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Julia Reed Hare

The dynamic motivational lecturer, relationship expert, author, social commentator and educational psychologist Dr. Julia Hare was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Hare has appeared on several television programs offering her expertise and insights on male/female relationships, gender interactions in the workplace, mate selection, toxic relationships and matrimonial harmony. She has appeared on CNN & Company, C-SPAN, Tony Brown’s Journal and Inside Edition. Hare has also spoken before the Congressional Black Caucus, participated in Tavis Smiley’s “State of the Black Family” Conference and spoke at the annual Essence Empowerment Seminars at the Essence Magazine Culture Festival. Her written work has been featured in several magazines and newspapers including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Miami Herald. Hare and her husband co-authored The Endangered Black Family; Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage, The Miseducation of The Black Child, Crisis in Black Sexual Politics and How to Find and Keep a BMW (Black Man Working).

Hare, along with her husband, Dr. Nathan Hare, formed The Black Think Tank located in San Francisco, California. Their consulting firm focuses on issues affecting the black family.

Dr. Julia Hare’s work has brought her many awards and honors including Educator of the Year for Washington, D.C. by the Junior Chamber of Commerce and World Book Encyclopedia in coordination with American University; The Abe Lincoln Award for Outstanding Broadcasting, The Carter G. Woodson Education Award, The Association of Black Social Workers’ Harambee Award; the Scholar of the Year Award from the Association of African Historians; and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Black Writers and Artists Union. Hare has been inducted into the Hall of Fame of her high school alma mater, Booker T. Washington High, was given a Presidential citation from the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education and was named one of the ten most influential African Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area.

During graduate school, Hare taught elementary school in Chicago, Illinois integrating music into the student’s lessons. Following a move to California, Hare served as the director of educational programs at the Oakland Museum and later hosted talk shows for both ABC television and KSFO radio stations. She also served as the public relations director in the local federal housing program in San Francisco.

Her formal education includes a B.A. in music from Langston University of Langston, Oklahoma; a M.A. degree in music education from Roosevelt University located in Chicago, Illinois and a Ph.D. in education from the California Coast University in Santa Ana, California.

Hare passed away on February 25, 2019.

Accession Number

A2004.040

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/5/2004

Last Name

Hare

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Reed

Occupation
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

George Washington Carver Middle School

Booker T. Washington Elementary School

Langston University

Roosevelt University

California Coast University

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Julia

Birth City, State, Country

Tulsa

HM ID

HAR06

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida, San Francisco, California

Favorite Quote

Do You Remember When Common Sense Was Fairly Common?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/7/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Watermelon

Death Date

2/25/2019

Short Description

Psychologist Julia Reed Hare (1939 - 2019) was the former director of educational programs at the Oakland Museum and hosted talk shows for both ABC television and KSFO radio stations. Hare also co-founded The Black Think Tank located in San Francisco, California and appeared on several television programs offering her expertise and insights on male/female relationships and other issues.

Employment

Black Think Tank

Oakland Museum of California

ABC

KSFO Radio

National Committee against Discrimination in Housing

District of Columbia Teachers College

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Julia Reed Hare's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Julia Reed Hare lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Julia Reed Hare describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her relatives and holiday family traditions

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Julia Reed Hare describes her early childhood memories of playing the piano

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Julia Reed Hare talks about the 1921 Tulsa race riot and its aftermath

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Julia Reed Hare describes her childhood neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Julia Reed Hare describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Julia Reed Hare describes her household responsibilities as a child and her religious upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Julia Reed Hare talks about going to Booker T. Washington Elementary School in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Julia Reed Hare describes her teachers and the culture of Booker T. Washington Elementary School in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Julia Reed Hare remembers prejudiced African American teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Julia Reed Hare describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Julia Reed Hare describes her childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Julia Reed Hare describes the segregated schools in Tulsa, Oklahoma, her teachers and her extracurricular activities as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Julia Reed Hare describes deciding to go to college and keeping in touch with her friends from Booker T. Washington High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Julia Reed Hare describes her experience at Langston University in Langston, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Julia Reed Hare describes going to Roosevelt University's College of Music in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Julia Reed Hare describes teaching elementary school while in graduate school at Roosevelt University's School of Music in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her work for the District of Columbia Teachers College in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Julia Reed Hare describes being director of education for the Oakland Museum of California in Oakland, California

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Julia Reed Hare describes her work for the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Inc. and as a radio host

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Julia Reed Hare recalls people she interviewed on the radio and teaching others about radio broadcasting

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Julia Reed Hare describes the content of lectures she gives across the country

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Julia Reed Hare talks about getting her educational and social psychology degrees at California Coast University and her lectures

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Julia Reed Hare describes what The Black Think Tank does, with HistoryMaker Nathan Hare, in San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Julia Reed Hare describes the book she authored with HistoryMaker Nathan Hare, 'Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage'

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Julia Reed Hare describes the book she published with HistoryMaker Nathan Hare, 'Crisis in Black Sexual Politics'

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her research on African American families

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Julia Reed Hare describes the changes she would like to see for African American students in the schools

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her love of playing piano

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Julia Reed Hare talks about reading

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her desire to write a romance novel and her spiritual growth

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Julia Reed Hare describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her proudest accomplishments and her values

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Julia Reed Hare describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Julia Reed Hare narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$1

DAStory

3$8

DATitle
Julia Reed Hare describes being director of education for the Oakland Museum of California in Oakland, California
Julia Reed Hare talks about the 1921 Tulsa race riot and its aftermath
Transcript
So, I became the first director of education for the Oakland Museum [of California, Oakland, California], because the museum was opening. Now, the museum was not exactly alien to me, because as the language arts and the college--and the supervisor at the college and--the University of the District of Columbia [Washington, D.C.], which was at the time the District of Columbia Teachers College [Washington, D.C.]--I had to do a lot of work with the curators of the Smithsonian [Institution, Washington, D.C.]. Because we tried to bring the museum to the kids, in addition to taking the kids to the museum. So, when Oakland--it was opening, this was a new museum that had never opened, hadn't had it there. And so, I was speaking at something at San Francisco State [College, later San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California], talking about the Smithsonian. I had no idea that some curators were there and asked would I come there and work with them on getting other people--blacks, ethnic minorities, women, whoever, involved in the museum. And I said, "I'd be delighted to do that." But I said, "I must develop something that you probably haven't had before, and that was a museum on wheels because a lot of people are not coming here. You're going to have to take the museum out to them." So, we had what we call traveling exhibitions that went out. And we had, we got all of this from the changing exhibition galleries. Because we had permanent galleries that you have to come there to see that, because that's borrowed from museums all over the world. But we would take the museums out to underprivileged areas. We would take them to middle class areas, any group of people that we felt would not on their own come there. We had things that they could handle and touch in the museum. It was not a hands-off, you know, you can pick this up, it's not going to break. Before we knew it, then they were coming to the museum. Because I would always dangle the carrot, "There's more of that over there at the museum if you come over to us." So, we would arrange for them to come there when I felt--then I developed a board and brought in people--these were adults, blacks who had never had the opportunity to sit on a board of a museum. Because you know, that's kind of a playground of the rich and the affluent. And so we brought them in and established a board for them. Well, they were surprised. Well by doing this, then we brought in black artists who had never had an opportunity to display their work in a museum. We brought in black scientists, because we also had a specialty there in the natural sciences. And the other specialty was California history. We were able to bring in black historians that never thought that they would have an opportunity to be in a museum. So, when the national museum meetings took place--and Thomas Hoving at that time was the director of the Smithsonian [sic, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York]. And we would meet at all of the fancy, great museums, Santa Barbara [Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, California], you know, there are good ones all over the country. These people that we brought into the museum were able to come with me, down, and meet other curators. So, now they are dispersed over the country.$You, you grew up in Tulsa [Oklahoma]?$$Yes.$$And Tulsa has a very interesting history.$$Yes, it does.$$Very interesting. Did your parents [Will Reed and Beatrice Brown Reed] ever talk, or did they experience the riot, the [1921] Tulsa [race] riot?$$No, my mother wasn't living there. She came to Tulsa when she was sixteen. The riot took place I think in 1921. But my father was living there, and he would tell it to us in the house because believe it or not, did you know that black people and black teachers were afraid to talk about that riot when we were growing up in school? Because I mean that was punishable by lynchings, or whatever it might be. That had to be swept under the rug. And the major newspaper of the day, the Tulsa Tribune, that fanned the flames by simply saying that a black man looked at a white woman on an elevator. Well, by the time that hit the radio news--it was not the television--and that went out, then the riot was on. And so, we're talking about concentration camps. They put the black people in that. My father said you could stand and look all across the country--the city and see everything that was burning. Well, the [U.S.] National Guard was called out, and they locked all the black people up in something called the Convention Hall. They locked them up, burned down the houses, destroyed the businesses. One of the reasons that was done is because Tulsa's black community had a self-contained community. They had black--doctors had their own hospitals and businesses. You didn't have to go to the other side of town to purchase anything; it was all done there. In fact, the whites had to come over to the black part of town to purchase a lot of things. And I guess someone just did not like that. And the papers, you know, the newspapers, really fanned that up. And the only church that has ever been bombed from the air in the United States was Mount Zion Baptist Church [Tulsa, Oklahoma], which was the church of my youth, and the church had recently been built, but about a million bucks [dollars] back then in 1921, you know, you can imagine the value of that now. Well, they bombed the church because they said they were destroying, in today's language, weapons of mass destruction but then they said they had an arsenal of weapons that were destroyed. And then after they bombed the church, they later learned that there were no weapons in the church. That church still stands, and they would like to get rid of that church now so that they can build a white university on that land, because they're trying to move now the blacks that are out of North Tulsa. It was often said the reason why--that was the only place blacks could live. It's often said that the reason why they want them out of North Tulsa is because the hurricanes that always visit Tulsa never went through North Tulsa. It always went through the other side of town. And so, they were trying to move them out. The school there that they built for blacks because of segregation, Booker T. Washington High School [Tulsa, Oklahoma], now they're trying to put all of them out and turn that school into a white preparatory school and move the blacks out of Tulsa. I just wrote an editorial for one of the newspapers back there on that situation. So, the reparations movement that they were trying to get for them, the State of Oklahoma ruled that it's so few of them living that we should not pass the reparations on to them or to their heirs, nor has there been an apology. So, the city is about to go up again anytime. Don't be surprised if you hear that.