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The Honorable Arnette Hubbard

Circuit court judge and attorney Arnette R. Hubbard was born in Stephens, Arkansas. Hubbard graduated with her B.S. degree from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. She went on to receive her J.D. degree in 1969 from the John Marshall Law School in Chicago, Illinois.

In 1969, Hubbard was hired as a staff attorney for the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. Then, in 1972, she went into private practice. Hubbard was named the first woman president of the National Bar Association in 1981. From 1985 to 1989, Hubbard served as commissioner of the Chicago Cable Commission. She then served on the three-member Chicago Board of Election Commissioners beginning in 1989, and, in 1992, she became the first African American commissioner elected president of the Association of Election Commissioners of Illinois. She was also the first woman president of the Cook County Bar Association, the nation’s oldest African American bar association.

Hubbard was an official U.S. observer to the 1994 historic elections in South Africa in which Nelson Mandela won the presidency. The following year, President Clinton appointed her to the U.S. Presidential Observer Delegation for the parliamentary and local elections in Haiti. In 1997, Hubbard began a six-year term as a circuit court judge. She began her term in the First Municipal District, but in 2001, Cook County Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans assigned her to the Law Jury Section of the Law Division. In 2004, Hubbard retained her seat, and that same year, she helped create and served as vice-chair of the Illinois Commission on the 50th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education.

Hubbard has served on the Election Authority Advisory Committee of the State Board of Elections of the State of Illinois, as well as the executive committee of the International Association of Clerks, Recorders, Election Officials, and Treasurers. She has received the Clarence Darrow Award in recognition of her contributions to social justice. In 2000, Hubbard received the Obelisk Award for education and community service. In 2001, she became the first woman inducted into the Scroll of Distinguished Women Lawyers by the National Bar Association in commemoration of the twentieth anniversary of her presidency of that organization. Hubbard also received the Margaret Brent Distinguished Achievement Award from the American Bar Association in 2009.

Arnette Hubbard was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 30, 2003.

Accession Number

A2003.310

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/30/2003

Last Name

Hubbard

Maker Category
Middle Name

Rhinehart

Occupation
Schools

Southern Illinois University

John Marshall Law School

Washington Middle School

First Name

Arnette

Birth City, State, Country

Stephens

HM ID

HUB02

Favorite Season

Whenever It's Sunny

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/11/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Greens

Short Description

Circuit court judge The Honorable Arnette Hubbard (1935 - ) was a practicing attorney for twenty-eight years before becoming a circuit court judge in Chicago. She was the first woman president of the National Bar Association, as well as the first woman president of the Cook County Bar Association.

Employment

Illinois Cook Judicial Circuit Court

Chicago Board of Election Commissioners

Chicago Cable Commission

Delete

Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

Favorite Color

None

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Arnette Hubbard's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Arnette Hubbard lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Arnette Hubbard talks about her family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Arnette Hubbard talks about her father, who passed away when she was a toddler

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Arnette Hubbard describes her mother, Madeline Edwards

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Arnette Hubbard describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Arnette Hubbard talks about her elementary school years at Washington High School in El Dorado, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Arnette Hubbard talks about her grade school teachers and early love of reading

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Arnette Hubbard narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Arnette Hubbard narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Richard Clayter

Lawyer Richard L. Clayter, Jr. was born on July 28, 1922, in Chicago, Illinois to Richard Clayter, Sr. and Bella Warren. Similar to many African Americans at the time, Clayter’s mother had taken part in the Great Migration of blacks out of the American South. During his childhood, Clayter still maintained ties to traditional African American communities in the South. His earliest memories are from his time in Wiggins, Mississippi. When he was only seven, Clayter experienced the Great Depression. Clayter attended William W. Carter Elementary located in the Washington Park neighborhood of Chicago’s south side. Aside from one year in Tuskegee, Alabama, Clayter attended Englewood High School located on Chicago’s south side. During this time he married his first wife, Mildred Warren, who was an orphan. Clayter graduated from high school in 1941 and soon after joined the U.S. military. His time fighting in World War II for the U.S. military would prove to be a transformative experience for Clayter.

After he returned from his service during the war, Clayter attended DePaul University. He earned his B.A. degree in sociology there in 1950. During this time Clayter married his second wife, Mary Lou Gullatt, and earned his M.A. degree in social work at Loyola University Chicago School of Social Work. At a meeting at his mother’s home, one of the guests pointed at Clayter and said that he looked like a lawyer. The experience left him determined to earn a legal degree. Despite being rejected by the law programs at Northwestern University and DePaul University due to their quotas, Clayter was able to enroll at Loyola University Chicago School of Law after a personal discussion with Dean John C. Fitzgerald. In 1956, Clayter became the first African American to earn his J.D. in the part time program at Loyola University Chicago.

Even after he graduated, Clayter continued to press for African American rights. In 1958, he served as counsel for Charles S. Jackson Company, Inc. in their suit against the Oak Woods Cemetery Association. The funeral association had refused, on the basis of race, to cremate several bodies brought to them by the Jackson Company. Clayter won the suit and effectively integrated the cemetery association’s crematorium. In 1959, he was the only African American in the Short Course for Prosecuting Attorneys at Northwestern University.

The recipient of many awards, Clayter was honored by two organizations with which he has a long history in 2005. He received the Outstanding Sole Practitioner Award from the Center for Disability and Elder Law with personal recognition by Attorney General Lisa Madigan. In March of the same year, Roland Burris presented Clayter with the Lifetime Achievement Award from The Original Forty Club of Chicago. A longtime member of the club of accomplished African American men, Clayter held every position in The Original Forty Club from Secretary to President.

Clayter passed away on July 22, 2013 at the age of 90.

Accession Number

A2010.110

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/11/2010

Last Name

Clayter

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

William W. Carter Elementary School

Englewood High School

DePaul University

Loyola University Chicago

Stone Middle School

Loyola University Chicago School of Law

First Name

Richard

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

CLA17

Favorite Season

None

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Freeport, Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Keep A Roof Over Your Head.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/28/1922

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Death Date

7/22/2013

Short Description

Trial lawyer Richard Clayter (1922 - 2013 ) was the first African American to complete the Loyola University Chicago School of Law’s part-time program. He also argued successfully for the integration of Chicago's Oak Woods Cemetery.

Employment

Illinois School for Boys

Starke and Anglin

Frost, Clayter, Sherard and Howse

Gassaway, Crosson, Turner and Parsons

Rivers, Lockhart, Clayter & Lawrence

Favorite Color

Silver

Timing Pairs
0,0:1780,23:21540,224:22032,231:22688,245:43870,399:65442,599:80988,794:83335,827:101615,1030:121101,1148:136668,1272:150582,1366:168041,1418:168743,1425:206194,1724:233888,1875:234278,1881:242606,1976:264880,2162:282935,2421:292432,2525:327735,2872:330830,2880:335236,2911:349070,3006$0,0:845,22:5972,104:7625,132:11310,140:20840,214:21750,229:23847,245:24123,250:24675,257:27021,321:31840,376:32296,383:32904,394:39730,476:49497,621:60080,849:60396,906:104298,1285:113928,1364:148190,1681:151908,1782:172591,1977:172947,1982:173748,1994:178020,2081:178821,2094:179177,2099:213404,2396:228050,2575:228510,2580:228970,2585:237214,2732:267400,3026:296568,3237:306670,3331
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Richard Clayter's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Richard Clayter lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Richard Clayter talks about his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Richard Clayter describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Richard Clayter talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Richard Clayter remembers his family's apartments in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Richard Clayter describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Richard Clayter recalls his experiences in Wiggins, Mississippi, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Richard Clayter recalls his experiences in Wiggins, Mississippi, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Richard Clayter recalls his start at Englewood High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Richard Clayter recalls his teachers and activities at Englewood High School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Richard Clayter describes his early employment

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Richard Clayter talks about his first marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Richard Clayter recalls being drafted into the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Richard Clayter remembers his U.S. Army training

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Richard Clayter remembers his combat flashbacks

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Richard Clayter talks about his U.S. Army service in World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Richard Clayter talks about divorcing his first wife

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Richard Clayter remembers DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Richard Clayter describes his early experiences in social work

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Richard Clayter talks about his second marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Richard Clayter remembers the Loyola University Chicago School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Richard Clayter lists his children

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Richard Clayter describes his early law career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Richard Clayter remembers the African American attorneys in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Richard Clayter talks about the Cook County Bar Association

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Richard Clayter recalls the start of the Oak Woods Cemetery desegregation case

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Richard Clayter lists the attorneys involved in the Oak Woods Cemetery desegregation case

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Richard Clayter describes the Oak Woods Cemetery desegregation case

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Richard Clayter talks about aversion to criminal law

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Richard Clayter remembers the African American judges in Cook County, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Richard Clayter describes his experiences of racial discrimination in the judicial system

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Richard Clayter recalls joining the law firm of Gassaway, Crosson, Turner and Parsons

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Richard Clayter describes his law career in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Richard Clayter remembers George N. Leighton and R. Eugene Pincham

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Richard Clayter describes his law career in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Richard Clayter talks about his working relationship with Wilson Frost, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Richard Clayter talks about his working relationship with Wilson Frost, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Richard Clayter lists the law firms where he worked in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Richard Clayter talks about the judicial appointment process in Cook County, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Richard Clayter talks about representing community organizations

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Richard Clayter describes his involvement in the Original 40 Club

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Richard Clayter talks about his friendship with James Weinstein

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Richard Clayter remembers the case of Friendship Medical Center, Ltd. v. Chicago Board of Health

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Richard Clayter remembers Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Richard Clayter talks about his memorable court cases, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Richard Clayter recalls securing a reduced sentence for a client

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Richard Clayter remembers applying to become a federal parole officer

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Richard Clayter describes his advice to aspiring lawyers

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Richard Clayter talks about his memorable court cases, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Richard Clayter reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Richard Clayter talks about his religious affiliation

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Richard Clayter describes his hopes for the world

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Richard Clayter shares a message to his children

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Richard Clayter reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Richard Clayter narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Richard Clayter narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

7$2

DATitle
Richard Clayter describes his early law career
Richard Clayter describes the Oak Woods Cemetery desegregation case
Transcript
Now you just graduated from law school [Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Chicago, Illinois], what was your first job?$$My first job was, the firm was Starke and Anglin [Chicago, Illinois], I believe. There--I was a social worker at the time and I was offered a job, I think, two hundred dollars a month, Golden State insurance company [Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company] and had a falling out with my supervisor so I quit that job, and I went in this law firm practicing with Starke and Anglin. I was not an employee, you know, I was on my own.$$So you just used their offices as your office?$$Well, there was, was a lawyer there; I shared expenses. They gave me a lower rate. I was, there was--Mary Lou's [Clayter's second wife, Mary Lou Gullatt Clayter] cousin, Adolphus Rivers [D. Adolphus Rivers], was there, as was Thaddeus Rowe [Thaddeus B. Rowe] and so forth. Yeah, so I was sharing expenses and they wised--every time I got a case, I got a, seventy-five dollars was a big fee. If I got seventy-five dollars, they got twenty-five and, yeah. I never had a job as a lawyer, I just practiced law, you know, representing people, representing companies, representing--as they used to say, rabble rousing.$$How did you get your clients?$$I got my clients by hanging out in taverns at night, even though I didn't drink, and I had a couple of people and I got, I guess as a result of my being a social worker, their friends, you know. But mostly I would hang out at these taverns at night, you know.$$So were you doing mostly criminal cases, or criminal and civil?$$Well I did criminal cases, I didn't have an awful lot, then divorce case, I did--I had near enough to do an appellate case. I did my first case, criminal case, second case, I think was, let's see (unclear), I did, called myself doing a divorce. I did a case involving a fight over a water cooler (laughter), it was an icemaker, is one of the, this in the years when they, before they really got popular, they finally came out with the idea of ice cubes. I think so, Harrison versus Crockett [Crockett v. Harrison, 1960] about the ice cooler, yeah, um-hm.$$So there was some kind of damage action?$$It was a civil suit. They were trying, (laughter) they, they had loaned him, they had loaned Crockett [Elzie Crockett] some money. Crockett wasn't too bright. They loaned (unclear) some money and he got, he borrowed some money from a guy named Harrison [Tommy Harrison]. I think money came from Harrison to Crockett and then this credit, by the way, they were trying to take the icemaker and I think they, I think they filed suit on behalf of Harrison, against Crockett, they're trying to use Harrison to get to the icemaker from Crockett.$$And you were representing Crockett?$$Oh yeah, that was my man. He was a ju- jukebox operator so that's how I met him, you know, in the various joints, so to speak, and I had some cases, I don't know how I got 'em. (Pause) Oh lord, lord, the fights that I had to fight.$Well tell us a little about, what were the kind of the facts for the Oak Wood Cemetery case?$$The facts were, it seems to me that I recall, that Cornell [Cornell Davis] had had an eye on these guys and they'd been discriminating forever, and he went there, Cornell, when they sent Cornell--they had a body they wanted to cremate, they sent Cornell there and he approached the people about this cremation, and I think they scheduled the cremation, but Corneal they thought was white. They scheduled the, the cremation, and when the folk got there to do the cremation, they saw they were colored and no way Jose, can't do that, you know, we don't allow, we don't--I've forgotten the exact word, we don't bury Negroes in this cemetery [Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois]. And they said well, don't have a Negro, I've got a non--how did they have that? They thought he had a, in other words, they, they were under the impression that he had a white person, that he was white, and he had a white person he wanted to cremate. They said, "We don't bury 'em, we don't create 'em, we don't cremate them, you have to go somewhere else." Lincoln [Lincoln Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois], I think Lincoln or Burr Oak [Burr Oak Cemetery, Alsip, Illinois] were the two black cemeteries, so to speak, and I think Cornell, he evidently prepared for this 'cause I distinctly remember he had some pennies, he had a jar of pennies that he saved to use for the fee, and once they found out that he was in charge of this committee and the committee had, I don't know, ways and means, is just what it was, committee had some power to cut off some funds, they had to rethink the thing. But in the meantime, I'll never forget this experience. These lawyers had a deposition scheduled--$$These were lawyers for the cemetery?$$Cemetery, they were on the top floor of this building, lavish office, I mean--$$Do you remember the name of the firm?$$(Laughter) No, I don't, and we had a deposition, when they saw me there, they, they evidently didn't realize what was going on. I guess they realized a lawsuit, but they were shocked when they, when I, they saw me there, you know, and we worked things out and they finally gave in. I've forgotten what happened. 'Cause they didn't, the case didn't get much publicity.$$Did it ever go to trial?$$No (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Or was it a settlement?$$There's a lawsuit filed, come to think of it, it was a settlement, not a trial, I don't think there was a trial. I don't remember there being a trial.$$What was the settlement agreement?$$That they would open the facilities to, people no matter what--I don't think they went so far as to say no matter what the ethic, ethnic configuration was. They definitely agreed to handle Negroes (laughter). And stuff, I can't remember. I didn't, I didn't figure, I was talking to my daughter [Ariana Clayter], I didn't figure why, I wondered why we didn't get more publicity about the thing. It seemed like it was just kind of kept undercover. They didn't blast out, say you know, "Well now we're open to Negro applicants and Negro cadav- cadavers," or whatever.$$They kind of wanted to keep it quiet even though they had settled.$$They did, they kept it quiet. There's no television, no radio, no--I don't recall any newspapers, kind of hush-hush.

Demetrius Carney

Corporate lawyer and Chicago police board president Demetrius Edward Carney was born on April 29, 1947 in Chicago, Illinois to James and Jessie Carney. Carney attended Chicago’s Holy Angels Catholic School and Joachim Junior High School. He went on to graduate in 1969 from De La Salle High School. Afterwards, Carney attended Loyola University where he initially pursued a degree in mathematics, but decided to change his major to psychology.

Carney graduated from Loyola University in 1972 and went on to work as a teacher at Chicago’s St. Ignatius College Preparatory High School. While working as a teacher, Carney was encouraged by a colleague to pursue a law degree. He then enrolled at DePaul University and graduated with his J.D. degree in 1974.

Also in 1974, Carney joined the law firm of Butler, Todd & Tucker. He left the firm in 1977 and partnered with Jerome Butler and formed the private practice of Butler & Carney. Then in 1978, he was hired by Lafontant, Wilkins & Butler and represented several organizations including Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Carney went on to form Carney & Brothers in 1985. He worked there until 1995 when he began working at the law firm of Wildman, Harold, Allen & Dixon, focusing his practice in the areas of real estate development. In 2003, Carney joined the Seattle based-firm, Perkins Coie, where he began specializing in the areas of government relations and lobbying issues.

Carney became the chairman of the Chicago police board. His other affiliations include the Cook County Bar Association, the American Bar Association and the National Bar Association. He serves on the board of trustees at St. Ignatius College Preparatory High School and on the board of directors at the Chicago Culture Center Foundation. Carney is a former commissioner and planning commissioner for the City of Chicago.

Carney lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Carney was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 5, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.009

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/5/2008 |and| 4/17/2012

Last Name

Carney

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

De La Salle Institute

Joachim Junior High School

Holy Angels Catholic School

Loyola University Chicago

DePaul University College of Law

First Name

Demetrius

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

CAR15

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Ski The Mountain In Front Of You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

4/29/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vegetables, Sushi

Short Description

Corporate lawyer Demetrius Carney (1947 - ) was a Commissioner and Planning Commissioner for the City of Chicago, who worked for several law firms including the Seattle based-firm, Perkins Coie, where he specialized in the areas of government relations and lobbying issues.

Employment

St. Ignatius College Prep

Chicago Title and Trust Company

Tucker, Watson, Butler and Todd

Lafontant, Wilkins and Butler

Butler and Carney

Carney and Brothers

Wildman, Harrold, Allen and Dixon LLP

Perkins Coie LLP

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:14801,332:21989,517:22427,524:26223,616:26515,621:28340,672:34618,808:36735,846:37173,853:53990,1149:54310,1154:57750,1220:59990,1276:63830,1369:64470,1378:65030,1438:65510,1445:66630,1462:74515,1515:74965,1522:75715,1534:77515,1582:78340,1639:91990,1923:92890,1941:106262,2051:110277,2157:116117,2271:118526,2323:119037,2332:121300,2384:121592,2389:125023,2445:132025,2508:137200,2615:138175,2631:138625,2638:139300,2650:152170,2819:155400,2876:155910,2883:158460,2925:159480,2941:164240,3054:165090,3065:166875,3113:172822,3157:174736,3210:178310,3272$0,0:4320,77:7120,188:11120,347:11760,356:13760,451:30894,626:31830,639:40098,854:43140,920:49122,1035:49666,1047:50210,1057:50482,1062:57010,1251:58982,1302:59934,1326:60614,1343:61906,1378:67482,1493:74422,1527:76380,1557:78993,1617:80001,1644:83592,1713:84474,1732:84726,1737:84978,1742:86679,1794:87057,1801:87498,1809:90030,1814
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Demetrius Carney's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney describes his father's craftwork

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney describes his parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Demetrius Carney remembers moving with his family

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Demetrius Carney describes the sights and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Demetrius Carney recalls the Holy Angels Catholic School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney describes the sounds of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney remembers the Holy Angels Catholic School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney describes the racial demographics at the Holy Angels Catholic School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney recalls camping at the Abraham Lincoln Center in Janesville, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney remembers his penmanship

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney recalls his early interest of reading

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney remembers his family's gatherings

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney recalls moving to a white neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney describes the Chatham neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney recalls his experiences at the St. Joachim School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to attend the De La Salle Institute in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney remembers the De La Salle Institute

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney remembers his early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to attend Loyola University Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney remembers Loyola University Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney remembers his first teaching position

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Demetrius Carney recalls his activism at Loyola University Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Demetrius Carney talks about his work ethic

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney recalls teaching at St. Ignatius College Prep in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney recalls his admission to the DePaul University College of Law, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his admission to the DePaul University College of Law, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney describes his law school experiences

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney remembers his early legal career

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney recalls joining the law firm of Tucker, Watson, Butler and Todd

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney recalls founding a law firm

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney recalls joining the law firm of Lafontant, Wilkins and Butler

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Demetrius Carney remembers his legal work for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney remembers his legal work for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney recalls his challenges while working for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls founding the Carney and Brothers law firm

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls the clientele of his law firm

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney remembers the American Lawyers Consortium, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney recalls the success of his law firm

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney describes his public finance work

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney remembers his mentor, Earl Neal

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to leave Carney and Brothers, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to leave Carney and Brothers, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Demetrius Carney talks about his medical condition

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney describes his medical condition, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney describes his medical condition, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to leave Carney and Brothers

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls the return of his brain tumor

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney recalls his experience at Wildman, Harold and Dixon LLP

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney recalls his clientele at Wildman, Harold and Dixon

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to join Perkins Coie LLP

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney talks about diversity in law practice

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney describes his law practice at Perkins Coie LLP

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney recalls his role on the City of Chicago Plan Commission

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his appointment to the Chicago Police Board

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls the fatal shooting of LaTanya Haggerty

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Slating of Demetrius Carney's interview, session 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney describes his tenure on the Chicago Police Board

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his challenges on the Chicago Police Board

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon his career

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney recalls how he began working with airport concessionaires

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney describes his legal work with airport concessionaires

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon the history of African American law firms

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney talks about the future of minority law firms

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon his legal career

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon his career

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon the legacy of his generation

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney describes his mentorship of young lawyers

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney talks about racial discrimination in the United States

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon the political history of Chicago

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney talks about his family

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon his life

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney describes his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

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DATitle
Demetrius Carney recalls founding the Carney and Brothers law firm
Demetrius Carney recalls the success of his law firm
Transcript
(Simultaneous) So now how do you go from Lafontant--to Wilkins and Butler [Lafontant, Wilkins and Butler, Chicago, Illinois], to Carney and Brothers [Carney and Brothers, Ltd., Chicago, Illinois], and where does brothers come into it?$$Okay. When I--are we on film now?$$Um-hm (laughter).$$Oh okay (laughter). Were we on film all that time?$$Yeah we were, but that's fine (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) When--when I--Jewel Lafontant [HistoryMaker Jewel Lafontant-MANkarious] wanted--it was really a firm where you shared space, it's really what it was. Yeah, that's how black lawyers practiced. And I was doing very well on my own. And Jewel wanted to really form a firm, and I didn't wanna--I didn't wanna do that. I just didn't like the economics that they were proposing, you know, in terms of the work I was doing and my clients would become part of the firm. I said, "No my clients are my clients, I developed these clients," you know, I had AKAs [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.] then, and you know, they said, "Wherever you go, we go." And so it was just a typical bartering at the time. And so I left with Jerome Butler to form a once again, form Butler and Carney. And I really had a good--had, had really good clients at the time.$$Who were some of your clients (unclear) (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) AKAs, I was starting to do work for Seaway National Bank [Seaway Bank and Trust Company, Chicago, Illinois]. I really developed a very significant real estate practice. I had picked up a couple savings and loans that I was doing--starting to do a little foreclosure work for, started to do a little real estate work. So I was developing a nice little client. You know, I was working really tough, but the, the clients are really starting to come. So I, you know, I didn't want my clients to become clients of her firm and you know, it was just probably more ego, probably would've been to my benefit as I look back, but I didn't wanna do it. So either you join the firm or you had to leave. And so Jerome and I talked about it and we decided that we're gonna leave and form our own firm. And so there was some space in the building with Tom Boodell [Thomas J. Boodell, Jr.], his--he had a firm and they had some space that they were not using on like the sixth floor. So we red- rented a suite of offices there and we started to grow the firm. And what happened was, Jerome Butler, his brother-in-law is Alan Brothers [Alan W. Brothers], so they were related. Jerome was married to Alan's sister. And so Alan was leaving Montgomery Ward and he wanted to come back into private practice, so he became part of the firm. And then right after we started the fi- growing the firm, Jerome became involved in the family-owned business that, you know, was Butler's restaurant. And so he left the practice of law to go ru- to be involved in his family business and Alan Brothers and I were the survivors. So, therefore, it became Carney and Brothers. And so we really--really started to develop the practice. Alan was a tremendous litigator and I had the skill set of developing business. And Alan said, "You just get the business and we'll handle it." So we hired a couple lawyers and I was just very good at--at--at securing business.$And you were blowing up, I'm telling you, you were like the model for, for a minority law firm (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) I was, I was--and that--and that's how I grew it. I grew it with the AKAs [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.]--I meant excuse me, the ABA [American Bar Association], I still had the AKAs as a client. I still had Seaway National Bank [Seaway Bank and Trust Company, Chicago, Illinois] as a client. I mean it's just through these contacts that I've made along the way. And for some reason I had the knack to be able to attract business and keep business. I knew--I knew how to sell. We picked up Metropolitan Life Insurance [Metropolitan Life Insurance Company] in New York [New York]. I got on a plane and went out to New York, made a pitch on our firm and bought ba- brought back the business. I mean I just--I just had this knack in order to sell. And so that's how I grew Carney and Brothers [Carney and Brothers, Ltd., Chicago, Illinois]. When Daley [Richard M. Daley] became mayor, he liked our firm, so we picked up more business from--from--through the Daley administration.$$So during the Sawyer [HistoryMaker Eugene Sawyer] years you didn't really do any more city business?$$You know, I started to do more city business at the end. Especially after Harold Washington and then you know you have to transition to Gene Sawyer and, and Rich Daley came in. And so Rich Daley really picked up the Harold Washington executive order and so he was really trying to use, you know, increase minority business. And so we were, of course it was [HistoryMaker] Earl Neal, it was our firm and I think there was probably Garland Watt too, he was very much involved. And so we, we started picking up more city business and we're really becoming very good in the public finance area.