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Wayne Embry

Basketball team manager and basketball player Wayne Richard Embry was born on March 26, 1937 in Springfield, Ohio. After graduating from Tecumseh High School, Embry attended Miami University and graduated in 1958 with his B.S. degree in education. While there, he was a star basketball player in the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

In 1958, Embry was drafted by the St. Louis Hawks in the third round of the National Basketball Association (NBA) player draft. Embry went on to play in the NBA from 1959 to 1969 for several successful franchises, including the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. He played with NBA Hall of Fame inductee Bill Russell and contributed significantly to the Boston Celtics team that won the 1968 NBA Championship. In 1972, Embry was named general manager of the Milwaukee Bucks and became the first African American general manager in NBA league history, as well as the first black general manager of a major U.S. team sport. From 1985 to 1992, Embry served as vice president and general manager of the Cleveland Cavaliers. He went on to become the first African American NBA team president with the Cavaliers in 1994. Under the guidance of Embry, the Cleveland Cavaliers averaged forty-five wins and had nine playoff appearances over twelve seasons. Embry was appointed senior basketball advisor to the general manager for the Toronto Raptors in 2004, and then became the senior advisor to the president one year later. On January 26, 2006, Embry was named interim general manager for the Raptors.

Embry was selected to play on the National Basketball Association’s All-Pro team in five consecutive seasons between 1961 and 1965. He was chosen as “NBA Executive of the Year” by Sporting News magazine in 1992 and 1998. Embry was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a contributor to the class of 1999. He was also inducted into the Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame as a member of the charter class. He is the 2013 recipient of the Ohio Heritage Award, which recognizes an Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame inductee for their contributions to the State of Ohio off the court.

Embry and his wife, Terri Embry, live in Scottsdale, Arizona. They have three children: Debbie, Jull, and Wayne, Jr.

Wayne Richard Embry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 17, 2013 and August 18, 2017.

Accession Number

A2013.166

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/17/2013 |and| 08/18/2017

Last Name

Embry

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Miami University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Wayne

Birth City, State, Country

Springfield

HM ID

EMB01

Favorite Season

Holiday Season

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arizona

Birth Date

3/26/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Phoenix

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Basketball team manager and basketball player Wayne Embry (1937 - ) was the general manager of the Milwaukee Bucks, becoming the first African American general manager in the history of the National Basketball Association and the first African American general manager of any major U.S. team sport. He played for the Boston Celtics team that won the 1968 NBA Championship.

Employment

Cincinnati Royals

Boston Celtics

Milwaukee Bucks

Cleveland Cavaliers

Toronto Raptors

Favorite Color

None

Sidney Green

Basketball player and college basketball coach Sidney Green was born on January 4, 1961 in Brooklyn, New York. He starred on his high school basketball team at Thomas Jefferson High School. In 1979, Green, a graduating senior, was a McDonald’s All-American selection and named the New York City Player of the Year. He chose to attend the University of Nevada at Las Vegas with a four-year athletic scholarship where he played under head coach Jerry Tarkanian. In 1983, Green was an NCAA All-American selection and he graduated that year with his B.A. degree in sociology. Green was the all-time leading rebounder and second all-time scorer in the history of the UNLV men’s basketball team.

Green was the fifth pick in the 1983 NBA Draft, where he was chosen by the Chicago Bulls to play power forward and played alongside basketball super star Michael Jordan. Green had a successful career in the NBA and went on to play for the Detroit Pistons, the New York Knicks, the Orlando Magic, the San Antonio Spurs, and the Charlotte Hornets before retiring from the league in 1993. In 1995, Green returned to basketball as head coach of the men’s basketball team at Southampton College in Long Island, New York. Despite inheriting a team that had won just six games the year before, Green led his team to twenty-nine wins and twenty-seven losses during his two years as head coach. In 1997, Green went on to coach at the University of North Florida, where he increased the team’s winning percentage by more than thirty percent. Florida Atlantic University hired Green as its head coach in 1999. He took his team to the first Atlantic Sun Conference championship in 2002, where he was named the A-Sun Coach of the Year. Green was hired as an assistant coach at the University of Indiana in 2005 and in 2009, the Chicago Bulls named him the team ambassador.

While in college, Green co-founded Shoot for the Stars Foundation in Las Vegas, Nevada. During his time with the Knicks in New York, Green participated in Governor Mario and Matilda Cuomo’s Mentor Program as a spokesperson in public schools. He also founded Sid’s Kids in Orlando, Florida while he played with the Orlando Magic. In 1989, Green received the NBA National Spirit of Love Award, given to the NBA player who has contributed significant time and energy to the community. Green’s jersey was retired by the UNLV basketball team, and he was inducted into the UNLV Hall of Fame in 1994.

Green and his wife, Deidra, have two children, LaShawn and Taurean. Taurean has also played in the NBA.

Sidney Green was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 18, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.115

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/18/2012

Last Name

Green

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Thomas Jefferson High School

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

P.S. 158 Warwick School

I.S. 302 Rafael Cordero School

P.S. 64

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sidney

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

GRE15

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Palos Verdes, California, Ft Lauderdale, Florida

Favorite Quote

The Pain Of Discipline Is Much Less Than The Pain Of Regret.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/4/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Basketball player and college basketball coach Sidney Green (1961 - ) played in the NBA for ten years. After retirement, he head-coached several college teams before being appointed ambassador for the Chicago Bulls.

Employment

National Basketball Association

Southampton College

University of North Florida

Florida Atlantic University

University of Indiana

Chicago Bulls

Wynn Las Vegas

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
10,0:4618,90:4874,95:5130,100:21090,343:56226,725:78915,1041:96939,1271:114916,1709:154180,2106:157091,2119:186398,2717:195580,2897:201819,3003:202127,3008:202435,3034:203051,3044:203436,3050:205284,3081:209519,3180:254360,3803:268704,4029:284150,4238:285767,4258:309600,4579$0,0:32330,548:39458,628:53850,895:68563,1140:74081,1258:81532,1478:109426,1844:112702,1915:115068,1996:127228,2264:166665,2734:172604,2794:186218,3051:196127,3230:197345,3255:198215,3267:209970,3574:210350,3579:215480,3702:216240,3711:216715,3721:220515,3818:221180,3826:221845,3869:224315,3909:224695,3935:255542,4328:257783,4396:259111,4421:270813,4568:271650,4585:277137,4676:281040,4713
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sidney Green's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sidney Green lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sidney Green describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sidney Green talks about his relatives in New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sidney Green describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sidney Green recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sidney Green talks about his father's experiences in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sidney Green remembers his parents' education and occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sidney Green describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sidney Green talks about his family's move to Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sidney Green describes his upbringing in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Sidney Green remembers his childhood household

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Sidney Green describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sidney Green recalls the racial divide in the East New York section of Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sidney Green describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sidney Green remembers the influence of his older siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sidney Green talks about Jim McMillian

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sidney Green remembers his brother's murder

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sidney Green recalls his early interest in basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sidney Green remembers James "Fly" Williams

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sidney Green talks about the basketball culture in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sidney Green remembers his favorite elementary school teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sidney Green talks about the assassinations of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Sidney Green recalls the start of his basketball career

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sidney Green describes his neighborhood baseball teams

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sidney Green recalls an incident that led to his interest in basketball

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sidney Green remembers his basketball mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sidney Green remembers his growing pains

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sidney Green recalls Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sidney Green remembers the guidance of his high school basketball coaches

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sidney Green recalls his decision to attend the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sidney Green describes basketball coach Jerry Tarkanian

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sidney Green recalls missing his high school prom to play in the McDonald's All-American Game

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Sidney Green remembers the players at the 1979 McDonald's All-American Game

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Sidney Green talks about the prominent basketball players of New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Sidney Green describes his discipline as a student athlete at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sidney Green describes Coach Jerry Tarkanian's basketball practices

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sidney Green remembers his physical training and diet regimen

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sidney Green talks about his basketball experiences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sidney Green describes the National Invitation Tournament game

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sidney Green talks about his college basketball statistics

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sidney Green recalls being drafted by the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sidney Green describes his first year with the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sidney Green remembers his teammates on the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sidney Green recalls Michael Jordan's first year with the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Sidney Green talks about his experiences with the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sidney Green recalls being traded from the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sidney Green remembers playing for the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sidney Green recalls buying a home for his mother in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sidney Green talks about the accomplishments of the New York Knicks

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sidney Green remembers his strongest basketball opponents

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sidney Green describes his teammates on the New York Knicks

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sidney Green describes his relationship with his wife

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sidney Green recalls playing for the Orlando Magic

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sidney Green remembers being traded to the San Antonio Spurs

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sidney Green remembers coaches Larry Brown and Jerry Tarkanian

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sidney Green recalls being traded to the Charlotte Hornets

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sidney Green remembers Alonzo Mourning

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sidney Green talks about his retirement from the NBA

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sidney Green recalls his jersey retirement ceremony at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sidney Green talks about his philanthropic foundations

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sidney Green recalls coaching at South Hampton College in South Hampton, New York

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sidney Green talks about his coaching experiences at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Sidney Green describes his coaching experiences at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Sidney Green describes his coaching experiences at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sidney Green describes the 2002 March Madness competition

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sidney Green recalls watching his son play for the University of Florida

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sidney Green remembers becoming the Chicago Bulls team ambassador

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sidney Green shares his analysis of the 2012 Chicago Bulls

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Sidney Green talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Sidney Green describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Sidney Green reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Sidney Green reflects upon his life and how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Sidney Green narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$5

DAStory

11$5

DATitle
Sidney Green describes his upbringing in Brooklyn, New York
Sidney Green remembers his strongest basketball opponents
Transcript
What was life like growing up for you? I mean can you describe where you lived, and then what were some of the sights, and sounds, and smells of growing up?$$Well, it was wonderful, you know. My--I lived in a six--well, let me start from scratch. Moving from Harlem [New York, New York] to Brooklyn [New York]--remember, we lived on Jerome Street in Brooklyn--East New York section of Brooklyn. We lived on Jerome Street for about a, a year, and then my mother [Lucretia Simmons Green] found a bigger apartment--bigger home for us--for nine of us that was living--well, it was ten of us that was living in a apartment; she found a six room apartment right around the corner on Pitkin Avenue, and I remember the story she told me. She, she was walking and the then landlord was doing some work outside the apartment, and he had a sign, you know, "Apartment for Rent," and she inquired about it and he asked her how many kids she had, and she said this is the only time she ever had to tell a different story--I don't wanna use the other word but, but she said she had to because she needed a bigger place, so he asked her how many kids that she had, and she said four (laughter), and he said, "Okay." And a few weeks after that, when we moved in, he noticed all the kids (laughter). It was four plus six more, and he was like--saying something in Spanish; he said she did not wanna hear what he was asking her in Spanish 'cause he didn't speak English. But his--the landlord wife told her, you know, that, you know, "I thought she said she only had four, and she bringing all these kids." (Laughter) But he accepted her, but one thing my mother always did is she always paid her rent on time, and she always kept a clean apartment and kept us in a respectful way. And after he saw my mother's characteristics on how she was raising us, he accepted her, and we wound up living there for seventeen years--eighteen years in that, in that apartment.$$Now this is--this is quite a job, you know, when you really think of--you know, when you reflect back on something like that. There is someone who's working as a domestic--$$Um-hm.$$--and she's gotta feed what--nine children? I mean she's got (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) It was ten of us.$$Ten, yeah.$$Yeah, it was ten (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And--$$And my sister, my oldest sister [Essie Mae Walton], was living in the Bronx [New York]; she was married--she got married at that time (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay, so she wasn't there to help.$$She wasn't there, no, so it was ten of us.$$So, this is, this is really a, a--she did a--you know--a job!$$I think she did a phenomenal job, the best that--she always said she did the best she could and, as I've told my family, you know, to this day, it was up to us to take it to another level for her, to make it better. Unfortunately, some didn't--some decided to go a different route but, you know, she did a phenomenal job under the circumstances.$$Right. And this is New York City [New York, New York] where you don't necessarily have like the, the village kind of, you know, situation you might have in South Carolina or someplace where there are other relatives always around, and people you know (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) No, she, she did it--she did it on herself with her character, integrity, and she was able to win a lotta people over in regards on how she tried to raise us, and keep us all together. And our, our closest friends was our landlord--the ones who--and also the one--the, the residents who lived on the sec- we lived on the third floor. And also the surrounding neighborhood was, you know, a lotta Puerto Ricans, you know; they were our friends. They really brought us in and, and accepted us and made us feel like, you know, we were part of their family as well.$$Okay, okay. So, it was a lotta Puerto Ricans in the neighborhood where you grew up?$$That is correct.$$Okay, all right. Did you learn how to speak Spanish?$$Oh, yeah. I have a brother, I think, who--I wanna make sure (laughter)--Wilbert [Wilbert Green] is a--totally converted, and my brother Wilbert, he worked in a grocery store right downstairs and they, they brought him in like, like he was their family 'cause they liked him, and he wind up working in a grocery store, and learned how to speak Spanish better than how everyone else was speaking Spanish in the neighborhood, and to this day, we still, you know, say--kid him that he's a fully converted Puerto Rican, yeah so.$$(Laughter).$$It's in, it's in his blood wholeheartedly.$So, who is your--when you were playing, who was your toughest opponent that you faced, do you think?$$Individually?$$Well, as a team and as individual players, you know. Who were the toughest (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Celtics [Boston Celtics].$$The Celtics? Really?$$Kevin McHale was one of the toughest players I ever had to defend. He was so uncanny, he was so imposing; he had unbelievable post moves--up and under--just so, so good; he was just so good no matter, you know, our scout report was to be aggressive with him and deny him from his position on the box that he wanted, he always found a way to get there with his footwork, and long arms and--you know; it was like pick your poison playing against the Celtics 'cause you have--try to stop Kevin McHale from doing--and Parish [Robert Parish] doing their thing, and you have, of course, Bird [Larry Bird] out there, and you have a great point guard in Dennis Johnson, God bless him--his soul. It was tough, but they were one of my toughest teams that I've ever had to play against. I mean all--every team in the NBA [National Basketball Association] is tough, but in that year--those years with Bird and (unclear). And then, of course, the Lakers [Los Angeles Lakers], you know, with Magic [Magic Johnson], and Kareem [Kareem-Abdul Jabbar], and Worthy [James Worthy], and Jamaal Wilkes and, you know.$$Now here's Kareem; you--that, that must have been something to play against him--somebody that you've watched as a kid.$$Oh, yeah, oh, yeah (laughter). I remember my first year playing against Kareem was my rookie year; he--you know, I got in the game to defend Kareem and he, he knew I was in awe by him and, you know, first couple a possessions, you know--bang, bang, bang, and one time--next possession he--I went up for a rebound and he tried to go over me; went over my back and hit me on my head with his elbows and that woke me up quick, you know (laughter). That awe that I had of Kareem just evaporated after that hit, and I said, "Okay, I'm in a war now," (laughter) you know, so I always--when I see him, I always kid him about that experience I had with him on that, on that, on that game. But he was a remarkable player.$$Now, is he--do you think--I've often thought--now this is just me look--well, watching--I was at a game once with the Bulls [Chicago Bulls] and the, and the Lakers when they had Artis Gilmore, and if Artis Gilmore was 7'1", how tall was Kareem? Kareem seemed like he was taller--much taller than Artis Gilmore.$$I think they say he was 7'2"; he was about a inch taller than him.$$Yeah, but I don't know; seem like he was much taller, but I don't know if that's (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Kareem, his physique was long and, you know--long, and Artis had a, you know, bigger body width wise.$$Okay.$$Yeah, width wise.$$Maybe just a optical thing--$$Correct.$$But, yeah, he looked a lot longer. He is made long, so he has longer arms and everything else--$$Um-hm.$$--so, yeah. So he just looked gigantic. I said, "Now, how in the world," (laughter). They're not even close to the same--they looked like they were close to the same size, you know, walking around, you know.$$Both great players.$$Yes, right.$$Both great players.$$And Gilmore was gone from the--he, he was--he was not playing with the Bulls anymore; he had just left, I guess, right (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) No, he was with--he was with the Spurs [San Antonio Spurs].$$Right, right.$$With the Spurs, yeah, I think it was--yeah.$$Okay. Now, now, do you get a chance--when you're, when you're playing an opposing team, do you get a chance to know the players on the other teams in the NBA? Do y'all ever eat together after the game, or do they--or do, do the (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) The game is so--you know--well, certain players on certain teams you probably know from, you know, the summer, or going on your NBA trips during the summer, you know, but--yeah. Yeah, but it's--you know, it's part of the professional sports. As far as embracing and hugging and figuratively kissing each players before games, you know, I never unders- you know, my objective was to, to beat you.$$Okay. Now, I always wondered--we, we see certain teams play, and the guys come out and they act like they're, they're greatest friends in the world, you know. I just wonder if they hang out after the game, or what, you know--how, how well the--your team knows the opposition, you know; that's what--$$Yeah, I, I (unclear) now--I didn't wanna warm our hearts up to my opponents too much. If I knew somebody on the opposing team I just--I say, "Hi," but just leave me alone, 'cause I gotta focus on what I gotta do for my team.

Ralph Sampson

Basketball player Ralph Sampson was born on July 7, 1960 in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Standing at 7’4’’, he was born with a natural talent for basketball. Sampson attended Harrisonburg High School, where he led the basketball team to victory in two State AA Championships in 1978 and 1979. Sampson then went on to attend the University of Virginia, where he received his B.A. degree and played for the university’s basketball team, the Cavaliers. During college, Sampson won three Naismith Awards for National Player of the Year and was only the second person to do so. He also received an unprecedented two Wooden Awards for Player of the Year. In 1980, Sampson and the Cavaliers won the National Invitation Tournament. In 1981, the Cavaliers made it to the NCAA Final Four.

Referred to as the most recruited college basketball player of all time, Sampson was the first pick in the 1983 NBA draft. Drafted by the Houston Rockets, Sampson won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award and played in the NBA All-Star Game for the first of four times. In 1984, the Rockets drafted Hakeem Olajuwon and the two came to be known as the “Twin Towers,” an unstoppable basketball duo that played together in 1985’s NBA All-Star Game. Sampson was named MVP for that game, and earned a spot on the All-NBA Second Team. In 1986, Sampson injured his knee and was traded to the Golden State Warriors. He went on to play for the Sacramento Kings and the Washington Bullets. Unable to fully recover from several knee and back injuries, Sampson retired in 1992.

In 1996, Sampson was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame. In 2002, Sampson was named to the Atlantic Coast Conference 50th Anniversary Men’s Basketball Team, a position that honored him as one of the 50 best basketball players in the history of the ACC. Sampson founded The Sampson Group, a consulting group, in 2005. In 2006, he went on to found Winner’s Circle Community, an online community dedicated to providing a forum for open and informed communication. That same year, Sampson also founded the Winner’s Circle Foundation, an organization to help young athletes achieve success. In 2010, he published a book entitled Winner’s Circle: The Ralph Sampson Game Plan; What Great Players Do Before, During and After the Game to help young athletes mentally prepare for and achieve success.

Ralph Sampson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on…

Accession Number

A2010.073

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/14/2010

Last Name

Sampson

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Waterman Elementary School

Thomas Harrison Middle School

Harrisonburg High School

University of Virginia

University of Virginia Darden School of Business

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ralph

Birth City, State, Country

Harrisonburg

HM ID

SAM04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

It Takes Team Work To Make A Dream Work.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

7/7/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pancakes, Bacon, Eggs

Short Description

Basketball player Ralph Sampson (1960 - ) was one of the most recruited college basketball players of all time. He won three Naismith Awards and an unprecedented two Wooden Awards in college, and was a four-time NBA All-Star with the Houston Rockets.

Employment

National Basketball Association

Baloncesto Malaga

James Madison University

Richmond Rhythm

Phoenix Suns

Ralph Sampson Sportswear Inc.

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:1182,25:5498,131:6494,147:41972,554:47140,721:55370,806:60018,905:73389,1063:73681,1068:78036,1088:85164,1254:87351,1348:93290,1385:94258,1397:102331,1564:104202,1592:105445,1606:114260,1745:117200,1864:144470,2182:146465,2221:160805,2393:165310,2446$0,0:16804,293:31440,637:32340,648:32740,653:50940,1024:51190,1030:51690,1158:55110,1272:55430,1294:85101,1580:85695,1587:88467,1625:99978,1863:112862,2063:118198,2273:140229,2745:156885,3020:175718,3279:178982,3309:179492,3315:182144,3377:188848,3458:196100,3567
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ralph Sampson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ralph Sampson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ralph Sampson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ralph Sampson talks about learning about his maternal grandfather through stories

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ralph Sampson describes his likeness to his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ralph Sampson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ralph Sampson talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ralph Sampson recalls his paternal grandfather's career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ralph Sampson remembers his paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ralph Sampson describes his likeness to his father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ralph Sampson talks about his father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ralph Sampson describes his mother's career

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ralph Sampson describes his parents' early relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ralph Sampson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ralph Sampson remembers Christmas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ralph Sampson recalls his neighborhood in Harrisonburg, Virginia, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ralph Sampson recalls his neighborhood in Harrisonburg, Virginia, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ralph Sampson remembers Waterman Elementary School in Harrisonburg, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ralph Sampson talks about his early growth spurts

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ralph Sampson talks about his experiences at Thomas Harrison Junior High School in Harrisonburg, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ralph Sampson remembers his extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ralph Sampson describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ralph Sampson talks about his early influences

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ralph Sampson recalls playing basketball at Thomas Harrison Junior High School in Harrisonburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ralph Sampson remembers the role of sports in his family

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ralph Sampson recalls his early experiences of religion

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ralph Sampson remembers playing basketball at Harrisonburg High School in Harrisonburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ralph Sampson talks about his basketball teammates at Harrisonburg High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ralph Sampson recalls the college basketball recruitment process

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ralph Sampson remembers his senior year of high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ralph Sampson remembers his college decision process

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ralph Sampson recalls visiting his top four college campuses

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ralph Sampson describes his decision to attend the University of Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ralph Sampson talks about LeBron James' career

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ralph Sampson describes the collegiate basketball conferences

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ralph Sampson recalls his transition to the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ralph Sampson remembers his sophomore year at the University of Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ralph Sampson describes his decision to complete his degree at the University of Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ralph Sampson talks about his academic experiences at the University of Virginia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ralph Sampson describes his experience in the NBA draft

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ralph Sampson reflects upon the impact of the NBA on his life

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ralph Sampson remembers his teammates on the Houston Rockets

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ralph Sampson talks about his career with the Houston Rockets

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ralph Sampson remembers playing in the NBA All-Star Weekend

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ralph Sampson talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ralph Sampson recalls being traded to the Golden State Warriors

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ralph Sampson remembers being traded to the Sacramento Kings

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ralph Sampson describes his transition to the EuroLeague

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ralph Sampson talks about his knee injuries

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ralph Sampson recalls playing against Michael Jordan

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ralph Sampson remembers coaching at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ralph Sampson recalls founding Ralph Sampson Sportswear, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ralph Sampson talks about the Winner's Circle Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ralph Sampson remembers Kristal Watson

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ralph Sampson talks about the Winner's Circle Foundation's after school program

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ralph Sampson describes his book projects

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ralph Sampson reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Ralph Sampson shares a message to future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Ralph Sampson reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Ralph Sampson remembers Christmas
Ralph Sampson describes his decision to attend the University of Virginia
Transcript
And now, tell me why was that particular Christmas with the--sounds like a Charlie Brown tree--$$(Laughter).$$--(Laughter) why was that one of the best Christmases?$$Because we had, you know, you go down and cut down your own tree. I think that was that may have been the year that and probably was that we kind of found out there was no Santa Claus either. And I think back at it at this point because that tree was my sisters [Valerie Sampson and Joyce Sampson Franklin] remember that tree very well as well even today. And it just was one of those years that everything that, that if you look back at it now you realize that parents [Sarah Blakey Sampson and Ralph Sampson, Sr.] may have been a little stressed out financially and trying to get things done because, you know, it could have went down three blocks and bought a Christmas tree, but we went to the country and cut one down. So I think that type of symbolic adventure going to the country and cutting a tree down instead of going and picking one up, put it on your car dragging it home made it more special. As far as remembering how it was done because you can do that every year and go down to the lot and pick one out but if you go in the country and chop one down, I think that's more, you would remember that a little bit more so and realizing that you can kind of see how that kind of affects a young kid and chopping it down and bringing it home and putting it up and making sure it has water on it, make sure it still want to live a little bit and then you go through the Christmas not knowing, you know, as a kid what that all means but also that we can remember back I think we were in our car and mom and dad were shopping and we were all in the backseat and they were getting stuff for Christmas and I was a little bit older and I can see they put the trunk up. I looked under the back window and you can see toys and stuff in the bag and said, "Oh, that's our toys." And they would close the trunk pretty quickly and say, "Oh, no, that's just stuff, that's just stuff we got." So, you know, like okay is there a Santa Claus, is there not Santa Claus, well, kind of what's going on with that. So that whole Christmas had a lot of that around it, the food, just the, you know, the being home spirit back then where it was very peaceful, very quiet, very symbolic to me as far as cutting down a tree and then also having those toys there under that tree as well.$I was the--still didn't know where I was going to school. I had the ability to try out for the 1979 Pan American team which I made, first high school player to make that team. And that was in Indiana University [Bloomington, Indiana] with Bobby Knight [Bob Knight]. I still hadn't picked a school so now he's recruiting me again and I'm on the campus and he got me there for a month and I'm playing and training and working out and maybe go to Indiana. I said, "No, no I don't wanna go to Indiana," you know, Bobby Knight that whole thing I didn't wanna quite do that. So I still didn't know where I wanted to go to school and then when I got back from that training and I make the team and we go for the summer to play and my mom [Sarah Blakey Sampson] said, "You need to make a decision, you know, the time--." I said, "I just don't know where I wanna go to school." So we set a date and said, "You gotta make a decision by this date," so setting this date so we had all the meetings and all the press and fanfare, press conference such and such et cetera and I still didn't--that night before I didn't know where I wanted to go so there was a lady that was very close to my mother at work and her family whatever, almost like a godmother and I went to her house that night, spent the night and the next day didn't go to school 'cause I--nobody--he didn't want nobody harassing me. Like I said, I don't know where I'm going to school, I didn't really know. So if you can imagine being in the, in the field house in this high school gymnasium and the stands filled with people outside the door and not even the top four University of Maryland [College Park, Maryland] and Lefty Driesell knocking at the door, "Don't go to no school. Let me in. I need to talk to you one more time." He had a guy named John Lucas [John Lucas II] that I became friends with 'cause I, one of those years that I went to camp in Maryland and John Lucas became a friend of mine even after the fact played with him in the NBA [National Basketball Association] and don't go, don't go to Maryland, go to (unclear) we'll give you a job and all this. Okay, great. He was at the door beating at the door so I come in the back of the gym. By that time I was still debating where to go to school and then when I get to the gym, I get there and tell my mom, I said, "I wanna cancel this. I don't, I don't really know where I wanna go." And she said, "Look you make a decision today so you go back there and you figure it out." So when I get there, I come out, I start evaluating I said, "Okay, I'm going to University of Virginia [Charlottesville, Virginia]." So told my coach [Roger Bergey]. He called the other school and said, "This is where he going to school at and this is what he's gonna do." So I get to the podium and they introduce, introduce my mom and dad [Ralph Sampson, Sr.] sitting beside me and we were talking about it and I said to the media, I said, "I think I'm going to University of Virginia." That word, "I think" became "you don't know," you know. I gave my reason so I did that so this whole business so he thinks he's going to Virginia but there might be a chance that he won't. So anyway then after I signed the paper then it's, you know, I'm at Virginia. So that happened, big hoopla and radio station and all the stuff in the State of Virginia and things happened so now I'm (unclear) Virginia Cavalier and so on and so forth, and then after the fact a couple days later, the coaches came over, we signed the papers and, and I became a Cavalier.

Harrison B. Wilson

University President and College Basketball Coach Harrison B. Wilson was born on April 21, 1925 and is a native of Amsterdam, New York. Wilson is the fifth of seven siblings. His mother was a school teacher and his father worked in construction. Wilson served in the United States Navy from 1945 until 1947, when he enrolled at Kentucky State University at the age of nineteen. There he received his B.S. degree, was an honor student and a star athlete in basketball, football, baseball and track.

In the early 1950s Wilson received his M.A. degree and his D.H.S. in health science and administration from Indiana University. Between the ages of twenty-three and thirty-nine, Wilson worked as a professor, administrator and coach at Jackson State College (now Jackson State University). Wilson was the head basketball coach from 1951 to 1960. He then became chairman of the Department of Health and Physical Education from 1960 until 1967. Additionally, he became chairman and professor of health and physical education at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee that same year as well. Wilson then briefly worked at Fisk University as the assistant to the President of Fisk before being named President of Norfolk State University in 1975. During Wilson’s term at Norfolk, which spanned over three decades from 1975 until 1997, Norfolk State University’s annual budget increased from $14 million to $86 million, enrollment increased from 6,700 students to 8,100 students, and the number of faculty and staff has grown from 377 to 412, with a student-faculty ratio of twenty-two-one. The University also added fourteen new buildings and acquired fifty-one acres of land during Wilson’s tenure.

Upon his retirement in 1997, Wilson was honored by Old Dominion University as one of their Strong Men and Women Excellence in Leadership series. Wilson is active in a number of boards and organizations, including the board of directors of Virginia National Bank, the lay advisory board of DePaul Hospital, the Virginia State Advanced Council on Vocational Education, and the board of directors of the Virginia Health, Welfare, and Recreation Planning Council. Wilson is also a member of the Alpha Kappa Mu fraternity.

Wilson is married to Dr. Lucy Wilson, and he is the father of six children.

Harrison B. Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 11, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.012

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/11/2010 |and| 5/13/2010

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

B.

Organizations
Schools

Kentucky State University

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Harrison

Birth City, State, Country

Amsterdam

HM ID

WIL51

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Saratoga, New York

Favorite Quote

God Bless America.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

4/21/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chesapeake

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ham, Chicken

Short Description

University president and college basketball coach Harrison B. Wilson (1925 - ) was president of Norfolk State University in Virginia. He was also on the board of directors of Virginia National Bank.

Employment

Jackson State University

Tennessee State University

Fisk University

Norfolk State University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Harrison B. Wilson's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his paternal great-grandfather, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his paternal great-grandfather, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his paternal great-grandfather, pt. 3

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his paternal grandfather's life after the Civil War

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his father's inheritance

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his mother's family

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his paternal uncles

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his father's move to Amsterdam, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his early years in Amsterdam, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson describes the president's house at Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his father

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson describes Amsterdam, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls Theodore Roosevelt Junior High School in Amsterdam, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers the influence of Joe Louis

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls boxing throughout his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his father's discovery of his boxing activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his reckless teenage behavior

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls his competition with classmate Rocco Petrone

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers being denied from the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls joining the U.S. Navy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about serving at Naval Station Pearl Harbor in Hawaii

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his service as a corpsman

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about World War II

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers working as a surgical assistant

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers visiting the South, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers visiting the South, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson describes Kentucky State College for Negroes in Frankfort, Kentucky

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls being hired at Jackson State College in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson describes Jackson State College

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers meeting a Chicago Bears football player

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson describes how his college work prepared him for Mississippi

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about changes in Mississippi collegiate sports

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about Medgar Evers

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls being arrested in Mississippi

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes Medgar Evers' personality

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls the civil rights activities in Mississippi

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls leaving Jackson State College in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers becoming reacquainted with Lucy R. Wilson, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers becoming reacquainted with Lucy R. Wilson, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls proposing to Lucy R. Wilson

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers marrying Lucy R. Wilson, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls being hired at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about Walter S. Davis

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers marrying Lucy R. Wilson, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls negotiating his wife's salary, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls negotiating his wife's salary, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his work at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers the speakers at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University and Fisk University

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his duties at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers buying his home in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers buying his home in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls being hired at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls his first impression of Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his work at Fisk University

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls the support of his wife

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his challenges at Fisk University

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls his interviews for university president positions

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his qualifications for university president

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers vying for the presidency at Norfolk State University, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers vying for the presidency at Norfolk State University, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his leadership of the Norfolk State University board

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his friendship with Virginia Governor Mills Godwin

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his father's legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his early work as president of Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls building the president's home at Norfolk State University

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his political moves as Norfolk State University president, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his political moves as Norfolk State University president, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls building the L. Douglas Wilder Performing Arts Center in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers improvements he made at Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls building the athletic facility at Norfolk State University, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls building the athletic facility at Norfolk State University, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson reflects upon his life

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson reflects upon his legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson reflects upon his legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson describes how he would like to be remembered, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes how he would like to be remembered, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his fighting background

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson narrates his photographs

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$9

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Harrison B. Wilson remembers his early years in Amsterdam, New York
Harrison B. Wilson recalls the support of his wife
Transcript
Now, can you kind of tell us what the neighborhood--you, you said you grew up in an Italian neighborhood basically in Amsterdam.$$Yeah.$$Yeah what, what kind of housing was there and what was the neighborhood like.$$(Laughter) Well that's, that's an interesting story. They were usually the worst house in that community. We--my mother [Marguerite Ayers Wilson] had to, and I'm growing up I'm a little kid, I'm, I'm living wherever, wherever we moved to. But what I found that my mother would take the house whatever it was and beautify it (laughter).$$So you lived in several different places?$$Several, you had to move when they (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And this is, just so people viewing this will understand this is during the Depression right when you were--?$$Right, during the Depression.$$Yeah, you were five years old, old I guess--$$Well, let's say--$$--or four or five when the Great Depression hit.$$Yeah.$$Yeah.$$And, and you have to look at, look at what I'm seeing through my eyes too; that's the other thing. And what I'm seeing is my father [Harrison Wilson, Sr.] being respected in that community, Italian community where you had Italian people who were just over from Italy. They were immigrants. They were clannish. They were friends. They were Catholics, and they would have a vineyard that they'd build like they had in Italy and on Sundays the old guys would get under there and drink their wine that they, that they made. They made wine. And they had a Italian spaghetti, and what you call pizza today was a poor man's food because what they did the mother would, would bake bread and they had vegetables and she'd cook tomatoes and she'd throw whatever they had on that piece of bread and the kids ate that. We used to laugh at them when I first saw that, and then I got nerve enough to taste it and it was good. It was good. And then later, you know years later, that was pizza. You know, I don't know how many will admit that, but that's, that's, that's the Amsterdam, New York, story. And anyway, my father had the great respect of, of the Italian people, and I can tell you why because he worked hard, he loved his family and protected them, and loved my mother. My mother ran, ran the house. My father thought he was in charge, but my mother was always in charge. And it was amazing how he changed. Even my father changed from being somewhat--coming from a family where he had everything to having a family during the Depression years. My father, people won't believe this, but my father would walk five miles in snow to catch a ride to go to a job thirteen miles away. My father was a bricklayer. He was a plasterer. He was, he, he cleaned up. He started with a job, if it was a matter of working on the foundation he did that. And when, if the matter--you needed a man to plaster he could do that. He could lay brick. They didn't have unions then. And then he'd clean up the area around it.$Lucy [Wilson's second wife, HistoryMaker Lucy R. Wilson] helped me with my speeches. Matter of fact she wrote my speeches for me and, and when, when, when I got to be president of the univer- here [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia] she wrote all my speeches. Of course, I paid her, I paid her. I, I got somebody to mop the floors and did all that and so she didn't have to do that, that was my way of paying her and I'm joking for the sake of the record (laughter). She would kill me if I left here, but I wouldn't. No she's, she's steady the, the woman behind me. I, and I would tell people. I'd give a speech and tell them about her and how she came to my aid. A lot of people thought all the children were hers. They thought we'd been married all those years, and I, I didn't, I didn't feel right not letting them know what, what I did or what we did, and they shocked. Every Sunday we were at our church that we went to, we took a whole pew. And when this little baby girl [April Wilson Woodard] came, I had those four boys and one bigger girl that was three years old [Jennifer Wilson], but I had that little baby girl I had to carry it in, in the church, not to the church, in the church and I'd hold her for a few minutes, and when she'd started crying I'd give her to her mother. But anyway it was, it was, if I'd ever had any bad luck or any, any, anybody had ever done anything that was distasteful or hateful to me growing up or any, anywhere in my life, I felt like my, the Lord, and I, and I believe in God, pointed out who I should marry. I didn't know--you know, you never know for sure, but I'm telling you she--and I embarrass her a little bit saying this--but she was, she was just something special. She, the only way I could say it as if she was 6'9" and you were counting on her to make the NBA [National Basketball Association] and in her first year she made the All-Stars and, and took you to the national championship or, or the pro championship, well that was Lucy.$$She's the Magic Johnson of marriage (laughter).$$She, she was Magic Johnson of my life.$$Okay.$$And because--$$Now, now, now let's see, let me--$$All right go ahead.$$--let me get you to--$$And I'm gonna try to talk a little, little less and answer quickly and stop.

David Lattin

Professional athlete and entrepreneur, David Lattin was born on December 23, 1943 in Houston Texas. His mother, Elsie Lattin, was widowed when Lattin’s father died in 1949. Lattin attended elementary and secondary schools in Houston before graduating from Evan E. Worthing Senior High School in 1963. Lattin was named All-State and All-American both his junior and senior years and was the first Texas player to be named to a High School All-American team.

Lattin left Tennessee State in 1964 citing the lack of basketball competition. He returned to Houston and played the AAAU before receiving a full scholarship to attend Texas Western College in 1965 where he played with the Miners, a Division 1 team in the NCAA. Under the leadership of Coach Don Haskins, the Miners won the 1966 Division 1 NCAA National Championship with five black starting players. Lattin was named All-American during the 1966 and 1967 seasons.

In 1967, Lattin left Texas Western College after he was drafted as the number one pick by the NBA’s San Francisco Warriors. He went on to play with the Phoenix Suns, the Pittsburgh Condors, and the Memphis Tams, ending his professional career with the Harlem Globe Trotters from 1973 to 1976. Returning to school, Lattin earned his B.S. degree in business administration and started several successful business ventures including Your Maison Housing.

Lattin was inducted into the Texas Black Sports Hall of Fame and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2007. That year, he also wrote Slam Dunk to Glory.

Lattin has a son Clifton, a daughter Leslie, and several grandchildren.

David Lattin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 11, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.016

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/11/2010

Last Name

Lattin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

L.

Schools

Blackshear Elementary School

William E. Miller Junior High School

Evan E. Worthing Senior High School

University of Texas at El Paso

Tennessee State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

LAT04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mexico, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

The Judge.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

12/23/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Corporate foundation executive and basketball player David Lattin (1943 - ) was part of the historic Texas Western College team that was the first to start an all-black lineup at the NCAA championship. He went on to play for professional teams like the Phoenix Suns and the Harlem Globetrotters.

Employment

Golden State Warriors

Phoenix Suns

Memphis Tams

Harlem Globetrotters International

Republic National Distributing Company

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:1600,23:2160,31:3040,50:5360,87:7440,118:11680,252:30452,491:32804,526:38516,661:53741,788:54033,793:61552,1074:81822,1354:94930,1510:102935,1651:120215,2029:120653,2036:128026,2145:131311,2181:141350,2391:141670,2396:143750,2441:144470,2448:148230,2554:164936,2791:170312,2885:183019,3003:192746,3249:201240,3355:204210,3411:209340,3497:227622,3781:230150,3827:240580,3948:242020,4029:245780,4122:255960,4210$0,0:1048,13:2358,23:8960,56:19551,154:29740,306:30068,311:32610,358:33102,365:41110,468:41510,477:57666,751:57938,756:59366,800:62086,877:65962,1015:66234,1020:66914,1077:84165,1379:84520,1385:87431,1480:93578,1522:97924,1608:98334,1614:102434,1695:102926,1702:106862,1793:119790,1919:132678,2080:141266,2250:143318,2311:149622,2388:150196,2397:152328,2438:173120,2961:182206,3101:183447,3134:192572,3358:193010,3365:193375,3371:194981,3398:201245,3459:213947,3616:214375,3621:215830,3626:217343,3651:220006,3689:222086,3714:223850,3726:224305,3735:237400,3865:242734,3983:265058,4253:266612,4278:267204,4290:269054,4330:275060,4414:275860,4429:283277,4539:296698,4740:297230,4750:301334,4835:301714,4841:303766,4893:304298,4901:314453,5010:316597,5060:317937,5089:318808,5116:319813,5152:320148,5158:321354,5187:322359,5206:323833,5246:329570,5332:330220,5357:333230,5417
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of David Lattin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - David Lattin lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - David Lattin describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - David Lattin describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - David Lattin describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - David Lattin recalls his childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - David Lattin remembers his community in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - David Lattin recalls his involvement with the Boy Scouts and YMCA

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - David Lattin describes his experiences at Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - David Lattin describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - David Lattin describes his junior high school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - David Lattin describes his early success as a basketball player

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - David Lattin remembers his first basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - David Lattin remembers learning to swim

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - David Lattin describes his college scholarship offers

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - David Lattin remembers his mentor, Lloyd C.A. Wells

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - David Lattin describes his senior year at Evan E. Worthing High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - David Lattin recalls his experiences at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - David Lattin describes his first impressions of the Texas Western College of the University of Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - David Lattin describes the basketball team at Texas Western College of the University of Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - David Lattin remembers Coach Don Haskins

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - David Lattin talks about his transition to college basketball

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - David Lattin recalls the first game in the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - David Lattin talks about the NCAA final game against the University of Kentucky

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - David Lattin remembers Coach Adolph Rupp

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - David Lattin describes the final game of the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - David Lattin recalls his preparation for the NCAA finals

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - David Lattin talks about slam dunking

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - David Lattin recalls winning the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - David Lattin describes the aftermath of his victory at the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - David Lattin recalls being drafted by the Golden State Warriors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - David Lattin describes his professional basketball career

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - David Lattin talks about his children and business career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - David Lattin shares his opinion on student athletes' compensation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - David Lattin describes his mentorship efforts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - David Lattin reflects upon his legacy and message to future generations

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

12$4

DATitle
David Lattin describes his early success as a basketball player
David Lattin describes the final game of the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament
Transcript
Now you, you said very quickly about how, how you built up your stamina, stamina to be able to, to play the following year during that summer that you grew. Can you tell me again, you, you said you rode your bike to--$$Rice Stadium [Houston, Texas].$$Rice Stadium, okay--$$Right.$$--and what did you do?$$Ran seventeen hundred stairs a day in the sun at about two o'clock in the afternoon. I knew nothing about nutrition. I don't know why I didn't pass out (laughter).$$Okay, so you, you were ready once you got to the new school?$$Yeah, because it was--and actually even though I was running the stairs I was playing basketball as well, so I was getting my skills together and I was getting stronger and then I found out I could jump and then the rest is history.$$Okay, so now, what high school do you go to?$$I went to Worthing [Evan E. Worthing High School, Houston, Texas], Attucks [Crispus Attucks Junior High School; Crispus Attucks Middle School, Houston, Texas] first and then--Attucks was Worthing and then they built another, a bigger high school, senior high school and that was Worthing, so I left Attucks and went to Worthing.$$And tell my about the experience there?$$At Worthing?$$Um-hm.$$It was a good experience for me because in the eleventh grade, when I got to the eleventh grade then I was high school All-American and I was the first high school All-American from the State of Texas in basketball at that level and so things started to really happen for me after that because the day that I was All-American, yeah, I got to tell you this story. They was announcing that I was All-American, the principal announced on the PA system that, you know, "We have an All-American in our school in basketball and it's Big D [HistoryMaker David Lattin]" and all that stuff you know, so everybody was--had a great time with that and so I got home that afternoon and somebody had called my mom [Elsie Boyd Davis] and gave her this pitch about I was the high school All-American, so I had my feet propped up on the coffee table and she walked in the door, she said--I'll never forget this, this is funny, she said, "Okay, Mr. High School All, All-American, it's okay that you are high school All-American, but get your foot off my coffee table." I said, "Yes ma'am, yes ma'am, yes ma'am." (Laughter), "You still can't put your foot on my coffee table."$$Your mother, was she very supportive? Did she come to your games?$$My mother never saw me play but once when I was playing for the Globetrotters [Harlem Globetrotters]. If I told my mother that--she couldn't tell you what a rebound was. She knew nothing about the game, didn't really care. All she cared about was that I was having fun and I was happy, so she knew nothing about the game at all.$$Did your grades get better?$$My grades did improve. There was a teacher by the name of Ms. Douglas [ph.] in high school and she was an English teacher and she was quite serious about making good grades, about everybody making good grades, so she would stay back and make sure that all the athletes, not just me, but other athletes as well, if they weren't studying like they were suppose to then she would make sure that, that they got their homework together before they left school. And actually she would stay until after basketball practice was over and we would go down in her room and she would, she would work with everybody, make sure that everybody got their grades together; because it was very stressful going to school, being an athlete and then having to--and the last thing you felt like doing was studying after practice, so you know, it's very difficult. The athletes have to, have to, they have to compete in the classroom the same, just like everybody else, there's no excuse.$$Were there rules in place that said that athletes had to have a certain average?$$No, there was, there were no rules in place that they had to, but everyone was aware that they, that that's this was what they needed to do. I mean, the guy--the kids were not like the kids are now, you know, you could talk to us, you know. If somebody said something that made sense, I mean, most, most of us would listen, so, it's nothing like it is now.$With all the publicity about you and, and your team, to keep you from not being so cocky you said that the, the coach [Don Haskins] would make you work a little harder, but did you begin to see that it wasn't this tournament [1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament] and the players--it wasn't just about you and basketball, but that there was a bigger picture?$$Oh absolutely and of course, in the beginning we were just playing basketball, but you know, later in life, you know, the next year for instance--right after the game no reporters came to our locker room to talk to us. Nobody brought--put mics in front of our face to, to get an interview or anything. And so you know never--we didn't think about it that much, you know, we just were anxious to get back to El Paso [Texas] where everybody--we had a lot of love there, in El Paso. It's just that the newspaper guys were stunned, you know, they didn't know what to write after the game because, you know, they thought it was going to be a walk over. They didn't know what to say, you know, this team with five African American players on, on the court beat all white Kentucky [University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky]--it was impossible, can't happen. They really did not know what to say or what to write. They were just, they were just stunned and, and no one after the game mentioned anything about five African American players had defeated all the white boys at Kentucky, nobody talked about that, not until next year when it really, when it really hit home and Sports Illustrated wrote articles and started writing and stuff about all of the, the African American players that had beat all white Kentucky, that's when it really, really, really hit home. No one said anything in the beginning because it took a while to catch on to what had happened.$$This, this--well, walk me through when you got off the bus to play this, this game, I mean, this, this changes history for the N- NCAA [National Collegiate Athletic Association]? Describe for me that game.$$You know, getting off the bus, first of all, we're living in a hotel where the Duke team [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina] and all its supporters stayed in the same hotel as we did. We didn't have hardly anybody there, just Bobby Joe Hill's brother and sister and a few others from Detroit [Michigan]. And they had "Go Duke" all over the place, I mean, I mean we couldn't hardly even walk out of the door, everything was Duke, Duke, Duke, Duke, Duke, Duke, Duke, not, nothing for Texas Western [Texas Western College of the University of Texas; University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas]. We didn't have not one little sign, not anything. So the bus driver, I told the story about the bus driver, the bus driver in my book ['Slam Dunk to Glory,' David Lattin], where I was the last one to get off the bus, you know, I'm always the last one to get off the bus. I would get--I was getting--I was disembarking and the bus driver said to me, "Why are you playing this game? Why are you wasting your time? You cannot beat Kentucky. You cannot beat them. They've got a white coach and that's Adolph Rupp. You, you African American guys think you can beat Kentucky? You're out of your mind, are you crazy? Why don't you just get back on the bus and let me take you back to the hotel and just forget about this game." (Laughter) So anyway, I didn't say anything, I just looked at the guy, you know, and proceeded on to the, to the game. I saw him after the game; he didn't say anything he just kind of looked straight ahead.$$So how it--because you said that everything, there was no signs and you had very few supporters there. What was it like walking out onto the court?$$Wow, you know, with the Confederate flags flying all over the place and you know, all the signs you know, just, you know, some of the things that I can't tell you that were said (laughter), "We got them by the toe now, they can't get away, it's all over." (Laughter) But it was, it wasn't intimidating for me. I never felt for one second that we were going to lose. I was hoping, I was hoping that I could stay in the game, you know, because, because the referees can control the game because they can just call fouls at random and control the game if they need to. This was a final game with every, every, with everyone looking, so I guess they called, called it as close to being right as they could. I had four fouls anyway, but that's as close as it could be.$$So you felt that the refs were more or less true to form?$$I thought as, as well as they could be. I, I, I mean there were fouls--the first foul against Pat Riley was not a foul, you know, and if you look at the tape over and over, and over, Pat--I talked to Pat about it--he said, "No man, it was a foul," you know, but still again I had to live with that. So I had to be very careful that I would--couldn't, couldn't foul out of the game. I had to be very, very careful. There were things I just couldn't do, I mean the coach had complained about the--about me, and the game and, and I talk about that in the book a little bit. The night before some of the games the coaches complained that they couldn't let me get away with some of the things I was doing, you know and I wasn't really doing anything, but just working harder under the basket doing what I do, you know, and that's about it, but--

Charles Holton

Former Harlem Globetrotter Charles Holton was born on September 3, 1930 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to Alice and Frank Holton. Holton attended St. Benedict School in Milwaukee, where he was a good athlete and played basketball. He graduated in 1948 at the age of eighteen. Holton was the first black to graduate from St. Norbert College in De Pere, Wisconsin with a B.S. in economics in 1952. Holton became a member of the Harlem Globetrotters, the then Chicago-based basketball franchise headed by legendary coach William “Pop” Gates.

Invited to tryout for the Harlem Globetrotters at Chicago’s St. Anselm’s Gym, Holton became a member of the Abe Sapperstein’s Globetrotters, the popular barnstorming Chicago-based basketball franchise. He became a Harlem Globetrotter during their glory years (between 1951 and 1957) and witnessed first hand the passing of the comic basketball star baton from Reese “Goose” Tatum to Meadowlark Lemon. Holton made the Southern Harlem Globetrotters, one of three traveling squads. His teammates included Leon Hilliard, Junior Lee, Chico Burrell and Babe Pressley. In 1954, Holton and the Globetrotters were warmly welcomed in Europe and later in South America. Holton left the team at the age of twenty-seven in 1957.

Holton began working in social services as an administrator for Milwaukee County the following year, a position he would retain until 1966. In 1967, Holton obtained his M.S.W. degree from the University of Michigan and began working for the State of Wisconsin as a social services administrator, where he would remain until 1996. In 1997, Holton became executive director of Milwaukee’s House of Peace, a Capuchin Franciscan Ministry that Holton would lead until retirement in 2000.

Holton lives with his wife, Carol S. Oakes, whom he married in 1969. His daughter is Miss Lori the public television children’s host and his uncle is Chicago police commander and award winning mystery writer, Hugh Holton.

Holton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.335

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2007

Last Name

Holton

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

St. Benedict School

St. Norbert College

University of Michigan

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Milwaukee

HM ID

HOL08

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Wisconsin

Favorite Vacation Destination

Door County, Wisconsin

Favorite Quote

Be Good To Yourself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Birth Date

9/3/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Barbecue (Ribs)

Short Description

Social service administrator and basketball player Charles Holton (1930 - ) played with the Harlem Globetrotters from 1951 to 1957. He then became social services administrator for the State of Wisconsin. In 1997, Holton became executive director of Milwaukee’s House of Peace, a Capuchin Franciscan Ministry, where he remained with until his retirement in 2000.

Employment

Harlem Globetrotters

House of Peace

State of Wisconsin

Favorite Color

Gray

Timing Pairs
0,0:5650,87:11323,168:12093,179:12709,189:16428,218:16716,223:17508,235:19380,271:19812,280:21180,304:21684,312:25930,361:32860,473:33256,478:34741,500:35137,505:36919,531:43840,567:45190,586:47800,635:48160,640:67902,955:76826,1208:90400,1327:93136,1412:114202,1652:114572,1658:115830,1677:116200,1683:117014,1697:117310,1702:121015,1743:121645,1751:122065,1756:123640,1772:124060,1777:128670,1805:131311,1817:131846,1823:132702,1833:133130,1838:137220,1887:142462,1951:149256,2081:161080,2198$0,0:738,13:5166,179:5904,192:6232,197:6560,202:9430,252:13408,275:15046,297:15358,302:16138,314:17464,342:18322,354:19804,378:20350,386:21286,400:21598,405:22378,417:24094,448:25810,483:26590,494:27292,506:28462,523:29710,543:30022,548:30880,561:31738,573:32362,583:32752,589:33220,597:40342,635:41350,646:41938,655:43198,666:48826,735:49414,744:49918,760:50422,766:51766,782:52690,796:53782,813:56470,855:57058,864:59074,889:59410,894:60166,903:60754,912:69914,943:70695,955:71334,971:73890,1010:74245,1017:75239,1035:77880,1048:78160,1053:88440,1247:89865,1280:93536,1307:104237,1396:105189,1405:109130,1456:109690,1465:115610,1583:117690,1623:128064,1773:135680,1823:142478,1921:145208,1965:145832,1975:146144,1980:148250,2018:155891,2051:157629,2082:160710,2132:167306,2215:168847,2237:169383,2247:169718,2253:170930,2258
DAStories

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charles Holton recalls his work for the House of Peace in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charles Holton talks about his health

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charles Holton reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Charles Holton describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Charles Holton reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Charles Holton talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Charles Holton reflects upon his experiences with the Harlem Globetrotters

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Charles Holton remembers Nathaniel "Sweetwater" Clifton

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Charles Holton talks about the contemporary Harlem Globetrotters

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Charles Holton recalls a challenging basketball game on the East Coast

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Charles Holton describes his daughters and granddaughter

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Charles Holton describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Charles Holton narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Charles Holton describes his experiences with the Harlem Globetrotters, pt. 2
Charles Holton talks about playing with the Harlem Globetrotters in Europe
Transcript
Well, all those games are tough, you know, that pounding and we played every night and sometimes twice a day with the Trotters [Harlem Globetrotters] and that pounding eventually takes its toll on the body. Played in some interesting places, we played in some wonderful places. There was a, Vancouver, British Columbia [Canada], you hit that floor and it was like bouncing off a mattress, it was so springy, a new gym that they had built. We hit a lot of new gyms, even high school gyms that were very nice and held quite a few people. I--and there, you know, it wasn't all fun and games, you hit that bus and you had to go to the next town and try to be ready. We didn't have, you know, laundry service, we had to wash out our own uniforms.$$So where would you do that? I mean, if you're on road?$$In the hotel.$$In the hotel--$$Yeah.$$--just in the sink?$$If you were in a town long enough--$$Yeah.$$--the team would send 'em to the laundry. But most of the times you were in a town, gone the next day, so.$$And did you ever play the next day in a dirty uniform, I mean, in the (laughter)--$$Oh, yeah, yeah, all the time (laughter). You know I had a roommate, Jesse Coffey, who, who would wash out that uniform every night. And it would get a little crusty (laughter) after a while. But, you know, we didn't have a trainer. If you, if you got an injury, you know, you found a doctor in the town you were in and then got treated that way. But it was--I mean these guys--. We didn't get, we didn't get meal money when we played in the states. And now (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So it just came out of your salary?$$--you read about these guys getting what, fifty dollars a day meal money, and then they're making millions, when we went overseas we got five dollars a day. Now, in all honesty you could take that five dollars, eat heartily and still have a couple of dollars for souvenirs (laughter). But, you know, to hear these players getting whatever it is for meal money is unbelievable when you think about the salaries they make, what do they need meal money for? You could take that money and donate it to the old timers, you know. So many things it's, things change.$Yeah, was it refreshing to be over there and be treated differently than (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes, yes, and, you know, they would look up to us [Harlem Globetrotters] like we were nine feet tall and (laughter) you know--we were compared to them, I guess, we were considered tall. But they enjoyed the basketball and that was the interesting thing. You go to those foreign countries and they enjoyed the basketball maybe more than the showmanship, and maybe they didn't understand some of the showmanship, but they did understand good basketball. Interesting thing was there were no teams in Europe. You know, you would have a few here and there, but basketball was not the sport, the worldwide sport that it is today. Later on when we went to South America we were amazed at how well some of the South American players played, had it all over the Europeans, and now it's, it's probably just the opposite. Rome [Italy] was an interesting place and being Catholic it was, it was interesting to have a chance to see the pope who had just come off an illness, I think it was Pius XI or XII [Pope Pius XII], so I went to St. Peter's Square [Vatican City] and--some of us went there. And we've had, subsequently we've had, and before that we've had private audiences with the popes who were in office at the time but I was never at one of those opportunities. Played in bull rings, swimming pools.$$Played in swimming pools?$$Yeah. You just take the water, take it--with the water out (laughter). And, you know, they set up the court, we had to carry, we traveled on buses over there, and we had to carry a portable floor. Played in--$$Was, was it made out of some kind of a hard rubber or something or what was it?$$No, it was wooden.$$Wooden?$$Plywood I think.$$Okay. Okay.$$'Cause, you know, dribbling wasn't always fantastic. But it was interesting to get a windy day or a night and have to--well, sometimes the wind was so strong you had to shoot the ball here (gesture) for it to go there and that was, that wasn't easy. But most of the games were on, you know, on like a, an open field and they'd lay the court down and it's and we'd perform and then they'd take it up. 'Cause it wasn't real popular sport in Europe in those days.

Earl Francis Lloyd

Earl Francis “Big Cat” Lloyd, the first African American to play in a National Basketball Association game, was born on April 3, 1928 in Alexandria, Virginia. Lloyd was raised by his father, Theodore Benjamin Lloyd, and mother, Daisy Mitchell Lloyd, in the Berg area of Alexandria. Lloyd’s mother’s wisdom influenced him to become a good student and an outstanding athlete at Lyles-Crouch Elementary School and Parker-Gray High School. His coach, Louis Randolph Johnson, helped Lloyd to enroll at West Virginia State University (WVSU) after his 1946 high school graduation. The speedy defensive-minded Lloyd, at 6’7” tall, led WVSU to two CIAA Conference and Tournament Championships in 1948 and 1949. Lloyd was named All-Conference three times and was All-American twice, as highlighted by the Pittsburgh Courier in 1949 and 1950. Lloyd graduated from WVSU with his B.S. degree in physical education in 1950.

In 1950, Lloyd was among the first three black players drafted by an NBA team when he was signed by the Washington Capitols, and became the first black to play in an NBA game on October 31, 1950 as part of Washington coach Horace “Bones” McKinney’s starting five. Drafted by the U.S. Army in 1951, Lloyd captured four U.S. Army basketball titles. Returning to the NBA in 1952, Lloyd and teammate Jim Tucker became the first African Americans to win an NBA title in 1955 with Dolph Schayes and the Syracuse Nationals. That year, Lloyd averaged 10.2 points and 7.7 rebounds for Syracuse, beating the Fort Wayne Pistons four games to three in a seven game series for the NBA title. Lloyd closed out his playing career with the Detroit Pistons from 1958 to 1960. Over his professional career, Lloyd played in over 560 games in nine seasons and averaged 8.4 points and 6.4 rebounds per game.

In 1960, Lloyd served as assistant coach and scout for the Detroit Pistons. As a scout, he helped draft Bailey Howell, but failed to interest Detroit in future legends Earl “the Pearl” Monroe and Willis Reed. Lloyd served as the NBA’s first non-playing coach with the Pistons from 1971 to 1973. After basketball, he worked for Chrysler and as a job-placement administrator with the Detroit Public Schools. Further recognition of Lloyd began when his name appeared as the answer to a question on television’s Jeopardy quiz show in 1988. In the 1990s, Lloyd worked for the steel and auto parts company of former Piston, Dave Bing, who had played for Lloyd during his years at the helm of the Pistons.

Now retired and living in Tennessee, Lloyd and his wife, Ginny, have one grown child.

Lloyd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 16, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.093

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/16/2007

Last Name

Lloyd

Maker Category
Middle Name

Francis

Occupation
Schools

Parker-Gray High School

Lyles-Crouch Traditional Academy

West Virginia State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Earl

Birth City, State, Country

Alexandria

HM ID

LLO01

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

National Basketball Association

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

It Gets No Better Than That.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

4/3/1928

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Crossville

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Smothered Pork Chops

Death Date

2/26/2015

Short Description

Basketball player Earl Francis Lloyd (1928 - 2015 ) was the first African American to play in a game in the National Basketball Association.

Employment

U.S. Army

National Basketball Association

Detroit Pistons

Detroit Public Schools

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:273,8:637,13:15743,244:19520,261:20420,272:38775,455:49188,660:90900,1176:94610,1261:95030,1268:102680,1350:149084,1866:163450,2048$0,0:2720,51:5440,86:36154,491:42772,586:59836,890:69114,1112:126680,1656:127715,1664:128405,1671:183930,2264
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Earl Francis Lloyd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his older brothers

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his family's impact on his basketball career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers his schooling in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing sports at Parker-Gray High School in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers Coach Louis Randolph Johnson

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the community of Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his high school basketball championship game

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing basketball at Parker-Gray High School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers his high school teammate, Oliver Ellis, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his high school teammate, Oliver Ellis, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his decision to attend West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing basketball at West Virginia State College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about historically black college basketball programs

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his basketball playing style

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about his basketball training routine

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls the status of black sports stars during his college years

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls barnstorming black basketball teams

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his community at West Virginia State College

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his social life at West Virginia State College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls being selected in the NBA Draft

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about the culture of professional basketball

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his experience of discrimination at NBA training camp

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his African American heroes

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls being drafted by the Washington Capitols

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the racial discrimination in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing for Coach Horace "Bones" McKinney

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls joining the Syracuse Nationals

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing for the Syracuse Nationals

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls winning an NBA championship with the Syracuse Nationals

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers being traded to the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls his career with the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls Coach Dick McGuire's departure from the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about scouting for the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about Detroit Pistons center Reggie Harding

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls scouting Dave Bing and Cazzie Russell

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the Detroit Pistons star player, Bob Lanier

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers his tenure as head coach of the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes the challenges of coaching in the NBA

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his career after leaving the NBA

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd remembers serving as a job training program administrator

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd recalls counseling young, African American job applicants

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about his friendship with Dave Bing

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes Dave Bing's community programs in Detroit, Michigan, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes Dave Bing's community programs in Detroit, Michigan, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Earl Francis Lloyd reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Earl Francis Lloyd describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Earl Francis Lloyd reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Earl Francis Lloyd talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Earl Francis Lloyd reflects upon the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Earl Francis Lloyd narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Earl Francis Lloyd narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$5

DAStory

8$7

DATitle
Earl Francis Lloyd describes his family's impact on his basketball career
Earl Francis Lloyd recalls playing for the Syracuse Nationals
Transcript
Now are your other family members tall? Now you're 6'5" (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, I'm 6'7", just about.$$6'7", okay. All right.$$Well from what I understand in my immediate family, I'm the only tall person. But I understand that that my father's father, my grandfather, was a hulk. You know he was that big 6'6" black dude that everybody was afraid of. That's the only recollection I have of him.$$Okay.$$And that's where I got the genes that made me this size. But my mother [Daisy Mitchell Lloyd], she's a short lady man but it didn't matter. I mean she had tremendous presence, tremendous presence man. And, and what I really appreciate about her the most, she had a tremendous affinity for young people. I mean a lot of old folks, "Man these young kids, this, that and the other," you know, and to the day she died man, she would tell you that most young people who are messed up were messed up by some messed up adults. That was her mantra, you know, I mean and the young kids that I grew up with playing ball with man they--I mean man this lady was like the Holy Grail, man. So when people ask me what person had the single most effect on me, and they expect you to say--'cause you an athlete, they expect you to say my coach--high school coach, tremendous influence. Man, that lady at home man, and just to give you an example, when you play three sports, I mentioned this earlier, you're going to different places a lot and she would tell me, "You know, you going someplace where people don't know us and they will invariably judge us by how you conduct yourself." And her last word was, "Do not embarrass this family." And she wasn't talking about winning or losing. I mean she was talking about you know in a gentlemanly fashion you know how you were trained to conduct yourself, don't forget that. So I--you know it's--I had a decent upbringing. My father [Theodore Lloyd] was there for us, you know, I mean he was a breadwinner, and my mother was--I called her killer Joe sometimes man (laughter), you know.$Things are different now in pro sports.$$Oh yeah.$$Black athletes often live far away from the black community--$$Very much so (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) the community doesn't see them anymore.$$Well, that's what high visibility will do to you now. You know it--and then guys, you know, they feel like you know like the guys that say, man I'm not, you know, I'm not a role model, and I understand it what they're saying because--and I always said that if you can't find a role model under your own roof, you got a problem. And I--man, I had enough role models man I could have started an--I could have started an agency, counting my parents [Daisy Mitchell Lloyd and Theodore Lloyd] and my teachers, my coaches right down the line man you know and people in the neighborhood who cared about you, you know it's--$$So who was on the Syracuse [Syracuse Nationals; Philadelphia 76ers] team and how did you all do?$$You mean how we do--$$Yeah in the league [National Basketball Association] and who was on your squad with you?$$Oh we played, we had a good team. We had one main player. We had one big name player, Dolph Schayes, but we had a supporting cast to him man that was second to none really. We won the world's championship in 1954, '55 [1955] and it's--the thing that amazes me is that other folks were amazed at us winning. But man, we had attitude, you know, our attitude was before we left the locker room every night to play, and defensively, we would say, you know, eighty or under, we gonna win and we held a lot of folks under eighty points so we won a lot of ballgames but what they don't understand is, it's very important, it's really, really important to know your role. But knowing is not enough. You got to accept your role. My job, rebound, run the floor, and I had to guard the top scorer on every team. And you were in for it man, look, I got a lot of rest 'cause man you chasing George Yardley and Paul Arizin and Elgin Baylor, man that's enough to run you crazy. But somebody had to do it, and on my team, I was better equipped to do it than most of the other guys. I mean first of all you're not gonna play Dolph, who was our top scorer, on their top scorer, you're wasting him, you know. So I--it was a challenge to me.

Mike Glenn

NBA guard and television sports analyst, Michael Theodore “Stinger” Glenn was born on September 10, 1955 in Rome, Georgia. Growing up in Cave Springs, Georgia, his father taught and coached at the Georgia School for the Deaf while Glenn’s mother taught him at E.S. Brown Elementary School. Glenn became the top rated high school basketball player in Georgia, averaging 30 points per game when he graduated from Rome’s Coosa High School, third in his class, in 1973. An All Missouri Valley Conference college basketball player, Glenn graduated from Southern Illinois University with honors and a B.S. degree in mathematics in 1977.

Drafted twenty-third overall by the NBA’s Chicago Bulls in 1977, Glenn broke his neck in an auto accident and was released from the team. Later that year, he was signed by the NBA’s Buffalo Braves (now the Los Angeles Clippers). In 1978, Glenn signed with the New York Knicks, playing with Ray Williams, Michael Ray Richardson and the legendary Earl “The Pearl” Monroe. Known for his shooting accuracy, Glenn was named “Stinger” by his teammates. In New York, Glenn attended graduate business classes at St. John’s University and Baruch College and earned his stockbroker’s license. Moving on to the Atlanta Hawks, Glenn became the team’s all-time shooting accuracy leader – making better than half of his shots. In 1984, Glenn, a six-foot, three inch jump shooting guard, shot an astounding 58% from the field. Between 1985 and 1989, Glenn, as a Milwaukee Buck, shared backcourt duties with Sidney Moncrief, Ricky Pierce and Craig Hodges.

During the 1991-1992 NBA season, Glenn served as a sports analyst for ESPN and the Atlanta Hawks on WGNX SportSouth and during the NBA playoffs for TNT and CNN. During the 1992-1993 season, Glenn served as a sports analyst for two weekly shows on CNN, This Week in the NBA and College Basketball Preview. He continued to serve as the Hawks TV analyst until 2003, broadcasting an average of 70 games per year. In 2004, Glenn was appointed Commissioner of the new World Basketball Association, a developmental league that sends players to the NBA and professional teams abroad. Active in community service, Glenn recently celebrated the 25th Anniversary of his All-Star Basketball Camp for the Hearing Impaired, where he was honored with the NBA Walter P. Kennedy Citizenship Award. An avid collector of rare African American books, Glenn is the author of From My Library, Volume 1 and 2 and Lessons in Success from the NBA’s Top Players.

Glenn was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 9, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.108

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/9/2006

Last Name

Glenn

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Coosa High School

E. S. Brown Elementary School

Southern Illinois University

St. John's University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Mike

Birth City, State, Country

Rome

HM ID

GLE01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

Feed Him And Fan Him.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/10/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Television sports commentator and basketball player Mike Glenn (1955 - ) played in the NBA and was a television basketball analyst, author, and commissioner of the World Basketball Association.

Employment

National Basketball Association

Merrill Lynch

Atlanta Hawks

World Basketball Association

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:468,16:2730,76:12090,340:15912,408:17394,439:17862,446:19344,509:26926,552:27458,561:28218,579:28902,589:32018,636:33310,683:36502,730:36882,736:37262,742:40378,820:44254,890:55036,1004:59846,1088:60512,1098:61104,1107:61622,1115:62510,1128:74868,1386:75164,1391:75682,1400:84932,1492:85228,1497:87152,1530:91740,1614:104192,1750:104736,1762:105008,1767:105756,1780:107320,1805:107932,1816:112488,1931:113100,1941:113780,1955:117792,2046:122008,2141:124660,2207:132928,2279:134169,2306:135921,2361:136213,2366:136724,2374:140739,2447:141542,2462:148802,2548:149450,2558:152114,2634:152474,2660:152978,2668:155282,2715:155930,2726:164354,2920:165866,2955:173180,2989:173570,2996:174285,3010:176040,3047:176300,3052:176690,3062:178315,3170:178835,3179:179160,3185:179810,3196:182215,3249:182475,3254:186115,3330:187610,3361:188260,3375:189040,3390:191380,3444:191705,3454:192095,3461:194825,3515:195215,3522:201160,3534$0,0:540,84:16920,411:17910,491:34558,631:36910,679:37666,690:41026,763:41530,770:43714,923:47578,1044:68660,1327:68956,1332:69548,1341:70510,1373:71250,1384:78724,1538:89909,1671:91988,1755:92373,1762:94606,1799:94914,1804:98071,1861:99303,1906:99611,1911:100458,1924:103461,1998:109313,2064:117036,2211:119848,2369:132692,2571:135048,2646:135352,2651:136264,2679:136644,2686:137176,2695:151062,2927:158286,3042:159126,3058:159882,3068:161898,3114:165510,3185:172280,3270:176824,3373:177392,3390:177889,3407:179735,3447:183711,3551:184492,3561:188468,3641:188965,3649:190172,3679:202354,3853:203146,3876:206026,3937:206530,3946:207898,3970:213082,4081:215970,4102
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Mike Glenn's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes his parents' personalities and occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Mike Glenn describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Mike Glenn describes his grade school experiences in Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn describes his grade school experiences in Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn recalls his childhood passion for basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn describes his experiences at Coosa High School in Rome, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn remembers playing basketball at Coosa High School, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes his relationship with the Georgia School for the Deaf

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn remembers playing basketball at Coosa High School, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Mike Glenn recalls his decision to attend Southern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn describes his experiences at Southern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn recalls being drafted by the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn remembers recovering from a spinal injury

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn describes the beginning of his professional basketball career

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn remembers his teammates on the New York Knicks

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes his tenure on the New York Knicks team

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn recalls leaving the New York Knicks to sign with the Atlanta Hawks

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn describes his teams with the New York Knicks and the Atlanta Hawks

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn recalls memorable games from his professional basketball career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn describes his social life as a professional basketball player

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn talks about founding basketball camps for deaf children

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn recalls playing for the Milwaukee Bucks

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes Craig Hodges, his former teammate

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Mike Glenn's interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn remembers retiring from the National Basketball Association

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn describes conflicts between coaches and players in the National Basketball Association

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn remembers giving his jump shot the name Candace

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn describes his career as a stockbroker

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn talks about working on television as a basketball analyst

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn describes his commissionership of the World Basketball Association

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Mike Glenn describes the social factors that hold back talented basketball players

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn recalls how he began collecting first edition books

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn describes his book, 'Lessons in Success from the NBA's Top Players'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Mike Glenn talks about his historical book series, 'Lessons From My Library'

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Mike Glenn talks about meeting Charles Blockson

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Mike Glenn talks about 19th century African American boxer Tom Molineaux

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Mike Glenn describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Mike Glenn reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Mike Glenn describes his family life

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Mike Glenn describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Mike Glenn narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Mike Glenn narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Mike Glenn describes his relationship with the Georgia School for the Deaf
Mike Glenn recalls memorable games from his professional basketball career
Transcript
I know that you were considered at one time, was it, one of the best or the best basketball player in the state, I think--$$Um-hm. And that's pretty interesting, too. Yes, I was. Mainly 'cause of growing up at the deaf school [George School for the Deaf, Cave Spring, Georgia] and practicing and all this legacy that I had. I was voted number one player in the State of Georgia. I was in the top ten my junior year, and number one my senior year [at Coosa High School, Rome, Georgia], and had choices of colleges all over the country. So, it was really a wonderful time, a wonderful experience for me to go to that level that you recognize where it had come from. It had come from deaf kids, basically. It had come from a place where people didn't even want to go down to the deaf school and couldn't even--were afraid of these deaf kids, and I had so much joy and opportunity that came through my experience with deaf kids. So, I do that as a basis of my talk a lot of times, too. When I talk about having friends from all diverse cultures that all of the blessings I received basically emanated from my relationship with deaf kids.$$Could you sign?$$Oh, yeah. Of course I could sign before I could talk, you know. The girls really started teaching me first. I remember dad [Charles Glenn, Sr.] had this one girl on his team. Her name was Mildred, M-I-L-D-R-E-D, and her last name was Nelson, N-E-L-S-O-N. She was the best player on his team. Matter of fact, Mildred was the best player in the history of Georgia School for the Deaf. Mildred was a beautiful girl. She had smooth, dark beautiful skin. At that time, I thought she looked like a Hershey's bar (laughter). So, Mildred would start teaching me my ABCs and she started teaching me sign language and lessons on inclusion and lessons on sharing, and I would go to the games and I would clap for Mildred. Mildred was knocking down those jump shots and everybody always talked about Mildred Nelson. She was such a great player. And there was another player on dad's team named Lois Smiley. Now, these were the girls on his girls team, obviously. Lois was his best student. Lois was a brilliant math student. He'd teach her separately. Dad--I would go to dad's classes and do the multiplication tables before I started to school and I would do 'em in sign language and I would just compete with his students, and--but Lois was his brightest student by far and he would take her separately and teach her. And he really encouraged and pushed Lois, and Lois went to Gallaudet College, and now it's Gallaudet University [Washington, D.C.]. She was the first student from, black student from Georgia School for the Deaf, a segregated school and less of everything, to go to Gallaudet College, and dad was so proud of her and I was so proud of Lois 'cause she was a great student, great math student, went to Gallaudet, represented Georgia School for the Deaf. So, all that education and basketball was just coming together, and even today, I've had those ladies to come back to a basketball camp [Mike Glenn's All-Star Basketball Camp for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing]. I've started the nation's first basketball camp for deaf kids, and I've had Lois and Mildred to come back now, and I tell all of the young deaf kids, "This is why I'm here now, because of these deaf girls." This is how I learned how to play and I want them to respect them and love 'em and learn the legacy from them and carry forth the message that I got onto future generations.$Of all the people you've named and some you may not have named, is there any player that in a game where you just couldn't believe what they did? I mean, you know, you played in an era with Dr. J, [Julius Erving], [HistoryMaker] Dominique Wilkins comes in later, but like--is there any story about just--$$There are just--there's a lot of 'em (laughter). There's a lot of 'em. You know, once or twice a year you're going to have those kind of phenomenal games, experiences that some--you have some yourself and you see other players have it. I've seen--oh man, I've seen a lot of them. I've seen--of course Dominique had some tremendous games where he just gets on fire and nobody can stop him. I've seen Larry Bird have a tremendous game where he went for almost sixty on us and we're trying to put everybody on him, and it got to the point that it got comical, you almost cheered for the guy because you're putting everybody on him and the ball keeps going in and it's always funny. It's never funny to the coach, but you just realize that he's in that bubble, and I remember Cliff Levingston was laughing so hard that Bird was hitting all these shots falling out of bounds. I mean, Antoine [Antoine Carr], Kevin [Kevin Willis], me, everybody guarding him and actually it was funny because there's nothing you can do when somebody gets like that. I can remember situations where even like Albert King would get red hot on us, and Don Nelson who is one of my favorite coaches would just look on and say, "We got anybody who can stop him? Anybody can guard him." I mean, he just guarded (unclear) (laughter)--ask anybody, can anybody stop him? I mean, I like that creativity. It was fun at those kinds of times, you know. You try to come up with a strategy, a double team or something like that to stop him, but there were a lot of instances like that. Bernard King would get on a roll, and just knocking out shots, and you kind of forget about some of 'em. But there were a lot of great performances, and players live for that to get in that what they call a zone where they're hot and the basket just gets big and all you want is the ball. You don't even have to look, you just catch and you just let it go and it's gonna go (laughter).$$Now you being a great shooter already--I mean, do you have--is there any like particular game that you remember that you--you know, where you really impressed yourself?$$(Laughter) Yeah, yeah, yeah. There were a few of them, man. I remember a game particularly with the Knicks [New York Knicks], we were playing Cleveland [Cleveland Cavaliers]. I always shot good against Cleveland for some reason. They had some stat that I have the highest field goal percentage against them for a career. Even maybe today, higher then Kareem [Kareem Abdul-Jabbar] and everybody. I don't know, something about Cleveland that I would have these outstanding games, and they were a couple when we needed a big win in our playoff push and I had one of my best games maybe like--I don't know, maybe fourteen out of seventeen shots, and Red [Red Holzman] was just calling plays for me and the teammates trying to get you the ball. That's the most fun time you can have when at a timeout they're asking you, "Where you want the ball? What do you want?" So, that was a play there. There was another big game in Atlanta [Georgia] where it was the last game of the season. We needed this win to make the playoffs and we were playing the Bucks [Milwaukee Bucks] and I came off the bench. Ted Turner was the, always on courtside and had twenty-five off the bench that game, and again they were just running plays for me and the ball was just going in and Ted was just jumping up like a cheerleader, but it was the most important game of the season 'cause we needed that win to make the playoffs, and we won the game and I was able to come up with the twenty-five points that really propelled us into the playoffs which was very significant for the whole organization, so there were some games like that that really, really stand out in my mind, very memorable.

William Baxter

Former National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball official William C. Baxter, Jr. was born on May 16, 1940 in Harlem, New York at Columbian Presbyterian Hospital. His parents were Christine Juanita Segee Baxter Phillips and William C. Baxter, Sr. Baxter’s father owned a hat business in New York City. Baxter attended St. Augustine College on a basketball scholarship and received his B.A. degree in physical education in 1962. During the 1960s, he played guard in the summer pro-leagues and began officiating high school games in New York City. In 1972, Baxter passed the examination to become a college referee and began officiating for the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC). In 1975, Baxter received his M.A. degree in recreation and education from Herbert Lehman College in New York City.

Baxter has worked as one out of approximately twelve African American officials in the New York-New Jersey region. He is also one of the first African Americans to become a basketball official for major college games. Baxter officiated at major annual tournaments for the NCAA. At the same time, Baxter served as Director of Recreation for the Department of Parks and Recreation in the Bronx, New York for thirty-seven years. In 2000, Baxter retired as an ECAC official, but continued to serve as a referee at the high school and junior college levels.

Baxter is married to Thelma Baxter. They reside in Englewood, New Jersey. They have two daughters, Dana and Dawn.

Accession Number

A2005.194

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/10/2005

Last Name

Baxter

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

P.S. 68

Ps 157 Benjamin Franklin School

Cooper Junior High School

Commerce High School

St. Augustine's University

Lehman College

P.S. 65 Little Red School House

Search Occupation Category
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

BAX01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, Atlantic City, New Jersey

Favorite Quote

You Only Pass This Way Once, So Enjoy Yourself While You're Here.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/16/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pie (Apple)

Short Description

Basketball official William Baxter (1940 - ) was one of approximately twelve African American officials in the Eastern College Athletic Conference during the 1970s. Baxter also served as Director of Recreation for the Department of Parks and Recreation in the Bronx, New York.

Employment

New York City Department of Parks and Recreatioon

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:1395,35:4063,44:4630,55:8194,119:9652,139:9976,144:10300,149:18470,281:18902,288:19550,298:23454,392:32010,528:35475,580:39664,635:40036,642:45999,726:46780,742:60549,886:81566,1259:81854,1264:83294,1305:93778,1413:94170,1421:108774,1647:109588,1659:110328,1678:125205,1794:125985,1815:129990,1846:130494,1855:135390,1961:136758,2002:144938,2101:150936,2234:158080,2373:158688,2391:171834,2467:180914,2577:180368,2596:193244,2895:205006,2966:206680,3010:213030,3071:216160,3091:216736,3102:217024,3107:220768,3186:233450,3385:235250,3405$0,0:322,7:1078,18:35112,514:37906,561:46144,650:52790,732:60615,818:64890,901:65604,910:68968,950:70024,971:76448,1089:81754,1160:90498,1257:92330,1266:96334,1427:109490,1614:118670,1774:119660,1790:120110,1796:124620,1846:125076,2024:125380,2058:139044,2303:151945,2452:167038,2642:173670,2705:174550,2726:181740,2817:183315,2858:186015,2914:186315,2920:187065,2933:189915,2998:204336,3146:219597,3318:220112,3324:227219,3428:245774,3708:278300,4433
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of William Baxter's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - William Baxter lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - William Baxter describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - William Baxter describes his family's hat business and his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - William Baxter describes his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - William Baxter describes his parents' hat store in Harlem, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - William Baxter details his career as a recreation director and basketball referee

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - William Baxter describes his maternal grandmother, May Segee

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - William C. Baxter describes his paternal grandfather, Dr. John E. Baxter

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - William Baxter describes his three siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - William Baxter describes his childhood home and neighborhood in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - William Baxter describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - William Baxter describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - William Baxter describes New York City's Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - William Baxter recalls attending P.S. 157 and P.S. 68 in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - William Baxter remembers Harlem playground director, Holcombe Rucker

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - William Baxter describes his two part-time jobs in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - William Baxter recalls attending Commerce High School in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - William Baxter recounts his decision to attend St. Augustine's College in Raleigh, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - William Baxter describes his basketball scholarship to St. Augustine's College in Raleigh, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - William Baxter recalls playing basketball at St. Augustine's College in Raleigh, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - William Baxter remembers his speech professor, Julia E. Delaney

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - William Baxter talks about his summer jobs during college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - William Baxter describes his major and his college basketball experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - William Baxter describes playing semi-pro basketball

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - William Baxter describes teaching at a junior high school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - William Baxter talks about his wife and two daughters

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - William Baxter describes his work as recreation director for the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - William Baxter talks about the growth of recreational facilities in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - William Baxter talks about his various positions with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - William Baxter describes the rewards and challenges of his career

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - William Baxter describes conflicts between different ethnic groups at New York City's St. James Recreation Center

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - William Baxter describes being recreation director for the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - William Baxter talks about his wife's career

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - William Baxter talks about becoming a basketball officiate

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - William Baxter describes his basketball referee training

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - William Baxter describes the application process for a college basketball official

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - William Baxter describes his college basketball officiating career

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - William Baxter talks about fellow African American basketball officials

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - William Baxter describes referee calls and the physical demands of refereeing

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - William Baxter talks about officiating major tournaments and awards received

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - William Baxter describes his post-retirement activities and his role models

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - William Baxter reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - William Baxter describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - William Baxter describes people he has helped and his admiration for his wife

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - William Baxter shares his advice for young people

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - William Baxter describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

11$7

DATitle
William Baxter describes the rewards and challenges of his career
William Baxter describes his college basketball officiating career
Transcript
Let me come back to the challenges that you found as a recreation professional. What are some of the major challenges that you faced over your long career?$$Well, I know when I got to that recreation center [St. James Recreation Center, Bronx, New York], we had basically Jewish, Jewish personnel using the center as a senior citizen's center. However, there were a lot of Hispanics in the area who wanted to use our center who thought that they had been frozen out. So had to, and we invited them in to run their programs. Also we had to bring youth, youth programs in there also. So we had like a homework workshop and an after school program. We had senior citizens during the day. We had to mix the senior citizens with the youth, which was difficult. You had to, you had to get the Hispanic culture in there where they had, they had, they liked arts and crafts whereas the Jewish contingent, they wanted to go trips to Atlantic City [New Jersey] and places like that. Where the Hispanics all they wanted to do was, they wanted to have arts and crafts. They had, we had a feeding program we brought in there also. So it was very difficult to get the two cultures together, but it worked out after a while.$$How did you manage it? How did you, what resources did you pull in to help you do that?$$Well, we put the food program, we gave the card, they had some card players in there, we gave them a special room. The Hispanics wanted to engage in arts and crafts activities, we gave them a special area. We had a special area for the kids when they came in. We also had an environmental program in there we called the Bronx River Restoration Group was in there also. I'm floundering now, but just trying to touch base on how we did it. But we managed to get all those groups working there at one time and they all co-existed.$$When you were the top person for the borough, Bronx [New York] borough. What was your major challenges in that big position 'cause that was your last major position was it?$$Yeah, the major challenge was trying to motivate twenty-five and thirty year old workers to do, to do a job. It was very difficult to motivate people to work sometimes, especially when they were your peers at one time. We all worked at the same level at one time. I thought that was a major challenge to motivate them to be able to do certain things which they hadn't been accustomed to doing you know.$$All in all then, how many years did you work as a professional in the field of recreation?$$Thirty-seven.$$Thirty-seven years. Does that include the years, the summers that you worked between college [St. Augustine's College; St. Augustine's University, Raleigh, North Carolina]?$$Well, in fact, in those years I only worked two hours, two months in the summertime, but that was only a total of eight months. So when you leave they factor that time in. They factor that time in also.$$Very briefly, before we end this part of the tape, what did you enjoy about doing this kind of work?$$I enjoyed, when I run into, when I run to former kids that I worked with, when I run into them and I see that they're matured and they're grown up in a nice outstanding individuals and they say you were one of my role models, that makes me feel pretty good, you know. That they've done something, that they managed to stay out of trouble and then become productive in society and whatnot.$Do you recall the first college game that you officiated?$$Yeah.$$Where, where was that and what was the--$$Where was that? I think it was Pratt, Pratt Institute [Brooklyn, New York]. That was my first, my first college officiating game. My first varsity college game was at Queens College [City University of New York, Queens, New York]. I remember that vividly because it was my first varsity game. I think I started from there. When you come into college you do a, you go on the associates' list when you first get in. You doing it like freshman. At that time they had freshman basketball. You're doing a freshman game.$$When you started college officiating, how many games would you officiate a season?$$When I, when I first started or after you're seasoned?$$Well, after you, when you first started, how many were you doing?$$They don't give you that many. I had about, I'd say about a fifteen, fifteen games.$$These were night games, weekend games at the college level?$$Night games.$$Night games?$$Sometimes weekend, but after you become established you do somewhere from fifty to eighty, eighty to one hundred games, once you get started.$$A year?$$A year.$$A year.$$The top guys do, they do a one hundred games.$$How do you maintain your physical being for all of that?$$You have to stay in shape. You have to run, do a lot of running. I played tennis so that helped me out a lot. You have to do a lot of running to get ready for the season. They didn't want to see you very heavy. If you get too heavy, they, they drop you out, you know. Can't get too heavy, however, there are some guys that do get heavy, but they have so much experience that they need it, so they try to keep them hanging around.$$What did you have to do, let's say twenty-four hours or twelve hours before officiating a game? Was there any special things that you had to do for yourself to get ready for a game?$$No, normally when you go to those college games you had to be there an hour and a half before, before the game. That way it gives you a chance to have a pre-game with your partner, to relax. The athletic director is relaxed once he sees you come into the building, they give you the quarters and what not so you can discuss how you're going to call the game. You can hang your coat up and relax, just relax. You have to be there an hour and a half before time.$$And once the game is over, can you leave or is there things you have to do after?$$No, you leave. You take a shower and you have to wait for the other guy to finish, then you leave, leave together, make sure everybody leaves together.$$So you had some pretty long days when you were working and then officiating. How did your family live with all this?$$They took it, they took it in stride. You know, it's a very, it's a very well-paid position. People don't realize what the people get for those games.$$Well, I was gonna ask you, what, what was the compensation for the college games?$$Depends on what level. The Division I games, anywhere from $500 to $1,000 per game. And some of those guys do a hundred of those games you know, but Division III levels were hundred and a quarter, up $125.$$Tell me about some of the big tournaments, major tournaments that you eventually officiated at.$$Well, I was chosen to do the Division III Final Four, which was in Roanoke, Virginia. Once I was also sent to Buffalo, New York to do the Division III final. I did the Division II final in Springfield [New York]. It's called the Elite Eight, the last eight teams in the Division II colleges, which, I wasn't up there that year, but St. Augustine's [College; St. Augustine's University, Raleigh, North Carolina] went up there one year. I recall them going up there, for the Final Eight, but it's usually teams like Division II teams, like Virginia Union [University, Richmond, Virginia], St. Augustine, California, Bakersfield [California State University, Bakersfield, Bakersfield, California], teams like that, but it's a good brand of basketball 'cause that's the NCAA [National Collegiate Athletic Association]. And the Division I tournament, of course, is the very big tournament, where you have, where you have all the, Duke [University, Durham, North Carolina] and North Carolina [The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina] and Indiana [University, Bloomington, Indiana] and all those teams. That's Division I.

Malcolm Hemphill, Jr.

Educator and sports official Malcolm Montjoy Hemphill, Jr., was born June 24, 1931, in Chicago, Illinois; his father was Third Ward Republican Committeeman and his mother played piano and organ for A.A. Rayner’s Funeral Home. Hemphill attended Forestville Elementary School, which at the time was the largest and most crowded grade school in the country. A basketball player and president of his class, Hemphill graduated from Wendell Phillips High School in 1949. At Fisk University, Hemphill played basketball with Wilson Frost, and was counseled by Dr. Billie Wright Adams; he later transferred to Arkansas AM & N where he earned his B.S. in health and physical education in 1953.

In 1954, Hemphill taught elementary physical education in the Chicago Public Schools, but was drafted in 1955, after which time he served in the United States Navy aboard the U.S.S. Hector. Returning to Chicago in 1957, Hemphill married Gloria Owens and became the son-in-law of Olympic great, Jesse Owens. At Marshall High School (1960 to 1973), Hemphill rose from teacher to assistant principal to acting principal for over 5,000 students; during this time he also coached basketball and baseball. Hemphill joined the rising chorus of Chicago’s black teachers who complained about the Chicago Public School’s (CPS) discriminatory promotion procedures. Earning his M.Ed. from Northeastern Illinois University’s Center for Inner City Studies in 1971, Hemphill became assistant principal at Manley High School and later Hyde Park High School. Until his retirement in 1997, Hemphill was coordinator of Physical Education Programs for the entire CPS.

Concerned that there were no African Americans officiating high school games in Chicago, Hemphill, with John Everett and Wilfred Bonner, formed the Metropolitan Officials Association (MOA) in 1962. MOA successfully trained and agitated for the assignment of black officials to referee CPS games. MOA went on to become the largest minority sports organization in the country, with alumni officiating at the NBA level. In 1974, Hemphill was one of the first three black officials assigned to a Big Ten Conference game; he officiated in the Big Ten for 15 years. Hemphill organized and trained the first group of African American women officials, and was director of the Nate Humphrey Memorial Officials Basketball Camp. Hemphill and his wife, Gloria, remained residents of Chicago, where they raised two daughters.

Accession Number

A2005.124

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/31/2005

Last Name

Hemphill

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Montjoy

Organizations
Schools

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Carter G. Woodson South Elementary School

Forrestville Elementary School

Fisk University

University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Malcolm

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

HEM02

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Gloria Hemphill

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cancun, Mexico

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

6/24/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

String beans, Potatoes (Boiled), Tomatoes, Fresh Onions, Ice Tea, Cornbread, Cobbler (Peach)

Short Description

High school principal, sports official, and physical education coordinator Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. (1931 - ) was coordinator of Physical Education Programs for the entire Chicago Public Schools system, in addition to holding other high ranking positions within the organization. Hemphill was also one of the founders of the Metropolitan Officials Association, and one of the first African American officials assigned to a Big Ten conference game.

Employment

Chicago Public Schools

Marshall High School

The Big Ten Conference

U.S. Navy

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Beige

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Malcolm Hemphill, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his mother, Elizabeth Dickey Hemphill, and her death

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his father's political work and views

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers his father's political colleagues

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his family's membership at Bethel A.M.E. Church in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. explains how he attended Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes Forrestville Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his neighborhood and childhood friends, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his neighborhood and childhood friends, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls becoming a baseball coach for Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes local basketball players who played at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers watching Negro League baseball games

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls the athletics program at Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. talks about the creation of DuSable High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes himself as a student

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers coaching baseball at Marshall High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls his plans after high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his transition to Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his transition to Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his friendship with HistoryMaker Dr. Billie Wright Adams

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls transferring to Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes adjusting to the segregated South

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his maternal great-grandmother, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his maternal great-grandmother, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers prominent figures at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls his time at Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes officiating for basketball games during his time in college

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. explains the difference between gym teachers and physical education instructors

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes changes to physical education in Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the start of his teaching career

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes teaching and coaching at Marshall High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers receiving an achievement award from Northeastern University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes Manley High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes Manley High School's basketball team

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers his former student Wayne Stingley, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers his former student Wayne Stingley, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recounts meeting his wife, HistoryMaker Gloria Owens Hemphill

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers attending the 1972 Munich Olympics with Jesse Owens

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his time in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the 1954 DuSable High School basketball team

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes transferring to Hyde Park Career Academy in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls working at Hyde Park Career Academy in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the past sports officiating system used in Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the founding of Metropolitan Officials Association

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. explains how he became the first African American official in the Big Ten Conference

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the qualities of an effective sports official

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls discrimination while officiating for the Big Ten Conference, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls discrimination while officiating for the Big Ten Conference, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes working with basketball coach Bob Knight

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls the racism he experienced officiating for the Big Ten Conference

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. reflects upon his career as a referee

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. retells his colleagues' officiating stories

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes the changes to basketball over the years

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes how basketball greats have influenced the sport

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. recalls his time as coordinator of the Office of Health and Physical Education and his retirement

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$7

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. remembers coaching baseball at Marshall High School in Chicago, Illinois
Malcolm Hemphill, Jr. explains how he became the first African American official in the Big Ten Conference
Transcript
Can I backtrack a minute--$$Yeah.$$--something you asked me about why I, why I--how I ended up coaching baseball?$$Oh, okay.$$Yeah. And I--because the principal told you what you taught, and what you coached. And she told me that I was going to coach the basketball team 'cause she called me. I was to coach basketball. And then, there was going to be a second sport, and I was going to be the assistant football coach. Well, I was the assistant football coach, and I was working with a guy, Jim Peeples [ph.], whom, who I knew and, and we got along great, so it was fine. But then, when the baseball coach left, there was no one to coach the baseball team, so she gave me the baseball team. And I can't say to her, I'm not going to do that. You can't do that. You, you coach that sport. So, I was coaching at Marshall High School [John Marshall Metropolitan High School] on the West Side [Chicago, Illinois]. And, at that time, we had five thousand students in that building--uh, just, just kids everywhere. I mean, fantastic young people, fantastic young people. And I'd tease them then because I said, "You know, they talk about you so bad, they talk about you so bad because of where you live," and we laughed about that. So, I was coaching the baseball team with these kids. And there was a boys' club on the West Side. It was then called the Midwest Boys Club [Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Club, Chicago, Illinois]. And two friends of mine, John Everett and, and [Wilford] "Moose" Bonner, worked after school there. They both coached and taught physical education also, so they would tell me who the athletes were because they got them all year long. So, when I started coaching, I knew the guys and knew who could and who could not play. So, we played baseball and I had the team. The kids were doing well. And one of my guys who was Nathaniel Humphrey would say, "Well, coach, you know, we need to try to do this." So, I'd come home sometime. My dad [Malcolm Hemphill, Sr.] say, "Well, how'd your team do? I saw yesterday in the paper that you guys won." I said, "Yeah, we won." He said, "Well, how'd you do today?" I said, "We won." So, this went on for quite a little bit until we got ready to go to the semifinals, going to Comiskey Park [Chicago, Illinois] to play baseball. So, we--I came home and he said, "Well, how'd the team do? Did you, did you do okay?" I said, "Yeah, we won. Dad, we won, man, we won." He said, "Those kids win in spite of you, don't they (laughter)?" He knew that I really didn't know a whole lot about coaching baseball. I could watch a game, I enjoyed it, I thoroughly enjoyed it. I haven't played softball for so long, but I didn't really know what I was doing when I started coaching baseball, so he was right. They won a lot of games in spite of me, in spite of me, so I had great fun with those guys on the West Side.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$We're going to get to that, you know, catch up on your career, you know, as we go along.$Now, in 1974, you, yourself, you were chosen to become an official in the Big Ten [Conference], right, a basketball official?$$Yes, I was, I was.$$Yeah.$$And that came as a shock to me really because I, it wasn't something that I really aspired to do. But I was approached by a dear friend, John Everett, who was retiring principal at Simeon [Neal F. Simeon Vocational High School; Simeon Career Academy, Chicago, Illinois], who's, who was then working football, Big Ten football. And I was doing high school ball when I could because I was still coaching. But he said, "Why don't you, why don't you come on, and, and try for the Big Ten?" Man, I think they, they, they, they would give you an opportunity to do that. And I said, "John, I'm not really that interested in it." So, I finally filled out at an application, sent it in, and, and it was looked at. And I was called and asked to come and referee a scrimmage over at DePaul [University, Chicago, Illinois]. And I did, and I didn't think I was really that good--that, that Sunday because I'd, I'd had an exciting Saturday night. And the scrimmage was that Sunday morning, you know, and I, I was readying myself to go to church. And John called and said, "Man, they, they want you over at DePaul, you know, get on over there." And I did. And the supervising official then was Herm Royal [ph.], and he came down after I, after I, working--chatted with me. We talked and, you know, asked me if I might be interested in doing that. And I said, "Well, let me get back with you." He said, "Get back with me?" He said, "Get back with me tomorrow then." So, I came back and talked to my wife [HistoryMaker Gloria Owens Hemphill] about it, and she was excited about it. And my daughter, who was a basketball fanatic, jumped at the idea. So, and I thought it would be a good opportunity so I, I did it, and it was good. It was good for me and I think it opened the doors for some other guys to come in, too.