The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Hazel Trice Edney

Journalist Hazel Trice Edney was born in Charlottesville, Virginia. She received her M.A. degree from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. Edney also graduated from Harvard University’s KSG Women and Power Executive Leadership program.

In 1987, Edney was hired as a reporter for the Richmond Afro-American newspaper. She went on to work as a staff writer for the Richmond Free Press until 1998, when she was awarded the William S. Wasserman Jr. Fellowship on the Press, Politics and Public Policy from Harvard University. In 2000, Edney was hired as the Washington, D.C. correspondent for the National Newspaper Publishers Association. Then, in 2007, she was appointed editor-in-chief of the NNPA News Service and Blackpressusa.com, serving in that role until 2010. Edney also worked as an investigative reporter as part of the NNPA NorthStar Investigative Reporting Program. While at NNPA, she covered the World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa in 2001; the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the Pentagon; Hurricane Katrina; and earthquake-ravaged Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

In 2010, Edney launched the Trice Edney News Wire. She also serves as president and CEO of Trice Edney Communications and editor-in-chief of the Trice Edney News Wire. Edney has worked as an adjunct professor of journalism at Howard University, and has served as interim executive director of the NNPA Foundation. She has appeared on the Tavis Smiley Show; CNN; C-Span, Bishop T.D. Jakes' Potter's Touch; The Al Sharpton Show; Washington Watch with Roland Martin; and the Washington Journal.

Edney’s awards include the New America Media Career Achievement Award; a fellowship at the Annenberg Institute for Justice in Journalism at the University of Southern California; the Lincoln University Unity Award in Media; the Tisdale Award; and NNPA Merit Awards, including the NNPA First Place Feature Story Merit Award in 1990 for her final interview with Virginia death row inmate Wilbert Lee Evans. She was also a congressional fellow in 1999 and 2000, and was the first African American woman inducted into the Virginia Communications Hall of Fame. Edney was named a "2008 Role Model" by the National Baptist Congress of Christian Education, and a "2010 Phenomenal Woman" by the Phenomenal Women’s Alliance. Hazel Trice Edney was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 6, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.339

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/3/2013

Last Name

Edney

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Trice

Occupation
Schools

Harvard University

Thomas Jefferson Elementary School

Louisa Elementary School

Louisa County High School

Saint Paul's College

Virginia Commonwealth University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Hazel

Birth City, State, Country

Charlottesville

HM ID

EDN01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Unto Everything There’s A Season And A Time For Every Purpose Under The Heavens

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/13/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Journalist Hazel Trice Edney (1960 - ) , founder of the Trice Edney News Wire, was editor-in-chief of the NNPA News Service and Blackpressusa.com. She was the first African American woman inducted into the Virginia Communications Hall of Fame.

Employment

Trice Edney Communications

Trice Edney News Wire

National Newspaper Publishers Association

BlackPressUSA.com

Richmond Free Press

Richmond Afro-American

Howard University

Greater Abyssinia Baptist Church

Greater Mount Calvary Holy Church

WTVR-TV

WFTH Radio

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
40,0:744,16:2592,119:4264,155:8928,246:12865,274:29180,449:31210,494:31630,501:33030,529:33310,534:34780,572:35130,578:50357,835:54153,916:54810,926:61891,1092:69238,1161:69573,1167:75871,1298:76407,1307:83057,1372:93766,1516:99410,1656$0,0:869,26:6579,123:10215,164:10922,173:12437,190:12942,196:18534,217:19918,228:27088,283:32184,378:33164,395:38950,439:39606,448:40836,474:42968,519:43378,525:43706,530:46545,563:46813,573:47148,579:47617,589:48153,599:49962,641:50364,648:50632,653:51302,664:52240,682:60258,786:60870,797:63046,853:65086,909:68542,938:71024,955:71336,960:71726,966:72974,986:73442,993:77248,1023:81990,1068:82390,1073:90090,1188:93886,1203:94858,1217:95425,1225:96559,1243:96964,1249:97288,1254:99394,1291:99718,1296:100852,1308:107170,1463:123269,1625:124322,1637:125942,1672:126590,1681:127238,1692:127643,1698:130370,1704:134198,1760:134981,1771:135329,1776:136112,1786:136808,1794:137417,1808:138200,1819:140549,1848:145851,1893:147732,1915:148623,1925:149118,1931:150108,1943:155045,1991:155305,1996:155955,2008:156280,2014:156865,2024:157450,2035:157775,2041:159890,2056:162200,2101:164433,2196:165511,2214:168437,2267:169900,2286:170439,2294:170901,2302:176032,2334:177736,2371:180150,2416:180434,2421:183016,2445:183529,2457:184099,2469:184327,2474:192536,2577:196308,2714:197046,2726:199096,2763:199424,2768:200080,2780:201556,2809:202048,2816:209794,2887:210202,2894:210610,2902:213466,2981:214554,3001:214894,3006:215914,3019:216458,3028:219858,3100:222578,3150:224074,3182:224618,3192:226182,3219:227542,3246:227814,3251:228086,3258:228562,3268:234100,3274:234736,3288:235372,3304:235637,3310:235955,3317:237015,3349:238030,3355
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hazel Trice Edney's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her mother's singing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her mother's favorite songs

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her father's military service, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her father's military service, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her early memories of her father

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her early home

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her community in Louisa, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers the desegregation of Louisa public schools

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the difficulties at home

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers the birth of her son

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls seeing a vision of an angel as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about an inspiring teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her behavior in school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her interest in music

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her early encounters with black media

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her decision to pursue collegiate study

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers marrying Eugene Edney, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the end of her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers transferring to Virginia Commonwealth University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the challenges in leaving her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the emotional support she had while finishing school

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working at WTVR-TV in Richmond

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls being the news director at WFTH radio station

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working freelance at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about working full time at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coworkers at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes Richmond, Virginia's political climate

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls major stories she covered at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her success as a political news reporter

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her move to the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her coverage of the L. Douglas Wilder's gubernatorial election

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working with media leaders at the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the highlights of her work at the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about contemporary instances of racial discrimination

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers being offered a fellowship at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers influential instructors at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls speaking at her Harvard University graduation

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her experiences as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about becoming a correspondent at the National Newspaper Publishers Association

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers covering the 2000 U.S. Election scandal

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the events of September 11, 2001, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the events of September 11, 2001, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coverage of Hurricane Katrina, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coverage of Hurricane Katrina, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls flying with the family of Rosa Parks

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about a lack of recognition for female leaders in African American civil rights organizations

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the similarities of discrimination against individuals of African descent worldwide

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers covering the 2008 U.S. elections

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about the importance of accountability in black leadership, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about the importance of accountability in black leadership, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls founding the Trice Edney News Wire

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her work at the Trice Edney Newswire

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her presidency of the Capital Press Club

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her experiences as a professor at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her encounters with racial slurs throughout her life

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Hazel Trice Edney talks about her decision to pursue collegiate study
Hazel Trice Edney recalls major stories she covered at the Richmond Afro-American
Transcript
When you were a senior then in high school [Louisa County High School, Mineral, Virginia], are you in the--you're in a school play, you're doing better in school? You feel energized; you won the contest. What did your counselors tell you about college?$$ They didn't. I sought them out. I, I had to go and seek out the counselors. You know, I wa- I had been the bad girl and who had suddenly become, you know, sort of like the star. And, and everybody was watching to see what was gonna happen next, but nobody said, "You know what, let me sit down and talk to you about college." I just suddenly decided in a conversation one day with a government teacher, Mr. Clutter [ph.]. I had written a story--a paper about John F. Kennedy [President John Fitzgerald Kennedy], and he was discussing the paper with me. It was something about it he disagreed with. Maybe I didn't do my research or something. It was something about he was scolding me. And I threw my head back and I said, "Well, I'm going to college" (laughter). And I didn't know--I, I don't even know why that came up at that moment, but--or why I said it at that time, but I--that was the first time I declared I'm going to college. And it was fra- and that was in the eleventh grade, and that's when I began to seek out the guidance counselors. And one of them told me actually about Saint Paul's College in Lawrenceville [Virginia], and they thought that I could possibly get in. And so in the twelfth grade I applied to Saint Paul's; and surely they accepted me. That was my, my bright--I always tell people that was my HBCU [historically black colleges and universities] cred.$What were some of the big stories in, in Richmond [Virginia] that you remember, or the memorable stories?$$ The memorable stories pertain to usually the, the, the pain and suffering of, of black people. There was a story, for example, about a, a food stamp line that stretched for blocks. You know, I wrote this story--that stretched for blocks in the wintertime, in, in the cold, in, in the summertime, in the sweltering heat, you had pregnant mothers. You had elderly women, et cetera who had to wait outside for their food stamps. And I would notice this line year after year, and finally I inquired, "What is this line?" It was in August that particular year. And I went inside the facility where they got their food stamps. There was no water, no air conditioning. It was like third world. I hate to use that term, but that's what it was like, literally. This was like--it couldn't be America happening. And so I wrote a story on it, and that story impacted the public policy pertaining to that particular food stamp distributor. The city manager at that time, who was Robert [ph.], Bob, actually cut the contract--ended the contract for that particular distributor and moved the, the recipients to another facility that--in which they could pick up their food stamps in a much more humane condition. And at the same time--and I don't take credit for this, but it just happened to have--happen at the same time. So it could have been my story that did it. Virginia went to like a stagger system in the, the food stamp recipients picking up their food stamps. They didn't all pick 'em up on the same day that caused that humongous line. And so a lot happened after that story broke that I, I believe brought hu- you know, humanity to the people who were suffering there. There were so many other stories. I remember doing a story on, on this--on seeing homeless people sleeping in paper--in cardboard boxes outside the shelter at night in the dead of winter. And we took pictures of these cardboard boxes with these people in them outside, and it was on the front page of the Afro [Richmond Afro-American; Afro-American Newspapers]. And then the next day, it was on the front page of the white daily--the Richmond Times-Dispatch. And so in many instances the stories that we were doing were followed by the white press, and this is just at the Afro. This is before I'd go to the Richmond Free Press. And, and--$$Now this is the opposite of what happens in some of the cities that I know of where the black press seems to--you know, pe- people joke that they're actually reading a white pa- paper the night before, you know.$$ Yes, they'll say we--we're following--well, this is--it's always been opposite in--you know, for, for me. It's always been opposite. I--you know, I've always tended to say okay, this is the story that goes against the grain, but nobody else is saying it. Nobody was writing it, so I'm gonna write it. And it ends up, for example, in The New York Times, which happened when I was at the Free Press. And it ended up on the front page of The Washington Post, which happened when I was at the Afro. And so it's, it's just a matter of having a gut instinct as a journalist and saying, you know what? This is a story regardless of what paper; and other papers will follow you, 'cause it is a story.