The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Richard Greene, Jr.

Hospital executive Richard T. Greene, Jr. was born on March 3, 1945, in White Plains, New York, to Virginia and Richard T. Greene, Sr. He graduated from Newtown High School in Queens, New York in 1962. In 1966, Greene earned his B.A. degree in zoology from Pennsylvania State University. He attended graduate school at Cornell University, where he received his combined M.B.A. and M.P.S. degrees in health administration in 1975.

In 1967, Greene joined IBM as a systems engineer, working until his enlistment as an officer with the Navy Supply Corps from 1968 to 1970 before joining the Naval Reserves where he attained the rank of Lieutenant Commander. Upon completion of active duty, Greene returned to IBM to work in its sales division in Pittsburgh until 1973. In 1975, after graduating from Cornell University, Greene was hired by the Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) to serve as a healthcare plan manager in Oakland, California. In 1978, he was promoted assistant administrator at Washington Memorial Hospital in New Jersey. In 1980, Greene moved to Atlanta, Georgia to serve as the chief executive officer of Southwest Medical Center. Three years later, he returned to New Jersey and became the chief operating officer of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) Hospital. Greene relocated to Clearwater, Florida in 1984 to serve as H.C.A.’s regional operations director. In 1987, Greene was appointed executive director of H.C.A.’s EquiCor operation in Florida. He moved back to New York in 1990, and became the chief operating officer at University Hospital in Brooklyn, serving until 1998. From 1998 to 2000, Greene was vice president of Bergen Regional Medical Center in Paramus, New Jersey. In 2002, the City of New York appointed Greene as the first Director of Health Services for the New York City Housing Authority where he served until 2012.

Greene serves as president of the Carver Scholarship Fund, which was founded by his father, Richard T. Greene, Sr., the former president of Carver Federal Savings Bank (Carver Bankcorp). He is also on the board of the Carver Community Development Corporation, an affiliate of Carver Federal Savings Bank. Greene was also co-founder of the Brooklyn Parks Advocates organization during his tenure as a board member of the Prospect Park Alliance. He also served as a board member of the New York Organ Doner Network where he promoted and advocated for organ donation in communities of color.

Greene married Diane Black in 1977, and the two reside in Brooklyn, New York. They are avid collectors of art and vintage books by African Americans.

Richard T. Greene, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 20, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.041

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/20/2019

Last Name

Greene

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

P.S. 136 Roy Wilkins School

Newtown High School

Pennsylvania State University

Cornell University

First Name

Richard

Birth City, State, Country

White Plains

HM ID

GRE18

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

The Hottest Places In Hell Are Reserved For Bystanders Of Injustice. -MLK

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/3/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Favorite Food

Barbecue

Short Description

Hospital executive Richard Greene Jr. (1945 - ) held executive positions at eight different medical centers across the country before serving as the New York City Housing Authority’s first director of health services.

Employment

IBM

U.S. Naval Supply Corps

Hospital Corporation of America

Equitable Hospital of America Corporation

New York City Housing Authority

Favorite Color

Green

The Honorable Tommy Jewell

State court judge Tommy Jewell was born on June 30, 1954 in Tucson, Arizona to Bobbie and Tommie Jewell, Sr. He graduated from Mazano High School in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1972, and earned his B.A. degree in 1976 and his J.D. degree in 1979, both from the University of New Mexico.

Jewell was first hired by the Legal Aid Society where he worked as a staff attorney. Following his marriage to fellow lawyer, Angela Jewell, in 1981, they opened their own law firm: Jewell, Jewell, Kelly & Kittson, in 1982. Jewell left the firm when he was selected judge of Bernalillo County Metropolitan Court in 1983, making him the first African American judge in New Mexico. In 1991, he was appointed to the 2nd Judicial Court District bench, where he served in Children’s Court. President Bill Clinton selected Jewell to serve on the State Justice Institute Board of Directors in 1995. He served on the nonprofit’s board until 2010. Jewell retired from his judgeship in 2005, and opened Jewell Law Office, a general practice firm, with his wife. In 2012, he served a six month interim term as the City of Albuquerque’s independent review officer while the city’s police department was under investigation by the Department of Justice, and the search for a permanent review officer was in progress.

Jewell is president of the NuRho Foundation, has a fifth-degree black belt in Isshin Ryu Karate, and serves as 8th District Counselor for Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. He has also received numerous awards for his work as a state court judge, including recognition for Outstanding Judicial Service by the State Bar of New Mexico in 1997, and Outstanding Judge by the Albuquerque Bar Association in 2001. In 2005, he also received the Distinguished Achievement Award from the University of New Mexico School of Law; and, in 2019, Jewell and his wife both earned an Asante Award, presented by the New Mexico Black Lawyers Association.

Jewell resides with his wife in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and they have two adult children, Thomas and Taja, and two grandchildren, Ian and Skyler.

Tommy Jewell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 24, 2019

Accession Number

A2019.067

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/24/2019

Last Name

Jewell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Manzano High School

New Mexico State University

University of New Mexico

First Name

Tommy

Birth City, State, Country

Tuscon

HM ID

JEW05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Arizona

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Mexico

Birth Date

6/30/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Albuquerque

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Employment

Legal Aid Society

Jewell, Jewell, Kelly & Kittson

Bernalillo County Metropolitan Court

New Mexico 2nd Judicial District

New Mexico Children's Court

Jewell Law Office

Harold Parker Law Firm

City of Albuquerque

Favorite Color

Purple

Greg Jones

Investment banker Greg Jones was born on July 1, 1957 in Orangeburg, South Carolina to Freddie Milton Jones and Nazry Davis Jones. He attended Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, where he received his B.S. degree in accounting in 1979. He later received his M.A. degree in public administration from Carnegie Mellon University and his M.B.A. degree in finance as a Cigna Foundation Fellow from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

In 1994, Jones was hired by JP Morgan in New York City to work as a division vice president. He left JP Morgan in 1997 when he was hired as the vice president of business development for the international joint venture partnership of Bechtel Construction and United Utilities. He served there until 2000, and subsequently joined the Pratt & Whitney division of United Technologies as director of business development. Pratt & Whitney was a subsidiary of United Technologies, primarily manufacturing aircraft and aerospace technologies. Jones directed strategy and value development and handled new investment evaluation and deal executions. He was promoted to division president and general manager of Pratt & Whitney Specialty Materials and Services in 2004, focusing on commercializing new technologies. From 2008 to 2001, Jones served as managing principal at the mergers and acquisitions advisory firm Corporate Development Group/Divesture Partners, where he specialized in strategy development and execution. In 2011, he joined Tyco Fire & Security as director of North American mergers and acquisition in Princeton, New Jersey. He left this role shortly after establishing his nonprofit, The Legacy Foundation of Hartford, Inc., in April of 2012. In April of 2017, Jones left Corporate Development Group/Divesture Partners and was appointed vice president of community health and engagement at Hartford Healthcare, working to build the bridge between healthcare and community members.

Jones serves as chairman of the board for The Legacy Foundation of Hartford, Inc. He has also served on the board of the Travelers Championship PGA Golf Tournament.

Jones and his wife, Lauren Allen-Jones, reside in Avon, Connecticut, and have one adult daughter, Erin Jones Geter.

Greg Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 17, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.093

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/17/2019

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

M.

Schools

Morgan State University

Carnegie Mellon University

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

First Name

Gregory

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

JON46

Favorite Season

Summer

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Passion

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Connecticut

Birth Date

7/1/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hartford

Favorite Food

Kale, Chicken, and Oxtail

Short Description

Investment banker Greg Jones (1957- ) served in executive roles for JP Morgan, the partnership of Bechtel Construction and United Utilities, the Pratt & Whitney division of United Technologies, and Tyco Fire & Security before founding The Legacy Foundation of Hartford, Inc. and becoming vice president of community health and engagement at Hartford Healthcare.

Employment

JP Morgan

Bechtel Construction/ United Utilities

United Technologies

Tyco International, Inc.

Corporate Development Group/ Divestiture Partners

The Legacy Foundation of Hartford, Inc.

Hartford HealthCare

Favorite Color

Purple

The Honorable James B. Lewis

State government official James B. Lewis was born on November 30, 1947 in Roswell, New Mexico, to Dorris Ward and William Reagor. Lewis graduated in 1966 from Gallup High School in Gallup, New Mexico and attended Bishop College in Dallas, Texas, where he earned his B.S. degree in education. After serving as a military policeman, and as an administrator at the University of Albuquerque, he attended the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque, where he earned his M.A. degree in public administration in 1977. Lewis went on to earn his A.S. degree in business administration from the National College of Business in 1980.

Lewis worked as a white collar crime investigator in the Bernalillo County District Attorney’s Office before being elected Bernalillo County Treasurer in 1982. He was then appointed as State Treasurer of New Mexico in 1985 after the incumbent Treasurer resigned. Lewis then won the election for the state treasurer position in 1986. In 1991, Lewis was appointed Chief of Staff for Governor Bruce King. Lewis held state level administrative positions in the New Mexico State Land Office and the New Mexico State Corporation Commission, before becoming City Administrator for Rio Rancho, New Mexico in 1996. Lewis became Assistant Secretary of Energy in 1999 for the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity. He ran unsuccessfully for Mayor of Albuquerque in 2001, but was offered the position of chief operating officer for the City. Lewis would go on to serve as the chief administrative officer for Albuquerque in 2004, before winning re-election as New Mexico State Treasurer. Lewis instituted various business practices while in office, serving two consecutive terms.

Lewis received numerous awards for his public service at the city, county, state, and federal levels. He was inducted into the New Mexico African American Hall of Fame, the NAACP Albuquerque Chapter Hall of Fame, and received the Legion of Honor Award from the Kiwanis Club of Albuquerque in 2005. He was named one of New Mexico’s 100 Influential Power Brokers in 2008, and received the Jesse M. Unruh Award in 2011, the highest honor awarded by the National Association of State Treasurers. Lewis was a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. and served as president of the National Association of State Auditors, Comptrollers, and Treasurers, as well as the National Association of State Treasurers.

Lewis is a widower, and has four children.

James B. Lewis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 25, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.004

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/25/2015

Last Name

Lewis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widower

Middle Name

Beliven

Occupation
Schools

University of New Mexico

National American University

Bishop College

Gallup High School

Lincoln Junior High School

John Marshall Elementary

Northwestern University

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Roswell

HM ID

LEW21

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Mexico

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

If I can do it, you can do it

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Mexico

Birth Date

11/30/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Albuquerque

Country

Chaves

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

State treasurer The Honorable James B. Lewis (1947 - ) was the first African American to be appointed and elected three times to a statewide office in New Mexico, and the first African American to be elected to a statewide office.

Employment

State of New Mexico

City of Albuquerque

U.S. Department of Energy

City of Rio Rancho

State of New Mexico Corporation Commission

State of New Mexico Land Office

Office of New Mexico Governor Bruce King

Bernalillo County New Mexico

Bernalillo County District Attorney's Office, Second Judicial District

University of Albuquerque

New Mexico State Personnel Office

Favorite Color

Green

Pluria Marshall, Sr.

Civil rights and media activist Pluria W. Marshall, Sr. was born on October 19, 1937 in Houston, Texas. After graduating from high school, Marshall enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. He served from 1956 to 1960 and was honorably discharged as an Airman, First Class. Marshall went on to graduate from Texas Southern University with his B.A. degree in photography.

In 1969, Marshall was instrumental in the creation of Operation Breadbasket of Texas. His civil rights work evolved both in scope and mission when he established the National Black Media Coalition (NBMC) in 1973. The organization’s mission was to increase the presence of African American media professionals. He later served as national organizer, treasurer and chairman of NBMC. In 1975, Marshall also helped in founding the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). Throughout his career, Marshall worked for and also served as the official photographer for NABJ, the National Association of Radio and Television Announcers (NATRA), and mainstream publications including the Jet and Ebony magazines.

Marshall is a member of the Texas State Advertising Commission and was appointed to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. In 1973, Marshall was the recipient of Community Service Awards from the National Association of Marketing Developers (NAMD) as well as the Houston Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Marshall was also honored in 1974 with the Outstanding Ex-Student Award from Texas Southern University and the Marketeer of the Year Award from the Houston Chapter of NAMD.

Marshall is married to Carmen Corbin. He has five children: Pluria Marshall, Jr., Mishka Marshall, Jason Marshall, Natalie Marshall Hughes and Christopher Marshall.

Pluria W. Marshall, Sr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 6, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.345

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/6/2013

Last Name

Marshall

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Texas Southern University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Pluria

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

MAR18

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

No Favorite Vacation Spot

Favorite Quote

You either respect us or expect us. (fr. Op. Breadbasket)

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

10/19/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Thanksgiving Dinner - Barbeque Ribs

Short Description

Civil rights activist and media activist Pluria Marshall, Sr. (1937 - ) founded Operation Breadbasket of Texas and the National Black Media Coalition. He also co-founded the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ).

Employment

National Black Media Coalition

Rainbow/PUSH

National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ)

National Association of Radio and Television Announcers

Jet Magazine

Ebony Magazine

Favorite Color

Blue

Ralph Simpson

High school principal Ralph Simpson was born on December 14, 1963 in Atlanta, Georgia to Roxie and Harry Simpson. Simpson was an average student and attended the Atlanta Public Schools and graduated from Southwest High School. Simpson enrolled in West Georgia College and received his B.A degree in criminal justice in 1986.

After graduation, Simpson worked for the Georgia State Department of Corrections for four years to become a teacher. He was employed with the DeKalb County Board of Education. In the DeKalb School System, he experienced tremendous success as a teacher, mentor, and leader.

Simpson returned to West Georgia College to pursue his M.A. degree in administration and supervision. In 1996, Simpson was promoted to assistant principal of discipline, instruction, and attendance at Miller Grove Middle School in Lithonia, Georgia. In 1998, Simpson was assigned to Stone Mountain High School as the assistant principal of discipline, and in 2000, Simpson became the first African American principal in the history of Stone Mountain, Georgia. Simpson earned his Ph.D. in educational leadership at the University of Sarasota in February of 2004.

Simpson became the first principal of Miller Grove High School, which is the largest high school in DeKalb County, Georgia. He is involved in several professional and public service organizations. Among these are the National Association of Educators, Georgia Association of Educators, DeKalb Association of Secondary School Administrators, and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Accession Number

A2006.175

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/15/2006

Last Name

Simpson

Maker Category
Schools

Southwest High School

University of West Georgia

Beecher Hills Elementary School

Woodson Elementary School

Argosy University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Evenings, Weekends

First Name

Ralph

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

SIM04

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Miami, South Beach, Florida

Favorite Quote

If You Don't Stand For Something, You Will Fall For Anything.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

12/14/1963

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Grilled Hot Dogs

Short Description

High school principal Ralph Simpson (1963 - ) was the first African American principal in the history of Stone Mountain, Georgia, serving as principal of Stone Mountain High School. Simpson was also the first principal of Miller Grove High School.

Employment

Metro Correctional Institution

Main Street Elementary School

Miller Grove High School

Stone Mountain High School

Miller Grove Middle School

Favorite Color

Black, White

Timing Pairs
183,0:1159,28:1525,35:1952,43:6771,232:7015,237:15204,364:32784,719:33136,724:34896,749:37816,786:38186,792:40998,850:42330,879:44328,923:45956,1002:47214,1052:56370,1143:56937,1156:57252,1162:57693,1170:60502,1216:61078,1231:61462,1241:62038,1255:66518,1405:67606,1434:75787,1639:79763,1728:80189,1735:81041,1772:82603,1812:90955,2001:91735,2037:99340,2201:111552,2358:112488,2375:114000,2420:114360,2426:117240,2484:118032,2503:125880,2621:126180,2630:126705,2639:137651,2819:138077,2837:140207,2875:143615,2930:143899,2935:144325,2942:144751,2950:147378,3016:149792,3075:158780,3198:159120,3204:159596,3219:160276,3230:170964,3357:175108,3487:182270,3560:188000,3707:192516,3796:194886,3858:201601,4024:201996,4030:208570,4115:212030,4131:212542,4145:214718,4197:217225,4215:224230,4305:227936,4420:239422,4605:241730,4620:250553,4729:252630,4765:253300,4778:253568,4787:253903,4793:255042,4828:258861,4918:268043,5084:268445,5091:271125,5175:278030,5266:278520,5275:279430,5296:284910,5437:290740,5500$0,0:5220,82:5580,87:23530,290:24805,305:26590,349:40416,535:44891,600:50670,654:54856,687:59446,782:71200,964:76320,1057:77840,1098:78720,1113:80000,1134:85224,1166:97277,1380:101225,1410:101990,1420:103010,1447:105378,1484:108612,1547:112037,1587:113300,1595:113880,1609:114576,1624:118456,1691:124629,1788:124953,1793:130731,1879:133214,1905:134572,1930:136221,1952:136803,1959:137385,1971:141730,2014:142430,2022:146673,2093:148016,2119:159819,2275:166626,2378:166921,2384:170107,2460:170579,2469:170874,2475:176690,2549:177320,2561:191726,2752:192818,2766:194246,2786:198278,2861:198614,2866:199286,2875:207482,2976:208058,2986:208850,3004:209570,3018:212860,3066
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ralph Simpson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ralph Simpson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ralph Simpson describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ralph Simpson describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ralph Simpson describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ralph Simpson describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ralph Simpson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ralph Simpson describes his childhood neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ralph Simpson describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ralph Simpson recalls his elementary school experiences in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ralph Simpson recalls influential teachers from his elementary school years

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ralph Simpson recalls his grades in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ralph Simpson describes his aspirations during elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ralph Simpson recalls his childhood activities in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ralph Simpson describes his experiences at Atlanta's Southwest High School, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ralph Simpson describes his experiences at Atlanta's Southwest High School, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ralph Simpson recalls his involvement at Southwest High School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ralph Simpson recalls his decision to attend West Georgia College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ralph Simpson describes his academic progress at West Georgia College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ralph Simpson describes his interest in rap during the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ralph Simpson recalls the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Children cases

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ralph Simpson recalls his position at Metro Correctional Institution

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ralph Simpson recall his introduction to the Nation of Islam

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ralph Simpson describes the start of his career as an educator

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ralph Simpson talks about educator Danny Buggs

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ralph Simpson recalls losing his job at Main Street Elementary School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ralph Simpson recalls earning a master's degree at the University of West Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ralph Simpson describes his leadership style as a school administrator

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ralph Simpson talks about his support for school dress codes

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ralph Simpson recalls his doctoral studies at the University of Sarasota, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ralph Simpson recalls his doctoral studies at the University of Sarasota, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ralph Simpson talks about mentoring his students as a high school principal

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ralph Simpson recalls becoming the principal of Miller Grove High School

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ralph Simpson describes the special programs at Miller Grove High School

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ralph Simpson describes his campaign for parental support at Miller Grove High School

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ralph Simpson talks about the role of parents in their children's education

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ralph Simpson describes his plans and hopes for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ralph Simpson reflects upon his family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ralph Simpson reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ralph Simpson reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ralph Simpson describes his mentorship of staff members as a principal, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ralph Simpson describes his mentorship of staff members as a principal, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

3$1

DATitle
Ralph Simpson describes his academic progress at West Georgia College
Ralph Simpson recalls becoming the principal of Miller Grove High School
Transcript
This one brother that would always come to check on me, wonderful fraternity brother [in Omega Psi Phi Fraternity], and this was before I was initiated in, he would always come to visit. He was from Atlanta [Georgia]. And when he came down, I was introduced to him and I was introduced by the brothers then as, you know, that's the guy that's from Atlanta who's always supportive. He's at all of our events, we really like him, we want him to go online it just--we want him to pledge, but he didn't have the grades. So every time he came to visit he would say, "Hey man, how your grades doing?" And then a year later he came and said, "Man you--you worked it out, you--you stuck in there and you made it happen." From that day until now, he's still my mentor. Because he was the first person that I could identify with that had graduated from college, was working in that field, had--had purchased a home, driving a nice car. My brother [Henry Simpson III] was just a year older than I was, so that was really no model or role model, or didn't really look up to him, he was going through the same things that I was going through. But that was the first example that I saw of education being a means to your success or the reason or rationale for graduating. And when I asked him, I said, "Man how did you go all this, what did--?" He said, "Well, you know, my major was this and I worked in my field, and this is why." So after leaving his house that weekend on my way back to West Georgia [West Georgia College; University of West Georgia, Carrollton, Georgia], I was saying, wow, maybe I need to graduate. So I went back to school, and yes. I did enough work to continue with that lifestyle in college because I really enjoyed it, the lifestyle. I didn't want to come back home, so I did enough work to get by to stay in school. But when I went back I said, well, you know, maybe I need to graduate. Declared a major. I think I took an introduction to criminal justice class. And that was really interesting to me. That was the first thing that interested me, first time something had interested me. So I said oh okay, wow, I'll change it to criminal justice. And the more and more I got into it, the better it became and my grades got better. I think I--one of my professors, Dr. Fuller [John R. Fuller], I'll never forget him. He showed me how to study. I didn't know how to study, I had no study habits whatsoever. No study skills. He showed me how to study. And when I used the technique in which he gave me, I started making good grades on tests and it was like, wow. So for my junior year, my last two years, I'm sure my grade point average may have reflected 3.0 or better. But it was the first two years that killed it, that kept me in the low twos. But, you know, I declared a major in criminal justice and, you know, it was time to graduate on out of there. But, you know, again it was that social part of college that kept me motivated. I mean, I enjoyed it. You know, being in a fraternity and the partying, and visiting other campuses throughout the State of Georgia, beyond the State of Georgia. You know, I was the chapter president; that was my first time ever in a leadership position. I was kind of thrust into it because the brothers all graduated and, you know, it wasn't a bureaucracy, it wasn't a democracy, you know, it was an autocracy, it was very autocratic 'cause I ran everything. No vote. It was what I wanted because that's all I knew. I'd never been in that type of a position before. I learned and I grew from it. That was my first experience being in a leadership position. I can remember my mom [Roxie Shannon Simpson] saying at graduation, right before I got ready to go line up, that when she sent me down here, she said, "When I sent you down here I just knew I was wasting my money." And I told her, I said, "Well I knew you were wasting your money too."$$That was gonna be one of my questions, who paid for you to go to college?$$Well, the first year my moth- my mom and my dad [Henry Simpson, Jr.], they, you know, combined their resources. But because I had become somewhat of a popular name, I started having parties. And the first party I had was in my backyard at my mother and father's house. It was free, about three hundred people came. Pretty large backyard. The next year, I charged a dollar. A thousand people came.$$A thousand people (laughter)?$$So then I said well, you know, maybe I'll try my hand at renting out--renting out some space. Borrowed some money from my dad to pay for the rental on the place, deejay, security. No advertisement, just word of mouth, and I did all of this in five days. And I think it made me about $3,500. Well that was enough money to pay back the money that I borrowed from my dad and go back and pay my tuition, as well as my rent because I moved off campus. Well I did this, this was right before Christmas, it was on December 26th. I'll never forget it. So that was enough to pay for my fall and my winter tuition. Well we got off of at spring break and I said well, you know, why don't I just have a party in the spring break, that week, to pay for my spring tuition. And that's what I did. So it paid for my spring tuition, paid my rent for the quarter, got out of sch- got out of school for the spring semester, I had one to get right out of school to pay for my summer school. I did that for the next three years and that's how I paid my tuition.$Let's go back to Stone Mountain High School [Stone Mountain, Georgia] and tell me what happens from there?$$Was feeling a need to make a change. And knew that--I had made my immediate supervisor aware of that and knew that there was going to be a change at the end of the year. They were already in the process of, you know, they had broke ground here and--but had not named a principal. They posted the position, I didn't apply. Because I--again, my ambitions weren't to really become a principal or, you know, be a principal any longer. But was pretty certain that I would have to get another school under my belt. My immediate supervisor shared with me that you--we want you to open up Miller Grove High School [Lithonia, Georgia]. And I looked at it as an opportunity to control my own destiny. You know, I get a chance to create a culture and a climate. I get a chance to hire everybody, every living, every working body in the school. And then I'd have the opportunity of doing something that very, very few administrators or principals are able to do, to say that they opened up a school, and to have that experience under my belt and to be able to place that on my resume. And you know, I mean it's insurmountable, something that, you know, only very few principals have been able to say that they've been able to do. And it's kind of known, it's the--it's an understanding in the field of education that if you've opened up a school, then obviously you were well thought of, because they don't pick any principal to open up a school. And then it being the largest, largest school in the history of the school system [DeKalb County School District]. This is--it was an opportunity and I jumped on it.$$Tell us, say the name of the school again please?$$Miller Grove High School. And, you know, things that I will be a part of I'd have never imagined. You know, creating the school crest, the naming of the school, selecting the school colors, the school alma mater, the mission--I mean the mission statement. I mean just--you know, everything that we've done has been first. You know, we made history. We've done--fifty years from now, my picture is gonna hop up as being the first principal somewhere. Why I don't realize it now, but that is the reality of it. It was a wonderful opportunity. I mean, it was--you know, to start out with ninth and tenth graders and create this, you know, and see it grow. I mean, I can remember standing right here and looking up and being able to see the sky. You know, and nothing outside, no walls and so that's my office right there as I rolled by. This was all dirt, you know. Picking the colors of the carpet and the furniture, and you know, having all of the intricate details strategically placed in the areas where I wanted them to go. And you know, going to Florida to seek out the best possible marquee. And you know, it's just an opportunity that--it was an opportunity that I would've--that I relished, that I know I can take anywhere else if I, you know, chose to go somewhere else.

Wayne Budd

Attorney Wayne Anthony Budd was born on November 18, 1941 in Springfield, Massachusetts. Educated in Springfield public schools, Budd graduated from Cathedral High School in 1959. In 1963, he received an A.B. degree cum laude in economics from Boston College. Between 1963 and 1967, he worked in the Industrial Relations Department at Ford Motor Company while attending law school at night. He attended Wayne State University School of Law in Detroit and received a J.D. degree in 1967.

Following his law school graduation, Budd served as Assistant Corporation Counsel for the City of Boston from 1968 to 1969. During that same time period, he developed a private law practice.

Budd also served as president of the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. In 1979, he became the first African American to head the Massachusetts Bar as President and at that time he was the youngest (at age 38) president of any state bar association.

Appointed by President George H.W. Bush in 1992, Budd served as Associate Attorney General of the United States. He oversaw the Civil Rights, Environmental, Tax, Civil and Anti-Trust Divisions at the Department of Justice, as well as the Bureau of Prisons. From 1989 to 1992, he worked as the United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts, serving as the state’s chief federal prosecutor and representing the federal government in all matters involving civil litigation. During this time, he was recognized for his efforts in combating drugs, street crime and gang violence. Budd also served as a member of the U.S. Sentencing Commission, appointed to that position in 1994 by President Bill Clinton.

Budd is currently senior counsel in the law firm Goodwin Proctor in Boston, Massachusetts, where he specializes in business and commercial litigation. Budd had previ¬ously been a senior partner at Goodwin Proctor from 1993 to 1996.

Prior to rejoining Goodwin Proctor in 2004, Budd served as Senior Executive Vice President and General Counsel at John Hancock Financial Services, where he was responsible for directing all of the company’s legal activities as well as over¬seeing the compliance, human resources, governmental affairs and community relations. Before joining Hancock, Budd was Group President-New England at Bell Atlantic Corporation (now Verizon Communications) where he was respon¬sible for policy, regulatory and legislative functions for the New England states served by Bell Atlantic.

Budd has served numerous government, public service, educa¬tional and business entities including serving as Commissioner and Chairman of the Massachusetts Civil Service Commission (1972 – 1989); as a Trustee of Boston College (1980 - 1997); as Director (former Vice—Chair) of the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce; and as a member of the National Board of the American Automobile Association.

Budd is the father of three daughters--Kim, a lawyer, born in 1966; Kristi, a teacher, born in 1968; and Kern, a nurse, born in 1970.

Budd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 5, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.064

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/5/2006

Last Name

Budd

Maker Category
Schools

William N. Deberry

Cathedral High School

Myrtle Street Junior High School

Boston College

Wayne State University School of Law

First Name

Wayne

Birth City, State, Country

Springfield

HM ID

BUD01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

Always Be On The Look Out For Opportunity. Don't Turn A Deft Ear Or A Blind Eye To It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/18/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Clam Strips Lobster, Pasta

Short Description

Commercial lawyer and presidential appointee Wayne Budd (1941 - ) was senior counsel at Goodwin Proctor, and the first African American to head the Massachusetts Bar Association as president, and at that time, the youngest president of any state bar association, at age thirty-eight. He was also appointed as Associate Attorney General of the United States.

Employment

State of Massachusetts

Goodwin Procter LLP

John Hancock Financial

Bell Atlantic Corporation

United States Department of Justice

Ford Motor Company

General Electric

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:1596,14:2280,23:4256,63:4636,69:5548,83:8208,121:10260,146:10564,152:12768,180:15808,288:16492,299:16872,305:17328,312:18012,323:19304,347:20520,367:20976,374:21888,395:30030,432:35790,520:36270,527:36910,559:37470,567:38510,581:57166,990:57506,996:58050,1004:58866,1019:59682,1034:60226,1044:61178,1082:94604,1425:98405,1441:101179,1502:101471,1507:101836,1513:105048,1561:105997,1583:110961,1668:112421,1704:113516,1721:114027,1730:125880,1791:126184,1796:127400,1826:130940,1876$0,0:960,29:6240,141:7120,153:9440,208:10080,217:10800,234:16560,372:17280,382:18880,466:22160,531:36272,625:40908,728:47555,793:48235,803:55634,877:57147,906:59995,1006:60351,1011:61152,1023:95296,1441:95984,1451:96758,1463:97446,1478:98908,1503:100112,1523:101058,1535:102262,1548:102778,1555:103122,1560:103724,1570:107680,1662:120910,1799:121801,1814:122449,1826:131359,2002:132088,2015:136452,2036:137580,2053:139020,2064
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Wayne Budd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd describes his father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Wayne Budd describes his maternal family's involvement in the Underground Railroad

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Wayne Budd recalls his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Wayne Budd lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Wayne Budd describes his wife and children

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Wayne Budd describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Wayne Budd remembers his childhood neighborhood in Springfield, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd describes his early education in African American history

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd describes his family life during childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd recalls the smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd remembers DeBerry Elementary School in Springfield, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd recalls Springfield's Myrtle Street Junior High School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Wayne Budd recalls his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Wayne Budd remembers Springfield's Cathedral High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Wayne Budd recalls his summer employment in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Wayne Budd remembers his decision to attend Boston College

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Wayne Budd recalls his experience at Boston College

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Wayne Budd recalls being recruited to work at Ford Motor Company

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Wayne Budd describes his experiences at Wayne State University Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Wayne Budd recalls a professor at Wayne State University Law School, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd recalls a professor at Wayne State University Law School, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd remembers working at Ford Motor Company while studying law

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd describes his decision to return to Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd remembers his early law career in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd recalls joining the law firm of Hamilton and Lampson

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Wayne Budd remembers establishing a law firm with Tom Reilly

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Wayne Budd recalls his organizational involvements

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Wayne Budd recalls serving as the U.S. attorney for Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Wayne Budd recalls becoming an associate attorney general of the United States

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Wayne Budd remembers directing the Rodney King investigation

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Wayne Budd recalls serving as the United States associate attorney general

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd recalls serving on the United States Sentencing Commission

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd recalls working for Goodwin, Procter and Hoar LLP

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd recalls working for NYNEX Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd describes his community involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd describes his hobbies

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Wayne Budd talks about his oldest daughter's law career

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Wayne Budd recalls working as general counsel to John Hancock Financial Services Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Wayne Budd describes his accomplishments at John Hancock Financial Services Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Wayne Budd describes his responsibilities at Goodwin Procter LLP

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Wayne Budd describes his hobbies

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Wayne Budd lists his board memberships

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Wayne Budd describes his hopes for Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Wayne Budd reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Wayne Budd describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Wayne Budd talks about the importance of history

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Wayne Budd shares his advice for African Americans interested in law careers

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Wayne Budd describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Wayne Budd narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Wayne Budd recalls his organizational involvements
Wayne Budd recalls serving as the United States associate attorney general
Transcript
While you had this law practice, Budd, Wiley and Richlin, what other community and citywide involvements did you have in business or legal work?$$Very, very active counsel for the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] at one time. I was a lawyer assigned to restart an Urban League chapter in Boston [Massachusetts], which I did and was active with for a number of years. We represented a number, and mainly pro bono, a number of entities in the community; Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health Center [Boston, Massachusetts], Harvard Street Health Center [Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Boston, Massachusetts], Whittier Street Health Center [Boston, Massachusetts]. So we did a fair number of health centers, as I think about it. But other community groups, we got involved a little bit in politics. I became the president of the Massachusetts Bar Association, kind of working my way up through the chairs. And when I was elected, I was the first African American to be elected to any state bar association.$$In the country.$$In the country, yeah. And I was elected in 1979, and it's a one-year term, so that was a great--$$What were your responsibilities as president of--$$Oh, oversee the state bar. You know, you had a full-time staff, but you were the bar leader. You were the designated lawyers of the lawyers statewide. It was a career changer. It was one of those things that, at least, for my own career, kind of took me a little bit apart from other lawyers of whatever color or stripe. You know, because if you're the state bar president, you're seen to be different. Not that you are, but you're seen that way. And that opened me up to opportunities to serve on boards, to, to, to get in line for other things. To work on task forces, for this governor, or that mayor, and, you know, and on, and on, and on.$Tell me about the process of becoming the associate attorney general of the United States. What was that process for you?$$Actually, it was interesting because, but for Bill Barr [William P. Barr], the then attorney general, I never would have gotten through the process. Apparently, when I went to the White House [Washington, D.C.] for my interviews--I never met with President Bush [President George Herbert Walker Bush], but the personnel people and the staff people who vet these things--I was deemed not to be conservative enough. So I was rejected. And they said, "Look for somebody else," to Barr. And Barr came back with, "Look, you gave me--you told me this was going to be my department, and I could pick my own people, and I want this guy." So, they yielded to him, and as a result of that, I became the associate attorney general.$$What was the highlight of that experience? You served there three years; is that correct?$$No, no actually, I was only there a year. I was there for the last year of the first Bush administration, '92 [1992], '93 [1993]. And so as--the moment the new administration, the new president raises his hand to take the oath, you're gone. You're fired. Your resignation--well, you don't even resign. You're terminated. So I got out--if the inauguration was on Tuesday, I was out on Friday, and finished up and came back home.$$What was the highlight of your tenure in this position?$$Well, actually, there was a couple, one of which was to oversee the prosecution and the prosecution team for the Rodney King case, the prosecution of four police officers in the federal court system. Although technically, the case wasn't completed by the time I left office. And the other was to revive the office of the associate. It had been, kind of, put on hold for a few years. And this attorney general decided it was important to have the position activated again. It's established by law, but to have it activated again. And so to organize that, to put together the team, and to make it work was a great experience.

Dr. Harvey Smith

Dentist Harvey Bryant Smith was born October 22, 1922 in Atlanta, Georgia. His parents, Baptist Reverend Harvey Miles Smith and Stella Bryant Smith, attended Morehouse College and Spelman College, respectively, and were friends of Rev. A.D.Williams, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s grandfather. Smith grew up in Albany, Georgia, where his father was pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church. He attended Ashby Street School in Atlanta, and Ware Street School and Monroe Elementary in Albany. Inspired by dentist Joseph Ellis, Smith dreamed of becoming a dentist. He graduated from Georgia Normal College High School, now Albany State University, as class president in 1939. After graduation as a pre-med student at Morehouse College in 1943, Smith entered the United States Army. The army paid his way through Howard University Dental School, and in 1946, he graduated, was married and opened a dental practice on Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia.

Returning to the U.S. Army in 1951, Smith served as captain in the Dental Corps at Fort Stewart, Georgia through 1953. Smith became active in the integration of the Georgia State Dental Association in 1953. He also became a member of the Northern District Council for Dentistry. When Atlanta’s most prominent African American dentist, Dr. B.F. Anderson lost his arm, he gave his practice to Smith, who then worked to increase the practice. Smith’s patients included Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and other civil rights leaders. Appointed to the Advisory Board of the Georgia Dental Association by former United States President, then Governor Jimmy Carter in the late 1970s, Smith sought to encourage opportunities for black dentists.

Smith was a member of the National Dental Association, the American Dental Association and the Academy of General Dentistry. In 2001, Smith retired and continued to live in the home he bought in 1957.

Smith and his wife, Laveda, had three grown children, Jane, Harvey and Homer.

Dr. Harvey Smith passed away on May 4, 2018.

Accession Number

A2005.202

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/24/2005

Last Name

Smith

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Georgia Normal College High School

Monroe Elementary School

Ware Street School

Ashby Street School

Ashby Street Learning Academy

Morehouse College

Howard University

First Name

Harvey

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

SMI11

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

Take Care Of Business.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/22/1922

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Catfish

Death Date

5/4/2018

Short Description

Dentist Dr. Harvey Smith (1922 - 2018 ) was a captain in the Dental Corps of the U.S. Army. As a dentist, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of his patients.

Employment

Private Practice

U.S. Army

Favorite Color

Gray

Timing Pairs
0,0:357,2:15112,331:18304,400:20204,443:20888,463:24232,527:35380,635:38400,655:39183,736:43702,795:47106,842:47474,847:59239,1009:61878,1051:76250,1266:85762,1371:86234,1380:95130,1476:95386,1481:104549,1621:106595,1650:120134,1874:121901,1895:122273,1900:126384,1931:130212,2009:136976,2223:145466,2307:154118,2536:170306,2691:170782,2700:178340,2834:178616,2839:179996,2860:195802,3058:198196,3122:221780,3450$0,0:1790,20:11284,127:12488,144:13004,151:26374,333:27256,343:40534,562:49335,694:53328,750:54496,775:78730,1153:101581,1468:104608,1508:109822,1694:113377,1834:119733,1902:144960,2185:157410,2323
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Harvey Smith's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Harvey Smith lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his paternal family's history as ministers

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his father as a pastor in Athens, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his father becoming a pastor in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his conversations with his father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his inspiration to become a dentist

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his parents' personalities and his likeness to them

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his jobs as a young boy in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes the sights of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls a lynching near Albany, Georgia around 1934

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls attending school in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his favorite high school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his extracurricular activities in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls having to work to attend Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his experience at Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls Dr. Benjamin Mays

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his extracurricular activities in college

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his favorite teachers at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls joining the Army Specialized Training Program

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls starting a family and a dental practice

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls serving in the Army Dental Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls integrating the Georgia Dental Association

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his first job as a dentist

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes inheriting his dental practice

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls a fundraiser with Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. moving back to Atlanta

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls the effect of integration on black businesses

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes attending Atlanta's Friendship Baptist Church

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Harvey Smith reflects upon the evolution of dentistry, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Harvey Smith reflects upon the evolution of dentistry, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Harvey Smith reflects upon the evolution of clients' expectations

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Harvey Smith reflects upon his mistakes as a young dentist

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his experience at Atlanta's Ben Massell Dental Clinic

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Harvey Smith reflects upon his career's highlights

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Harvey Smith reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Harvey Smith reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Harvey Smith talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Harvey Smith reflects upon his career's highlights and his religion

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Harvey Smith describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$8

DATitle
Dr. Harvey Smith recalls joining the Army Specialized Training Program
Dr. Harvey Smith recalls his experience at Atlanta's Ben Massell Dental Clinic
Transcript
I finished Morehouse [Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia] and went on to, to Howard [Howard University, Washington, D.C.] of course. When I, when I did go to Howard and making a decision, of course, back in those days, all--the only words that you knew was Meharry [Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee]. Everybody knew about Meharry; wasn't nobody talking about no Howard or nothing like that. But when I got time to go to dental school, I had heard about Howard and learned about Howard. I decided I was gone be different. I didn't want to go to Meharry, so I applied for Howard--$$Okay.$$--and I got accepted to Howard University.$$To the school of dentistry [Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, D.C.]?$$School of dentistry.$$Okay.$$I sure did, and I--when I was going to Howard I knew that I was not going to have money to stay. And I knew my parents [Stella Bryant Smith and Harvey Smith] wasn't able to send me there. But it was World War II [WWII], I guess. And they had established the Army Specialized Training Program [ASTP] in the colleges; Army Specialized Training. So if you were in dentistry or medicine, if you got in medical or dental school and could get in the Army Specialized Training Program, they paid for your school. So I went there knowing I wasn't gone be able to stay if I couldn't get in the Army Specialized Training Program. And I got there; was doing fine; was living with Robert Smith [ph.], a friend of mine from Morehouse. We both taking dentistry, and he got in on the Army Specialized Training Program first and looked like I wasn't gone get in--my money run out, I didn't have money. And so I told Smitty, my roommate, I told him I said, "Smitty, I'm not gone be able to stay 'cause my money running out and I'm not getting in the [U.S.] Army. And I just don't know what in the world I'm gone do." Robert Smith was his name from Waycross, Georgia, and he grabbed me by the hand and look me dead in the eye and said to me, "You ain't going nowhere. I'll take care of you 'til you get in the Army." And he did; he paid my room rent there 'cause in about thirty days later, they inducted me into the Army. They took me into the Army and from that point on there was no problem.$$Now what, what year was that when you were inducted into the Army?$$Okay let's see I went there 1943, see (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So that's in the heart of the war?$$Yeah, see it was in the in the summer of '43 [1943] when I got inducted into the Army and they kept us two years. And they had enough dentists in the Army; they didn't need no more dentists. So they put the dentists out of the Specialized Training Program all over the country. And then I had to hustle to make it by myself then. But I'd been there long enough to get established; got me a job at the post office working after school. I'd get off in time to come, go to class, you know, so I made it all right 'cause the government had paid most of my way. And I made it, made it through just fine. Dental school was not a problem. But for me, I was doing all right; always a subject I have trouble with; didn't, didn't pass comparative anatomy. I had to take that course over in dental school, but I finally got through with it. Never was on the honor roll there, just another student, just hitting it hard, yes sir (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So when did you finish, was that 1946?$$Forty-six [1946].$$Okay.$The Ben practice in dentistry, I learned that in the Ben Massell Dental Clinic [Atlanta, Georgia]. That was a clinic that was sponsored by the Jewish people; they sponsored the Ben Massell Dental Clinic.$$How do you spell that?$$B-E-N, M-A-S-E-L [sic.], Ben Masell it was a Jewish--you didn't pay nothing to go there. And it was a volunteer work, so we black dentists was volunteering to go on Wednesday. That's the only day they would let us come; we'd have to come on Wednesday. And the white dentists, of course, could go whatever day they wanted to give some time; say well I'll take off on Thursday, I'll give some time on Thursday. But any rate, I never shall forget that Dr. Marvin Goldstein was the administrator of the clinic. And one time I remember that the president of the Emory University School of Dentistry [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia] came to visit in the clinic. And he--Dr. Goldstein was walking him around the clinic introducing him to everybody, but when he got to me and Dr. Robinson [ph.], he didn't let us meet the good doctor, I guess because we were black. But another thing I learned there, there was a white dentist by the name of Dr. Harris [ph.], who was a root canal therapist. And he worked in there too, so they asked him, they wanted him to run the clinic to be in charge, to be the supervisor of the clinic, Dr. Harris, white dentist. So they asked Dr. Harris; say, "Dr. Harris, would you be the director of the dental clinic?" And he said to them, "Yes I would, under one circumstances, and that is that you let the black dentists come like we do when they can. And when they can give the time and if you're--if you do that I'll be the director." And that--he was an endodontist, root canal therapist, and I thought he was such a beautiful person; he stayed that way all during the time during my practice.$$Now what year was that?$$Ben Massell Dental Clinic; I'd come out of the [U.S.] Army then. I would say it was in the, in the early '60s [1960s].$$Okay.$$That's when that was, in the early '60s [1960s], yep.$$So he helped to integrate the (simultaneous)--?$$(Simultaneous) Oh yes, he sure did. He did integrate it. Yeah, he integrated it, and it stayed that way; it's that way even till today and they still have a beautiful clinic. Yep.