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James Phillips

Visual artist James Phillips was born in 1945 in Brooklyn, New York. Phillips attended the Fleisher Art Memorial School in Philadelphia in the 1960s. He then went on to study at the Philadelphia College of Art (University of the Arts for Philadelphia) from 1964 to 1965, followed by a brief affiliation with the Lee Cultural Center in 1968. Phillips then attended the Printing Trade School in New York City. From there, he became a member of the Harlem-founded Weusi Artist Collective, a group of young artists who made African iconic imagery and symbols a central part of their work, from 1969 to 1973.

In 1970, Phillips met the founding members of AfriCobra (African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists), a group that was committed to incorporating African aesthetics, iconography and positive political imagery into African American art. Phillips also became a member of AfriCobra. From 1973 to 1977, he served as an artist-in-residence at Howard University with duties as a mural consultant. Then, from 1977 to 1979, Phillips was affiliated with C.E.T.A., a nationwide arts initiative of the Carter Administration. After participating in the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Exchange Fellowship in Tokyo, Japan in 1980, he was appointed as a visiting lecturer at the University of California at Berkeley from 1983 to 1984. Phillips went on to teach courses at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Hampton University. Phillips earned his M.F.A. degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1998. In 2001, Phillips re-joined the faculty of the art department at Howard University as a lecturer, eventually becoming an associate professor of foundation and painting where he oversees all the graduate coursework.

As a painter, Phillips has participated in over seventy group and solo exhibitions in galleries and museums both nationally and internationally. His work is included in several well-known collections, including the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Arts and Artifacts Collection of the New York City Public Library and Hampton University. Phillips’ works have also been specially created for public art projects for the city of Baltimore, Howard University, the Department of Parks in New York City, and the transit system for the City of San Francisco. In 1994, he was commissioned by the Philadelphia Airport to create a permanent piece of art for their domestic wing. The Art in Embassies program of the United States Department of State purchased two of Phillips’ paintings in 2006 for the American Embassy in Togo, West Africa. Phillips was also honored with the Creative Artists Public Service Award in 1971.

James Phillips was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 5, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.210

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/5/2013

Last Name

Phillips

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Henry

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Harriton High School

Philadelphia Museum College of Art

Printing Trade School

Maryland Institute College of Art

Search Occupation Category
First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

PHI06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Studio

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

4/29/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Visual artist James Phillips (1945 - ) a member of the Weusi and AfriCobra artist groups, has participated in over seventy art exhibitions around the world. His work is included in several well-known collections.

Employment

Howard University

Museum Institute College of Art

Hampton University

University of California, Berkeley

Suitland High School

Favorite Color

All Colors

Timing Pairs
0,0:3910,25:7650,47:8030,52:29217,428:81580,901:108070,1089:117108,1174:141175,1386:142171,1410:161610,1686:170826,1818:182749,1954:186686,1995:240530,2454:240822,2459:253906,2573:256490,2612:273029,2816:273645,2831:293400,3095:293800,3101:310150,3310$0,0:3785,65:4748,79:25204,193:27756,228:42868,378:43808,389:128818,1468:131567,1473:161169,1793:161792,1805:177010,1938:182350,1969
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Phillips' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Phillips lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Phillips describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about his family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Phillips describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Phillips describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Phillips talks about attending Northside School in Gretna, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about his parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about his affinity for art as a child at Northside School in Gretna, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about moving from Gretna, Virginia to Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Phillips describes the differences between Gretna, Virginia and Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about going to school in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Phillips describes his childhood interests and activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Phillips describes life in Gretna, Virginia and living next door to white sharecroppers

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Phillips describes his experience of racial discrimination in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about how he became involved with the March on Washington in 1963

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Phillips describes his teenage years in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about his activities at Harriton High School in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Phillips talks about his activities at Harriton High School in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Phillips remembers meeting HistoryMakers A.B. Spellman and Amiri Baraka, and Ted Jones

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about the origins of black art

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Phillips talks about his experience at the Philadelphia College of Art

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Phillips talks about moving to New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Phillips describes the music scene in New York City during the late 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about the music he listens to while painting

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Phillips describes becoming serious about creating visual art

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Phillips talks about his brief return to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and his involvement with the Lee Cultural Center

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about his return to New York City and his work as an opaquer and printer

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Phillips describes meeting members of the Weusi Artists Collective

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Phillips describes the origins of the Weusi Artists Collective which preceded the East Community Center

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Phillips talks about the East Educational and Cultural Center for People of African Descent

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - James Phillips talks about The Last Poets as well as other poets and musicians in New York City during the late 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - James Phillips talks about his artwork and meeting HistoryMaker A.B. Spellman

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about his painting "The Dealer"

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about Harlem, New York in the mid-1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about artistic influences on the development of his painting style

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James Phillips describes the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about the Studio Museum, the Weusi Artists Collective, and AfriCOBRA

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about incorporating African motifs and color contrast into his artwork

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - James Phillips remembers painting a backdrop for a John Coltrane award concert at Town Hall in 1973

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - James Phillips describes his art exhibitions in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - James Phillips gives a history of AfriCOBRA

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about AfriCOBRA and the evolution of his painting style while an artist-in-residence at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about HistoryMaker Jeff Donaldson

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about musician Donald Byrd

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - James Phillips describes the atmosphere at Howard University in Washington, D.C. during the 1970s

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about the pitfalls of making album cover artwork

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about his time as an artist-in-residence for the CETA Arts Program

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - James Phillips talks about his experience as an artist-in-residence at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - James Phillips talks about his NEA fellowship experience in Japan and his interest in mandalas, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about his NEA fellowship experience in Japan and his interest in mandalas, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about exploring new ways to present his ideas through art

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about the relationship between cosmograms across cultures

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - James Phillips talks about his time living in California

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - James Phillips describes his commissioned mural for Philadelphia International Airport, "Gateways to the World"

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about the logistics of government-funded public art, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - James Phillips talks about the logistics of government-funded public art, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - James Phillips describes earning his M.F.A. degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about the requirements for an M.F.A. degree at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - James Phillips describes earning his M.F.A. degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - James Phillips talks about his early teaching career

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about teaching at Howard University in Washington, D.C. and his career highlights

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - James Phillips describes highlights from his time at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - James Phillips talks about his students' artistic philosophies

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - James Phillips talks about his own artistic philosophy and practices

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - James Phillips reflects on his life

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - James Phillips reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about his family

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - James Phillips reflects on how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - James Phillips narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$7

DAStory

7$2

DATitle
James Phillips describes life in Gretna, Virginia and living next door to white sharecroppers
James Phillips talks about exploring new ways to present his ideas through art
Transcript
Okay. So, now you're in school and, you're in high school, and you graduated in '62 [1962] or '63 [1963]?$$Sixty-four [1964].$$Sixty-four, [1964], okay, '64 [1964]. Now, you're in school when the March on Washington takes place [in 1963].$$Oh, yeah, I was here.$$Okay. So, you actually came to the March?$$Yeah.$$Well, tell us about that. How did you get a chance to go to the March?$$Well, I actually didn't finish talking about things when I was in [Gretna] Virginia.$$Okay, well, go ahead.$$Like I said, I was saying we had our farm. We had what I thought was our forty acres, which turns out to be twenty-two acres. And there was this white family, and they had a sharecropper. And the sharecroppers that they had, they had about three of them during the time that I was there, they were all white. Now, the house that I grew up in, it was basically a log cabin. And then they added on a kitchen, and a porch, and several other rooms, and upstairs. The house that the sharecroppers lived in was about the same. The only difference was, I mean, what I saw visually was they, they kept it painted. They painted the logs white, and where the dirt--they painted that brown. So, you had this brown and white posh looking cabin. Ours was just a cabin. And then later on, they would put that brick siding on it to uplift, spiff it up. So, so, the sharecroppers, they would have families, they had kids. And then of course, the Ingram [ph.] family, which owned--where the sharecroppers worked from--they had kids. And they were all a little older than me. So, they'd want to play, or I'd want to play, because I had nobody else to play with unless I went into town. And wasn't old enough at that time to go into town on my own, which was about a mile away. So, we would play. And we would have these little incidents. And they'd, of course, end up using the "N" word, right, and we'd end up fighting. So, and they would come back the next day. "Can..." they called me Jimmy then. "Can Jimmy come out and play?" So, this went on. And of course, if they saw me in town, you know, they'd look the other way, and I'd ignore them, too. So, this went on back and forth. And then the old--Mr. Ingram, the old man, he used to work for the railroad, and he only had one arm, so he was scary. There was another family called the Clays [ph.] that lived at the end of the road, and I used to play with their two sons. And Miss Ingram was very nice. She would invite me in the house, and he'd come home and chase me out. He had a son, Frank, Jr., he was a schoolteacher; I used to play with his kids. And his wife, I was okay with. But he'd come home and he'd chase me out. (Laughter). So, this thing went on. It was either--somebody--the mother or the father, it was either one or the other. Like, the Clay kids, the mother didn't like me associating with them, but I kind of grew on her, so then she said it was alright. So, I had this back and forth thing. And like I said, the town was a mile away. So as I got older, I started going into town hanging out with the black kids. And of course, I went, I would see them in school. And of course, we'd go, we all went to church together. So--$$Was that--you said it was, what kind of church was it?$$Baptist.$$Baptist, okay.$$Yeah.$All right.$$All right. So, this, we're talking about--but we're talking about what you learned in Japan.$$Oh, I just started to see a different direction for me to take my work. Because even back in the days when I was in New York [City], I had somewhat of a problem. Because I didn't really fit--the way I was working, with the work-- even though, you know, it had a strong connection with the African imagery and had a strong connection with the music--I had, I didn't fit in, because the uptown artists felt that it wasn't political enough. So, they had issues with it. The downtown artists--because there's two divisions of artists in New York [City], probably in Chicago [Illinois], too. You got the uptown artists and you got the downtown artists. And the downtown artists, most of them are in the galleries, and then people in uptown at the time were more political. They felt that my work was too African and too political. So I didn't really fit, because they weren't really looking at what I was doing, or they weren't aware of what I was doing. And the same thing happened when I did the mural at Cramton [Hall at Howard University in Washington, D.C.]. So, I was looking at this new way of presenting my ideas and making my statement, and still maintaining my sense of abstractionism. And see, one of the things--since I was in this limbo, one of the things that attracted me to AfriCOBRA [African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists] was the fact that they were very much into abstraction. Because they had--one of their principles is mid-point mimesis, which means that it's like a place between realism and abstraction. So, that was one of the reasons why I gravitated towards them and eventually stopped associating with Weusi [Artists Collective]. Well, one of the reasons was distance, particularly when I got to California, you know, it was too far away. So, this was a new--I guess you would call it a new search, a new direction for me.

Napoleon Jones-Henderson

Napoleon Jones-Henderson was born in 1943 in Chicago, Illinois. Jones-Henderson attended the Sorbonne Student Continuum Student and Artists Center in Paris, France in 1963 where spent one year immersed in an independent study program. Upon returning to the United States, he enrolled in the Art Institute of Chicago and received his B.F.A. degree from there in 1971. Jones-Henderson went on to earn with his M.A. degree from Northern Illinois University in 1971 and his M.F.A. degree from the Maryland Institute College Art in 2005.

In 1968, during the apex of the Chicago Black Arts Movement, Jones-Henderson became involved with a Chicago-based artists’ collective called COBRA (Coalition of Black Revolutionary Artists). The collective changed their name in 1969 to AfriCOBRA (African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists). During the formative years of AfriCOBRA, Jones-Henderson created large pictorial weavings that were included in the group’s important series of exhibitions mounted at the Studio Museum in Harlem in the early 1970s. He has been an active member of AfriCOBRA since 1969 and is the longest standing member of the group. In 2011, Jones-Henderson produced Africobra: Art for the People (2011), a documentary about the groups’ involvement with the 1960s Black Arts Movement.

Jones-Henderson became the Executive Director of the Research Institute of African and African Diaspora Arts, Inc., in Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1979. He then went on to serve in various academic positions at Malcolm X College in Chicago, the Massachusetts College of Arts, Emerson College in Boston. Jones Henderson was appointed adjunct artist critic and lecturer at the Vermont College of Norwich University in Montpelier, Vermont in 1989. In addition, Jones-Henderson served as an artist-in-residence at Towson University, Syracuse University, and the McDonough School. In 2005, Jones-Henderson was appointed associate professor of art at Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina. His artwork is housed at the DuSable Museum of African American History, Schomburg Cdner of Research in Black Culture, Southside Community Art Center, Hampton University Museum, Art Institute of Chicago, and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

In recognition of his art, Jones-Henderson received the Merit of Honor Award from the Walters Art Museum and the Award for Outstanding Recognition from the Museum of Science and Industry. He was also honored by the National Conference of Artists with the Award of Excellence.

Napoleon Jones-Henderson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 22, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.009

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/22/2013

Last Name

Jones-Henderson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Occupation
Schools

George Washington Carver High School

Wilson Junior College

Shore Shore Junior College

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Northern Illinois University

Maryland Institute College of Art

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Napoleon

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

JON32

Favorite Season

All Seasons Except Winter

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

History Does Not Make Appointments.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/23/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beans (Lima)

Short Description

Mixed media artist Napoleon Jones-Henderson (1943 - ) is director of the Research Institute of African and African Diaspora Arts Inc. and associate professor of art at Benedict College, is the longest standing member of AfriCOBRA.

Employment

Research Institute of African and African Diaspora Arts, Inc.

Benedict College

Vermont College

Emerson College

Roxbury Community College

Massachusetts College of Art and Design

Favorite Color

All Colors

Timing Pairs
0,0:9198,207:9728,213:10470,222:10894,227:11530,234:14270,243:14620,249:14900,254:15180,259:17944,286:22036,341:25012,373:38750,536:39425,547:40175,559:41300,573:50280,611:53080,642:53500,650:57892,711:58262,717:59594,741:60334,752:65010,817:67880,884:68290,890:71390,916:74976,965:75260,970:75899,983:76822,998:81900,1048:83340,1069:83660,1074:85550,1085:88444,1093:91344,1106:91890,1116:93060,1130:93606,1138:95088,1162:96102,1182:97038,1198:109563,1339:110242,1357:114200,1421:114624,1426:121620,1584:132640,1714:133773,1727:134803,1740:138305,1787:142370,1814:145030,1880:147060,1920:147410,1926:147970,1936:159110,2079:160230,2099:161670,2125:162150,2132:166894,2161:168886,2190:169384,2197:169965,2205:173949,2305:174447,2312:183794,2463:184058,2468:184322,2473:188172,2519:189920,2539:190361,2548:190928,2561:191999,2586:192314,2592:193448,2617:193700,2622:193952,2627:196535,2685:196850,2691:200650,2724:201280,2734:204970,2807$0,0:506,3:2846,79:3392,96:3704,101:5342,146:10412,292:12908,348:19304,505:19928,515:31868,647:43956,847:53240,971:53544,976:56148,1037:68706,1238:68982,1243:74255,1276:79510,1352:79900,1364:85657,1496:85965,1501:86273,1527:93820,1648:95624,1684:96116,1692:107499,1903:115300,2009:115620,2014:116740,2038:120380,2079:123714,2135:125994,2201:126450,2217:129534,2277:131421,2332:131625,2337:133980,2347:140970,2459:141654,2471:150216,2608:150526,2614:158572,2737:159792,2762:163147,2860:165099,2897:166929,2945:168637,3006:176822,3133:181100,3168:185760,3206:186327,3215:187542,3233:193331,3283:194441,3305:198845,3382:202160,3493:211795,3619:212695,3647:213055,3656:213370,3665:213550,3670:219730,3783
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Napoleon Jones-Henderson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his maternal grandfather's migration from Alabama to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about the history of Juneteenth and Emancipation Day celebrations across the United States

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his father's life in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his memories of growing up on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his father's World War II service and how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson explains the origin of his first and last names

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson remembers the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls the Hall Library, Regal Theater, and Museum of Science and Industry on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls moving to Chicago's Altgeld Gardens community and attending George Washington Carver High School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about Pan-Africanist scholar Frederic H. Hammurabi Robb and about Chicago's Chicken Man, Anderson Punch

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls his teachers at George Washington Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls his teachers at George Washington Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls his elementary school years in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his educators at George Washington Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois including principal Curtis C. Melnick

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes the Altgeld Gardens community of Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes the Altgeld Gardens community of Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his extracurricular activities at George Washington Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson remembers Sammy Davis, Jr.'s performance at George Washington Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois, and learning to dance

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes preparing for college as a student at George Washington Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls receiving a scholarship from the Jewel Tea Company to attend Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his decision to attend junior college and continue working for Jewel Tea Company after graduating from high school

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes receiving a scholarship to study art at the University of Paris in France

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about leaving his position at the Jewel Tea Company to study abroad in Paris, France

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recounts his journey to Paris, France to study art at the University of Paris

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes studying art at the University of Paris in during the summer of 1963

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his travels in Europe during the summer of 1963

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his return to Chicago, Illinois from Paris, France in 1963

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes the Black People's Topographical Research Centers on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes the intellectual environment of Paris, France in 1963

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recounts his decision to stop cutting his hair

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls the black community of Chicago, Illinois during the 1960s, the Nation of Islam, and HistoryMaker Margaret Burroughs

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about Malcolm X and black activism in Chicago, Illinois during the 1960s

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls the Black Arts organizations in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his interest in African textiles in art of the African Diaspora

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls a lecture by Whitney Halstead on African art at the Art Institute of Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls receiving a fellowship from the Art Institute of Chicago to study African art and art of the African Diaspora

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his religious upbringing

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his grandmother's religious beliefs and the spiritual importance of family and African heritage

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls the formation of AfriCOBRA in 1968, civil unrest in Chicago, Illinois, and the Wall of Respect mural project

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about AfriCOBRA and the desire to foster a uniquely African American artistic tradition

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes AfriCOBRA's aesthetics and the role of the image-maker

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes AfriCOBRA's first exhibition, at the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York in 1970

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about the National Conference of Artists

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson explains the aesthetic principles of AfriCOBRA's works

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about HistoryMaker Wadsworth A. Jarrell, Sr.'s Wall of Respect mural

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about the Afro-Arts Theater and the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes the network of African American cultural and political organizations in Chicago, Illinois in the late 1960s

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his mentors at the Art Institute of Chicago, including HistoryMakers Margaret Burroughs and Richard Hunt

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his fellowship with textile artist Claire Zeisler and the founding of Ankh Studio

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson explains the roles of African art and Egyptian symbols in the Black Arts Movement

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about Raah Bird and the Ankh Studio in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes the South Shore community of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls teaching at Malcolm X College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes Malcolm X College in Chicago, Illinois, and how it has changed since the 1970s

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson lists artists involved in AfriCOBRA, including Omar Lama

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about muralists Calvin B. Jones, Mitchell Caton, William Walker and Eugene Eda, and other artists

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls studying textile arts under Mahboob Shahzaman at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about marrying Annette Jones and moving to Boston, Massachusetts to teach at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about teaching at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about buying the Edward Everett Hale House in Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes the history of his home and studio, the Edward Everett Hale House in Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes cultural events at the Edward Everett Hale House in Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls the 1999 Juneteenth celebration at the Edward Everett Hale House in Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson contrasts the political and social environments of Chicago, Illinois and Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recounts his 1979 arrest in Detroit, Michigan, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recounts his 1979 arrest in Detroit, Michigan, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about NCA artists in Detroit, Michigan, including HistoryMakers Willis Bing Davis, Jon Onye Lockard, and Tyree Guyton

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about accepting an offer to teach at Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes challenges he faced teaching students at Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson remembers a controversy in 1999 over the flying of a Confederate battle flag over the South Carolina State House

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about employment opportunities for art faculty at historically black colleges and universities

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recounts his consulting work for USAID in Haiti

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes traveling to Barbados and Mauretania

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recounts his trip to Mauritania, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recounts his trip to Mauritania, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls Festac '77, the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture, in Lagos, Nigeria

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about experiencing a spiritual connection to Africa at Festac '77 in Lagos, Nigeria

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about the people he met in Nigeria during Festac '77

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his visit to the Osun-Osogbo Sacred Grove of Osogbo, Nigeria

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson reflects upon Festac '77 and the presidential election of HistoryMaker Barack Obama

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls the contrast between luxury guest accommodations and local poverty in Nigeria during Festac '77

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes his family

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his desire to preserve his artworks and his books

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Napoleon Jones-Henderson narrates his photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DATitle
Napoleon Jones-Henderson recalls his teachers at George Washington Carver High School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2
Napoleon Jones-Henderson talks about his mentors at the Art Institute of Chicago, including HistoryMakers Margaret Burroughs and Richard Hunt
Transcript
Now was Carver [George Washington Carver High School, Chicago, Illinois] rather new, I mean new when you when you moved out there (unclear)--$$No, no, it was an old, old--well, it might have been new in the sense that the high school building might have been built in the '50s [1950s], early '50s [1950s], before I moved out there. But the older part of the school, which were single-story long structures, because Altgeld Gardens [Chicago, Illinois] was built right after World War II, as those sort of settlements they were building around the country for relocation of military and their families. Brother Green, Thomas Green [ph.], the English teacher, he was friends with, and it's not surprising when I think about it, they were all colleagues together with Lorraine Hansberry, and Gwendolyn Brooks, and [HM] Margaret Burroughs, and you know, you go on down the line. All of these people were a part of the people who taught me at George Washington Carver High School. And actually, when Lorraine Hansberry's 'A Raisin in the Sun' was on Broadway, because of that friendship with my teachers, T. Green, we were the only persons outside of the Broadway production who were given rights to perform 'A Raisin in the Sun' while it was on Broadway (laughter).$$So were in it? Did you, did--$$Walter Lee.$$Okay.$$Yep. I still got my script and all my notes. And--$$Now that's some, that's basic, that's one of the lead roles--$$Hey--$$--in the play.$$--you know.$$Yeah, the role played role played by Sidney Poitier and other great actors.$$Yeah, but I don't think they did as good a job as I did--$$Okay (laughter).$$--'cause see, I'm from Chicago (laughter).$$Okay.$$But, yeah, so we had a, we had a deep education in terms of our school being populated by artistically engaged faculty. And I mean they, they didn't just--we didn't have a relationship with them just in school. We had relationships with them after school as well, 'cause they were very much committed to that community of students beyond the classroom, 'cause Helen used to, Mrs. Joyner [ph.] used to take us out to tile companies and get all the broken tiles or out to bottled soda distributors and get all the broken bottles that they'd have, 'cause back then they used to put soda in glass bottles. Yeah, we'd get all that broken glass, and we'd get ceramic tiles. And we'd go to fabric stores and get all the leftover fabric. And you know, she just opened up where that art was more than painting, and drawing, and sculpting. It was anything you can do with the stuff you do things with. And so she would have us, and our parents were very comfortable in lettin' us do whatever the teachers wanted after school, and they'd take us to do different things. And they were really, they were just an extension of our family.$In terms of that, just speaking about that, I mean, I, I haven't asked you who your, other than high school, I haven't asked you who your mentors were. And did you have a particular mentor at, at Art Institute [of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois], and was there, was there any particular mentors amongst the older artists in Chicago [Illinois]?$$Yeah, well, you know, Marion Perkins, and [HM] Margaret Burroughs, and Charlie Burroughs [Charles Gordon Burroughs], and [HM] Richard Hunt of course 'cause I knew about him because he had gone to the Art Institute, and he graduated in '55 [1955]. And, and serendipitously I guess you could say, since he graduated in 1955 and won a traveling fellowship from the Art Institute, no other black person had won one until I did in 1971. So, I mean, you know, take that, you know, so those and Etheline [ph.] Henderson, who was a ceramist and [HM] Geraldine McCullough, sculpturist, I mean, you know, all these different people, and Bill Walker [William Walker], and you know, on and on and on. I, those, particularly those who were older than me, I knew about them when I was at the Art Institute. And in our--quote--"activism" at the Art Institute, the handful of black students I mentioned were, that were students there, lobbied the school for--(unclear)--you need to get some black instructors here. And of course, the first thing they say, "We don't know no black artists." Oh, I do, we do. And so we just, we just pull it a lit--you know, we went from Jeff [HM Jeff Donaldson], from Margaret to Jeff. And he was doing his graduate work at Northwestern [University, Chicago, Illinois] then. And of course, they brought Margaret in to teach a class, and that's fine, 'cause we, we done, we're not trying to get the whole door. We just want the doorknob now. We'll get the hinge next, we get this part; we, you know, we move on to the whole thing. And even for the fellowship competition, the way they invite jurors into judge, and we said no, you've got to have some black artists as a part of this jury. You know, you've got black graduates here, so how is it that you cannot--and there are black artists out here, so we gave them a whole list of people. And of course, they, they took [HM] David Driskell--not so much of course, but they took David Driskell 'cause he was the most prominent academic artist out there at the time. This was '71 [1971]. So--$$That's right.$$--Driskell came in and was a part of the jury. And so, all of these were people--you know, I knew of, of Aaron Douglas, and I knew of you know, Hale Woodruff, and you know, all these people. And I, and, and I knew about them because of being in, in, in, connected to Margaret Burroughs, you know, and her being the well-spring of information. And at an NCA conference, I mean, you know, Margaret had you by your collar, not by your hand, but by your shirt collar, taking you around saying: well, this is Charles White, this is Elizabeth--(unclear)--this is--(unclear)--you need to sit down here with this person and talk to them, sat us down there, and she'd go off someplace else. So we had to get engaged with these people, so they became my mentors from afar. But the ones who were up close and personal was Margaret, you know. And so, through Margaret, I mean, you know, that was like having a job, being with Margaret, 'cause she put you to work. I mean you had to go to this; you had to do that; you had do this; you had do that, and all, all it was about was giving us the stuff we need to have to go forward, you know. She was committed. And from her level of commitment, which was the same as I was speaking about my high school teachers, it became mine. Like I said, you had to choose not to be an activist if you grew up in Chicago.