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Robin Stone

Journalist Robin D. Stone was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1964. Her mother, Ora L. Hughes, worked for the U.S. Postal Service in Detroit. Her father, Lawrence R. Stone, was a building contractor. Stone graduated from Michigan State University with her B.A. degree in journalism in 1986. She is completing her M.A. degree in health arts and sciences at Goddard College in Vermont.

Stone first worked as a copy editor for The Oakland Press and the Detroit Free Press. She then served as layout-makeup/slot editor at The Boston Globe for one year, and then as a copy editor for The New York Times from 1990 to 1993. After briefly serving as special projects editor for Family Circle Magazine, Stone was named deputy living editor at The New York Times in 1994. As deputy living editor, she was integral in developing the prototype for the paper’s current Dining In/Dining Out section. In 1997, Stone joined Essence magazine, where she was first hired as a senior editor and eventually promoted to executive editor. Under her stewardship, the magazine earned awards from Folio, the National Association of Black Journalists, the New York Association of Black Journalists, and the Congressional Black Caucus, among other organizations. Stone became founding editor-in-chief of Essence.com in 2000, and, from 2005 to 2007, she served as deputy editor at Health magazine. After leaving Health in 2007, Stone worked as a freelance writer and editor, focusing primarily on issues related to health, parenting, and families. Her thesis work explores Black women, body image, weight, and self-care in the face of racism, sexism and other stressors.

Stone is the author of No Secrets, No Lies: How Black Families Can Heal from Sexual Abuse, which was published in 2004. She also edited and contributed the afterword to My Times in Black and White: Race and Power at the New York Times, the memoir by her late husband, Gerald M. Boyd, who was former managing editor of The New York Times. Stone’s writing has appeared in The New York Times, Essence magazine, Glamour magazine, The Boston Globe, and other publications.

From 2002 to 2003, Stone was a Kaiser Media Fellow, where she researched and reported on sexual abuse in Black families and other health issues. She has taught magazine editing and production at New York University, and advanced reporting at the City College of New York. She is a board member of Greenhope Services for Women, a residential drug treatment center for formerly incarcerated women, and a New York Alumnae member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Stone served as vice-president/print for the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), and as president of NABJ's New York chapter. Her career and contributions to journalism garnered her an Outstanding Alumni Award from her alma mater, Michigan State University, in 2004.

Stone and her fiance, Rodney Pope, live in New York, New York. She has a teenage son, Zachary Boyd.

Robin Stone was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 6, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.220

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/6/2014 |and| 08/11/2016

Last Name

Stone

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Deneane

Occupation
Schools

Goddard College

Michigan State University

Renaissance High School

Luddington Magnet Middle School

Edgar A. Guest Elementary

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Robin

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

STO07

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/19/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chilean Seabass Over spinach

Short Description

Journalist Robin Stone (1964 - ) served as an editor for The Boston Globe, The New York Times, Health magazine and Essence magazine. She was founding editor-in-chief of Essence.com and the author of No Secrets, No Lies: How Black Families Can Heal from Sexual Abuse.

Employment

HealthJones LLC

Health Magazine

Essence Communications, Inc.

Essence Magazine

New York Times

Family Counseling

Favorite Color

Green and Coral

A. Peter Bailey

Journalist and author A. Peter Bailey was born on February 24, 1938 in Columbus, Georgia to Upson and Alga Bailey. He was raised in Tuskegee, Alabama, and attended Tuskegee Institute High School, but graduated from Nuremberg American High School in Germany in 1955. Bailey served in the U.S. Army from 1956 to 1959, and went on to attend Howard University until 1961.

In 1962, Bailey moved to Harlem, New York City; and, in 1964, became a founding member of Malcolm X’s Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU), where he was editor of the OAAU newsletter, Blacklash. From 1968 to 1975, he worked as associate editor for Ebony magazine. From 1975 to 1981, Bailey served as associate director of the Black Theatre Alliance (BTA), where he also edited the BTA Newsletter. He has also contributed articles to numerous publications including Essence, Black Enterprise, Jet, The New York Times, the Negro Digest, Black World, The Black Collegian, and the New York Daily News. He also writes a bi-monthly column for the Trice-Edney Wire Service.

Bailey has lectured on Malcolm X at thirty-five colleges and universities, and taught as an adjunct professor at Hunter College, Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of the District of Columbia. In addition, he has written the play, Malcolm, Martin, Medgar, which has been presented at several staged readings. He is the author of Witnessing Brother Malcolm X, The Master Teacher: A Memoir; Harlem: Precious Memories, Great Expectations; co-author of Revelations: The Autobiography of Alvin Ailey with Alvin Ailey; and co-author of Seventh Child: A Family Memoir of Malcolm X with Rodnell P. Collins.

Bailey served as president of the New York Association of Black Journalists from 1983 to 1985, and was a member of the Tony Awards Nominating Committee in the 1975-76 Broadway season. He also served on the board of the Bethune-DuBois Institute, and is a member of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Bailey has received several awards, including Lifetime Achievement awards from the National Newspaper Publishers Association and the New York Association of Black Journalists.

A. Peter Bailey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 18, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.088

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/18/2014

Last Name

Bailey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Peter

Schools

St. Joseph Catholic School

Tuskegee Institute High School

Nurnberg American High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Alfonzo

Birth City, State, Country

Columbus

HM ID

BAI10

State

Georgia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/24/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist and author A. Peter Bailey (1938 - ) was a founding member of the Organization of Afro-American Unity and served as a longtime editor for Ebony magazine. He authored Witnessing Brother Malcolm X, The Master Teacher: A Memoir and Harlem: Precious Memories, Great Expectations; and co-author of Revelations: The Autobiography of Alvin Ailey and Seventh Child: A Family Memoir of Malcolm X.

Employment

Ebony Magazine

The Black Theatre Alliance

Virginia Union University

Bethune-DuBois Institute

Audrey Edwards

Magazine editor and author Audrey M. Edwards was born on April 21, 1947 in Tacoma, Washington. Edwards received her B.A. degree from the University of Washington in 1969, and her M.A. degree from Columbia University in 1974.

In 1970, Edwards began her career at Redbook magazine as an associate editor in the fiction department. She served for one year as editor of Community New Service, a black and Puerto Rican news service in 1974. Then, in 1975, Edwards went to Fairchild Publications where she was hired as a news reporter for the trade paper, Supermarket News, and was then promoted to the promotions news editor position. In 1977, Edwards joined Black Enterprise magazine as an associate editor, but left in 1978 to become a senior editor at Family Circle magazine. Edwards was named executive editor of Essence magazine in 1981, and was promoted to the position of editor two years later. She left Essence in 1986 to open a real estate brokerage firm, Plaza Properties, but continued to write for the magazine as a contributing editor/writer. In 1990, she returned to Black Enterprise magazine as executive editor and vice president of editorial operations, while continuing to run her real estate business. In 1998, Edwards became a senior editor at More magazine.

In 2008, after successfully running her real estate company for twenty-two years, Edwards joined the real estate firm of Brown Harris Stevens as an associate broker. In addition, Edwards has served as an adjunct professor of magazine writing and magazine editing at the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University and New York University, respectively.

Edwards has consistently freelanced as a journalist, and her work has appeared in numerous publications including Vibe, the New York Times Sunday Magazine, the Columbia Journalism Review, Essence, More, Redbook, Ladies Home Journal, Glamour and Black Enterprise. Edwards has also authored several books including, Children of the Dream: The Psychology of Black Success, published by Doubleday in 1992, and co-written with Dr. Craig Polite. Her latest work is a collaboration with Edward Lewis, co-founder, CEO and publisher of Essence magazine, on his business memoir, The Man From Essence: Creating a Magazine for Black Women, to be published by Atria Books (Simon & Schuster) in 2014.

Edwards’ professional affiliations include membership in the New York Association of Black Journalists (NYABJ), The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY). She served as a regional director of NABJ from 1981 to 1983, and was the program co-chair for the NABJ Annual Convention held in New York in 1989. In 1992, Edwards received an NYABJ Excellence Award for Magazine Feature Writing.

Audrey Edwards was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 12, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.320

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/12/2013

Last Name

Edwards

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

University of Washington

Columbia University

Rogers Elementary School

Gault Middle School

Lincoln High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Audrey

Birth City, State, Country

Tacoma

HM ID

EDW05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/21/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Rice

Short Description

Magazine editor and author Audrey Edwards (1947 - ) was the executive editor and editor of Essence magazine, and also served as executive editor and vice president of editorial operations at Black Enterprise magazine.

Employment

Redbook

Community News Service

Fairchild Publications/Supermarket News

Black Enterprise

Family Circle

Essence

Plaza Properties

More Magazine

Brown Harris Stevens

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

New York University Graduate School of Journalism

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Audrey Edwards' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards talks about her maternal grandparents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards remembers segregation in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards describes her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards talks about her mother's U.S. Army service

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards describes her father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards talks about her West Indian identity

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards talks about her relationship with her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Audrey Edwards remembers attending Catholic school

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards remembers living in Japan, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards remembers living in Japan, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards recalls attending an all-black school in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards talks about living in Jefferson City, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards remembers her family's first home in Tacoma, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards talks about her father's first marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards recalls her transition to Gault Junior High School in Tacoma, Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards remembers narrowly avoiding a fight with a classmate

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards describes her activities at Lincoln High School in Tacoma, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Audrey Edwards recalls her parents' views on the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards talks about her father's Caribbean heritage

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards describes her parents' community involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards talks about her early religious experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards recalls her childhood aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards talks about her parents' relationship

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards recalls attending the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards remembers attending Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards recalls her academic experiences at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards describes her return to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards recalls briefly attending Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards remembers meeting her half-sisters

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Audrey Edwards recalls moving to New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards lists publications where she has worked

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards recalls learning about her Caribbean heritage in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards remembers working for Redbook

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards describes her decision to leave Redbook

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards remembers working at Columbia University's Urban Center in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards talks about joining Black Enterprise

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards recalls working for the Community News Service and Supermarket News

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards remembers her experiences writing for Supermarket News

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards describes her position at Black Enterprise

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards remembers working for Family Circle

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards recalls her decision to join Essence, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards recalls her decision to join Essence, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards remembers working with Susan Taylor

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards describes memorable stories from Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards remembers the staff dynamics at Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards describes the challenges of starting a magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards recalls Essence's first men's issue

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards talks about Susan Taylor's 'In the Spirit' column

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards describes Essence magazine's coverage of Vanessa Williams

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards talks about covering historically significant events

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards describes the prominent figures at Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards talks about her freelance editing career

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards talks about the Essence Achievement Awards and Essence television show

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards recalls being chosen to co-author a book with Edward Lewis

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards describes the founding of Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards remembers Essence's first three editors-in-chief

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards describes the Essence television show

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards talks about the editorial process at Essence

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards talks about hiring African Americans at Essence

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards recalls her attempt to hire African Americans for Essence's television show

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards describes her role on the Essence television show

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards talks about the editors at Essence Magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards describes Essence magazine's political coverage

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards talks about Essence's appeal to men

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards describes Essence magazine's varying subject matter

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards reflects upon her career

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards recalls her decision to leave Essence magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards talks about her marriage

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards describes her successors at Essence magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards recalls working as the editor-at-large of Black Enterprise

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards describes her book, 'Children of The Dream'

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards recalls writing 'Children of The Dream' with Craig K. Polite

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards describes the reactions to 'Children of The Dream'

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards recalls writing an Essence coffee table book

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards talks about her move to Paris, France

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards describes her real estate business

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards recalls working at More magazine

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards talks about her freelance writing career

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards remembers writing 'Bring Me Home A Black Girl,' pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards remembers writing 'Bring Me Home A Black Girl,' pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards talks about the importance of a black press

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards describes the role of Black Enterprise

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards talks about Time Warner, Inc.'s acquisition of Essence

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards describes Essence founder Edward Lewis

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards remembers Susan Taylor's retirement

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards talks about the importance of training successors

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards describes her concerns for the black press

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$7

DAStory

11$6

DATitle
Audrey Edwards recalls her decision to join Essence, pt. 1
Audrey Edwards talks about Essence's appeal to men
Transcript
Oddly enough, when the Essence opportunity came along, I initially turned it down because--now I'm thinking as a history maker--Family Circle is about to make me articles editor, which is now almost part of management, which would have been a coup for a black woman to make articles editor. And I wanted to do something historic, and that was become articles editor. And I--and Ed Lewis [HistoryMaker Edward Lewis] called me when [HistoryMaker] Susan Taylor was made editor-in-chief. She was putting together a staff. He called me first, took me to lunch, and I told him no, wasn't interested. And you know what turned it around? My friend [Emile Milne] who had taken my place at Black Enterprise. The person they made a senior editor, he told me, "If you don't want that job at Essence, I do." And I'm like they're not gonna give this--it was--it was the executive editor; that was the title, executive editor. I'm like they're not giving this to you. And then the managing editor at Family Circle, who was a white man, said to me, "Are you crazy? You have an opportunity to go work for a real magazine." And I'm like, "But Family Circle is number one." He did not view--he just said, "You have an opportunity to work for a magazine that is fairly new, reflects who you are; it's geared to black women." So it took two men to turn me around (laughter). And I called Susan over the weekend, and I said, "Look," and I had met with her also, and I said, "I'd like the weekend to think about the offer." And I called her on Monday and said I'd take it, but I initially said no.$The other thing the magazine did under, under Susan [HistoryMaker Susan Taylor] that I think was absolutely groundbreaking was create a dialogue between black women and black men. Because what was going on--the big thing going on culturally in the '80s [1980s] was this schism all of a sudden. Well, I don't know if it was all of a sudden, but there was a real schism between black men and black women. You know, there was--there was a lot of fallout from Alice Walker's book, 'The Color Purple,' Gloria Naylor's book, 'Women of Brewster Place,' ['The Women of Brewster Place'] and Ntozake [HistoryMaker Ntozake Shange] play, 'For Colored Girls' ['For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow is Enuf']. You know, that had men up in arms, sometimes women up in arms. And the magazine became a forum for men and women to talk to each other. And at its height, 25 percent of Essence's readers were men, which was very significant for a women's magazine because it meant that men wanted to know what women were thinking. And men wrote for the magazine, so women could find out what they were thinking--very important. And, again, not what typical women's magazines were doing. And then a lot of magazines started copying. You know, all of a sudden women's magazines were doing special issue on men, and that was started by Essence.

Yanick Rice-Lamb

Editor, publisher and professor Yanick Rice Lamb was born on September 27, 1957 in Akron, Ohio to William R. Rice and Carmelie Jordan. Lamb graduated from Buchtel High School in Akron in 1976. She went on to receive her B.A. degree in journalism from Ohio State University in 1980.

Upon graduation, Lamb was hired as a copy editor at the Toledo Blade, where she was promoted to reporter in 1982. Lamb then worked for the Journal-Constitution in Atlanta, Georgia, as a copy editor until 1984, when she was hired as a layout editor for the New York Times. While employed at the New York Times, Lamb worked in various capacities, including deputy home and living editor, assistant editor of the Connecticut Weekly, and metropolitan copy editor. Then, in 1992, she became a senior editor for Child Magazine, serving two years. She was then hired as an editor-at-large at Essence Magazine in 1994. From 1995 until 2000, Lamb served as editor-in-chief, editorial director, and vice president at Black Entertainment Television. At BET, she was responsible for editorial management of BET Weekend, for which she was founding editor, as well as BET Publishing Group’s Heart & Soul. Lamb worked at Vanguarde Media, Incorporated, as editor-in-chief from 2000 to 2001. She was then hired as a journalism lecturer at Howard University in 2001, and was later promoted to associate professor. After receiving her M.B.A. degree from Howard University in 2005, she became the associate publisher and editorial director of Heart & Soul, where she served until 2011. In 2010, Lamb co-founded Fully-Connected.com, a website that connects people from Atlanta to Accra through interactive journalism and social networking. She also co-founded FierceforBlackWomen.com in 2013. Lamb continued to teach at Howard University, serving as chair of the Department of Media, Journalism and Film since 2013.

Lamb has co-authored three books: 1996’s The Spirit of African Design, 2004’s Born to Win: The Authorized Biography of Althea Gibson, and 2005’s Rise and Fly: Tall Tales and Mostly True Rules of Bid Whist. She has also received numerous awards, including the Folio: Editorial Excellence Award and the McDonald's Black History Maker of Today Award in Journalism. Lamb was also honored at the NABJ Salute to Excellence Awards; and she has served twice as president of the New York Association of Black Journalists. In addition, the Association of Health Care Journalists selected Lamb as a Health Performance Fellow in 2010; and, in 2013, she became the John A. Hartford/MetLife Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow.

Yanick Rice Lamb was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 23, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.275

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/23/2013

Last Name

Rice-Lamb

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Buchtel High School

The Ohio State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Yanick

Birth City, State, Country

Akron

HM ID

RIC18

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Lamu, Kenya

Favorite Quote

Dream big

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/27/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

Magazine editor Yanick Rice-Lamb (1957 - ) , founding editor of BET Weekend, is the co-author of three books: The Spirit of African Design, Born to Win: The Authorized Biography of Althea Gibson, and Rise and Fly: Tall Tales and Mostly True Rules of Bid Whist.

Employment

Toledo Blade

Journal-Constitution

New York Times

Child Magazine

Essence Magazine

BET

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

Howard University

Heart and Soul Magazine

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb narrates her photographs

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Yanick Rice-Lamb's interview

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb lists her favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her mother's family background and life in Haiti pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her mother's family background and life in Haiti pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her father's educational background and teaching career

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her parents' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about growing up in a Haitian household in a diverse neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her family's religious background

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Yanick Rice-Lamb briefly talks about going to Catholic schools

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her family's living near the Akron Zoo in Akron, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her childhood interests, favorite subjects and teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 16 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about how her interest in writing was influenced by the comic strip Brenda Starr and others

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about some black journalists that served as role models in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her high school achievements and experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her experiences at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her mentors at Ohio State University and newspapers she worked for as a student

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her first internship and expectations for black students at Ohio State University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Yanick Rice-Lamb recounts her experiences as an intern at the 'Reader's Digest' and 'The Times Union'

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her experiences as a general assignment reporter at 'The Toledo Blade'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Yanick Rice-Lamb recounts her first day as a reporter for 'The Toledo Blade'

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about 'The Toledo Blade' staff and her mentors in Toledo, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about being hired at 'The Atlanta Journal Constitution'

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her experiences in Atlanta, Georgia during her time at 'The Atlanta Journal Constitution' in the early 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her experiences at 'The New York Times' and her professional mentors

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about transitioning from newspaper journalism to magazine journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her most memorable project at 'The New York Times'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about the mentors she had while working at 'The New York Times,' as well as difficult situations she faced at the paper

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Yanick Rice-Lamb discusses her work with 'Child' magazine and the differences between publishing a newspaper and a magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes memorable stories she worked on at 'Child' magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her transition from 'Child' magazine to 'Essence,' and on to 'BET Weekend' in the mid-1990s

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about developing the 'BET Weekend' magazine and her philosophy for magazine production

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about criticism Black Entertainment Television has faced over its programming content

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes innovative television and print content BET has tried to produce

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her transition from 'BET Weekend' to teaching at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her work with 'Heart and Soul' magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about memorable stories from 'BET Weekend' and 'Heart and Soul' magazines

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb mentions milestones of her career from 1998 to 2011, including writing her first book

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about writing Born to Win, a biography of Althea Gibson, with Fran Gray

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks Althea Gibson's life and career

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about writing and promoting her book Rise and Fly

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her Aunt Rose, a relative who influenced her and whom Rice-Lamb wrote about

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about working on her coffee table book, The Spirit of African Design

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about articles she has written on teaching media and the history of newspaper supplements

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her coverage of the 2012 Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her professional association memberships

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her personal philosophy on teaching and journalism

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb reflects upon her career and legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her family and how she would like to be remembered

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Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about developing the 'BET Weekend' magazine and her philosophy for magazine production
Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about articles she has written on teaching media and the history of newspaper supplements
Transcript
Well, tell us about BET's [Black Entertainment Television] magazine. (Unclear)--$$That was fun. That was probably one of my most enjoyable jobs. I, I like starting things, and I had always wanted to start a magazine since I was in college, so it gave me the opportunity to start a magazine with someone else's money (laughter). But I figured whoever did the prototype, if they liked it, that, that person would get the job, so I wasn't gonna let go of the prototype, you know, developed it--you know, the different ideas I had-- Bob Johnson in, in particular, and I've worked with Debra Lee. They were particularly interested in my Style background at the 'New York Times' and some of the things I did there, and just kind of the diversity of doing news and Style and Entertainment and bringing that together. So I kind of help develop the concept for the magazine, and it was--it took off; it was a hit. Readers really loved it. The papers liked carrying it. We traveled around the different newspapers to negotiate them picking up the newspaper and inserting it in their magazine. We had to pay--I mean their newspaper--we had to pay for that of course, but just like building something from the ground up, coming up with a concept, hiring a staff, finding the writers, setting up, you know, photo shoots, and thinking about paper and--you know, just all the different things that go into it. And it was kind of a way of pulling in everything I had done, you know, from the copy editing, reporting, from the design and layout, and all of that in, in one place, and then reacting to news or thinking long term about how we were gonna do things too so. And we--our circulation grew in three years from eight--800,000 to 1.3 million, so we were the second largest publication behind 'Ebony.'$$What, what's your philosophy in, in terms of layout of a magazine, you know, in terms of what, what, what should the--should be the--what, what the cover should be like and what the--$$One, one of the things--because we were working with the newspaper initially, they were kind of content with doing something on news print. But we felt that--you know, thinking about how African Americans do things, we like top shelf this and that. We wanted to have magazine quality publication, so we wanted to make sure that we went after some of the people who were popular or pioneering at the time, whether it was Toni Morrison or Dr. Ben Carson, or whether it was Denzel Washington or you know, an Olympian at the time. So we wanted to be topical, we wanted to try to be as fresh as--you know, first if possible with the information. We wanted to use some of the best photographers, the best writers, have a really nice design for the time--you know, make it interesting, telling people something they didn't already know. And that was my criteria when people pitched stories to me. It's like I read a lot of things. I keep up with things. Tell me something I don't already know. You know, tell me a new angle on this, a new twist on this. So we wanted to--we wanted to give the audience something they hadn't been getting so. And I think that's why people were receptive to it, because they were seeing stories that they weren't seeing in other places, that they weren't seeing in their newspapers so. Some people said it was a breath of fresh air when they picked up their newspaper and they pulled out 'BET Weekend.'$Okay, now the, the book 'Teaching Converged Media through News Coverage of the 2--2--2008 Presidential Election.' Now this is--I think it's the first election that was won where--$$Obama [President Barack Obama].$$--where the media was used in the campaign, social media.$$Yes.$$Yeah.$$This--so this was a--this was a journal article that we did. We had one of the largest news teams covering the election, with students. 'Cause we had almost the entire department. We--there were students who were excused from their classes for the 2008 election, and, and then again for the inauguration. And we had them at precincts all over the region also--all over Washington, D.C., all over northern Virginia, all over Maryland, the out--the surrounding counties of, of Maryland, and so they were there. We had 'em in shifts all day long, from the--from when the polls opened til the time that they closed. So they were doing that, and they were, you know, monitoring like the traffic and how often people are voting, any problems, special stories, taking pictures, shooting video, all of that. So they, they did a really wonderful job with that, so we kind of documented some of that in that article--$$Now (unclear)--$$--then we did it again for the inauguration.$$Was this like a priority for the School of Communications at Howard [Howard University, Washington, D.C.] to make sure that we document the history of this first inauguration of (unclear)--$$It was--$$--(Simultaneous)--$$--it was a priority. I mean, it was--the, the university was very engaged, I mean political science obviously. It was a--it was a major story, and one of the things that we--we encourage our students to get off campus. And being here right here in Washington, it was--you know, we couldn't pass up the opportunity to have them, you know, cover history, and they were excited about doing it. And then we had a lot of professionals, and some of our adjuncts had come in too, so we commandeered all of the computer labs on this floor, and we had, you know, just a big operation all day long. And, and so the student who wrote the lead story declaring him the winner, she was actually--she had it online actually ahead of some major news organizations too. But they, they were everywhere. They were at, like I said, all over the precincts, at the White House, on U Street. And, and also, the ones who went home to vote, they were sending back stories and pictures from there. So we had one, when he gave his victory speech--his acceptance speech, we had a student there who sent a picture of--through her cell phone, and we put it online immediately. And she was sending information from there. We had students who were where Biden [Vice President Joe Biden] went to vote in, in Delaware, so they were all over the country and as `well as a big team here. So it was a lot of work, but it was a lot of fun, and the students got a lot out of it. Then we did it again for when he ran for re-election.$$--(Simultaneous)--$$And we've done it for a lot of--a lot of different elections, not just those, for local elections as well.$$Okay, okay, students have credentials and stuff when they go out?$$Yeah, they had credentials and, and they've, they've covered things. They've gone out of the country. They've gone to Haiti. They've gone to--they've done, you know, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. So wherever it's a story--anniversary of the sit-in movements in Greensboro, North Carolina. Some of them go abroad and do different things, so wherever there's a--you know, and the hurricanes that were on the East Coast, they were doing--some of them went up to New York and New Jersey to do stories there.$$Okay, this is an art--article too I guess, 'Supplementing the news, an Industry Based De--Description of Magazine Supplements.'$$Yes, that's a journal article. I was always--when I started doing 'BET [Black Entertainment Television] Weekend,' people kept telling me about 'Tuesday,' which was basically doing what we were doing except much earlier. And so I was always fascinated by that history, so I was looking--and then as a result of 'BET Weekend,' a number of other supplements started. People started local ones as well as national ones, so I was looking--I was interested in looking at the history of that. So that's what that article was.$$And what, what are the other memorable ones other than 'Tuesday.'$$There was one called 'Suburban Styles' that was--I think Annette was doing as a partnership. And there was--I'm trying to remember the names of all of them. Oh, the 'Atlanta Daily World' started one of the first ones that they were doing--they were circulating. They owned a number of--they owned a number of other smaller papers, and they were in partnership with a num--they had a distribution arrangement with a number of papers in the South where they were printing their papers for them and distributing them. So they had kind of a sepia tone insert that they were putting in some of the newspapers there. So that was kind of the first one that I discovered, and--so that's, that's one that stood out too.