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Myrtle Davis

Pharmacist and veteran city council member Myrtle Reid Davis was born on October 9, 1931 to Emmalee Reid, a teacher, and Carl Reid, a postal worker. Davis was raised in Rock Hill, South Carolina where she attended Emmett School Elementary and High School. After graduating from high school in 1949, Reid went on to attend Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana where she pursued her B.S. degree in pharmacy.

In 1953, Davis was hired at the Queens City Pharmacy in Charlotte, North Carolina. In 1956, she moved to Atlanta, Georgia where she was hired by the Triangle Prescription Shop. That following year, she was married to activist and local physician, Dr. Albert M. Davis.

Throughout the 1960s, Davis served on the boards of numerous Atlanta based organizations including the League of Women Voters of Fulton County, where she served as president. She also served on the board of directors for the Gate City Day Nursery Association, and in 1970, she was elected to serve on the board of directors for the Atlanta Urban League. In 1979, Davis was hired by Leadership Atlanta where she worked as co-executive director for ten years.

In 1981, Davis ran for public office and was elected as a member of the Atlanta City Council. During her tenure on the Atlanta City Council, Davis served as chair of the Human Resources Committee, the Water and Pollution Committee and the Community Development Committee. Davis also served for five years as chair of the Finance Committee. Then, in 1994, after Maynard Jackson decided to leave his post as mayor, she became a candidate for mayor of the City of Atlanta. She later became the coordinator for the 1996 Atlanta Expo, and in 1998, Davis retired from city government as water utility manager for the City of Atlanta.

Davis’ other affiliations include the Kiwanis Club of Atlanta, the National Board of Girl Scouts, the United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta, the Task Force for the Homeless and the City of Atlanta’s Board of Ethics.

Davis lives in Atlanta, Georgia with her two daughters, Judge Stephanie C. Davis and Stacey Davis Stewart. Stephanie is a judge in the Magistrate Court of Fulton County, and Stacey is the senior vice president of Fannie Mae.

Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 28, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.037

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/28/2008

Last Name

Davis

Schools

Emmett Scott School

Xavier University of Louisiana

First Name

Myrtle

Birth City, State, Country

Rock Hill

HM ID

DAV22

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Walgreens

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

Treat Others As You Would Want Them To Treat You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/9/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Pharmacist and city council member Myrtle Davis (1931 - ) was a city councilwoman for the City of Atlanta, Georiga. She also ran for mayor of the city in 1993. Davis served as the coordinator for the 1996 Atlanta Expo, and in 1998, she retired from city government as the City of Atlanta's Water Utility Manager.

Employment

LaBranche’s Drug Store

Queen City Pharmacy

Triangle Prescription Shop

Atlanta Department of Watershed Management

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Myrtle Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis describes her parents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis talks about her mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis talks about her parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis describes her community in Rock Hill, South Carolina, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis describes her community in Rock Hill, South Carolina, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Myrtle Davis describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Myrtle Davis remembers segregation in Rock Hill, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis recalls segregation in Rock Hill, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis recalls her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis talks about her college education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis describes her mentors during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis recalls her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis recalls her childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis talks about her Catholic faith

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis recalls her social life during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Myrtle Davis recalls her preparation for college

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Myrtle Davis talks about her childhood pastimes

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Myrtle Davis remembers the start of World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis recalls the entertainment of her youth

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis remembers her arrival at Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis recalls her experiences at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis remembers the leadership of Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis describes her activities at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis recalls her classes at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis remembers her professors at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis recalls her internship at LaBranche's Drug Store in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis talks about Mardi Gras

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis recalls her graduation from Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Myrtle Davis describes her first impressions of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Myrtle Davis recalls how she met her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Myrtle Davis remembers Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis remembers the community on Auburn Avenue during the 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis describes her husband's civil rights activism in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis talks about her children

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis recalls her mother's civil rights activism in Rock Hill, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis talks about the Civil Rights Movement in Rock Hill, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis describes segregation in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis remembers the Peyton Wall in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis describes the Collier Heights neighborhood of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis remembers the events of the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis recalls joining the League of Women Voters of Atlanta-Fulton County

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis recalls her experiences of discrimination in the medical field

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis describes the integration of the medical industry in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis describes her role at the Gate City Day Nursery Association

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis talks about her work for the Girl Scouts of the United States of America

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis remembers her involvement with her daughters

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis describes her role in the Leadership Atlanta program

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis remembers her older daughter's car accident and rehabilitation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis recalls her younger daughter's college application process

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis remembers her campaign for Atlanta City Council

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis reflects upon her time on the Atlanta City Council

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Myrtle Davis recalls her campaign for the mayoralty of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Myrtle Davis reflects upon the mayoral leadership of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Myrtle Davis remembers the support for her mayoral campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Myrtle Davis recalls her role at the City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Myrtle Davis talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Myrtle Davis describes her civic involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Myrtle Davis reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Myrtle Davis describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Myrtle Davis shares a message to future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Myrtle Davis reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Myrtle Davis narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

9$2

DATitle
Myrtle Davis talks about her Catholic faith
Myrtle Davis describes her husband's civil rights activism in Atlanta, Georgia
Transcript
Now, you talked a little bit about church and your parents [Emmalee Williams Reid and Carl Reid] being Presbyterian, what church did your family attend?$$They were Presbyterians; both were very active in the church. And let me tell you how the whole intrusion of the whole--how Catholicism started in my life. My father got sick and went to St. Philip's Hospital [Rock Hill, South Carolina] and was--which was a Catholic hospital. And, of course, he had daily visits from, from the Chaplin there at the hospital who was a Catholic priest. And this Catholic priest was telling him about his plans to build a new Catholic church in the colored section of town which was Saint Mary's [Saint Mary Catholic Church, Rock Hill, South Carolina]. And that he needed someone to, to be an organist and asked him if he knew anybody. So my father said, "Well, my, my, my daughter Myrtle [HistoryMaker Myrtle Davis] plays. Maybe she would play for you." So he asked me if I wanted to do it and I said, "Well, sure, I'll do it." But, what my father used to do, we used to go to the 9:30 Mass and I would play and he would be outside waiting for me to take me to the Presbyterian church. Well, as time went on, and we did that for a long period of time where every Sunday morning he would take me to play at the Catholic church and then we would go to the Presbyterian church. Then it got to the point where I really liked the Mass and the Catholic church. And, they were a little bit disappointed I guess that I did not wanna continue in the Catholic church, but certainly they said it was my decision to make. My, my father said, "You're already female and you're already colored, why do you wanna add another thing to your, your life, another misery to your life to become Catholic as well?" But I hadn't looked at it like that. But there at that time, of course, in Rock Hill, South Carolina there were very few Catholics. There was one Catholic church, Saint Anne's [Saint Anne Catholic Church, Rock Hill, South Carolina] and, of course, St. Mary's was developed when I was in, in high school [Emmett Scott School, Rock Hill, South Carolina]. But, that was the whole motivation for my changing in, in religion from one to the other.$$How old were you?$$Well, I was actually, when I became interested in it, I was probably was fourteen, fifteen years old. When I actually was baptized or taken into Catholic church, it was my freshman year in college [Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, Louisiana].$$Okay. What was the name of the Presbyterian church?$$It was Hermon Presbyterian Church [Rock Hill, South Carolina].$$Okay, and the Catholic church again?$$St. Mary's.$$St. Mary's.$$Uh-huh.$$And so, you went through the religious instructions to be confirmed and first communion and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That's right, that's right. Actually, what happened was I had taken instructions at St. Mary's before I went to college, and I didn't finish. Well, when I came back my freshman year, was when I had my--when I was taken into the church. My confirmation took place in New Orleans [Louisiana] because I was a sophomore in college and it was occurring at the St. Louis Cathedral in, in New Orleans and they had a confirmation class. And that's where I was confirmed.$Now let's talk more about your husband. You get married and he's a very prominent physician, tell me about your husband and--'cause he's involved in a lot of different organizations and things here in Atlanta [Georgia] so tell me about some of his doings here in Atlanta (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Well, well he was, and particularly leading into the Civil Rights Movement. My husband was truly an activist. And I think if anybody had--if he'd had his, his--he made his own decisions about what he wanted to be I think he would have--first of all, he would have been a foot, football, football or basketball coach. He loved sports. But, in addition to that, he was truly a social activist. He became involved in, in causes and he was very active during, during the student movement [Atlanta Student Movement]. Supported the students entirely. He helped them get out of jail, he got out and picketed with them and so he was, he was that kind of person. I can remember one night in particular when he and [HistoryMaker] Dr. Clinton Warner and someone else went down to the old Heart of Atlanta Motel [Atlanta, Georgia], and they took bags and in the bags they had just packed towels, you know. They were gonna check into the Heart of Atlanta Motel because it was one of the places that, you know, just refused to open up. So they went down and, of course, they were arrested. So he did have--he had that streak of rebellion in him. I mean, he, he--there was, there was this need to, to make things better and he was gonna be a part of it. I mean, he--there was hardly a time that he ever sacrificed being out of his office but when something came up that he had to attend to that had a civil rights' nature to it, I mean, he was involved in that. There was a group of men who met on a regular basis to strategize and to support the students. And some of those people included Jesse Hill and--I'm trying to think of some of the early leaders in there but they were a lot of people on the Atlanta University [Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia] campus, professors on the--many doctors, folks who, whose certainly livelihood did not depend on, on jobs. I mean, they--there jobs were not threatened as a result of the actions that they took. But Albert [Davis' husband, Albert Miles Davis] continued to be active, he also became president of the Atlanta chapter of the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] and served in that capacity. In fact, I think he was serving as president of the NAACP when, when Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] was assassinated. I mean, with it came a lot of--well, lot of things to respond to at the time, I mean, other than the student unrest and meeting with the downtown business people about opening up businesses. And he and Sam Williams [Samuel Woodrow Williams], who was--Sam Williams was a pastor of Friendship Baptist Church [Atlanta, Georgia], were very instrumental in meeting with the Atlanta school board to help integrate the schools. So he was very much involved in all of the integration efforts going on at that time.$$Now, after you marry, you no longer work at the--as a pharmacist?$$I worked for a while, I worked until possibly I was carrying Stephanie [HistoryMaker Stephanie Davis] and I stopped after a while during my pregnancy.$$I'm sorry, I meant to ask you about your husband. You mentioned the Guardsmen [National Association of Guardsmen].$$Um-hm.$$What group was that?$$It, it's a social organization that still exists. But they started a, a chapter here in Atlanta and there were about thirty guys who got together and established an Atlanta chapter. And what it was, it was truly a social club but they had entertainment at the various cities where each chapter was located. It still goes on this way about four times a year. And, of course, the Atlanta parties were the parties that, that people liked to go to 'cause it was a, really a good time.$$

Valerie Richardson Jackson

Valerie Richardson Jackson, host of Atlanta, Georgia’s, public radio station WABE’s Between the Lines, a series of conversations with some of today’s brightest and most notable writers and thinkers, and former First Lady of Atlanta as wife of the first African American mayor of Atlanta, Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr, was born April 3, 1949 in Richmond, Virginia. Raised by parents Cora Ruth Feggins Richardson and Charles Hoover Richardson, Jackson integrated the high school she attended in Richmond and went on to major in business management at Virginia Commonwealth University. Jackson earned her M.B.A. degree from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania; after graduating in 1973, she worked as an advertising executive at Grey Advertising in New York City, and as Regional Marketing Supervisor for TWA’s corporate headquarters in New York.

Jackson met Maynard Jackson at a party hosted by Roberta Flack in 1976. In 1977, during Maynard Jackson’s second of three terms as Mayor of Atlanta, the couple was married; they had two children, Valerie-Amanda and Alexandra. During her twelve years as First Lady of Atlanta, Jackson served as Special Advisor to the Mayor’s Office of Economic Development, helping to bring the 1988 Democratic National Convention and the 1996 Olympic Games to Atlanta. Maynard Jackson’s last term in office ended in 1993, but both Jacksons remained active in civic life as Maynard Jackson was considering a bid for the U.S. Senate in 2002. Jackson husband died at age 65 of a heart attack on June 23, 2003, while on a business trip to Washington, D.C.

As host of Between the Lines, Valerie Richardson Jackson interviewed such notable individuals as Hillary Clinton, Sidney Poitier, former President Jimmy Carter, Cornell West, Ayanla Vanzant, and Deepak Chopra. Jackson served as chair of Jackmont Hospitality, Inc., and as president of Jackson Securities, Inc. In addition to her executive and radio activities, Jackson worked with civic boards and organizations as a motivational speaker, and volunteered on numerous civic boards and organizations, including the Maynard Jackson Youth Foundation; Habitat for Humanity; Leadership Atlanta; the Northwest Georgia Girl Scout Council; and the Alliance for a New Humanity.

Accession Number

A2005.148

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/23/2005 |and| 12/16/2012

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Middle Name

Richardson

Occupation
Schools

Henrico High

Virginia Commonwealth University

School of Medicine

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Woodville Elementary School

Whitcomb Court Elementary School

First Name

Valerie

Birth City, State, Country

Richmond

HM ID

RIC09

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Buford, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Do Second Level Thinking.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

4/3/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Civic leader Valerie Richardson Jackson (1949 - ) was the widow of former Atlanta mayor Maynard Jackson, and the host of Between the Lines, a radio interview show on Atlanta, Georgia’s, public radio station WABE.

Employment

Grey Advertising Group

Trans World Airlines

City of Atlanta

Georgia Public Broadcasting

Public Broadcasting Atlanta

Jackmont Hospitality, Inc.

Jackson Securities

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Valerie Richardson Jackson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Valerie Richardson Jackson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her experience integrating her high school

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her maternal family being light skinned

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls an interview with Patricia J. Williams

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her mother working at a white bank

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her parents' education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls growing up with seven siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls finding relics of the Confederacy

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes the sights, smells and sounds of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls music and church during her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls being molested as a young girl

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her childhood interests and activities

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her personality as a young girl

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her elementary school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her aptitude for learning

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her experience in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls integrating Richmond's Henrico High School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls being hired as a telephone operator

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her prom at Henrico High School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls winning the Miss Warrior Contest

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her experience in college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes being hired at Neighborhood Youth Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon the Neighborhood Youth Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon her family's slogans

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her admission to the Wharton School

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her experience at the Wharton School

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her position at Grey Group in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes how she met Maynard Jackson

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes meeting Maynard Jackson in 1976

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her courtship with Maynard Jackson

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her role as First Lady of Atlanta

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Charles, Prince of Wales' visit to Atlanta

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her family's challenges during her husband's mayoralty

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her involvement in Atlanta's 1996 Summer Olympics

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes the Maynard Jackson Youth Foundation, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes the Maynard Jackson Youth Foundation, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her first impressions of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Valerie Richardson Jackson's interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her wedding to Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls the construction on Atlanta's international airport terminal

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson's popularity

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes Atlanta after Maynard Jackson became mayor

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls the establishment of Turner Broadcasting

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Atlanta's bid for the 1996 Summer Olympics

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her role as First Lady of Atlanta

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls the Atlanta Child Murders

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Atlanta's airport construction

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes Maynard Jackson's salesmanship

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon the preservation of The King Center

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls HistoryMaker Andrew Young as mayor of Atlanta

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Maynard Jackson's run for a second mayoral term

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon Maynard Jackson's legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon minorities being scared of using their power

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon Maynard Jackson's third mayoral term

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon her time as first lady of Atlanta

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes Atlanta as the "cradle of civil rights"

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Mayor Maynard Jackson's heart surgery

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her career in television broadcasting

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her career in radio broadcasting

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her radio show, 'Between the Lines'

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her commitment to leadership training

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes choosing guests for 'Between the Lines'

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her volunteer activities

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes Jackmont Hospitality, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls Maynard Jackson's bid for the U.S. Senate

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her husband, Maynard Jackson

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Valerie Richardson Jackson talks about her family

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes her hopes for Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon President Barack Obama's election

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon her life

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Valerie Richardson Jackson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Valerie Richardson Jackson recalls her parents and siblings

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Valerie Richardson Jackson describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Valerie Richardson Jackson narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

12$8

DATitle
Valerie Richardson Jackson describes how she met Maynard Jackson
Valerie Richardson Jackson describes the Maynard Jackson Youth Foundation, pt. 2
Transcript
(Simultaneous) Yeah, so how did you meet him [Maynard Jackson]? Yeah.$$I met Maynard at Roberta Flack's house in New York City [New York, New York]. Roberta was a mutual friend of ours. A great friend that worked with me in, in the advertising area, he and I were both friends of Roberta, and he called me one day and said, "Hey look, Valerie [HistoryMaker Valerie Richardson Jackson], Roberta's having a brunch for Maynard Jackson and we think you should come." You know, "Why don't you come and meet him." And so I'm like, you know, I knew who Maynard Jackson was, of course, but I was like, "Oh, you know--." He says, "Oh come on, Valerie, come and meet him." I said, "Well, I don't know, I've got to do this, I've got to do that." He says, "Look, I want you to meet Maynard Jackson." He said, "He's the kind of man you need, and you're the kind of woman he needs." And I said, "What are you talking about?" I said, "What are you talking about?" He said, "Well these guys that you're running around with aren't worth your time." And he said, "You're the kind of woman that Maynard Jackson needs." And I said, "Well, what are you talking about? Isn't he married?" And he says, "Oh, no, not anymore." I said, "What?" And he said, "Oh come on Valerie." He said, "[HistoryMaker] Quincy Jones will be there." I said, "Okay," (laughter). So, to this day, Quincy Jones laughs and jokes with us and says, "Well Maynard, if I hadn't been there, she wouldn't even have come to meet you," you know. But I did come and I did meet him and we did hit it off; and I think he was very impressed to meet, you know, a Wharton woman, you know, a black Wharton woman, right. And, of course, I was very impressed with him. And it was almost as if things were in divine order because when I was at Wharton [Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] working on my M.B.A., Maynard was elected for the first time as mayor [of Atlanta, Georgia]--in 1972 he was elected mayor for the first time. So Ebony magazine had done this four or five page spread on Maynard Jackson, "Brilliant young attorney, youngest mayor of any major American city," you know, yada yada yada. So I'm reading the paper, I mean the magazine article, and I'm about halfway through it and I just stop and I l- just look up and I say to myself, "Now that's the kind of man I want to marry." I said, "I want to marry a Maynard Jackson."$We [Maynard Jackson Youth Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia] talk to them [students] about public speaking, about public demeanor, about public manners, about things like not chewing gum in public. We have etiquette classes where we'll bring them in and sit them in front of a full table set with six pieces of silverware and all the different glasses and so forth. Teach them how to use the silverware and then we always take them to lunch. We could take them to Paschal's [Paschal's Restaurant, Atlanta, Georgia]. We can take them to The Varsity [Atlanta, Georgia] or we can take them to a five-star hotel and see what they've learned about their etiquette and if they pull out the chair for the ladies, and so forth and open the doors, because we still teach all that. All of that old fashioned stuff, we think, is still crucial to the success of a person and it's the nuances that really make the difference. Chris Tucker came to the house for a surprise, for them, for the Christmas party, the comedian, Chris Tucker of 'Rush Hour' fame. He's a friend of ours and so I asked him to come by and say a few words to the kids. Well, the week before I had talked to the kids about chewing gum and how one should not chew in public and that the origin of chewing gum is really from the indigenous people who would pull gum from a tree, put it in their mouth and chew it to clean their teeth and then discard it. And so I said to them, you wouldn't brush your teeth in public, so why chew chewing gum if you're sitting on a dais or if you're speaking in public or, I said it's okay if you're doing sports and that kind of thing but if you're in a, you know, a public setting, then you really, you know, should not chew chewing gum, at least not where people can tell that you're chewing chewing gum. Okay, so, Chris Tucker comes over and Chris Tucker's chewing chewing gum. I mean, Chris is really chewing his chewing gum, right. At least five kids came up to me and said, "Ms. Jackson [HistoryMaker Valerie Richardson Jackson], you need to talk to Chris Tucker about his chewing gum." So I know they're listening, thank God, right, and that's what it's all about. I used to wonder, for ten years, how does Maynard [Maynard Jackson] get up every Saturday, every other Saturday and go down there after working all week and doing everything, how does he do it? And then when I started doing it, I found out, it's because of the children. They give us the energy. They give us the spirit. They give us the motivation to keep coming, to keep sharing with them because they really are the future. They really are the future.

Kenneth Crooks

Georgian civic leader Kenneth Crooks, Jr. was born in Boston, Massachusetts on September 12, 1931. He attended elementary school in Hampton, Virginia and secondary school in Jamaica, West Indies. Crooks graduated in 1957 from the University of Massachusetts with a Bachelors Degree of Business Administration and received a Masters of Business Administration from Atlanta University in 1962.

Crooks went to work for the National Urban League in its Regional Office in Atlanta, Georgia, covering twelve southern states in 1962. His responsibilities there included providing technical support for local Urban Leagues and developing new affiliates in the South. Crooks remained at the Urban League until 1991, taking time off in 1972 to assist Maynard Jackson's first campaign for Mayor of Atlanta. During his tenure at the Urban League, he worked in Economic Development and Employment, Education, Housing, Counseling and Community Awareness programs. He also developed programs for youth in fine arts, creating the Summer Youth Academy, the "Do the Right Thing" Rallies and brought the Chattahoochee Court-Appointed Special Advocates program for deprived and neglected children to the community.

In 1993, Crooks moved to Columbus, Georgia to serve as President of the Urban League of Greater Columbus. He had previously held the position of Community Service Specialist and Assistant Director of Development at the Fort Valley State College. Crooks also serves as Special Assistant to the pastor at Fourth Street Missionary Baptist Church. He has received several awards recognizing his service to the community, including "Man of the Year" for 2001, given by the Men's Progressive Club of Columbus.

Accession Number

A2002.016

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/16/2002

Last Name

Crooks

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Clark Atlanta University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Kenneth

Birth City, State, Country

Boston

HM ID

CRO02

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

All

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium Specifics: Would accept honorarium, though not required; flexible on range
Preferred Audience: All

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

If I’m Not Up To It, I’m Down On It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/12/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Swordfish

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive Kenneth Crooks (1931 - ) was the president of the Columbus, Georgia Urban League.

Employment

Fourth Street Missionary Baptist Church

Urban League of Greater Columbus

Fort Valley State University

Urban League of Broward County

National Urban League (NUL)

Delete

Atlanta University

Grambling State University

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Kenneth Crooks' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Kenneth Crooks talks about his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Kenneth Crooks talks about his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Kenneth Crooks talks about his grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Kenneth Crooks describes his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Kenneth Crooks remembers his early childhood in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Kenneth Crooks describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Kenneth Crooks recalls an experience with segregation in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Kenneth Crooks describes attending school as the son of the headmaster

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Kenneth Crooks remembers his family's move to Jamaica

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Kenneth Crooks discusses his father's educational expectations

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Kenneth Crooks talks about returning to the United States to attend the University of Massachusetts Amherst

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Kenneth Crooks recalls the sights and sounds that remind him of Jamaica

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Kenneth Crooks talks about segregation and cold weather at the University of Massachusetts Amherst

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Kenneth Crooks talks about his decision to major in business administration and other college experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Kenneth Crooks remembers being drafted into the U.S. Army as a medic after graduation

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Kenneth Crooks talks about his struggle to find a job as a black man in New England and moving to Grambling, Louisiana after his father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Kenneth Crooks talks about his role in the Atlanta Student Movement while he was a graduate student at Atlanta University

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Kenneth Crooks talks about coordinating student sit-ins in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Kenneth Crooks describes how the Atlanta Student Movement focused on improving the economic power of blacks

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Kenneth Crooks talks about civil rights organizations and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s influence on them

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Kenneth Crooks talks about his effort to create a job placement office at Atlanta University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Kenneth Crooks talks about Clarence Coleman's role in recruiting him to join the National Urban League

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Kenneth Crooks talks about the roles of Lester Granger and Whitney Young in the history of the National Urban League

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Kenneth Crooks talks about significance of the National Urban League

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Kenneth Crooks talks his role in the National Urban League and its impact on his personal life

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Kenneth Crooks talks about the National Urban League

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Kenneth Crooks talks about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s connection to the Urban League

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Kenneth Crooks talks about the expansion of the National Urban League and working on Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson's campaign

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Kenneth Crooks talks about Whitney Young and Vernon Jordan, presidents of the National Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Kenneth Crook's talks about National Urban League President Hugh Price's emphasis on sound economics

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Kenneth Crook's describes the untapped potential of the black church

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Kenneth Crook's talks about the future of the National Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Kenneth Crook's talks about his leadership of the Urban League of Greater Columbus in Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Kenneth Crook's talks about the National Urban League's agenda and its approach to AIDS in America

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Kenneth Crook's reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Kenneth Crooks talks about coordinating student sit-ins in Atlanta, Georgia
Kenneth Crooks talks about Clarence Coleman's role in recruiting him to join the National Urban League
Transcript
As the, as the president of the student body for Atlanta University [now Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia], (unclear) the graduate school, I got involved with the youngsters from Clark [Clark College, now Clark Atlanta University], Marshbon (ph) Spelman [Spelman College] and Morehouse [Morehouse College]. These were young, aggressive, tuition-having-been-paid-by-parents-kids (laughter). When I was a graduate student struggling, working on the weekends at the Jewish club out on, I'm not sure where the location is, but I had waiter's jobs on the weekends where I was waiting tables, trying to survive to make it in those tough times. And so there was--although I felt strongly in support of what they were doing, I didn't have the wherewithal to--I had to watch out where the next meal was coming from (laughter). No father and my mom [Adele Crooks] was working as a counselor and I was a grown person at that time, and didn't feel like I should burden her with that responsibility. And so I was really caught between the devil and the deep blue sea in fulfilling my role as an African American, which I was, who I just happen to have spent some time in Jamaica and the Jamerican, which we like to call ourselves, we had a (unclear) little group trying to make it in the great country of opportunity. The kids would take a rally club approach to some solutions and I would try with others to meld--mold that so that it didn't have to be as dramatic as they like to see it happen. I think I spent a lot of time on the telephone in Reverend [Joseph Everhard] Boone's church payphone directing kids to where the police were not, 'cause the police couldn't be everywhere at the same time. So we'd the find the location where there were no police cars; we'd send the kids from that location to the place where there were no policemen and they would try to sit-in. And when the cops got over there, then we'd (unclear), and in fact they were not at Sears, then we send the kids back to Sears. So for a couple days there we had an exciting play with the, with the police. And they did arrest the kids and they took them to jail and we'd take them food baskets and take letters back and forth for their--to their parents and they'd write theirs in jail and we'd spend the time doing that. I saw myself in the coordinating, functioning, assisting role and not being in jail with the kids. Somebody had to do the other part of it and I think that's where the T.M. Alexanders [Theodore Martin Alexander, Sr.] and the wealthy black Atlantans tried to make sure that they had a vehicle for solving the problems.$So did you feel these were sincere efforts on the part of these businesses? Did they really want blacks--$$No, no,$$--in their--$$(Laughter). When the guy come to town and he, and he--well there were exceptions. The guys who were on the liberal end of the totem pole said, "where is the place that I can stay, no I don't want to stay at the Hilton, what's the nearest hotel to the school, what's Paschal's Motel [Paschal's Motor Hotel] like, I can't find it in the book, how do I get there", etc, etc. Those guys did get cabs and came to the Paschal's and stayed there and did their things, did the interviews, some in Paschal's, and some on campus [Atlanta University, now Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia]. Others stayed downtown, came to the campus at nine o'clock in the morning, left at four and didn't invite us over as they did the other placement officers, I learned later, and that was kinda were we were. But the basic--the largest majority of them were complying with, with what seem to have been a directive from somewhere upstairs that said, "let's get some folks hired".$$Did this create any frustration in you?$$I wouldn't call it frustration. I take each of these experiences as challenges. I recognized that there's an education that white America needed and the only way to give them the education that they needed was to kinda put them in a setting in which they had as little fear as possible. And that they did not expect to be jumped on if they asked the wrong question. In each of the other settings, if they asked the wrong question, they get pounced on and in other settings they found themselves kinda afraid of the environment. I try to put them at ease and when I did that I able to get through them, I think, to them. And this has been the hallmark of my approach to life and that's how I got involved with Whitney [Whitney Young], and Whitney at the School of Social Work [at Atlanta University], and when I got the call from Clarence Coleman at the Urban League in Atlanta--National Urban League in Atlanta--that said, "how would you like to work for the Urban League"? I said, "doing what"? He said, "doing for Atlanta University for 40 other schools". I couldn't turn it down. So I became the liaison for black schools for the South, to try to get them to put their placement offices in some kind of an order so that we could go ahead and build a schedule. And part of my job, having linked up with some of the big industries was to get that information even down to LeMoyne College and some of the other schools all over the South, an exciting experience.