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Tage Larsen

Musician Tage Larsen was born on November 7, 1970 in Hartford, Connecticut and adopted by Rikk and Pamela Larsen. He graduated from The Peabody School in 1984 and from Cambridge Rindge School in 1988. Larsen went on to receive his B.M. degree in music performance from Michigan State University School of Music in 1992, and his M.M. degree in performance from the University of Rochester, The Eastman School of Music in 1994. While at The Eastman School, Larsen toured the country with the Dallas Brass quintet for nearly a year, making appearances, performing, and providing youth clinics to support young musicians.

Following completion of his masters program, from 1995 to 1999, Larsen served as solo cornet with the “President’s Own” U.S. Marine Band, in Washington, D.C. He then went on to join the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, in Annapolis, Maryland, where he served as the principal trumpet from 1999 to 2000. Then, he joined the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, where he served as second trumpet from 2000 to 2002. In July 2002, Larsen was the first African American hired in the history of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra where he has served as fourth/utility trumpet of the orchestra’s brass section. In 2008, Larsen was featured in the Dream Out Loud music education advocacy campaign, a collaboration between the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association and Yahama Corporation of America. He also served in the role of Yamaha Trumpet Artist, educator, and roster member. Larsen has performed with the CSO Trumpets, as the featured faculty soloist for the DePaul Festival Winds, and as a guest trumpet soloist with the Evanston Symphony Orchestra in Evanston, Illinois, under the direction of Lawrence Eckerling.

In 2004, Larsen received the first Michigan State University College of Music Distinguished Alumni Award. He joined the faculty at DePaul University School of Music, in Chicago, Illinois in 2007, as an instructor in applied and performance trumpet.

Larsen conducts master classes, has performed at conferences hosted by the International Trumpet Guild (ITG), and also served on the faculty at Roosevelt University’s Chicago College of Performing Arts.

Tage Larsen was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 12, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.053

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/12/2019

Last Name

Larsen

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Occupation
Schools

Andrew Peabody School

Cambridge Rindge and Latin School

Michigan State University

Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester

First Name

Tage

Birth City, State, Country

Hartford

HM ID

LAR03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Connecticut

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

You Break It, You Buy It

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/7/1970

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Thai

Short Description

Musician Tage Larsen (1970- ) was second trumpet for the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra before being hired as the first African American in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 2002.

Employment

U.S. Marine Band

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra

Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Annapolis Symphony Orchestra

Favorite Color

Blue

Alfreda Burke

Opera singer Alfreda Burke was born in Chicago, Illinois on June 17, 1961. Her father, John H. Burke, Jr., was a pastor; her mother, Mamie Burke, a church administrator. She received her BM and MM degrees from Roosevelt University Chicago Musical College (1984, 1987).

Burke made her Carnegie and Orchestra Hall debuts in Strauss’ Elektra in 1995 with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra led by Daniel Barenboim. She has also performed with numerous orchestras and at various venues in North America and Europe, including the Auditorium Theatre (1995); the Chicago Symphony Center (1997); the Chicago Symphony at Ravinia; the Kennedy Center (1998); the Detroit Opera House/DSO/Rackham Symphony Choir (2002); the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra (2003); the Chorus Angelorum (2003, 2010); the Cincinnati Pops Symphony Orchestra (2011); the Chicagoland Pops Orchestra (2004); the Lancaster Festival (2003); the Umbria Music Festival (Italy) (2007); the Prague Philharmonic (2010); the TodiMusicFest (2007); the Millennium Park Gala (2008); the Miss World (China) (2012); and the NATO Chicago Summit (2012).

Burke’s oratorio, opera, concert and musical theater engagements include the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts broadcast on WFMT-FM; Mozart’s Requiem; Handel’s Messiah; Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Beethoven’s Mass in C; Poulenc Gloria; Mahler’s 2nd & 8th Symphonies; Strauss’ Elektra; Puccini’s Turandot; Tchaikovsky’s Iolanta; Barber’sKnoxville: Summer of 1915; Menotti’s Amahl & the Night Visitors; Rutter’s Requiem; Boulez’s Le Visage Nuptial; Gershwin’s Porgy & Bess; Bernstein’s West Side Story; and Kern’s Show Boat (Prince). She was featured in CSO’s Symphony Center Inaugural Festival and Radiothon.

In 2002, Burke and her husband, opera singer Rodrick Dixon, performed in Too Hot to Handel The Jazz-Gospel Messiah at the Detroit Opera House and the Auditorium Theatre (2006). Burke performed with Tenors Cook, Dixon & Young (formerly the Three Mo’ Tenors) as a featured soloist.

Burke’s work in recordings, music video, television, radio, film and commercials, includes Celine Dion and R. Kelly’s I’m Your Angel; The Visit; The Visitors; Unconditional Love; guest soloist appearances on WTTW/Odyssey’s broadcast, 30 Good Minutes; solo CD, From the Heart; the Prague PBS Special Hallelujah Broadway; and the Chicago Olympic 2016 Bid Anthem, I Will Stand. Some of Burke’s other engagements include the Auditorium Theatre & DiBurke Inc. co-produced show “Songs of A Dream,” CD release, and national tour; and Old St. Patrick’s Church production of Siamsa na nGael at Symphony Center.

Burke has taught music and voice at a number of institutions, including Evanston/Skokie District 65 (1985-1996); the CSO Musicians Residency at South Shore Cultural Center (1996-1998); the Wheaton College Conservatory Voice Faculty (1998-2009); the Carl Sandburg High School (2004-2007); the Chicago State University Voice Faculty (2007-2008); the Young Musicians Choral Orchestra, Berkeley, California (2009-2012); the Wright State University Music & Medicine Symposium (2009-Present); and master classes throughout the US.

Burke is a Roosevelt University CCPA Advisory Board member and served on the Chicago 2016 Olympic Bid Arts & Culture Advisory Committee. In 2005, Burke was an Alumna Ambassador for Roosevelt University's 60th Anniversary.

Opera singer Alfreda Burke was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 20, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.231

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/20/2013

Last Name

Burke

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

"Freda"

Occupation
Schools

Roosevelt University

Lindblom Math & Science Academy High School

Rudyard Kipling Elementary

Mary Church Terrell Elementary School

First Name

Alfreda

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

BUR20

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy, England

Favorite Quote

What Goes Around, Comes Around.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/17/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Greens (Collard)

Short Description

Singer Alfreda Burke (1961 - ) has performed with a number of symphony orchestras, as well as performing with her husband, Rodrick Dixon, in productions of Too Hot to Handel: The Jazz-Gospel Messiah, and Prague PBS Special, Hallelujah Broadway.

Employment

Wheaton College Conservatory

Chicago State University

CSO Community Outreach

Dr. Martin Luther King Experimental Lab Schools

Young Musicians Choral Orchestra

DiBurke, Inc.

First Mennonite Church

Favorite Color

Melon

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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117482">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke narrates her photographs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117483">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117484">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117485">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117486">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke talks about her mother's childhood and education, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115158">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke talks about her mother's childhood and education, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115159">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke talks about her mother's childhood accident</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115160">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke talks about her mother's college education and move to Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115161">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115162">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke describes her father's experiences as a musician before his call to the ministry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115163">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Alfreda Burke talks about her father's call to the ministry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115164">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Alfreda Burke describes how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115165">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Alfreda Burke talks about which of her parents she takes after</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115166">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Alfreda Burke talks about her sister and their experience as preacher's kids</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115167">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Alfreda Burke describes her childhood in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115168">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Alfreda Burke describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117487">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117488">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke talks about her experience at Mary Church Terrell Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117489">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke describes her experience at Rudyard Kipling Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117490">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke describes her academic and artistic interests in school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117491">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke describes her interests at Lindblom Technical High School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117492">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Alfreda Burke talks about the congregation at her father's First Mennonite Church in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117493">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Alfreda Burke describes her experience at Lindblom Technical High School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117494">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Alfreda Burke describes her graduation from Lindblom Technical High School in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117495">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Alfreda Burke talks about enrolling at the Chicago Musical College at Roosevelt University in 1979</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117496">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke talks about her musical abilities in high school and some of the ensembles she sang in</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117497">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke talks about her voice teacher at Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois and the Alexander technique</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117498">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke talks about vocal health and taking care of her mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117499">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke talks about some of the technical elements of her musical education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117500">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke talks about the factors that inform a musician's interpretation of a piece of classical music</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117501">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Alfreda Burke talks about how music history informs performers' musical interpretations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117502">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Alfreda Burke talks about famous black sopranos and the different types of operatic sopranos</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117503">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke talks about the power of children's singing voices</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117504">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke talks about maintaining a healthy voice while crossing musical genres</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117505">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke recalls meeting Chicago Mayor Harold Washington</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117506">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke talks about beginning her career in music education at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Laboratory School in Evanston, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117507">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke describes her experience teaching music at Martin Luther King, Jr. Laboratory School in Evanston, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117508">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Alfreda Burke describes her graduate recital at Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois in 1987, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117509">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Alfreda Burke describes her graduate recital at Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois in 1987, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117510">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Alfreda Burke talks about her voice teachers, mentors, and inspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117511">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Alfreda Burke talks about vocal phrasing and the importance of acting in opera</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117062">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke describes her experience singing with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117063">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke talks about her experience singing oratorios</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117064">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke describes her experience singing in Richard Strauss' "Elektra" with Daniel Barenboim and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117065">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke talks about studying foreign language pronunciation as a singer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117066">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke talks about the differences in singing technique between opera and gospel</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117067">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Alfreda Burke talks about joining the cast of "Show Boat" in 1995 and leaving her job as a teacher</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117068">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Alfreda Burke describes her experience performing in "Show Boat" in 1995, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117069">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Alfreda Burke describes her experience performing in "Show Boat" in 1995, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117512">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke reflects on the message and music of "Show Boat"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117513">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke remembers meeting her husband, HistoryMaker Rodrick Dixon</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117514">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke recalls her wedding to HistoryMaker Rodrick Dixon and their careers in 1998</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117515">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke talks about teaching at Wheaton College Conservatory of Music from 1997 until 2009</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117516">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke talks about performing "Too Hot to Handel," pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117517">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Alfreda Burke talks about performing "Too Hot to Handel," pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117518">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Alfreda Burke talks about the creation of DiBurke, Inc. and her album "From the Heart"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/117519">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Alfreda Burke describes the scope of DiBurke, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115202">Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke talks about serving as an alumni ambassador for the sixtieth anniversary of Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115203">Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke describes her work with the Young Musicians Choral Orchestra in Berkeley, California, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115204">Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke describes her work with the Young Musicians Choral Orchestra in Berkeley, California, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115205">Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke describes recording "Hallelujah Broadway" in Prague, Czech Republic in 2010</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115206">Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke talks about performing "Hallelujah Broadway" in Cincinnati, Ohio and Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115207">Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Alfreda Burke describes performing in "Siamsa na nGael" in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115208">Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Alfreda Burke describes her "Songs of a Dream" concert, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115209">Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Alfreda Burke describes her "Songs of a Dream" concert, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115210">Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Alfreda Burke talks about her future projects</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115211">Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Alfreda Burke lists the organizations she is involved in</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115212">Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Alfreda Burke talks about orchestras she has performed with</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115213">Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Alfreda Burke describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115214">Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Alfreda Burke reflects on her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115215">Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Alfreda Burke reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115216">Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Alfreda Burke reflects upon the label of "crossover artist"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115217">Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Alfreda Burke talks about her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/115218">Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Alfreda Burke reflects on how she would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$8

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Alfreda Burke talks about how music history informs performers' musical interpretations
Alfreda Burke describes her work with the Young Musicians Choral Orchestra in Berkeley, California, pt. 1
Transcript
Okay, so there's a certain amount of latitude even within classical music in terms of the interpretation of a piece.$$Right because you're--you're gonna do the research. You have to do the history, you have to find out the, the year this piece was con--'cause I love just the fact we do "Too Hot To Handel" and we do [George Frideric] Handel's Messiah" the traditional, the version of the classical oh it was baroque, but you know what I mean when I say that the traditionally sung one, performed one, and I am amazed that Handel was inspired by God and [Wolfgang Amadeus] Mozart was, all of these masters of music, you know [Franz] Shubert, [Robert] Schumann, [Gustav] Mahler all of these-- [Ludwig van] Beethoven, and on and on. They all have their moments and their stories of inspiration but with Handel's Messiah, he composed that piece in twenty-four days and it is a monumental work that is done now. It was composed in the 1700s [1741] and he did it in twenty-four days and it is, it's--I can't believe three parts to that piece and if you were to do all of the movements then the audience would sitting there for quite a while and it's the, the birth, life, death, resurrection of the Messiah, Jesus Christ and it speaks to people in different ways. It's, it is just a very uplifting and inspiring piece and the music is very powerful and very beautiful and it is said that he wouldn't even eat for much of that time while he was composing this piece and he just felt the glory of God in the room and he was writing and writing, he even fell ill but he just said I have to continue writing, so he may have rested a while in there but it was done rapidly, twenty-four days is not a long time, less than a month to do such a loved, adored piece. Love it and, and frequently performed, the piece to this day.$$As a performer then you have to immerse yourself into some sort of cultural education to be able to really perform the music on a high level.$$And it's the stylistic right, because you can't, you're not just gonna sing it like you would an R&B piece or, or--and it's early music, it's baroque so we're talking about the traditional and original [George Frideric] Handel's Messiah, not the offshoots from it which are different interpretations in our day and age now, which I think they have their place too, and Handel would probably be tickled pink knowing because he's said to be a man of the people.$$Now just to be simple here what, what does "baroque" mean?$$The, the, the 1700s, let's see, 1685 to--it is a period from the, I don't wanna say it wrong, but it is the in the 1600s to the 1700s, and so you have like the "Baroque" period and then you go into the "Classical" period in the 1700s and then the "Romantic" period in the 1800s then "20th Century music" in the 1900s, and now we are the "21st Century."$$So these, these periods of music.$$They have different stylistic and a different set of rules, different set of tendencies and ways that the music is to be performed. So I, you know I if I would bring portamento into you know Handel's "Messiah" (laughter), that's wrong 'cause that's later on in the you know where we have the Romantic era where you can do that in arias and in opera and that's-- and even in later music you can so, but it's more clean, and you have the figured bass and you have the harpsichord. You even have instruments according to that period, early instruments like the harpsichord which is not gonna be the full sound of the piano that we hear later, in later periods as we get closer you know, 1700s, 1800s--1800s is when--and then you see these instruments evolving and getting--they really begin to have more tone, more resonance. You have--the, the orchestras are even extended to have more orchestral members and you know the brass section is larger, the string section is expanded so, so now a composer like [Ludwig van] Beethoven can and [Gustav] Mahler can really go, you know and they use dissonance quite a bit and have a deceptive cadence so you're expecting this chord to resolve one way and then they fool you and it goes in a totally different direction so that, you can have that back in the early periods, the Baroque and Classical periods where things are sort of more in the box.$Tell us about Daisy Newman's Project in, in University of California at Berkeley [Berkeley, California]. Is that?$$Oh, yeah, oh yes the Young Musicians Choral Orchestra and it was formerly "YMPA" Young Musicians Program and she founded this instead, well no she did not. She came on board and really took it to the next level and, and this it was on the campus of U.C. Berkeley and she being a stellar soprano and performer herself who worked with Leonard Bernstein, she could certainly--it takes one to know one, 'cause she could certainly spot the use and the talents for this program and they were wunderkinds, they were genius, brilliant, talents but her program was centered around those that were under privileged or children or risk or you going through all kinds of adverse circumstances in their lives and their homes and may not be able to get that type of training that she offers, and the type of training she offers for master teachers, and she had a staff of teachers that taught the students around the year, through the, the summer they were learning musical instruments, they were learning vocal, they had voice lessons and training as well as choral rehearsals, so they had to be able to be proficient in more than one instrument. She wanted them to sing as well as to play their instruments and they--and academic subjects they also had to main a certain GPA and they also had to be students of excellence and respect one another and the campus and the opportunity. So she has her program set so she could talk to you on more about more eloquently about Three Tier. The, the rate, rate of the students leaving her program by the time they're ready for college they--100 percent acceptance rate. They were accepted by and some of the leading music conservatories and schools and institutions in our nation, Juilliard [The Julliard School in New York City, New York], Manhattan School of Music [New York City, New York], on and on you know all over the nation, some of our leading institutions for music; and many times they were receiving full rides, full scholarships or partial scholarships but because her, she raised the bar and because of her own standards and what she had achieved in real life. She also worked for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra [Detroit, Michigan], she worked for other New York Philharmonic [New York City, New York]--you know as far as an administrator with educational outreach tentacles that as well as having been a perform--an international performer so she had auditions and interviews, interviewed the parents, interviewed the stud--the children, the students and there were times when she--she had an age group that she wouldn't go lower than but there were times when she even had to take young ones you know, eight year olds, nine year olds, because they just exhibited such extremely genius ability and the capacity to go through her program and to be able to digest and process all of these great people that are in front of them. I mean she even has a jazz group, so we're talking classically at first and operatically and then they're learning German lieder, they're speaking foreign languages, they have to know their theory as well, they have to read and then they have wonderful proficient voice teachers, prolific staff of people that really can produce abundance you know--$$So that means you right, you're part of the staff that teaches voice and--$$Well we [Burke and her husband, HM Rodrick Dixon], well thank you for that (laughter), we're honored to be part of that but we come two weeks in the summer and this is the first time that we didn't because the program is transitioning off-campus to its own location now and she has a board of directors and donors and sponsors, supporters. So she has a lot of support, she knows a lot of people and she you know she's had people like Martin Katz who is known concert pianist and a recitalist, come work with her students, Frederica von Stade, a world class mezzo-soprano from the Metropolitan Opera [New York City, New York] and other venues around the world, all of kinds of people and for the jazz, Patrice Rushen, and she her staff oh, they are, they're just amazing what they are getting out of those students, those children and they--plus the students come to work and she provides two meals for them. So I just think there is a special place in heaven for her.