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Les Bond, Jr.

Investment banker Leslie Bond, Jr. was born on July 18, 1957 to Leslie Bond, Sr., a prominent surgeon, and Anita Lyons Bond, a civil rights activist, in St. Louis, Missouri. He attended and graduated from St. Louis Country Day School in 1963, and went on to attend Princeton University, where he earned his B.A. degree in public and international affairs as a Woodrow Wilson Scholar in 1979. He then received both his J.D. degree and M.M. degree in finance in marketing from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois in 1983.

Bond was hired by the King & Spalding law firm in Atlanta, Georgia in 1983, making the firm’s first African American partner. Their clients included The Coca-Cola Company, General Electric, and General Motors. In 1986, he was appointed deputy general counsel for the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority of Chicago where he was responsible for the development and financing for the expansion projects of both Navy Pier and McCormick Place. Bond was subsequently hired as general counsel to the Comptroller of St. Louis, Missouri, where he had additional responsibilities as fiscal manager of external finance. In 1996, he co-founded Columbia Capital Management, a firm that provided advisory services to municipal bond issuers and borrowers, as well as investment assistance to local governments. He served as senior managing director of their investment advisory group until 2001, when he co-founded another company, Attucks Asset Management in Chicago, where he served as CEO. Attucks Asset Management specialized in providing investment assistance for diverse and emerging managers. In 2011, he was appointed to serve on the Chicago Plan Commission, which was responsible for reviewing proposals involving planned developments and districts, as well as the Lakefront Protection Ordinance. He was reappointed to this position by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel in 2016.

Bond resides in Chicago, where he has served on the boards of the National Association of Securities Professionals, the Marshall Faulk Foundation, the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Foundation, and MOBILE Care Foundation. He has also been a member of the Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs and the New American Alliance.

Leslie Bond, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 11, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.063

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/11/2019

Last Name

Bond

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Occupation
Schools

Princeton University

Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Business

Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law

Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School (MICDS)

First Name

Leslie

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

BON04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any Beach

Favorite Quote

Don't Quit

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/18/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Soul Food, Collard Greens, Smoked Meats, Mac And Cheese

Short Description

Investment banker Leslie Bond, Jr. (1957 - ) was the first African American partner at the law firm King & Spalding before he co-founded two investment advisory firms: Columbia Capital Management and Attucks Asset Management.

Employment

King and Spalding

City of Chicago

Comptroller's Office; City of St. Louis

Columbia Capital Management

Attucks Asset Management

Favorite Color

Blue

Thomas L. McLeary

Insurance executive, Chartered Life Underwriter and CEO of Endow, Incorporated, Thomas Livingston McLeary was born on September 8, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois. His mother, Edna Tubbs McLeary and all of her sisters were graduates of Rust College and his father, Thomas Jefferson McLeary, operated a dry cleaners. McLeary attended Doolittle Elementary School and graduated from Englewood High School in 1961.With the help of youth minister Clyde Miller, McLeary received an Illinois General Assembly scholarship, and earned his B.A. degree in psychology from the University of Illinois in 1965.

After graduation, McLeary joined the National Guard and enrolled in Prudential Insurance Company’s Management Training Program. McLeary began to appreciate the insurance business as he worked in the Chicago home office from 1965 to 1970. From 1970 to 1977, McLeary moved into Prudential Insurance’s Chicago Hyde Park office ins sales. Under the guidance of John Lassiter, a member of Operation Push, McLeary won the Prudential’s Agent of the Year Award in 1975 and a President’s Citation. McLeary, a Huebner Scholar attended American College and soon qualified as a Chartered Life Underwriter (CLU). In 1978, McLeary co-founded Endow, Incorporated as a multi-line insurance company dealing with public entities, small and large corporations and individuals of large net worth. In 1992, he formed with three others, Premier Network Service Group, the first national African American property and casualty and financial services firm.

McLeary is a past president of the Chicago Association of Life Underwriters and the Illinois Association of Life Underwriters (IALU). In 1987, McLeary was awarded the IALU’s Distinguished Service Award. A longtime member of the National Minority Business Development Council, McLeary is a member of ABLE and has also been a member of Chicago’s Million Dollar Round Table for twenty-four years. McLeary is active on numerous boards and civic committees. He also enjoys working with his wife on various projects to encourage and support young people.

McLeary was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 10, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.155

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/10/2006

Last Name

McLeary

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Schools

Englewood High School

James R. Doolittle, Jr. Elementary School

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Thomas

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

MCL03

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Maui, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

9/8/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Insurance chief executive Thomas L. McLeary (1944 - ) co-founded and served as the CEO of Endow, Incorporated, and helped form Premier Network Service Group, the first national African American property, casualty and financial services firm.

Employment

Prudential Insurance Company

Endow, Incorporated

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Thomas L. McLeary's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Thomas L. McLeary lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about his mother's teaching career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his paternal family's experiences in the South

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Thomas McLeary remembers his father's dry cleaning business

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls the decline of his father's business

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his father's later years

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Thomas L. McLeary describes how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about being an only child

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Thomas L. McLeary describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Thomas L. McLeary remembers his father's business difficulties

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls his introduction to the insurance industry

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Thomas L. McLeary describes the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls his early religious activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Thomas L. McLeary describes the Church of the Good Shepherd in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Thomas L. McLeary remembers Englewood High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Thomas L. McLeary remembers the gang activity at Englewood High School

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Thomas L. McLeary remembers the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Thomas L. McLeary remembers sports players at the Big Ten Conference

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls his academic difficulties at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls his decision to attend the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about his challenges in college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls the recruitment of black students to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Thomas L. McLeary remembers avoiding the Vietnam War draft

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls joining the Prudential Insurance Company of America

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Thomas L. McLeary remembers his promotion to sales at the Prudential Insurance Company of America

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his career at the Prudential Insurance Company of America

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Thomas L. McLeary remembers John Lassiter

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Thomas L. McLeary describes the products offered by the Prudential Insurance Company of America

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his success at the Prudential Insurance Company of America

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls forming the Endow, Inc. insurance brokerage

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his role in the National Association of Life Underwriters

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls his children's sports activities

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about his clientele

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Thomas L. McLeary recalls meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Thomas L. McLeary describes the Chicago Minority Supplier Development Council

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about the Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about the Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his insurance certifications

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Thomas L. McLeary describes the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his business strategies

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about developing an insurance program for Native American tribes

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about the future of his insurance brokerage

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his business philosophy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his hopes for the black business community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about his civic involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Thomas L. McLeary describes his mentorship efforts

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Thomas L. McLeary reflects upon his commitment to community service

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Thomas L. McLeary reflects upon his career

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Thomas L. McLeary reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Thomas L. McLeary talks about his children's college education

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Thomas L. McLeary describes the importance of historically black colleges

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Thomas L. McLeary describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Thomas L. McLeary narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

4$4

DATitle
Thomas L. McLeary talks about his challenges in college
Thomas L. McLeary recalls forming the Endow, Inc. insurance brokerage
Transcript
It was funny about six, seven years ago, I got this call from the University of Illinois [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois]. For whatever reason, they offered back in the '60s [1960s], they offered lifetime membership into the alumni association for one hundred dollars. So I said why not you know. I had no real good feelings about the school but I said one hundred dollars why not? So I became a lifetime member of the alumni association. So for a number of years they have been calling me trying to get me, "Well you know that was a great deal but most of the people that took that one hundred dollar deal are paying the annual dues." And I said no (laughter). Got my one hundred dollars, my lifetime membership and that's it. So they sent this lady by, Larry [Larry Crowe], a nice little lady and she came by and she was reclaiming, you know graduates from the school of liberal arts and science who had not been active in years and you know a number of people gave her my name so she came by to see me and she said, "What was your most memorable experience at the University of Illinois?" And I sat there for a few minutes and I said, "I have no good memorable experiences from my four years at the University of Illinois." And I was just being honest. And that poor lady, she didn't know what to do or what to say. She--I guess nobody ever answered like that. But when I was down there you know there are places we couldn't get served on campus, we could not get our hair cut on campus, we could not go into any bar safely on campus. So it was almost total segregation at the University of Illinois when I was down there.$$This was 1961?$$Yeah. Yeah, we--the black students, the black boys had to go into Champaign [Illinois] to get their hair cut at the black barbershop and that was dangerous because the town kids did not like the university kids you know. So we had to ride our bikes in groups in to get our hair cut. And if they find--found out we had to just get up and go and the barbers were nice, they said, "You guys got about five minutes just get up and get in this--just get on out of here, we'll finish right quick do what we can do," and so it got to the point where--and didn't have money to come home. Even though you know I mean, you know my folks [Edna Tubbs Johns and Thomas J. McLeary, Jr.] didn't have money for me to take the train home. I don't know how much it cost but so once I left in September you know it was Christmas before I came back you know. Maybe every once in a while they would come get me for Thanksgiving but basically it was at least Thanksgiving before I would come home. So you got your hair cut when you left and you got your hair cut when you got back to Chicago [Illinois]. But it was rough. It was not, it was not a very good experience. I had a professor, I got a, I got a you know--I was taking this criminal justice course and I took the first exam and got like you know like all of his questions right. And he called me up and he said you know he said, "You know you did really good on this test." He said, "I'll tell you what. This is our deal," he said, "Just, it's just me," he said, "it's just personally I don't think I can ever give a black student more than a C." He said, "So I tell you what, you've got a C right now, you don't ever have to come to any of my classes. You don't have to take any exams. This will be our deal." He said, "You don't really need this course so you know it's just a credit you know to graduate." And that was, that was our deal so.$$Did you accept the deal?$$Absolutely. I had previously tried going to the administration with what I thought was discrimination. That was a worthless, worthless waste of time. I mean nobody was listening to anything. Nobody cared you know. I mean there were only a handful of us on campus at the time. Until '63 [1963] when they had this big program when they brought in a lot of black kids from Chicago and then, then you know social life changed.$And as I began building my business now, having you know being able to reach the--before I had to sell my customer the best Prudential [Prudential Life Insurance Company of America; Prudential Financial, Inc.] product, now I could sell my customer the best product regardless of where--what company it came from. And that made all the different in the world to me and so I began building my business. I formed my first corporation in 1978 because I needed an entity to contract with those other companies. I didn't wanna contract with me as an individual so I established a corporation with a friend [HistoryMaker Ann Smith]. She and I established this corporation and we, we began operating as a business. So for the first time now I'm operating as a business. Had my own secret--$$Is this Endow [Endow, Inc., Chicago, Illinois]?$$This is in Endow yeah, yeah. And Endow was first formed in--and again we went to a friend of ours who was not a, you know, not a corporate lawyer, he was just a you know a jack of all trades you know nice guy. For some reason he recommended that we established as a 501(C)(3), a tax exempt organization because our first customer under Endow was a university. They had--we had pitched them on setting up a charitable giving program where we would sell life insurance to their, to their graduates with the school as owner and beneficiary as a charitable gift to the school. So we needed a name to fit that sales strategy. So that's how Endow came about. We, we, we came up with the name Endow but he said, "Well since you're selling charitable stuff maybe you should you know be a 501(C)(3)," and we did. But it made absolutely no sense at all so we reformed in 1981 as a for-profit. So Endow actually started in '78 [1978] as a not-for-profit and then reformed in 1981 as a for-profit organization and at that point in time I had finished my year as president of the Chicago Association [Chicago Association of Life Underwriters] and I felt it just didn't make sense for me to stay you know an employee of the Prudential so I moved on and separated, had my own office, was no longer housed in the, in the agency. Had my own organization, hired my own people. And that's how I really got into the insurance business and that was the major step you know. Stepping out of the agency, you know having my own business, having to pay bills, having to hire employees, having to do all of those things. So that kind of got me, got me started.

Eugene Morris

Pioneering advertising executive Eugene Morris, Jr. was born in Chicago, Illinois on July 25, 1939. The youngest of four siblings, Morris was raised in Chicago’s historic Bronzeville neighborhood. Owning several restaurants, Morris’ parents, Eugene Morris, Sr. and Willie Mae Morris, instilled an entrepreneurial spirit in their son. At the age of twelve, Morris and a childhood friend started a junk resale business with local thrift and resale shops as their clients. In 1952, Morris graduated from Forestville Elementary School. He then attended Tilden High School, graduating in 1956.

Morris attended several community colleges, and was later drafted into the U.S. Army in 1962. He was stationed in Kentucky at Fort Knox, in South Carolina at Fort Jackson, and overseas in Germany. By 1968, Morris returned to Chicago and obtained a job with the advertising agency of Foote, Cone, and Belding. He worked for several years at Foote, Cone, and Belding while attending Roosevelt University. In 1969, he received his B.A. degree in business administration and his M.B.A in 1971 from Roosevelt University. During the period between 1974 and 1986, Morris worked as an account supervisor and senior vice president management supervisor at Burrell Advertising Agency. He developed advertising programs for clients including Coca-Cola, McDonald’s and Johnson Products.

In 1987, Morris founded his own advertising agency entitled Eugene Morris Communications, Inc. (EMC). EMC has been ranked as one of Black Enterprise’s top fifteen advertising agencies. EMC’s clientele have included American Family Insurance, Tyson Foods, Illinois Department of Transportation, and Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. EMC has created major multi-cultural and multi-dimensional advertising campaigns that have generated $37.7 million in billings. Morris received the 2005 Martin Luther King Legacy Award from the Martin Luther King Boys and Girls Club for his philanthropic efforts. He has also received the 2006 Illinois Governor’s Small Business Person of the Year Award.

Accession Number

A2006.006

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/24/2006 |and| 2/1/2006

Last Name

Morris

Maker Category
Schools

Edward Tilden Career Community Academy High School

Carter G. Woodson South Elementary School

Roosevelt University

Kennedy–King College

First Name

Eugene

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

MOR10

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

Common Sense Ain't Common.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/25/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Advertising chief executive and advertising executive Eugene Morris (1939 - ) owns his own advertising company called Eugene Morris Communications (EMC).

Employment

E. Morris Communications, Inc.

Burrell Advertising

Foote, Cone and Belding

U.S. Post Office

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:888,8:6134,86:18948,333:33832,515:35128,533:51306,696:55128,742:55518,748:64020,859:65424,881:66282,896:68700,927:69168,934:69480,939:74074,954:75946,983:92560,1221:93600,1239:98080,1319:98560,1326:99520,1343:100640,1367:101360,1377:102960,1406:134005,1842:137645,1918:147690,2061:148070,2067:160686,2381:169130,2466:181106,2687:181496,2693:181886,2699:190310,2892:208678,3076:215822,3217:237853,3618:238145,3623:238583,3630:261160,3985:261880,3999:276280,4168:280669,4355:294180,4619$0,0:395,25:16595,299:30789,500:32997,547:34860,614:46394,806:47252,818:48890,860:49202,865:54584,985:54896,990:57470,1033:59186,1066:59888,1077:71390,1198:73640,1237:76490,1286:82650,1341:87393,1401:96735,1509:100335,1590:106840,1694
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Eugene Morris' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Eugene Morris lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Eugene Morris talks about his birth

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Eugene Morris talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Eugene Morris describes his maternal and paternal family histories

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Eugene Morris describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Eugene Morris describes moving to the Near North Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Eugene Morris talks about his experience at Sexton Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Eugene Morris remembers his sixth grade teacher, HistoryMaker Frances T. Matlock

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Eugene Morris describes his experience at Tilden Career Community Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Eugene Morris talks about renting a horse to collect scrap metal

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Eugene Morris describes the racial tensions at Tilden Career Community Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Eugene Morris talks about his experience on the wrestling team at Tilden Career Community Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Eugene Morris talks about his shop teacher at Tilden Career Community Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Eugene Morris talks about his father's restaurants

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Eugene Morris talks about what kind of student he was at Tilden Career Community Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Eugene Morris talks about his experience in the City Colleges of Chicago between 1956 and 1962

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Eugene Morris recalls being drafted into the U.S. Army in 1962

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Eugene Morris describes being stationed in Germany as a U.S. Army clerk

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Eugene Morris describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Eugene Morris describes his experiences with segregation while in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Eugene Morris describes his experience as a company clerk in the U.S. Army at Coleman Barracks in Sandhofen, Germany, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Eugene Morris describes his experience as a company clerk in the U.S. Army at Coleman Barracks in Sandhofen, Germany, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Eugene Morris talks about his entrepreneurial experience on Coleman Barracks in Sandhofen, Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Eugene Morris describes returning to the United States and enrolling at Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Eugene Morris talks about his mother's religion

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Eugene Morris recalls being hired at the advertising firm Foote, Cone and Belding in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Eugene Morris recalls working at Foote, Cone and Belding and studying at Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Eugene Morris recalls working at Foote, Cone and Belding and studying at Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Eugene Morris talks about being oblivious to the 1968 Democratic National Convention protests in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Eugene Morris recalls the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Eugene Morris talks about the assassinations of Bobby Kennedy and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Eugene Morris talks about how his car was stolen after his return from Germany in 1965, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Eugene Morris talks about how his car was stolen after his return from Germany in 1965, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Eugene Morris describes his experience as an account executive at Foote, Cone and Belding, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Eugene Morris describes his experience as an account executive at Foote, Cone and Belding, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Eugene Morris describes being hired as an account supervisor and media director at Burrell Advertising in 1974

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Eugene Morris recalls working on advertising campaigns for McDonald's and Coca-Cola at Burrell Advertising

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Eugene Morris describes the state of black advertising in 1976

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Eugene Morris talks about changing general market advertising campaigns to work for black audiences

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Eugene Morris recalls his departure from Burrell Advertising in 1986 and his relationship with HistoryMaker Thomas J. Burrell

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Eugene Morris describes starting Morris Randall Advertising and E. Morris Communications, Inc. in 1987

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Eugene Morris recalls the deaths of his parents and his likenesses to them

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Eugene Morris talks about his early clients at E. Morris Communications, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Eugene Morris shares his total marketing concept

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Eugene Morris describes losing Oldsmobile as a client in 2001 and how it affected E. Morris Communications, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Eugene Morris describes the quick turnover of business in advertising

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Eugene Morris describes how E. Morris Communications, Inc. rebounded from the loss of Oldsmobile in 2001

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Eugene Morris describes his experience working on advertising campaigns for Wal-Mart Stores

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Eugene Morris describes his approach to marketing to different segments of the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Eugene Morris talks about founding the Association of Black-Owned Advertising Agencies

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Eugene Morris describes his experience working with Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Eugene Morris describes his experience working with the Illinois Department of Transportation and the reconstruction of the Dan Ryan Expressway

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Eugene Morris talks about the "Double Dutch" advertising campaign for Tyson Foods, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Eugene Morris describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Eugene Morris reflects on how his parents would view his career

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Eugene Morris shares his advice for young entrepreneurs

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Eugene Morris reflects on his faith and marriage

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Eugene Morris narrates his photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Eugene Morris remembers his sixth grade teacher, HistoryMaker Frances T. Matlock
Eugene Morris talks about founding the Association of Black-Owned Advertising Agencies
Transcript
But the teacher who impacted me the most in, in, in, in, in grade school was my sixth grade teacher [at Forestville Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois], and her name was [HM] Frances T. Matlock. And she was a little bitty lady, although she didn't look very little to me, 'cause I was a little bitty kid. I mean I, I grew very late. But she was, she was very tough, very tough, physically tough. I mean she would, she would get very physical. She couldn't exist today, but in those days, I mean she didn't hesitate to lay a little corporal punishment on you if, if you got out of line. But she was a tremendous teacher. She was the first and only teacher until I, I guess sometimes in college where I--she taught us anything about black history. And she was doing this in 1950. And she used to bring, during, during February, she would bring all kinds of materials to school, and we would have skits and plays and things like that. But she taught us a lot about having black pride, I mean, you know, long before anybody ever, ever mentioned it. You know, and she taught us a lot about black historical figures who, at, at a time when nobody was taking about it. And I always--you know, she, she taught us just about, about life and wanting to excel and wanting to live a better life. And she taught us social skills, and, and music, and all kinds of different things that, that went above just the regular curriculum. In fact, I, I might be getting ahead of myself, but I had not, had not seen her for a very long time. And one of the things we, we might talk about this later, but I'm real big on, on celebrating my birthdays. And the, the--my E. Morris [Communications] team here, they know that I really like this, and so they always try to do something to surprise me for my birthday. And so one day I had planned to take off for my birthday, and they called me and told me that something had happened, and I need to come in. And so I came in, and they said it's in, in the conference room. And I went in the conference room, and all these people were in there. And so, I--(unclear)--ah, man, they're just trying to trick--it's a birthday surprise, and I thought it was just the staff. But then when I started looking around, I could see, well, wait a minute, there're some other people here, was a friend who I grew up with, who I, I main--maintained contact with. His mother was here and several other people. And then so I see this little lady, and, but she had her back turned, and I couldn't figure out well, who is this? And at first I thought it might have been one of my aunts, and then I said no, it's not her. And she turned around. It was my sixth grade teacher. They had found her.$$How had the found her?$$And they found her--$$That's so awesome.$$--they found her, and, and I just started screaming: Ms. Matlock, Ms. Matlock, 'cause I had not seen her in forty-five years or something, you know--$$And she was still alive.$$She, she was still alive. In, in fact I found a picture of her that we took that day, because we, we, after the, after we had our little champagne and cake celebration, we, we--they had rented a bus, and we went on a tour of all, a lot of the places where I used to live and where I went school. And Ms. Matlock rode the bus with us and spent the whole day with us. And it was just, it was just a fabulous birthday present.$$That's beautiful--$$Yeah.$$Oh, my goodness.$$Yeah.$$I love that.$$Yeah.$$That's so sweet. Was she proud of you?$$Oh yeah. I mean she brought me, she brought all kinds of--she had these clippings and stuff. She had some things that, some clippings that, of, of, that were written about me in the school newspaper, all kinds of things, you know.$$She had been following you all of these--$$Yeah.$$--years.$$Yep.$$That is such a beautiful story. Ah, I wish it was like that still.$$Yeah.$$Oh, I wanted to ask, were, was your--was Forestville [Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois] integrated at that time?$$No, it was an all-black school. It was located on, on 45th and, and St. Lawrence.$$Oh.$$So it was, it was all-black school.$$So wait now, I guess--were you still living here on the north side then, or--$$No, no, we had moved, we had moved back to the South Side.$$Okay, right, that's what--$$We were always moving.$$Okay, I just wanted to get that--$$I don't know why. I don't know if we were trying to stay one step ahead of the rent man or what, but we moved a lot.$$Okay, that's what I was trying to figure out. I'm like, wow, you had a black teacher here on the North Side. That's really cool.$$Yeah.$And the, the other thing that you've done is, is to form the Association of Black-Owned Advertising Agencies.$$Yes.$$What, what led you to start that?$$Well, it's, it's something that's long overdue, and we've tried to do this before. I mean it's been tried a number of times. And for a number of reasons it, it, it never worked before. But it's important that African American agen--agencies be able to speak with one voice. I'm very vocal, and I'm always mouthing off about what's wrong in our industry, and why do you do this? And I write letters to people, you know, to companies and to the media and all that. But they can blow me off, like well, who are you? You know, you're a little guy. You got a little $40 million dollar agency, you know, what do we care about you? But if you have ten agencies or twenty agencies, and we're all saying the same thing, we write a letter, and everybody is on the, you know, is a signatory to it, then people have to pay a little bit more attention to it. And so, we have a lot of problems and a lot of challenges within our industry, and some of them are very specific to African American agencies. And so we need to be addressing those. And I think fortunately, because I have been around a very long time, and I think that I have always conducted myself in a way, tried to make people respect me, tried to operate above board, be a person of my word, know the people, people know that they can count on me, so I, I, I think I was able to get a bunch of agencies in the room, and they know that I didn't have a real agenda, other than this is something that we all need to do for our collective good. It's not just for, for Eugene Morris.

James Hill, Jr.

Accountant James Hill, Jr. was born in Baltimore on August 20, 1941, to Joyce and James Hill, Sr. Hill graduated from Central State University with a B.S. in accounting in 1964, and received his M.B.A. in personnel administration and accounting in 1967 from the University of Chicago. He is CPA-licensed in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin.

In 1964, Hill began his career as a cost accountant for Union Carbide in New York, where he stayed for one year. After receiving his M.B.A., he began working as a Chicago staff auditor for Alexander Grant & Company. Between 1968 and 1970, Hill worked as the deputy director of the Chicago Economic Development Corporation. In February 1972, he founded his own accounting firm. In 1975 he took on a partner to become Hill, Taylor, Certified Public Accountants where he presides today as chairman and CEO.

Hill has received numerous awards and honors for both his professional and community work. His professional affiliations include the American Institute of CPAs, the Illinois CPA Society, the National Black Association of Accountants and the National Black MBA Association. He is a board member of various community and nonprofit organizations, including the Illinois Institute of Technology, the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce, the Better Government Association, Citizen Information Service, the Chicago Commons Association, the Economic Club of Chicago, the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition, and the Chicago Economic Advisory Committee. He is also a council member to the graduate business schools at both the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois.

Hill married Sheree in 1995. He is father to two adult sons, James III and Brian.

Accession Number

A2003.007

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/15/2003

Last Name

Hill

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Dunbar High School

Central State University

University of Chicago

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

HIL03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bermuda

Favorite Quote

Begin Today To Mold The You of Tomorrow.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/20/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Vegetables

Short Description

Business chief executive James Hill, Jr. (1941 - ) owned the accounting firm, Hill, Taylor, Certified Public Accountants.

Employment

Union Carbide Corporation

Alexander Grant & Company

Chicago Economic Development Corporation

Hill, Taylor Certified Public Accountants

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:5320,63:20051,292:26751,424:27488,442:35300,509:63586,840:76136,1001:77504,1025:78584,1050:79664,1065:86720,1202:100122,1451:102168,1576:125026,1930:125458,1937:143802,2340:155460,2499$0,0:15066,312:16686,344:17577,357:21870,440:43750,752:46975,834:52480,865:53000,881:53260,886:60475,1015:61320,1030:64245,1097:64570,1103:86818,1521:90316,1595:102015,1760:112675,1972:123332,2106:124160,2120:136840,2353
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Hill's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Hill lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Hill describes his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Hill talks about his father, James Hill, Sr.

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Hill describes his mother, Joyce Lee Hill

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Hill talks about how his parents met and his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Hill describes the sights, sounds, and smells of Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Hill describes his interest in sports as a boy

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Hill talks about his elementary school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James Hill remembers attending Dunbar High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - James Hill recalls his high school activities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - James Hill talks about his post-high school plans

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Hill talks about deciding to attend Central State University

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Hill describes attending Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Hill describes his professors and the president of Central State University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Hill talks about pledging the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity at Central State University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Hill talks about majoring in accounting at Central State University

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Hill describes the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Hill remembers his first accounting job at Union Carbide in Niagara Falls, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Hill describes Niagara Falls, New York in 1964

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - James Hill talks about getting his MBA from the University of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Hill talks about his reasons for taking a job at a CPA firm in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Hill talks about his divorce and children

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Hill remembers working for Graham Thornton and the Chicago Economic Development Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Hill recalls briefly entering the car wash business in 1970

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Hill describes starting his own accounting firm in 1972

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Hill describes his accounting firm's specialty areas

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Hill describes the highlights of his accounting career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Hill talks about his accounting work with nonprofits

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - James Hill gives advice to young people who are interested in accounting

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - James Hill shares his view on the Arthur Andersen scandal

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - James Hill describes his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - James Hill talks about his volunteer activities

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Hill describes the technological changes in accounting since the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Hill talks about ethics in accounting

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Hill reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Hill talks about his father's pride in his success

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Hill describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Hill talks about the future of his accounting firm

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Hill talks about the key to business success

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Hill reflects upon his skills

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - James Hill describes how small nonprofits do not understand accounting

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - James Hill talks about his business partner, Kenneth Yu

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - James Hill describes ABLE, Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Hill narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
James Hill remembers working for Graham Thornton and the Chicago Economic Development Corporation
James Hill describes the highlights of his accounting career
Transcript
So who did you get hired by after you got your certification?$$After I got--I wasn't certified. What happened after I got my MBA, I got accepted to Graham Thornton. I had done an internship with them, they were called Alexander Graham at the time and they hired me as an intern. I was the first black to work for them also in the history of their company. And so I worked for them and then after I got--after I finished school, I went to work for them full time. So that's how I gained my experience. I still have an excellent relationship with them even today as we speak.$$Now this takes us--where are we now in terms of time?$$We're in 1967, that's when I graduated and that's when I started to work for them. So I worked for them for a couple of years and then I got an opportunity I couldn't refuse. I went to work for Chicago Economic Development Corporation and they made me a job offer I couldn't refuse because at the time they were going to make me the number two person, I was very young then. I was like twenty five/twenty six. They had about twenty five people that I was going to be in charge of and they were a nonprofit organization so they were totally out of accounting. I still had not gotten my CPA [Certified Public Accountant] at that point in time but I had the experience now. I could take the exam but you still had to have the experience in those days. So I had the experience but once you had a Master's degree that gave you years of experience automatically. In the state of Illinois, I think you only needed one year's experience or that Master equivalent so I had that. So I was able to take it or it might have been two years because I had the extra year. But anyway I went to work for Union Carbide-I mean, I'm sorry, I went to work for Chicago Economic Development Corporation. I was there number two man there and so I stayed there until 1970. The reason why I left because the person that was my boss whose name was Garland Guice who is deceased now. He was a young man, he was only about five/six years older than me so I had nowhere to go. I mean being the number two man is fine if you are older, if that happened today and I was the number two man, I probably would stay on longer. But when you're twenty five/twenty six years old and you're the number two man, you don't have no place to go so if you've got ambition then you want to do something else. But by then I wasn't sure whether or not I wanted to go back into a corporation, so.$What are the--looking back on this, what are--I don't know much about accounting but what are the highlights of a career as an accountant? Are there some memorable--(simultaneous) (unclear)?$$I think some of the highlights of being able to be a trailblazer. We've been a trailblazer for the state, we were the first minority firm to do state auditing and that has open the door for other minority firms to do state auditing. We were the first minority firm to do any work for corporations here in this state, that's opened the door for other minority firms to do it. I was the first black to work for Union Carbide as a cost accountant or as an accountant, I'm sure they've got other blacks now in their accounting departments worldwide. I was the first to work for Graham Thornton, again that's open the door for other blacks to work there as accountants. So these have been some highlights in my career that I think, that's been good. I'm also very--I've been very involved in the profession. I was on the state board of directors of the Illinois CPA Society. I served on that board for three years. I was also on the state board of accountancy, I was appointed by Governor [James R.] Thompson on the state board of accountancy. I served five years on that, I believe. I've been on committees with the American Institute of CPAs, so I've been on two or three committees with them. So I've been very involved there. I headed the task force for the State of Illinois to deal with whether or not we should do quality review and quality review means that we get audited. So we did a study on that to determine whether or not the State of Illinois wanted to have quality review which they did do--a peer review we call it. So those are some of the highlights that we've had and also the fact that we've maintained a very good reputation over the years. People know us, people know our firm, they know what we do. If you talk to anybody about accounting, not just being a minority CPA, we're noted now as being a good CPA firm. You know, years ago you try to sell it based on minority but we don't try and sell it on that now. We try to sell it on our experience and what we do and what we do best and that's how we do. We can compete favorably with anybody our size and our size standards on what we do. So that's how, what we look at.