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Charlynn Goins

Civic leader and business executive Charlynn Goins was born on September 15, 1942 in New York City, New York. Her mother was Charlotte Wilson, a model and book seller; her step-father, Clifford Wilson, was a United States Army captain and postal worker. Growing up in New York, Goins graduated from Briarcliff Manor High School in 1959. She then attended Barnard College, where she received her A.B. degree in government studies in 1963. From 1963 to 1964, Goins completed graduate courses at the Teachers College at Columbia University. In 1976, she received her J.D. degree from Columbia University Law School.

Goins was hired as a tax lawyer in 1976 at the law firm Proskauer, Rose, Goetz & Mendelsohn, now Proskauer Rose LLP. Then, in 1982, she left the practice of law and joined Integrated Resources, Incorporated, as the assistant to the president. In 1986, Goins was promoted to chief operating officer of a new Integrated Resources subsidiary. She worked in that role until 1990, when she was hired as the senior vice president and director of international marketing at Prudential Mutual Funds and Annuities. In 1997, Goins retired from Prudential and began serving as a consultant to the United States Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency. Then, in 2004, New York City Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, named her the first African American woman chairperson of the board of directors for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

Goins has served as a board member of numerous organizations. From 2001 through 2004, she served on the boards of the Community’s Bank and its holding company, the Urban Financial Group. From 2001 through 2006, Goins was a member of the board of Mainstay Funds. In 2002, she was elected to the New York Community Trust’s Distribution Committee, where she went on to serve as chairman. In 2006, Goins was named to the board of directors of AXA Financial, Incorporated, and its subsidiaries AXA Equitable Life and MONY Life. Then, in 2008, she was elected to Fannie Mae’s board of directors. Goins has also served on various other boards including Continuum Health Partners, Beth Israel Hospital, St Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, FOJP Service Corporation, New York City Global Partners, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and the Gracie Mansion Conservatory. She was honored in 2008 by Mayor Bloomberg with the installment of “Charlynn Goins Day.” Goins was also awarded the United Hospital Fund Trustee Award in 2008.

Goins lives in New York with her husband, Dr. Warren Goins. They have two children: Hilary and Jeffrey.

Charlynn Goins was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.260

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/21/2013

Last Name

Goins

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Briarcliff High School

Barnard College

Teachers College, Columbia University

Columbia Law School

First Name

Charlynn

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

GOI02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Southern France

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/15/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Cheese

Short Description

Lawyer Charlynn Goins (1942 - ) was the first African American woman chairperson of the board of directors for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Her career spanned over thirty-five years in the fields of law, corporate business and philanthropic charity.

Employment

Proskauer Rose LLP

Integrated Resources, Inc.

Prudential Mutual Funds and Annuities

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charlynn Goins' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charlynn Goins lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charlynn Goins describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charlynn Goins shares her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charlynn Goins talks about her father and stepfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charlynn Goins talks about her name

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charlynn Goins describes her childhood neighborhood in New York City, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charlynn Goins describes her childhood career as an actor

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience at Professional Children's School (PCS) in New York City, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience on tour with the play "The Climate of Eden"

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Charlynn Goins talks about growing up in New York City's Washington Heights and skipping ahead in school

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Charlynn Goins describes her community in White Plains, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Charlynn Goins talks about her decision to attend Briarcliff High School in Briarcliff Manor, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charlynn Goins describes her childhood personality and the community of African American teenagers she met in White Plains, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience at Briarcliff High School in Briarcliff Manor, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charlynn Goins describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charlynn Goins talks about the black community in White Plains, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charlynn Goins describes her decision to attend Barnard College in New York City, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience at Barnard College in New York City, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charlynn Goins talks about her wedding to HistoryMaker Dr. Warren Goins and their first years of marriage, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charlynn Goins talks about her wedding to HistoryMaker Dr. Warren Goins and their first years of marriage, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charlynn Goins recalls her experiences after graduating from Barnard College in New York City, New York in 1963

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charlynn Goins describes moving to Essex, England with her husband, HistoryMaker Dr. Warren Goins

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience living in Essex, England

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charlynn Goins describes the birth of her daughter in Essex, England

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charlynn Goins describes her social life in Essex, England and traveling across Europe

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charlynn Goins describes the role of social class in England

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charlynn Goins talks about other people's perception of her as African American in England and the United States

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charlynn Goins describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charlynn Goins talks about her significant experiences and travels while living in England

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Charlynn Goins describes moving to The Bronx in New York City, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Charlynn Goins talks about her mother's death, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charlynn Goins talks about her mother's death, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charlynn Goins describes her family's move to New Rochelle, New York after the birth of her son in 1969

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charlynn Goins describes her community in New Rochelle, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charlynn Goins describes her involvement with the Negro Ensemble Company

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charlynn Goins talks about the status of African American medical doctors

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charlynn Goins describes her decision to enroll in law school in 1973

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience as a district leader for the Democratic Party in New Rochelle, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Charlynn Goins describes her community's reaction to her decision to enroll in law school

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Charlynn Goins talks about her experience and support while a law student at Columbia Law School in New York City, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charlynn Goins describes being hired as a tax lawyer by the firm of Proskauer, Rose, Goetz & Mendelsohn

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charlynn Goins describes the environment of the law firm of Proskauer, Rose, Goetz & Mendelsohn

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience in international tax law and being hired by Integrated Resources, Inc. in 1982

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience at Integrated Resources, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charlynn Goins describes the effects of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 on Integrated Resources, Inc. and Integrated Resources International

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charlynn Goins reflects on the racism and sexism she encountered during her careers working in international tax law and business, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charlynn Goins reflects on the racism and sexism she encountered during her careers working in international tax law and business, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charlynn Goins talks about challenges she faced during her career

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Charlynn Goins talks about the collapse of Integrated Resources, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Charlynn Goins talks about moving to Manhattan, New York and selling her house to her daughter in New Rochelle, New York

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Charlynn Goins describes her and her husband's 1989 apartment search as an African American couple in Manhattan, New York

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Charlynn Goins describes building a vacation house in Sag Harbor, New York and its black community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Charlynn Goins describes being hired by Prudential Securities in 1990

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience creating and selling mutual funds internationally for Prudential Securities, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience creating and selling mutual funds internationally for Prudential Securities, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Charlynn Goins reflects on the decline of Prudential Securities and her experience there

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Charlynn Goins describes her retirement from Prudential Securities and undergoing open heart surgery

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Charlynn Goins describes working with HistoryMaker Peter F. Hurst, Jr. on the board of The Community's Bank in BridgePort, Connecticut

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Charlynn Goins talks about her experience on the board of Mainstay Funds

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience on the board of directors of AXA Financial, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience on the board of directors of Fannie Mae as well as on other boards

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Charlynn Goins reflects on what she has learned from her experience on corporate boards

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Charlynn Goins describes her experience as chair of the board of directors of New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation and meeting Mayor Michael Bloomberg

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Charlynn Goins talks about the boards of directors she is currently on

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Charlynn Goins reflects on her civic engagement and corporate career

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Charlynn Goins reflects on her plans for the future and on her accomplishments

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Charlynn Goins describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Charlynn Goins talks about her and her husband's collection of African American art

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Charlynn Goins talks about her marriage to HistoryMaker Dr. Warren Goins

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Charlynn Goins describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Charlynn Goins reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Charlynn Goins narrates her photographs

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Charlynn Goins narrates the photographs of her husband, HistoryMaker Dr. Warren Goins

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

9$1

DATitle
Charlynn Goins talks about her experience and support while a law student at Columbia Law School in New York City, New York
Charlynn Goins describes being hired as a tax lawyer by the firm of Proskauer, Rose, Goetz & Mendelsohn
Transcript
So you go off and what is the, the, both the racial and female/male ratios in law school at the time?$$At Columbia [Law School in New York City, New York], my first year, there was a decent number of African American students but not large. I mean, I can't remember if my class--I don't even remember how large my class was but there might have been 15 or 20 blacks in the class, mainly men, and there weren't that many women in the school and there were virtually no older people. So it was--I was a minority in many ways. And I, I didn't get to know my classmates. I had too much else on my plate. For one thing, I drove to school every day from New Rochelle [New York] because getting to Columbia from Westchester is not that easy. I would have had to take a train and then some buses and so I drove but there were no garages around Columbia at the time and so the first year I had to get to school, park, go to class, come out and then double park while the police went up for the alternate side of the street parking and I would eat lunch and read in the car for a couple of hours and then go back, and then I could move the car back across into a parking space on the street and go back into school. So, I did that for one year. So you could imagine I didn't know my classmates very well and then after that, for my second and third year, we were very fortunate--we were on the board at that time, a Boys & Girls Harbor, and one of our fellow board members was very involved at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine [New York City, New York], he got me a parking space on the Cathedral's campus and so I was able to park and I could spend the day at class and go back and just get my car and go home. But I really didn't get to know many people. Some of the older women, the few of them that were there in my class, I got to know well but other than that, there wasn't any social life attached to school.$$What about the classes, though? Because the first year can be somewhat daunting?$$Oh, it was so hard for me. I mean, I had barely read anything but a magazine for ten years and to get to law school, I was really, really challenged and my first semester I did not do particularly well. I didn't do well, period. I was a very average student but then I got the hang of it and I ended up doing pretty well.$$So who are you, who are you discussing things with if you, you know, you're, you've got your family life and you're studying in your car, and you're driving back and forth? Who are you, like a lot of times it helps to have study groups and things?$$No study group, ever. Never had one, never even thought of having one, never.$$So, so once you, so, but you're, but Warren [HM Dr. Warren Goins] is being supportive this whole time?$$Oh, Warren was incredible, and his parents [Ernestine Goins and Jepther Goins] were incredible. Warren changed his hours so that he was home all day on Tuesdays and then worked Saturdays instead and that way when it came time for braces to be adjusted at the orthodontist or there was a school play, he could take the time off to go to that and that way I could go to school and his parents would come at the drop of the hat and spend the weekend and just take over if I was studying for exams or something like that. So, they were wonderful.$$So, it was like a modern day-- I mean, they were--everybody was supportive because--$$Oh, and I was terrified to tell my mother-in-law that I was going to go to law school. She had been a homemaker her whole life and I don't even think she knew many people, women who worked, and when I told her I was going to law school, I was really afraid that she was going to be furious that I was abandoning my family and I was shocked. She said, "If I had--if I were your age or had to do it over again, I'd do the same thing." And she and dad were up there all the time helping with the kids, and summers even. We had a house in Sag Harbor [New York], they would go out and spend a month with the kids and we would come on weekends. So they were always right there for us, wonderful.$$So she was then, what she was feeling the same way that, not the same way, but had similar sentiments about desires? Other desires?$$I'm not sure. I'm not sure because she was a very reclusive person, not at all social, really only close to her sisters but not other people so I'm not sure she would have been comfortable out in the world.$$Right, but--$$But she was very supportive of me.$$That's, that's really--$$It was amazing--$$Amazing.$$--because I was really scared to tell her.$$Okay, I mean we're talking about the early, you know, the 1960s [sic, early 1970s]. I mean women are burning their bras by this time.$$Right.$$You know, there's women's rights coming into being but still, you know, people have their ideas about what is proper and what's not proper, you know.$$That's true, and I think that the African American community is slower to accept new ways.$$That's right.$$At least traditionally, I think, that's been the case.$$That was--that has been the case. I mean, still, so you--and three years is a long time.$$It is.$$I mean, it's a long time.$$You know.$$Right.$So I'm gonna-- so, tell me what you do during the summers.$$Okay, my first summer after law school [Columbia Law School in New York City, New York], I stayed at home with the family. Then that fall, the beginning of my second year, I interviewed on campus for a summer internship at one of the Wall Street law firms and I interviewed--I signed up for interviews at a number of them. Some actually said, "oh, you're too old, you know, how could you--" and I said, "Well, I'm 31, I thought I had a few good years left" but they had never had the experience of having a new summer clerk or a new associate come in at such an advanced age. But I did get offers from three firms to come as a summer intern and I choose Proskauer, Rose [Proskauer, Rose, Goetz & Mendelsohn, now Proskauer Rose LLP] and so that was what I did my second summer. And then at the end of my internship there, they invited me to return as an associate upon graduation. So, after taking the Bar exam, that third year, the summer after the third year [1976], I returned to Proskauer.$$So what are, what is the work that you did that summer and how large a firm are they? And--$$They're a very large firm with offices in Europe and in California and Washington [D.C.]. They're one of the oldest and largest predominantly Jewish law firms like Paul, Weiss [Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison]. They'd been around since the days when the "A" students at Harvard Law [School in Cambridge, Massachusetts] couldn't get a job if they were Jewish, so they created their own firm. They had a big practice, a labor practice, representing hospitals and medical groups, not on the plaintiffs side but on the defendants side and a big corporate department and a big tax department, not tax litigation but tax planning, also a large litigation department. They represented the NBA [National Basketball Association] and they--David Stern was there, who is now head of the NBA and I knew David and I ended up doing international tax law. I went to law school to be a poverty law person, a civil rights person and I got to law school and the courses I hated were constitutional law, all the things where I just felt that I was floating around with nothing to grab onto and what did I like? Corporations, tax, all those courses. So, that's what I ended up doing.$$You know, that's surprising even in terms of your description that you love the literature, and you know, and Latin, and you know, didn't like math or science and you end up--$$But, tax law is not about numbers and calculations and that kind of thing. Tax law is like finding loopholes, looking for pieces of a puzzle and putting them together to plan how to structure an acquisition or a deal and it's really, it's supposedly the most intellectual area of the law, and never get a tax lawyer to do your tax return, or something like that, it's just not the same as accounting or economics. I had taken economics at Barnard [College in New York City, New York] and didn't like it at all but I loved tax law.

Vincent Lane

Real estate executive and real estate developer Vincent Lane was born on March 29, 1942 in West Point, Mississippi to Doyle Lane and Bertha Lee. He grew up on the southside of Chicago and graduated from Tilden Technical High School in 1960. Lane earned his B.S. degree in business administration from Roosevelt University in 1968. After earning his undergraduate degree, he worked in the accounting departments of several companies including Mt. Sinai Hospital, International Harvester and U.S. Steel. Lane received his M.B.A degree from the University of Chicago in 1973.

After completing his education, Lane became senior vice president of the Woodlawn Community Development Corporation (WCDC). In 1976, Lane served as the president and general manager of Urban Services and Development, Inc. and LSM Venture Associates housing management companies. In 1988, Lane was appointed by managing director and chairman of the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA). As chairman, he re-organized the CHA creating new programs such as the Chicago Housing Authority Police Department and Operation Clean Sweep. In 1991, Lane became president of American Community Housing Associates, Inc. Lane resigned from the CHA in 1995 after serving seven years as chairman. From 1997 to 2002, Lane served as president of Affordable Community Housing Advocate, LLC. In 2004, Lane became CFO of Woodlawn Community Development Corporation and since 2006, he has been a consultant responsible for the management of WCDC's real estate development program.

Lane has served on the boards of several organizations including the Corporation for Supportive Housing, National Historic Trust, Women's Treatment Center, Urban Land Institute and Roosevelt University. He received much recognition for his work in affordable housing development including the Regional Award for Minority Developer of the Year from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Distinguished Public Service Award from the Anti-Defamation League and the Visionary Award from the Boys and Girls Club. Lane is married to Rita Denise Vargas and has three adult children Vincent, Steven and Craig.

Vincent Lane was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 18, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.015

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/18/2012

Last Name

Lane

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Roosevelt University

University of Chicago

Edward Tilden Career Community Academy High School

Robert S. Abbott Elementary School

First Name

Vincent

Birth City, State, Country

West Point

HM ID

LAN07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Keep Putting One Foot In Front Of The Other.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/29/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Greens (Turnip)

Short Description

Real estate executive and real estate developer Vincent Lane (1942 - ) served as chairman of the Chicago Housing from 1988 and 1995. He has been president of the American Community Housing Associates, Inc. and CFO of the Woodlawn Community Development Corporation.

Employment

United States Immigration and Naturalization Service

Urban Services and Development, INC

LSM Venture Associates

Chicago Housing Authority

Woodlawn Community Development Corporation

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:3610,41:6360,96:8340,117:11422,131:17620,180:20480,256:21030,262:25920,283:27375,292:29606,320:30188,329:30673,336:35814,459:36396,466:36978,473:40490,482:40926,487:46042,506:46480,514:46991,523:47356,529:47867,537:54183,574:55002,596:58807,637:59717,658:63094,678:66350,683:66987,692:67442,698:68079,706:70062,733:70590,741:74286,805:76486,848:77190,860:79655,873:82566,954:82850,961:83702,974:84057,980:85761,999:86755,1019:87110,1025:91512,1096:99750,1197:102062,1284:104594,1295:105377,1330:105899,1350:106508,1359:115862,1466:116366,1473:116870,1480:123470,1523:133614,1566:134144,1572:135628,1594:140922,1623:142775,1633:143725,1645:144770,1657:145150,1662:145625,1668:147525,1697:152964,1729:153499,1735:154360,1743:155890,1748:158302,1762:163434,1781:171445,1836:176807,1866:178578,1895:185010,1934:185595,1946:185985,1955:186570,1967:187805,1994:190910,2020:195200,2057:195752,2062:201417,2088:206080,2113:208768,2159:209356,2167:217345,2236:217685,2241:218110,2247:220150,2280:220575,2286:227630,2329:230630,2372:233710,2382:236110,2417:239070,2462:239390,2467:239950,2475:240750,2489:252186,2581:254538,2603:256106,2620:262644,2642:267735,2678:268310,2685:271566,2721:271956,2727:272424,2739:273126,2753:274062,2768:276402,2818:276792,2824:279288,2862:279990,2872:285744,2925:286432,2938:286862,2944:287464,2954:287980,2961:289528,2982:289872,2987:291334,3009:298750,3125:301790,3138:302614,3147:310910,3189:313950,3195:323590,3266:324640,3285:325315,3295:325615,3300:326140,3309:328660,3316:329000,3321:329680,3330:330700,3346:335035,3408:338830,3430:342060,3481:344520,3496$0,0:746,10:1070,15:2285,26:2771,33:4148,61:5606,91:6335,101:6740,107:22680,218:23320,227:24360,253:24920,261:31760,331:35716,355:39496,375:43056,447:43857,457:49731,545:50176,551:51244,564:65432,651:75730,714:79860,719:80508,727:83100,760:83964,769:87005,788:87788,800:88484,812:89006,820:97341,898:97633,903:103651,948:104321,959:104924,969:105192,974:105728,985:106130,992:108754,1026:109099,1032:111963,1053:115877,1096:116598,1105:117422,1114:118349,1127:120615,1139:128620,1184:129095,1190:129570,1196:130140,1207:134966,1242:135254,1248:136118,1262:136478,1268:137198,1280:138062,1294:138422,1300:140580,1313:141532,1330:147264,1348:147734,1354:148110,1359:148956,1368:149332,1373:153850,1407:158500,1437:159499,1445:163828,1473:167560,1486:167848,1492:169144,1510:170008,1526:170296,1531:174533,1560:175067,1568:175423,1573:180763,1639:188786,1679:189150,1684:189696,1692:191698,1721:192153,1727:192517,1732:195065,1771:196612,1789:197158,1797:197613,1803:203860,1818:206718,1845:207430,1854:207786,1859:216294,1920:219100,1933:219860,1939:223102,1958:229757,2039:230293,2048:237590,2071:238865,2090:239545,2099:240905,2117:241500,2126:248820,2172:250160,2177:251900,2189:252747,2197:256410,2204:258770,2220:259445,2232:263730,2260:264318,2269:264822,2276:265326,2284:266870,2291
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Vincent Lane's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane recalls his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane talks about his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane reflects on the land his family owned in Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane talks about his mother and Mary Holmes School in West Point, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane talks about his mother's feelings on race and his memories of visiting Mississippi in the summers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Vincent Lane talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Vincent Lane talks about the Bryan family in West Point, Mississippi and his father

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Vincent Lane talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane talks about his family church in West Point, Mississippi and his family's move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane talks about his family's businesses

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane describes about his earliest childhood memory, playing hooky from school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane lists about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane talks about growing up near Bridgeport in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane recalls baseball at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane talks about the Back of the Yards and Bronzeville neighborhoods in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Vincent Lane talks about urban renewal and Chicago, Illinois' State Street Corridor

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane talks about his recollections of black political power in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane talks about his high school interest in engineering

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane recalls working at Immigration and Naturalization Service while attending the University of Illinois at Navy Pier in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane comments on changes in public housing policy and residents in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane recalls life on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane recalls life on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane recalls his decision to major in accounting at Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Vincent Lane talks about his work during college and starting a small business

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane talks about black businessmen in Chicago including HistoryMaker Lester McKeever

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane talks about his jobs after graduating from Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane talks about his work at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane talks about being unable to advance while working at International Harvester

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane recalls the 1968 riots in Chicago, Illinois following the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane recalls Mount Sinai Hospital's role in responding to the 1968 riots on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane talks about working at Tuesday magazine, and later The Woodlawn Organization

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Vincent Lane talks about working for The Woodlawn Organization

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane talks about intentional fires in the Woodlawn neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane talks about the Woodlawn neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois and The Woodlawn Organization

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane talks about black neighborhoods on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane talks about his mother's bar on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane talks about The Woodlawn Organization's relationship to the University of Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane talks about gentrification in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane comments on the demolition of public housing high rises and the administration of housing vouchers

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Vincent Lane recalls earning his M.B.A. from the University of Chicago and starting Urban Services and Development, Inc. and LSM Venture Associates

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane talks about multi-family housing units he developed

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane talks about project-based section 8 housing

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane talks about how Seventh Day Adventists were involved in his development projects

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane talks about how he was able to finance his development projects

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane talks about HistoryMaker Renault Robinson and getting involved with the Metropolitan Planning Council

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane comments on flaws he saw with public housing policy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane talks about the effects of the Brooke Amendment and the Chicago Housing Authority's neglect of public housing residents

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane talks about changes he made as chair of the Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane talks about the lack of policing in public housing in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane describes how he set up a police force for the Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane talks about the origins of Operation Clean Sweep

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane gives an outline of how he conducted Operation Clean Sweep

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane talks about the objectives of Operation Clean Sweep

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane talks about how residents reacted to the presence of those conducting Operation Clean Sweep after the first raid

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Vincent Lane talks about changes in Chicago public housing after Operation Clean Sweep

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Vincent Lane offers justifications for Operation Clean Sweep

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane talks about the flow of federal money to the Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane talks about HistoryMaker Renault Robinson and former Chicago Housing Authority Police Commander Leroy O'Shield

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane describes the composition of Chicago public housing and taking his tactics to other cities

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane talks about reductions in the murder rate in Chicago public housing after Operation Clean Sweep

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane talks about Hope VI and his efforts to reconfigure public housing

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane comments on problems he sees with development requirements set by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane talks about the American Community Housing Association

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Vincent Lane recalls leaving the Chicago Housing Authority in 1995

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane talks about events of 1994 and his decision to resign from Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane talks about the circumstances that led to his indictment in 2001

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane talks about the toll of being indicted and convicted

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane reflects upon his career in public housing

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane talks about reducing the staff of Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Vincent Lane describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Vincent Lane talks about his future plans

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Vincent Lane explains how he became chairman of Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Vincent Lane talks about the people who represented the interests of Chicago Housing Authority residents during his tenure as chairman of the CHA

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Vincent Lane considers what he would have done differently in his career

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Vincent Lane talks about his family

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Vincent Lane describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Vincent Lane narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$7

DAStory

8$4

DATitle
Vincent Lane talks about urban renewal and Chicago, Illinois' State Street Corridor
Vincent Lane talks about the origins of Operation Clean Sweep
Transcript
Okay, okay, now, did you have a--did you like to play sports when you were growing up?$$Yeah, I played little league baseball. We played at the field across, right around Federal Street. The old Armour Institute [of Technology, Chicago, Illinois]. It's still there. It's an old, dark red building. And it was--it's still, I think, part of IIT [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chciago, Illinois], but they had a huge field there. And we would play our little league games at that location. And, of course, it's not there anymore because Mayor [Richard J.] Daley and President [Dwight D.] Eisenhower hooked up the Dan Ryan to the Interstate [Highway] System. And that's when this big urban renewal program took effect.$$Now, this is something that's really important, and it would be important to everybody, but especially to you with your future, you know, career being, you know, so closely aligned with the Chicago Housing [Authority] and all that. What did you think when you--what are your reflections of urban renewal and the redevelopment of that whole State Street corridor from being what they used to call the Black Belt with the tenements to housing projects?$$Well, it--$$You actually were here to see all of it, right?$$I actually was here to see all of it. Of course, my mother [Bertha Spraggins Lane] and father [Doyle Lane] were not political at all. I mean they just were working and trying to, living over the drugstore at 37th. And my mother worked occasionally. Of course, my father worked every day. But I remember during a period right after the war, I mean World War II [WWII], that we were, the country was involved in some tough times. And I had to--and my brothers, had to go to 35th and State Street, just north of 35th Street to get this potatoes, you know, like out of the box or bag at that time, butter, eggs. And so I remember the lines up there, people going to get these staples. Of course, you know, my parents had money and worked, but, you know, it was--I think the government just gave it to you. And that stretch, State Street and Wabash and Wentworth and Princeton, these old buildings--now, they had already torn down a lot of the tenements to build Wentworth Gardens. But in that block where I lived on the corner, and going South to White Sox Park, a lot of old, old buildings, apartment buildings, cold-water flats. I thought that--I was envious of the people who lived in Wentworth Gardens at the time because they had, you know, the steam heat from the piping that's run under Wentworth Gardens. They had bedrooms upstairs and they got yards. And, you know, my second-story flat, we would get together and, no grass, anywhere. And the pool hall on the other side of the building, the drugstore, and then we had the pool hall (laughter). And it was right over our apartment, so I was--always, something going on at the pool hall. And we would go into the back, and we would hang up a bushel basket, and we would play basketball and, or we would go a block away and play at the playground over at [Robert S.] Abbott [Elementary School, Chicago, Illinois], football and baseball over at Armour Square. So it was, it was that, almost end of the tenement, the real gutsy 1920s tenement era. But we still had a lot of buildings that were run down. That building that I lived in never had central heat, never until--and it never did have it because once they did start acquiring the tract for the Dan Ryan, all of that went down.$There's a step before the police department that I wanted to mention too, and that was the Operation Clean Sweep?$$Yeah.$$Now, what was--how did that come about and what was it?$$Well, in, I think within a month of my becoming chairman of the [Chicago] Housing Authority [CHA]--$$This was '88 [1988], yeah.$$In '88 [1988], I got a call one day from Nancy Jefferson who was a community activist on the West Side.$$She's probably one of the revered community activists in the city. She's almost sainted by people, Nancy Jefferson.$$I developed a close relationship with Nancy, and she said--and I didn't know at that time well. I knew of her, but she says, "Vince, you've just gotta do something. The gangbangers just burned, severely burned a little girl in Rockwell Gardens." And, of course, you know, I was full of energy and vigor to take on this. And so I got over to Rockwell Gardens, and sure enough, the gangbangers were trying to torch somebody's apartment that they had a grudge against. And he, they picked the wrong apartment. And they firebombed the apartment where this little girl was severely burned. And that really just set me off. I just, I said, how can we think about fixing the elevators and fixing sinks if, you know, employees are being terrorized, residents are being terrorized. Something has to happen. And so I don't know what. I just said, we probably--I was thinking about a war, one of these war movies, taking a hill in Korea, you know. And I said, what they do, the soldiers do is, when they wanna take a hill, they have to come with overwhelming force. And they have to surround whoever is on that hill, and once they take the hill, they have to control the hill. They just can't walk away from it. And so we, I worked out with Leroy Martin that we would have surprise, what we called "sweeps" of selected high rises, and that first one was at Rockwell [Gardens]. And we would plan a major offensive with not only police and our, what we--all we had at that time was rent-a-cops, you know, security guards. And we would, unannounced, and I wouldn't tell Leroy Martin where we were going because I knew that if I told him, that some of the Chicago police hierarchy would pass on the information and we wouldn't have the effect that we needed.

Gloria Toote

Gloria E.A. Toote, attorney and real estate developer, was born on November 8, 1931, in New York City. Toote has been advisor to four American presidents. She is a graduate of Howard University where she received her B.A. degree in 1952 and went on to receive her J.D. degree in 1954. To complete her studies, she also attended Columbia University, where she received her M.A. degree in 1956. Toote, a conservative Republican, has held positions in the Nixon, Ford and Reagan presidential administrations.

From 1966 to 1970, Toote served as president of Toote Town Publishing Company and Town Recording Studios, Incorporated. From 1971 to 1973, she was Assistant Director of ACTION, and from 1973 to 1975, she was Assistant Secretary for Equal Opportunity in the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. In 1976, she served as an uncommitted New York State delegate to the Republican National Convention and gave the seconding nominating speech for Reagan as president. During the Reagan administration, Toote was vice chairman of the United States Office of Private Sector Initiatives. She is a founding member of the board of governors of the National Black United Fund and a member of the steering committee for Citizens for the Republic. In the late 1980s when Toote began developing real estate in New York City, she became the president of TREA Estates and Enterprises, Incorporated, an apartment building operating firm.

Toote received special achievement awards from the National Association of Black Women Attorneys; and in 1992, the National Political Congress of Black Women recognized her contributions for furthering the participation of African American women in the political process.

Toote lived in New York City.

Toote passed away on May 18, 2017.

Accession Number

A2006.150

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/29/2006 |and| 12/4/2006

11/29/2006

12/4/2006

Last Name

Toote

Maker Category
Schools

P.S. 119

Junior High School 136

Howard University School of Law

Columbia Law School

George Washington High School

Howard University

First Name

Gloria

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

TOO01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Palm Desert, California

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/8/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Macaroni and Cheese, Chitterlings, Lasagna

Death Date

5/18/2017

Short Description

Real estate entrepreneur, lawyer, and federal government appointee Gloria Toote (1931 - 2017 ) served as an advisor to four American presidents. She was vice chairman of the United States Office of Private Sector Initiatives during the Reagan administration, and was president of TREA Estates and Enterprises, Inc., an apartment building operating company in New York City.

Employment

Greenbaum, Wolff and Ernst

Time magazine

Town Sound Recording Studio

Toote Town Publishing Company

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

ACTION

President's Advisory Council on Private Sector Initiatives

Favorite Color

Blue, Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:1274,26:13888,342:15214,353:24470,480:69902,1002:76614,1270:90220,1546:96490,1627:104820,1704:121365,1943:122157,1953:124038,1979:124434,1984:124830,1989:125325,1997:125919,2004:131950,2042:137320,2118:150450,2258:150930,2263:151650,2270:156652,2344:170230,2527$0,0:15512,337:27762,524:30570,577:42410,773:43488,793:47506,871:48290,1019:62180,1182:70530,1344:72138,1406:78436,1576:84730,1689:94320,1780:104580,1973:111499,2032:112795,2082:114739,2120:115306,2128:116116,2149:145758,2498:147242,2518:154406,2569:158408,2647:158843,2759:176404,2968:183600,3080
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gloria Toote's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote describes her maternal family's professions

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote describes her mother's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote remembers her father's role in the community, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote remembers her father's role in the community, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote describes her father's activism

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote recalls her relationship with Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gloria Toote recalls her father's relationship with Marcus Garvey, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Gloria Toote recalls her father's relationship with Marcus Garvey, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote talks about her family background

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote remembers her father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote describes her father's church in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote remembers her father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote remembers her first watch

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote describes her early memories of New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote describes the housing conditions in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote remembers Reverend Major Jealous Divine

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote talks about her early education

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote recalls her enrollment at George Washington High School in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote talks about her junior high school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote recalls her experiences of racial discrimination as a lawyer

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote describes her early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote remembers her mentor at Junior High School 136 in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote recalls a childhood friend

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote remembers learning to play golf

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote describes her maternal grandmother's bakery

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote recalls the influence of a family friend

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Gloria Toote describes her parents' roles in her college decision

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Gloria Toote recalls the mentorship of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote recalls her admission to Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote recalls her introduction to southern segregation in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote talks about her sinus condition

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote recalls her experiences of discrimination in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote talks about her preparation for college

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote describes her studies at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote remembers her mentor, Eudora Williams Webster

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote recalls her decision to attend law school

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote remembers her involvement in the Howard University Players

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Gloria Toote recalls her vocal training at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Gloria Toote recalls her experiences at the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Gloria Toote recalls interviewing James Edwards for The Hilltop newspaper

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote recalls her challenges during law school

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote remembers Professor George E.C. Hayes

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote talks about her role as a law research assistant, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote talks about her role as a law research assistant, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote describes her work for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote describes her experiences as a female law student

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote recalls her role on the census advisory council

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote talks about President Ronald Wilson Reagan

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote recalls the decision of Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Gloria Toote remembers passing the bar examination

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Slating of Gloria Toote's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote recalls her experiences at the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote recalls her mentors in New York City's Harlem community, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote recalls her mentors in New York City's Harlem community, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote recalls her influences in New York City's Harlem community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote describes her role on the Coordinating Council for Negro Performers

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote recalls the political corruption in New York City

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote remembers joining the Republican Party

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote recalls her challenges as an African American Republican

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote remembers the intellectual community in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote recalls writing for the New York Amsterdam News

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote reflects upon her interest in law

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote remembers writing for Time magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Gloria Toote describes her social life

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote recalls her decision to purchase a recording studio

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote recalls the construction of the Town Sound Recording Studio, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote recalls the construction of the Town Sound Recording Studio, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote reflects upon her experiences in the music industry

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote remembers the fire at the Town Sound Recording Studio, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote remembers the fire at the Town Sound Recording Studio, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote recalls representing L. Joseph Overton

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote recalls her role as the assistant director of ACTION

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote recalls her experiences of discrimination at ACTION

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote talks about objective-based management

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote talks about President Richard Nixon's affirmative action initiatives

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote recalls her experiences of discrimination at ACTION

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote recalls the influence of President Richard Nixon

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote recalls her appointment to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote describes her role at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote recalls President Richard Nixon's meetings with the Congressional Black Caucus

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote reflects upon her time at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote recalls her resignation from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote describes her initiatives at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote describes her initiatives at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote describes her career after leaving the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote recalls her role on the board of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote talks about her political ideology

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote recalls her role in the creation of Martin Luther King Day Jr. Day

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote talks about President Ronald Reagan's relationship with the black community

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote describes the misconceptions about President Ronald Reagan

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Gloria Toote remembers President Ronald Reagan's visit to Vernon E. Jordan, Jr. in the hospital

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Gloria Toote recalls her role in President Ronald Reagan's administration

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Gloria Toote describes her role in President George Herbert Walker Bush's administration

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Gloria Toote reflects upon her role as a black Republican, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Gloria Toote reflects upon her role as black Republican, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Gloria Toote describes her hopes and concerns for the Republican Party

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Gloria Toote describes her plans for the future

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Gloria Toote remembers Clarence Thomas

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Gloria Toote reflects upon her career

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Gloria Toote reflects upon her life

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Gloria Toote talks about her junior high school experiences
Gloria Toote talks about her role as a law research assistant, pt. 1
Transcript
When I was in junior high school [Junior High School 136, Harriet Beecher Stowe Junior High School, New York, New York], I was--I don't want to say a science genius, but I was good in science. And I was slated for The Bronx High School of Science [Bronx, New York]. I was gonna be a doctor, and thank you God, thank you God. But it was an experience that children should not have to encounter. I'm making all--not all A's in all courses. I'm making A's in courses I like and courses I don't like, I slough. So I don't want any further in math, I'm good. I'm bad, but science, crackerjack. I had a history teacher who sits there every day writing love letters to her boyfriend. No, she's a substitute for the science teacher who became ill who was scheduled to teach. For one year, I had a history teacher who knew nothing about science. For one year, the board of education [New York City Board of Education; New York City Department of Education] made no effort to replace her, and she sat there every day and gave us twenty pages to read. Well, heck, I'm a speed reader. I was a speed reader before people were talking about speed reading. So I read my twenty pages and mischief, you know. I was--she almost got into trouble 'cause she wanted to hit me with a ruler. And the students had to stop her because my seat was right in front of her desk. 'Cause it was science. So I wanted to be right up front, I wanted to see everything. And I'd sit there and hum. Her boyfriend's name was Johnny [ph.]. (Sings) "Oh, Johnny, Oh, Johnny, how you can love." Very soft, softer than that, much softer than that. Only folks, kids close to me could hear. "Oh, Johnny, Oh, Johnny." Give me that exam, I read my twenty pages, so I wanted to make my grade. And one day she just, I don't know what was wrong with her. But she got up with her ruler. She was going to hit me. And the other students stopped her. So that ended my career in science, because I needed that last year of junior high to prepare me to pass the test. Very difficult test for The Bronx High School of Science. Later in life, I found out I can't stand blood. That's number one; and number two, I most certainly wouldn't have been a surgeon; and number three, most of your finest doctors don't live long. They save their patients, but with each patient that they save, they give a part of themselves and they die considerably younger than anyone else. So the Lord, I hope he knew what he was doing when he sent me in another direction.$How did I meet Thurgood Marshall? I gotta sch--I was a scholarship student [at Howard University School of Law, Washington, D.C.], I was assigned to work on Brown versus the Board of Education [Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 1954], Bolling versus Sharpe [Bolling v. Sharpe, 1954], I had my briefs, my [U.S.] Supreme Court brief signed, and the, the law school, my class had, was assigned--particularly, the better students--assigned the responsibility of the research. And I was fortunate enough to have a bulk of work, and, therefore, when, the two faculty members, George E.C. Hayes and Jim Nabrit [James M. Nabrit, Jr.], who was then my law professor, became professor of law school, he was secretary of the university when he was a law professor, then became president of Howard University [Washington, D.C.]. When they came, he and, and, and George Hayes came to New York [New York]. I had to travel with them. I got a--listen, I don't read all these little pieces of paper, you know. You gotta have your flunkee. They didn't think of me as that, but that's really what my job was. I'm not trying to impress anybody. But again, it was that exposure. And we'd come up, they stayed at the Algonquin Hotel [New York, New York] in the '40s [1940s]. And the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] office was the opposite Bryant Park [New York, New York] down there in the four--they were in the lower 40s, on the other side of Bryant Park, the Algonquin was about, coming uptown, let's say like about 46th [Street] and they were about 41st [Street], NAACP office. And we'd work until, they'd come in on a train, we'd come in on a train, and work all night almost. They'd go get some sleep, I'd come home, and set the time, be back there again. And that was work. I mean, I earned my--know whatever I did, I sure did well. I enjoyed every moment of it. And, what at Constance Baker Motley, Judge Motley who died a couple years ago, brilliant woman, good attorney, sweetheart of a person. Husband [Joel Wilson Motley, Jr.] had an office. While she was sitting on the federal bench, her husband's office was on 8th Avenue on what you call Frederick Douglass Boulevard and 130--I had a building on 134th Street--133rd [Street], 8th Avenue on the east corner, east, north corner. And he sold-- they sold insurance. He predominantly handled insurance, but the whole office was his. And I met her, and, and it was just a marvelous experience. So when I finished law school, I was so impressed with George E.C. Hayes, that I got use Glor- and I found out I had another middle name. I had a name from my mother's mother [Frances Tooks] and my father's mother [Clarita North Toote]. I knew about my father's mother, and I just added the initial from the other one and I became Gloria E.A. Toote [HistoryMaker Gloria Toote]. And I made everybody say E.A. And I will always remember George E.C. Hayes had the dullest class, one of the worst classes that I've ever had to take in life. And it was at eight o'clock in the morning.

Eugene Henry Webb

Eugene Henry Webb was born in Red Level, Alabama on November 24, 1918. After graduating from Parker High School in Birmingham, Alabama, Webb later attended Columbia University in New York City, where he studied real estate appraisal. He also attended Pohs Institute and Miles College.

After high school, Webb worked as a dining car waiter on the Seabound Rail Road and the New York Coastal Railroad. In 1941, he joined the U.S. Navy, serving for two years during World War II. After his honorable discharge, Webb moved to Harlem, and began attending school. After attending Columbia University, he went to work in the real estate industry, and in 1968, opened his own brokerage, Webb & Brooker, Inc. Today, after almost forty years, Webb & Brooker is one of the most successful real estate management brokerage firms in Harlem.

Webb has been active in the Harlem community for decades, having been a part of the group that helped to found both Carver Federal Savings and Loan Bank and Freedom National Bank. He later served as chairman of the executive board of Freedom National Bank. He has been a member of the Real Estate Board of New York for twenty years, and a member of the Columbia Society of Real Estate Appraisers for almost four decades. He is also a former member of the board of trustees of Cambridge College and Stillman College, and has received honorary doctorates from Miles College and the New York Podiatric College of Medicine.

Webb has two children, and in 1999, married attorney Danna Wood Webb.

Accession Number

A2004.244

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/2/2004

Last Name

Webb

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Henry

Occupation
Schools

A.H. Parker High School

Councill Elementary School

Miles College

Columbia University

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Eugene

Birth City, State, Country

Red Level

HM ID

WEB04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/24/1918

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Greens (Collard)

Short Description

Real estate broker Eugene Henry Webb (1918 - ) is the owner of Webb & Brooker, one of the most successful real estate management brokerage firms in Harlem. He also helped to found Carver Federal Savings and Loan Bank and Freedom National Bank.

Employment

U.S. Navy

St. Louis-San Francisco Railway

Webb & Brooker, Inc.

Seabound Railroad

NY Central Railroad

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Eugene Henry Webb's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb talks about his father, Eddie Webb

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers growing up in Ensley, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers the First Baptist Church of Ensley in Ensley, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls getting into trouble with the police

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb describes Council Elementary School in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his mother's parenting

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his life as a young boy

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Eugene Henry Webb talks about segregation in Ensley, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers working odd jobs as a boy

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls his childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers working and attending Birmingham's A. H. Parker High School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb describes the jobs he worked as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers looking for work in California

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers working as a waiter on the railroad

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls his time in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers joining the real estate business

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his trajectory in the real estate business

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers his mentors in business

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers founding Webb & Brooker Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers connections he made in the real estate business

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb predicts increasing gentrification of Harlem, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon changes in race relations

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb explains the economics of poor African American communities

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb explains why he kept Webb & Brooker, Inc. located in Harlem, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon challenges for black owned businesses

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his hopes and concerns for American politics

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb talks about prioritizing his employees

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon the importance of preserving history

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his concerns for young people in Harlem

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his commitment to communities in Harlem and Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls giving free rent to the embassy of Chad

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers encouraging Fannie Mae to advertise in black publications

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers helping a young man pay for college

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls his greatest moment

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his family

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb offers advice to aspiring businessmen

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers saving the TV show 'Like It Is' from cancellation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers HUD Secretary Robert C. Weaver

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Eugene Henry Webb describes notable African Americans acquaintances

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his office decor

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb narrates his photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Eugene Henry Webb talks about segregation in Ensley, Alabama
Eugene Henry Webb remembers his mentors in business
Transcript
Well we know this is the South, we know what time it is, but this is a history that you're giving us, so I'm, I'm asking you, what--what's your impression of race relations in that--in that place (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Now?$$Yeah. No, no, then.$$Then?$$Then and what, what did you--$$Well, then, you--as I said, when you--when you are born in, in a, a period of time where segregation was accepted and we didn't--there was no such a thing as a Civil Rights Movement. During that period of time, black people didn't rise up and say I'm not going to be segregated in schools, I'm not--housing, like that. Black people accepted that. And where I came from, we had no--we had no black leaders talking about white people was treating us bad or treating us good or--we were in--we didn't have this or we were denied this. We did not have that. So when you grow up in that environment and everything else around is, is that way, it really doesn't affect you. We wasn't able to travel to other places to, like, Chicago [Illinois] or maybe some of the northern cities where there might be different type of style of living. Were we grew up, there--we lived over in the, what they call a Bottom, the Sandy Bottom [Ensley, Alabama], for example, and those blacks who had better incomes, like a postman or a doctor or something, they lived in another little section. We didn't live over there. We lived in sand--what they call Sandy Bottom. That's where all the very few--very poor people lived. We didn't live in the section that the blacks that was mobile or financially were able. We couldn't afford to live up there. We didn't have no house. We lived in a shotgun house; we rented. We didn't own any land. We didn't own anything.$$Who owned the house that you were in and was it a--$$Some Italian fella. He owned the house. And then I think he used to have the grocery store in the corner, and he owned those houses we lived in. In the South back in those days, the companies used to have the company housing. You worked in the steel mill, you could live in a company house or if you're a coal miner, you can live in their house. They would be houses for their employees and the blacks could live there and then have a commissary where they could go buy. I--we didn't live in one of those houses. We lived in a house where we--this I--Italian grocery man owned. He had a bunched of 'em and we lived in one of his houses, and that's who we paid the rent to.$$Okay.$$If we hadn't been able to, I've--if I had an adult that worked in the steel mill or coal mine, we would've maybe had a, a house, 'cause the company built those. If, if my mother [Docia Foster Webb] had a better school teacher, perhaps we could've been able to move over to the better section of black community and we'd had a house. We didn't have those things.$Okay, now I was just talking--we, we just--you just described kind of quickly how you got involved (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Right.$$--and how you rose and stuff, but, but what were--were there any obstacles to, to being a successful real estate person--$$Well, you know--$$--in Chicago [Illinois]?$$--when you start out--$$In, in New York [New York]?$$--you're, you're poor. There's always obstacles because you're poor and you start out. You don't start out with a wealthy background or wealthy family in the real estate business, so you start out from scratch; you're very poor, and, and, and--far as real estate is concerned, and you don't have the luxury of having a family that's in there and that you have a foundation you build on. When you start from scratch, you, you build a foundation, so I didn't--that wasn't successful. I was helped along the way by a lot of people. For example, I just said, Danny Burrows [Daniel L. Burrows], who was the father-in-law of Dave Dinkins [HistoryMaker David N. Dinkins], the former mayor, I, I was helping with him because he, he would give me business during that period of time, and other elder real estate brokers that had been in business a long time. There's a guy named Lloyd Jenkins [ph.] who used to give me a lot of business, you know. Because at that--at that stage in their life, the business that they--that they didn't want was like a piece of cake to me, but it was--you know, they didn't need it, they say give it to Webb [HistoryMaker Eugene Henry Webb], and that's what a lot of the old timers used to say, give it to Webb, you know. It's like a crumb if you wanna look at it--back at it, but it was a piece of cake at the period of time. So that's where you get the idea on, what do I do next with my life or what do I do to make my--to, to be able to make a better business than I got? Well, I came to the conclusion, like I said, my friends was all over the--United Mutual [United Mutual Life Insurance Company; Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, New York, New York] was a company that was controlled by blacks, so I asked, like I said, Danny Burrows, I appreciate if you could, you know, if an opening come on the board, I'd like to be able to sit on that board and he said, all right, I'll keep it in mind. Well, a couple years later, he mentioned it and says "I'm on--you wanna sit"--I said, "Yeah." So I asked people like that who has helped me.