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Isisara Bey

Corporate entertainment executive and event producer Isisara Bey was born on July 18, 1953 in Brooklyn, New York to Shirley and Eustace Jones of Guyana. She graduated from the Academy of St. Joseph in Brentwood, New York with honors in 1970. Bey earned her B.A. degree in theater in 1976 and her M.A. degree in media communications in 1980, both from Antioch University.

Bey’s career began as an on-air personality for WEAA.FM at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland. She then worked as an award-winning news writer and producer for WJZ-TV. In 1988, Bey began working at Sony Pictures Entertainment in Los Angeles, California as a management associate. She was promoted to director of corporate affairs in 1992, later becoming the senior director. She then transferred to Sony Music Entertainment in New York City as vice president, corporate affairs. She retired from the position in 2007, and became the vice president of programs for the non-profit organization, Count Me in For Women’s Economic Independence. She also founded her own consulting company, Journey Agent Productions, serving as a keynote speaker, live events producer and workshop facilitator. Her U.S. and international clients included the Institute for Veterans and Military Families, the Apollo Theater, New York Public Radio, American Society of Transplantation, New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Odyssey Media Business Women’s Retreat, Association of Southeast Asian Nations Women of the World (WOW) Festival, Vital Voices and Pathways to Prosperity. She served as the artistic director of the March on Washington Film Festival in Washington, D.C. since 2014.

Bey served on the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation board, and organized the first Congressional Tri-Caucus retreats of Black, Hispanic, and Asian & Pacific Islander members of Congress. Bey also served on the boards of the National Book Foundation, Tony Bennett’s Exploring the Arts Foundation, Rhythm & Blues Foundation and the e-Women Network Advisory Council.

As a news producer for WJZ-TV, Bey received the National Unity Award for reporting on social issues and Maryland’s Associated Press award for best investigative/documentary. She was also awarded the Outstanding Radio, Producer, Short Form award from Associated Press.

Bey has one daughter named Makara Bey.

Isisara Bey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 29, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.013

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/29/2016

Last Name

Bey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Schools

St. Peter Claver Elementary

St. Pascal Baylon School

Academy of St. Joseph

University of Connecticut

Antioch College

First Name

Isisara

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

BEY03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Someplace New

Favorite Quote

The Rest Of My Life Is The Best Of My Life.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/18/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Curry

Short Description

Corporate entertainment executive and event producer Isisara Bey (1953 - ) worked as the director of corporate affairs of Sony Pictures Entertainment and the V.P. of corporate affairs at Sony Music Entertainment. She also founded the business consulting agency Journey Agent Productions.

Employment

WEAA.FM

WJZ-TV

Sony Pictures Entertainment

Sony Music Entertainment

Count Me In for Women's Economic Independence

Journey Agent Productions

March on Washington Film Festival

Favorite Color

Orange and Amber

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650396">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Isisara Bey's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650397">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650398">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650399">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey talks about the history of Guyana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650400">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey talks about her mother's education and immigration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650401">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650402">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey talks about her extended family in Guyana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650403">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey describes her upbringing in Queens, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650404">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey talks about the establishment of the St. Peter Claver School in Queens, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650405">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey remembers the Academy of St. Joseph in Brentwood, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650406">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey remembers her early experiences of religion</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650407">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey recalls her experiences of discrimination at the Academy of St. Joseph</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650408">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey remembers developing an interest in radio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650409">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey talks about her college scholarship</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650410">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey recalls her start at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650411">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey remembers the social movements of the late 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650412">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Isisara Bey describes her parents' perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650413">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey remembers her decision to leave the University of Connecticut</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650414">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey recalls how she came to attend Antioch College in Columbia, Maryland</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650415">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey recalls joining the Theatre Project in Baltimore, Maryland</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650416">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey recalls her introduction to the Moorish Science Temple of America</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650417">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey describes the history of the Moorish Science Temple of America</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650418">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey recalls her activism with the Moorish Science Temple of America</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650419">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey talks about the reparations movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650420">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey talks about the influence of the Moorish Science Temple of America</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650421">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Isisara Bey describes her current affiliation with the Moorish Science Temple of America</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650422">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Isisara Bey remembers her influences at Antioch College in Baltimore, Maryland</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650423">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey talks about Take Our Daughters to Work Day</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650424">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey remembers her employment during graduate school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650425">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey recalls hosting the morning show on WEAA Radio in Baltimore, Maryland</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650426">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey remembers the programming on WEAA Radio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650427">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey recalls teaching at Morgan State College in Baltimore, Maryland</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650428">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey remembers her internship at WJZ-TV in Baltimore, Maryland</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650429">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey talks about the growth of black radio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650430">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey recalls receiving an award for her news coverage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650431">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Isisara Bey talks about the death of her husband</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650432">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Isisara Bey remembers the management training program at Columbia Pictures</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650433">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Isisara Bey describes her position in corporate affairs at Columbia Pictures</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650434">Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Isisara Bey talks about Sidney Poitier's impact on the film industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650435">Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Isisara Bey recalls her mentors at Columbia Pictures</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650436">Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Isisara Bey recalls creating a diversity symposium for film executives, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650437">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey recalls creating a diversity symposium for film executives, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650438">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey reflects upon the legacy of H. LeBaron Taylor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650439">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey remembers the speakers at her diversity symposium</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650440">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey recalls the response to her diversity symposium</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650441">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey recalls her exhibition of portraits from the Columbia Records archives</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650442">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey recalls her promotion to head of corporate affairs at Sony Music Entertainment</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650443">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey recalls hosting a retreat for the Congressional Tri-Caucus</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650444">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey remembers her decision to adopt a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650445">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey remembers traveling to Cambodia to adopt her daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650446">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey describes how adopting her daughter changed her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650447">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey remembers adjusting to single parenthood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650448">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey recalls her challenges at the Sony Music Diversity Council</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650449">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey recalls her role in the founding of the Congressional Tri-Caucus</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650450">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey describes her work at Count Me In for Women's Economic Independence</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650451">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey remembers her TEDx talk</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650452">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey recalls founding Journey Agent Productions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650453">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Isisara Bey talks about the March on Washington Film Festival, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650454">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Isisara Bey talks about the March on Washington Film Festival, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650455">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey remembers the Women of the World Festival</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650456">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey reflects upon her career, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650457">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey reflects upon her career, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650458">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650459">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650460">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey talks about her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650461">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/650462">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Isisara Bey remembers developing an interest in radio
Isisara Bey recalls hosting a retreat for the Congressional Tri-Caucus
Transcript
Now in light of what your career is about, in terms of media--$$Yes.$$--and so, what was your exposure to media growing up? I know--$$Oh, this was (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) I know there was a lot of education, and--but did you go to the movie, did you watch television, listen to the radio?$$It was Guyana. When I was growing up, Guyana didn't get television until the mid-'80s [1980s] and so there were two radio stations and those radio stations provided everything in the country. And when I was younger, my mother [Shirley Jones], one of her batch mates [from Queen's College, Georgetown, Guyana], was a writer for one of the daily papers and he had a program on the air. You know, Guyana is such a small country that whenever people came to visit, someone would put them on a program and have them on the air. So I remember Uncle Basil, Basil Hinds was his name. He led, he was the head of the American library there and he wrote for one of the papers [The Guyana Annual] and he had a jazz show ['Just Jazz']. And I came to Guyana once with my 45s [45 rpm record]. And I brought several 45s on the air. So I had the--I had The Jackson 5, 'I Want You Back.' And he'd play his song--music and I'd play one of mine and we would talk about them. So I played that song and he said, "Well you know they sound good, but I don't think they're gonna last very long." So what was fun was years later coming back, even a few years later and him saying, "I guess I was wrong about that." But I remember once being asked to be on one of the morning shows and the engineer was a young woman. And this is when everybody did their own records and they would play--the radio stations in Guyana provided all the entertainment because that was all there was. So there were--the radio plays from England, these were in seven year cycles. They were like soap operas on the air. And then they had classroom on the air so people could learn things who were in the rural parts of the country. They had the farm report and one other program that stuck out to me was the death announcements. So this funereal music would come on--an organ playing. And a gentleman would then recite the names of any Guyanese who had died anywhere in the world, except in Guyana. So who died in England, who died in New York [New York], who died in Canada. Back then those were the only places Guyanese went to. New York, Toronto [Canada] and London [England]. And so radio on the air was on all day long because it was something different, radio plays, Guyanese plays after independence, a lot of programming that Guyanese made themselves, popular music, it was the lifeline. I remember one time we took a trip into the interior which is what it was called going from the country down into the remote parts. And on a big ferry boat that was on the Essequibo River and then people would come on to the boat. It would start and then it wouldn't stop, it would slow down. So folks would take a launch from the bush and they would transfer their produce to go to the market and the boat would slow down so they could jump on. And I could hear the radio from stop to stop out in the interior. Once cousin Gertie [ph.] and I were walking from our house to go play bingo and we were concerned because we would miss 'Dr. Paul' who was on in the evening. But everybody was listening, and because it was always warm weather there were no windows with glass, it was all shutters. People were outside and we heard the whole program walking to bingo. So I realized--it fired my imagination how important radio was and how much people could visualize and learn, and be connected through radio. So that's what sparked my interest in working in radio.$So when he asked to do that, the idea I came up with was to do a retreat for those three minority groups [Congressional Tri-Caucus]. And so that we would fund. The first one was held outside of Washington [D.C.] in Virginia at a hotel. It was over a weekend. We--I hired someone to do--to facilitate some of their work together, and also had entertainment. So I went to [HistoryMaker] Russell Simmons. At the time they had the 'Def Poetry Jam' and we created a 'Def Poetry Jam' evening during their retreat and had some of the poets that later were on 'Def Poetry' on Broadway to come and perform. A multicultural group of poets. We had Sarah Jones come who is the actress who does, she won a Tony [Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre] for her one woman performance where she represents a number of different cultures. Her first piece was called 'Surface Transit.' She has this uncanny ability to replicate any accent under the sun and she tells the story of different immigrants coming to New York [New York] in America, and their--their influence with each other. So she performed. She had a piece called 'This Revolution will not be Televised' [sic. 'Your Revolution']. It was kind of based on the one that Gil Scott-Heron song ['The Revolution Will Not Be Televised'] that he did that had been banned from the air, and so she was able to perform it in front of members of [U.S.] Congress who was going, "Why was this banned?" And we're able to work with helping her reverse that. The other moment in that retreat that stands out for me was the facilitator had had them--we had a timeline on there and she asked them to go up and to indicate when they got involved in public service. And one of them on the Hispanic caucus [Congressional Hispanic Caucus], one of the congressmen, talked about his political career started as a border guard. He was a border police. And in Sarah's monologue, she replicated a young man whose family had been arrested by the border police and used a term that they use to describe the border police [La Migra], a Spanish language term. So later when the congressman is talking about it, he talked about how he had heard this term and it was derogatory in a sense, and moved him to tears. You know, he got emotional about it and in that came this whole conversation of everyone talking about what brought them into public service. So we had those who were the children of migrant workers with the grandchildren of sharecroppers with the--the descendants of immigrants with the same universal approach to public service and now in the Congress and that was started because they were in the same room together talking about it and because they heard a theater piece that urged them to--that was the catapult to that. That was the culmination to me of everything that I think is important in the work that I do.$$Okay, and this retreat was in what year?$$Oh you're asking me years, I remember when I was thinking about--$$About 2001, 2000--$$--preparing this. It was after LeBaron [H. LeBaron Taylor] died, so it might've been around 2002 or three [2003].$$Okay.$$So we did three actually with them. That first one and then a year later or so we did one that was in Puerto Rico, and then the third one was in Texas right around the time of Hurricane Rita. So it was not as--we had to switch the focus of it more into a town hall in Houston [Texas] because of the devastation and the need.$$Okay, okay. Now you were the founder of Sony's [Sony Music Entertainment] diversity--?$$Yes, they did not have affinity groups then, and so I helped form a black, Hispanic and Asian affinity groups; and then that was the year I was one of the founding members of the diversity council for the company [Sony Music Diversity Council].

June Baldwin

Entertainment executive June M. Baldwin graduated from Stanford University with her B.A. degree in psychology. She went on to receive her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1975.

Following graduation, Baldwin served as clerk for the jurist Luther Swygert on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, Illinois. She then moved to Los Angeles and was hired as an executive for NBC, where she was responsible for, among other things, the day-to-day business transactions for The Tonight Show and Carson Productions, the television and motion picture production company founded by the late talk show host, Johnny Carson. At NBC, Baldwin became one of the first African Americans to enter the executive ranks of the entertainment industry. She then worked for Norman Lear, Quincy Jones and Aaron Spelling, where she held the position of head of business affairs at their independent production companies.

Baldwin went on to be hired as vice president of business affairs at United Paramount Network. She also worked in a similar capacity at Columbia TriStar Television from 2000 until 2001. In 2004, Baldwin was hired as director of business and legal affairs at KCET, the nation’s largest independent public television station. Then, in 2010, she was promoted to vice president and general counsel of KCET. Baldwin has negotiated a variety of production deals, and has worked on such critically acclaimed productions as Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State, A Place of Our Own, Los Ninos En Su Casa, Wired Science, and SoCal Connected.  In addition, for seven years she managed business and legal affairs for the PBS late-night talk show Tavis Smiley, and the primetime series Tavis Smiley Reports.

Baldwin has served on numerous boards, including the Hollywood Women's Political Committee, the Hollywood Policy Center, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, the California Women's Law Center, Planned Parenthood, the Archer School for Girls, Women in Film, Women in Film Foundation, Artists For A New South Africa, The Coalition for At-Risk Youth, NBC Credit Union, the Minority Health Institute, and the Black Entertainment and Sports Lawyers Association.

June M. Baldwin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 18, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.310

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/20/2013

Last Name

Baldwin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Michelle

Schools

St. Madeline Sophie

Ancilla Domini Academy

Shipley School For Girls

Stanford University

Harvard Law School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

June

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

BAL04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

Everything In Its Time

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/4/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Vegetables

Short Description

Entertainment executive June Baldwin (1950 - ) became one of the first African Americans to enter the executive ranks of the entertainment industry when she worked for NBC.

Employment

KCET

Columbia Tri Star TV

United Paramount Network

Spelling Television

Quincy Jones/David Salzman Entertainment

NBC

Favorite Color

Blue, Greens

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670400">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of June Baldwin's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670401">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - June Baldwin lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670402">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - June Baldwin describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670403">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - June Baldwin talks about her mother's education and profession</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670404">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - June Baldwin describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670405">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - June Baldwin talks about her father's young adult years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670406">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - June Baldwin describes her parents' personalities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670407">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - June Baldwin talks about her parents' civic activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670408">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - June Baldwin describes her early household</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670409">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - June Baldwin describes her earliest childhood memories</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670410">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - June Baldwin describes the sights and sounds of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670411">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - June Baldwin remembers the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670412">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - June Baldwin talks about her early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670413">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - June Baldwin recalls her decision to attend the Shipley School for Girls in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670414">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - June Baldwin describes her early interest in acting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670415">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - June Baldwin remembers race relations at the Shipley School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670416">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - June Baldwin describes her religious experiences at the Shipley School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670417">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - June Baldwin talks about the prominent figures who inspired her</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670418">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - June Baldwin recalls developing her racial identity during the late 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670419">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - June Baldwin remembers her teachers and guidance counselor at the Shipley School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670420">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - June Baldwin reflects upon her time at the Shipley School for Girls in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670421">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - June Baldwin talks about creating a scholarship at the Shipley School for Girls</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670422">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - June Baldwin recalls attending the March on Washington</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670423">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - June Baldwin remembers studying psychology at Stanford University in Stanford, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670424">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - June Baldwin talks about Eldridge Cleaver and Timothy Leary</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670425">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - June Baldwin recalls visiting the Black Panther Party in Algeria</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670426">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - June Baldwin talks about the Black Power movement at Stanford University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670427">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - June Baldwin recalls her decision to attend Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670428">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - June Baldwin remembers her classmates and experiences at Harvard Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670429">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - June Baldwin remembers her challenges at Harvard Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670430">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - June Baldwin recalls clerking for Judge Luther M. Swygert</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670431">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - June Baldwin talks about her early legal career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670432">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - June Baldwin describes her experiences at Morrison and Foerster LLP</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670433">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - June Baldwin recalls working for Silverberg, Rosen, Leon and Behr</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670434">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - June Baldwin talks about joining Women In Film</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670435">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - June Baldwin recalls her entry into the entertainment industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670436">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - June Baldwin describes her initial experiences at NBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670437">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - June Baldwin recalls working on 'The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670438">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - June Baldwin remembers the black television executives in the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670439">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - June Baldwin talks about Michael Jackson's award at the NAACP Image Awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670440">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - June Baldwin recalls her proudest moments as a television business affairs executive</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670441">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - June Baldwin remembers working at Norman Lear's company, Act III Productions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670442">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - June Baldwin talks about working for Quincy Jones Productions, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670443">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - June Baldwin recalls working with Aaron Spelling Productions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670444">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - June Baldwin remembers her music publishing venture with George Butler</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670445">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - June Baldwin recalls working at United Paramount Network</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670446">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - June Baldwin describes her work at Columbia TriStar Television</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670447">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - June Baldwin describes her position at KCET in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670448">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - June Baldwin talks about the merger of KCET and Link TV</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670449">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - June Baldwin describes the growth and changes at KCETLink</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670450">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - June Baldwin talks about her board memberships, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670451">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - June Baldwin talks about her board memberships, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670452">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - June Baldwin shares her plans for the future</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670453">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - June Baldwin reflects upon her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670454">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - June Baldwin reflects upon her legacy in the entertainment industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670455">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - June Baldwin talks about her dating life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670456">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - June Baldwin describes her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670457">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - June Baldwin talks about her international travels</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670458">Tape: 6 Story: 11 - June Baldwin describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/670459">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - June Baldwin narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
June Baldwin reflects upon her time at the Shipley School for Girls in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania
June Baldwin recalls visiting the Black Panther Party in Algeria
Transcript
Well, tell us the Shipley [Shipley School for Girls; The Shipley School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania] story.$$So obviously Shipley was a seminal event in my life. And for all of the, the challenges, I developed some wonderful friendships with a few girls there who are lifelong friends, like sisters. And they saw me; they--it didn't matter to them that I came from a different background or that I was black. And so they were my rocks, and we're still very, very close today. Also in 2003, Shipley gave me the distinguished alumna award, which was a huge shock to me because I had not had much contact at all with the school since I left. And I had an opportunity to tell my story, which I had never done. But I wanted them to know that I loved and appreciated the education that I got and that I saw it as a very positive thing. It was very difficult for my mother [Audrey McLaughlin Harris] to decide to send to me to Shipley. That was not something that we did in the black culture. You don't send your daughter off during her adolescent years to be part of a social experiment. And I'd never really realized how much that had weighed on my mother because, of course, that shaped the rest of my life. So they gave me the award, which was very lovely, and they honored and acknowledged my mother. And the school official said, "I don't think I would have had the courage to send my child away like that." And so I was very happy because although it's been my journey it was also my mother's. So fast forward, I ran into a Shipley classmate at Stanford [Stanford University, Stanford, California] whom I hadn't even been friends with at Stanford. Again, when I left Shipley I sort of didn't wanna have anything to do with Shipley. Fast forward, I run into this classmate, and she's a, a writer for The New York Times and she said, "I ha- it's great to see you. I have an idea and I'm wondering if you'd be interested." And the idea was to create a school sca- a class scholarship for an underprivileged girl of color. And she wondered if I thought that was a good idea, and if I would work with her on it. And I said oh, I think that's a great idea. So last May we went to our forty-fifth reunion, and we proposed this to the class, and that is what we're going to do. And sh- they have said that it was because of knowing me, and it was a time when their lives changed that that inspired her to want to do this scholarship. And so it just was so overwhelming for me to come out of the blue after all these years. Because I think when you make personal sacrifices--I mean I did it willingly and gratefully. I appreciated the opportunity. But at some point when you look at where race relations are today, and you say was it worth it--you know, was it worth it? And so this validates that. It was worth it. I mean, I decided it was worth it, but this is a, a, a really gratifying validation.$Now who was in the Panther [Black Panther Party] entourage, I guess, in Algeria besides Eldridge Cleaver?$$The names of the other people I don't know. I don't remember. What--I was very excited to be there. Eldridge Cleaver was extremely nice to me, very respectful. As I said he wanted to--me to stay on because I spoke French and be a translator. And I think as a result of my Shipley [Shipley School for Girls; The Shipley School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania] experience and my own sense of identity, I had the big Afro, very much wanting to claim my identity, and wanting to have a quote, unquote revolutionary experience. I was a big supporter of the Panthers. You know, they were doing wonderful work; they were feeding children; they were educating children; they were providing healthcare services. I mean, they were being portrayed as terrorists, but they were doing many wonderful things. And they were just really seeking social justice for a lot of oppression that was going on. And so I wrote my mother [Audrey McLaughlin Harris]. I also was still interested in being the actor, so I had tried out for 'Hair' ['Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical']. There was a--in Marseille [France]. And I was finished with school [Stanford University, Stanford, California], and so I was a quarter ahead of myself because I had gone a year straight through. And I didn't wanna graduate early, so I wanted to stay in Europe for another three months. And I thought I'll try out for this play. Maybe I'll get this role. And then I went to Algeria and was asked to be the translator and it--and at first really wanted to do that. And so I said to him, "Well, you'll have to write my mother." And so he did, and my mother still has the letter in pale blue stationary with the Black Panther insignia that jumps out at you. And he wrote her a very nice letter asking permission for me to stay on for a couple of months and be a translator. And by day three, there used to be--everyone would be upstairs in a room and listening, talking, and the--there were concentric circles and I was in the second circle. And someone got up and went down to do kitchen duty, and I--who was in the first circle--and so I moved up to be in the first circle. And then the person came back, and I wasn't aware the person was going to come back, and so I said, "Oh, I'm sorry I took your seat." And he said, "Oh no, sister, you didn't take my seat; it's the people's seat." And in that moment I realized, hm, everything is communal here, and there weren't--there weren't any women. I wasn't seeing any women. And all of a sudden I realized, hm, I might become communal property (laughter) if I didn't affiliate or associate with someone. And of course that wasn't what I was wanting. You know, I was wanting to have this political experience. And so I decided that I didn't wanna stay, and so I did not. Meanwhile, I would have come--had I gone back--I would have still gone back to France and then come back. In the meantime, my mother got the letter, and she and my brother [William James] were quite horrified. And they admired the Panthers. It's not that they, they didn't, but they didn't want their daughter there in Algeria with--$$Now this is--$$--Eldridge Cleaver.$$I mean 'Soul on Ice' [Eldridge Cleaver] had been published in 1960 [1968]--well, I know I read it in '67 [1967], so it was already out. And he was--he made some remarks about women that weren't really very--$$Misogynistic.$$--encouraging.$$Yes, yes, but that's what I'm saying. That's what was so fascinating, because he was not like that at all with me. He was just this amazing gentleman and intelligent and just lovely, lovely. Now I was only there three days, but that was my experience. And when my mother decided--my brother was, "You tell her to get on a plane and come home." And my mother was like, "No, no, I'm just going to use the truth and, and add something." And so she told me she was going to have to have surgery, and she really would like me to be there for the surgery and so would I mind coming home. I still hadn't heard about the play. And she said, "And if you get in the play, then I'll send you back;" so I went home. And she was having surgery, but it wasn't, you know, as serious as I had thought (laughter), and they just wanted to get me home so. And then I did not get into the play so I did not go back.$$Now did you--did you happen to talk to Timothy Leary?$$No, I did not.$$Or see him even?$$I got a glimpse, but no.$$And was he (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) They, they had him in a room. You know, we were staying at a hotel, and we would come over and be there during the days and the evenings.