't she?$$Um-hm.$$Was she there while you were there?$$Um-hm, yes, she was. I'm smiling because this is really a funny story. There's a lot to Jackie Onassis having been there. But when I was an editor, she came to Doubleday. And I remember clearly, looking up from my desk and seeing Jackie Onassis standing at the door with someone who was taking her around to introduce her to editors and people in other departments. And it's just, it, it was just amazing, just to see her standing there. But I stood up to go and greet her and my pocketbook was (laughter) on the floor right by my desk which I hadn't seen and I go (making sounds) (laughter) all over, what a grand introduction. I said oops, at least I didn't fall on the floor. But there, I remember that, you know, tripping, I said okay, hi, and she says, "Hi, I'm Jackie Onassis," and I said, "I know, (laughter) you know, it was so great to meet you." And then, you know, and we talked on a couple occasions about book projects. And then I left to become an agent and I had sent her a project on [HistoryMaker] Katherine Dunham, Miss Dunham's memoir and she called me to talk about it, you know, and I just really could not still believe that she was on the telephone because this was before I moved into the whole house which was another story but my office used to be right there in that little small space there and I can see myself picking up the phone, "Hi, this is Jackie Onassis," and I'm just like, I don't believe this, you know. And she called to tell me why she couldn't acquire the book, you know, because she's really couldn't convince the powers that be at Doubleday. But she told me that she remembered seeing Miss Dunham dance in Paris [France] when she was there and how important she was to her cultural development in experiencing, you know, Katherine Dunham's dance. And then she also called me about Vertamae Grosvenor [Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor] because she really wanted Verta to do this book on her life when she married Bobby Grosvenor [Robert Grosvenor], because the Grosvenors and the Auchinclosses, had been neighbors up in Hyannis Port [Massachusetts] or where ever up on the Cape [Cape Cod, Massachusetts], where ever they were raised (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Martha's Vineyard [Massachusetts].$$And she knew Bobby Grosvenor when he was a young man and she knew all the family and all of that but then when Verta married into the Grosvenor family, because he's with the Grosvenors of the National Geographic and all of that, that was just another whole experience for, you know, this family and all of that. And she would say, "Well, I just don't know why she doesn't wanna write this," I mean, she wanted to write it but she could never get around to writing it so, you know, we had several conversations. And then she was a great supporter of the Frederick Douglass Creative Arts Center [New York, New York] which is still in existence. Budd, Budd Schulberg was one of the founders along with Fred Hudson of the Frederick Douglass Creative Arts Center which is a, an organization that supports black arts and artists, you know, in New York [New York] through workshops, seminars, and productions. And I remember Budd saying well, we have to get together and have lunch with Jackie. And so he and Fred and I went to lunch with her and it was just a great experience and I, it was a rainy day just like this and we had lunch on a, somewhere in the 50s between Madison [Avenue] and Park [Avenue]. And then, you know, she said, okay. And then she just said, "I'm going, now, I'm going, I'm just gone take a half day with work and just jump on the bus and go home." And she, I said I could imagine those people on the (laughter) Madison Avenue bus seeing her get on the bus, you know. But, you know, she was just that way. She was just, you know, very accessible. And she, people would ask me, "Did she come to work?" I said, yeah. She, you know, she does, you know. She was serious about her editing (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Okay.$$--and about her job.

Robert Stull

Robert “Rob” Stull is an accomplished comic book artist. In the design of comic book pages he is known as an inker—drawing the characters and scenes with black ink before the coloration is added. He has worked for every major publisher in the comic book industry.

Born on February 2, 1967 in Boston, Massachusetts, Stull grew up and attended public schools in nearby Brookline, Massachusetts. He began drawing at age four and was encouraged throughout his childhood and youth by his mother Patricia Ryder and his father Donald Stull. Stull began his professional career after graduating form the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in 1989. At Stulldesign / Ink on Paper, he worked with several companies in Boston and New York, providing services ranging from graphic design to art direction.

Stull’s projects include: Spider Man Adventures, Slingers, Iron Man, X-Force, New Mutants, Wolverine and Spider-Man / Doctor Octopus: Out of Reach--all for Marvel Comics. Other projects include Nightwing and Secret Files for DC Comics and Tellos for Image Comics.

Stull is also the creator and curator of Sequential Art: The Next Step, the first ever gathering of African American comic book artists and the grouping of their art in exhibition format, to demonstrate the presence of blacks in comic book art. Sequential Art is a traveling exhibit spotlighting the contributions to comic book art and popular culture, which has been viewed around the country. The exhibit displayed over 100 works by thirteen mainstream contemporary black comic artists.

Stull was also the co-founder, along with Keron Rant and Chris Walker, of Armanda Design Group, a New York based studio, whose mission was to properly fuse together comic books and hip-hop. The studio produced high quality illustration work for clients such as Virgin Records, Tommy Boy Record, The Fader magazine and Cornerstone. In 2004, Stull taught a two-week “crash course” in Bordeaux, France, at the Carnival des 2 Rives to communicate the language of Sequential Art and have the participants produce work in a deadline fashion just like the comic book artists that work in the industry.

Robert Stull was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 28, 2005.

Accession Number

A2005.029

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/28/2005

Last Name

Stull

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Pierce Elementary School

Brookline High School

School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Boston

HM ID

STU02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Never give a person any reason to deny you anything.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Interview Description
Birth Date

2/2/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chicken, Fish

Short Description

Comic book artist Robert Stull (1967 - ) worked for every major publisher in the comic book industry. Stull was also the creator and curator of Sequential Art: The Next Step, the first ever gathering of African American comic book artists, and was the co-founder of Armanda Design Group, a New York based studio, whose mission was to fuse together comic books and hip-hop.

Favorite Color

Black

DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19882">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Stull interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19883">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert Stull's favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19884">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Stull discusses his mother's background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19885">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Stull describes his father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19886">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Stull lists his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19887">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Stull recalls his father's background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19888">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Stull remembers his granparents and great-grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19889">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Stull shares memories of childhood friends</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19890">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Stull reflects on his childhood neighborhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19891">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Robert Stull recalls school life at Pierce Elementary in Brookline, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19892">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Stull recalls his early art instruction</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19893">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Stull discusses his father's profession</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19894">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Stull shares childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19895">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Stull recounts his high school art instruction</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19896">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Stull remembers friendships forged during high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19897">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Stull describes his high school career aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19898">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert Stull recalls participating in youth art contests and exhibits</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19899">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Robert Stull details his artistic influences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19900">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Robert Stull recalls his childhood interests</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19901">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Robert Stull recounts his post-high school educational path</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19902">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Stull organizes a black student organization at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19903">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Stull details his interest in graffiti art</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19904">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Stull recounts his early career in graphic design</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19905">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Stull describes his beginnings in comic book art</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19906">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Stull remembers his first break in the comic book industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19907">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Stull discusses his work as an inker for Marvel Comics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19908">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Robert Stull recalls his work on Spider-Man for Marvel Comics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19909">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Robert Stull details his work on 'The X-Men'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19910">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Robert Stull recounts co-founding Armada Design Group</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19911">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Robert Stull describes his seminal exhibition, "Sequential Art: The Next Step"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19912">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Robert Stull describes the success of his exhibits for "Next Step"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19913">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Robert Stull recalls several exhibitions of "Next Step"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19914">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Robert Stull details his work in Europe</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19915">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Robert Stull reflects on his life and career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19916">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Robert Stull shares his advice for black youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19917">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Photo - Robert Stull as a kindergarten student, ca. 1972</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19918">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Photo - Robert Stull's mother, Patricia Ryder, and his grandmother, Virginia Ryder, ca. 2002</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19919">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Photo - Robert Stull's father, Donald Stull, ca. 1995</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19920">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Photo - A drawing by Robert Stull at age three, 1970</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19921">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Photo - A childhood drawing by Robert Stull</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19922">Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Photo - Robert Stull, Osaka, Japan, ca. 1981</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19923">Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Photo - Robert Stull with his host mother and aunt, the Nemotos, Osaka, Japan, ca. 1981</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19924">Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Photo - Robert Stull's host sister, Sarah Nemoto, Osaka, Japan, ca. 1981</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19925">Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Photo - Robert Stull's host sister, Sarah Nemoto, Osaka, Japan, ca. 1981</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19926">Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Photo - Robert Stull with Tom Silcott at their high school graduation, Brookline, Massachusetts, 1985</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19927">Tape: 5 Story: 15 - Photo - Robert Stull at his high school graduation, Brookline, Massachusetts, 1985</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19928">Tape: 5 Story: 16 - Photo - Robert Stull at his art school graduation, 1989</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19929">Tape: 5 Story: 17 - Photo - Robert Stull painting a mural, Boston, Massachusetts, ca. 1984</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19930">Tape: 5 Story: 18 - Photo - Promotion for Les Nubians, Bordeaux, France, 2003</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19931">Tape: 5 Story: 19 - Photo - A drawing of Muhammad Ali by Robert Stull, 2004</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19932">Tape: 5 Story: 20 - Photo - Drawing of the 'X-Men' character "Storm" by Robert Stull, 1994</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/19933">Tape: 5 Story: 21 - Photo - "Sensational Spiderman" cover art by Robert Stull, ca. 2000</a>