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Wayne Bowen

Biology and Pharmacology Professor Wayne Darrell Bowen was born to (mother) and (father) in 1952. As a child, Bowen knew early on that he was interested in pursuing a career in science, and indeed, he went on to earn his B.S. degree in Chemistry from Morgan State College, in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1974. Bowen then pursued a graduate degree with a major in biochemistry and a minor in neuropharmacology, graduating from Cornell University with his Ph.D. degree after completing a thesis on the biochemical process of cholesterol synthesis.
Bowen went on to do his postdoctoral work from 1980 to 1983 at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), a research institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) located in Bethesda, Maryland, where his work centered on opiate receptor biochemistry. From 1983 to 1991 Bowen taught courses in endocrinology, introductory biology, and biochemistry at Brown University as an Assistant Professor of Biology. During his time at Brown, Bowen also founded the macromolecular biochemistry facility on campus, which provided campus and surrounding medical facilities with synthetic peptide compounds.
From 1991 until 2004, Bowen served as tenured chief of the Unit on Receptor Biochemistry and Pharmacology at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland, working in the Drug Design and Synthesis Section of the Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry. During his time as Chief, Bowen continued to lecture for undergraduate students at Brown University, serving as both Adjunct Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry as well as Adjunct Professor of Neuroscience. During a corresponding period, from 1999 to 2004, Bowen also chaired the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the NIH Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences Graduate School.
In 2004, Bowen returned to the task of educating future scientists as a full-time Professor of Biology at Brown University, teaching in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology. Bowen was then appointed Chair of his department in 2007. His research at Brown focuses on the potential for developing new treatments for disease through the understanding of sigma receptors, specifically treatment for neurological disorders and cancer.
Bowen has served as President of the Black Scientists Association at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2001and is a member of the Society for Neuroscience, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the International Brain Research Organization/World Federation of Neuroscientists. He has also received a Certificate of Appreciation from the Student and Teacher Internship Program at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and NIH as well as an Award of Appreciation from the Science and Engineering Fair at Morgan State University. In addition, he was also awarded a Certificate of Recognition from the NIH Speakers Bureau and a Special Recognition Award from the Undergraduate Scholarship Program at NIH, as well as numerous research grants.

Accession Number

A2012.216

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/9/2012

Last Name

Bowen

Maker Category
Middle Name

D.

Occupation
Schools

Morgan State University

Cornell University

Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson Elementary

Baltimore City College

William H. Lemmel Middle

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Wayne

HM ID

BOW07

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Rhode Island

Birth Date

11/11/1952

Speakers Bureau Region City

Providence

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Biologist Wayne Bowen (1952 - ) is a professor of biology and pharmacology and a biologist studying alternative treatments for disease at Brown University.

Employment

National Institute of Mental Health (NIH)

Brown University

Cornell University

National Institute of Health (NIH)

Smith, Kline and French

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Wayne Bowen's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Wayne Bowen lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Wayne Bowen talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Wayne Bowen talks about his mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Wayne Bowen talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Wayne Bowen talks about his father's growing up and his career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Wayne Bowen talks about how his parents met, married, and later moved to Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Wayne Bowen talks about his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Wayne Bowen describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Wayne Bowen describes his childhood neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Wayne Bowen describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Wayne Bowen talks about his interest in music during his adolescence

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Wayne Bowen talks about his interest in science and his experiments with his Gilbert chemistry set

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Wayne Bowen talks about his interest in science and his aspirations for a career as a scientist

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Wayne Bowen talks about his family's involvement in both the Baptist and Methodist church

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Wayne Bowen talks about his elementary school, his early science education, his interest in chemistry, and his favorite high school science teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Wayne Bowen talks about his friend's death, his social life in junior high school and his junior high school science projects

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Wayne Bowen talks about his high school extracurricular activities and his interest in photography

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Wayne Bowen talks about his band, St. George's Gate

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Wayne Bowen talks about his experience playing in a musical production

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Wayne Bowen talks about his decision to attend Morgan State University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Wayne Bowen talks about his high school experience at Baltimore City College, including the demographics of the school and his job as a photographer

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Wayne Bowen talks about missing Jimi Hendricks perform at the Baltimore Civic Center

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Wayne Bowen talks about his mentors, his jobs, and his experience in the chemistry department at Morgan State University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Wayne Bowen talks about his extracurricular activities and his experience being a commuter student at Morgan State University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Wayne Bowen talks about his undergraduate research project on porphyrins

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Wayne Bowen talks about his emerging interest in biochemistry and his decision to attend Cornell University

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Wayne Bowen talks about his first research publication and his introduction to the field of pharmacology

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Wayne Bowen talks about his Ph.D. advisor, James Gaylor, and his experience at Cornell University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Wayne Bowen talks about his dissertation research on the biochemical process of cholesterol synthesis - part one

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Wayne Bowen talks about his dissertation research on the biochemical process of cholesterol synthesis - part two

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Wayne Bowen talks about graduating from Cornell University and his interest in pharmacology at the National Institute of Mental Health

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Wayne Bowen describes his postdoctoral research on the biochemistry of opioid receptors at the National Institute of Mental Health

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Wayne Bowen talks about establishing the Macromolecular Biochemistry Facility at Brown University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Wayne Bowen describes the pharmacology of sigma receptors

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Wayne Bowen talks about his research on opioid receptors

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Wayne Bowen talks about his research on sigma receptors - part one

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Wayne Bowen talks about the role of sigma receptors in cancer research

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Wayne Bowen talks about his research with sigma receptors - part two

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Wayne Bowen talks about his professional activities and his research on sigma receptors and their implications for cancer research

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Wayne Bowen talks about his research with sigma receptors - part three

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Wayne Bowen talks about the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Black Scientists Association and its initiatives

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Wayne Bowen talks about becoming Chair of the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology at Brown University

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Wayne Bowen talks about his duties as Chair of the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology at Brown University

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Wayne Bowen talks about the potential uses of the sigma-1 receptor and emerging areas of research

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Wayne Bowen talks about therapies that have been developed from the sigma 2 receptor

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Wayne Bowen talks about the field of structural biology

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Wayne Bowen talks about how street drugs can inform pharmacological research

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Wayne Bowen talks about the physiology of drug addiction

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Wayne Bowen talks about the hallucinogen, ibogaine, its psychoactive effects, and its potential therapeutic uses

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Wayne Bowen reflects upon his life choices

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Wayne Bowen reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Wayne Bowen shares his advice for aspiring scientists and pharmacologists

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Wayne Bowen talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Wayne Bowen talks about his interest in history and the Civil War

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Wayne Bowen talks about his hobbies

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Wayne Bowen talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Wayne Bowen describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Wayne Bowen talks about his professional activities and his research on sigma receptors and their implications for cancer research
Wayne Bowen talks about the potential uses of the sigma-1 receptor and emerging areas of research
Transcript
So, I went back to NIH [National Institutes of Health] in 1991.$$Okay, alright. The director of--$$And became director, a unit chief down there, and stayed down there until 2004.$$Okay.$$And during that whole time I was at NIH, we did, the work was completely focused on sigma receptors. And we published a number of papers showing that sigma receptors were present in an organ now called lipid rafts, and that that might influence their function. We discovered that the sigma receptors, when activated, produces a change of calcium levels in cells, which is a known second messenger that can change signaling and biochemistry in cells. We found that turning on the sigma receptor increases the levels of a lipid called ceramic, which is a toxic lipid that has a number of targets in cells, and can turn on the apoptotic process. And at the same time, we developed a whole series of compounds through our collaboration with a medicinal chemist. The main chemist that I collaborated with was Brian DeCosta, who was at the NIH then. There was another chemist called Craig, his name was Craig Bertha, who made some compounds that we, he made a compound that we're still using today, that's sort of a prototypic selective sigma 2 receptor agonist. We're always interested in--so, once we found that there were two sub-types of the receptor--so, we were first interested in designing compounds that were selected for the sigma receptor system. And we found a few of those. But now what we're trying to do is hone compounds to be selected for either the sigma 1 or the sigma 2 receptor. And we found a few of those, working with our medicinal chemist colleagues. So then in 2004 I moved back to Brown [University], and joined The Department of Molecular Pharmacology Physiology And Biotechnology, and continued to work on the sigma receptor system. And continuing now with more of a focus on what they're doing in tumor cells, how they are affecting cell growth and proliferation, with a main focus on the ability of the sigma 2 receptor to turn on the apoptosis. And the discovery there was that cells that are resistant--forms of cancer that are resistant to chemotherapy, like pancreatic cancer, is resistant to a number of chemotherapeutic approaches, are susceptible to the sigma receptor. So, we can kill--we looked at three different pancreatic cancer cell lines that are readily killed by activating the sigma 2 receptor when these cells are resistant to other types of chemotherapeutic agents. So, the signaling mechanisms that are turned on by the sigma 2 receptor apparently go in directions that bypass a number of the molecules that are mutated in cancer. Cancer is a problem of unrestricted cell growth, so proliferation. And the way cancer cells do that, is they, there are mutations and molecules that are normally designed to turn on the cell death process. So, cells have a, all the cells in your body, with the exception of your neurons, have a time clock in them, and they'll divide for a certain number of times. And then that cell will turn on an apoptotic program, and basically commit suicide.$$This is the process of replenishing--$$The process of replenishing cells. And in cancer cells, that process is sabotaged, it's hijacked, because the biochemistry that's used to turn on that cell death process is altered in tumor cells. So, these cells escape this apoptotic process. And what we're trying to do with these chemotherapeutic agents is turn that process back on. And apparently, what the sigma 2 receptor does is turn on the programs that sort of bypass these roadblocks in the apoptotic pathway, so that if you have a cell that is resistant to chemotherapy, turning on the sigma 2 receptor opens up another pathway, because there are multiple ways to kill a cell. And the tumor cells haven't figured out yet all of those ways. So we try, so the sigma 2 receptor finds a way to exploit a system that's not yet been altered, and that's a very, that will be a very valuable tool. Because if all tumor cell types, or most tumor cell types, express these receptors, then you have sort of a broad spectrum of tools to attack a number of different types of tumors. So, since coming back to Brown [University], we've focused on that. I've had a couple of post-docs that have worked on this project. Shee Wong worked on looking at the mechanism of how the cells are able to use the mitochondrial pathway to turn on cell deaths. This is a relatively novel discovery, that the mitochondria in cells can be involved in committing this type of cell suicide.$Now, where do you see the field of sigma receptors heading in the next decade?$$So, I think we're in a state, at a stage in the field now where we're just beginning to figure out what these receptors might be doing. There are people studying this system from a number of angles. So, most of the, if you were talking to me five years ago, I would say that most of the people in the field are coming into the field from neuroscience, because they were originally thought to be opioid receptors. And so, people of my age group, I guess, generation, started out studying opioid receptors, from a standpoint of the CNS [central nervous system]. But in recent years, the field has branched into other areas. So, one of the areas where the field is going is in the area of drug abuse. It turns out that the sigma 1 receptor is a target for, a potential target, for developing drugs to treat drug abuse. One of my colleagues I collaborated with is Ray Natsomoti, who's now at West Virginia University, and has pioneered this work in showing that the sigma receptor, that the sigma 1 receptor, when it's blocked, will ameliorate some of the toxic effects of cocaine, some of the local motor effects of cocaine. One of the things that, one of the toxicities of cocaine is that it causes convulsions at high dosages. And she found that if you block sigma 1 receptors with sigma 1 receptor antagonists, that you block the convulsive effects of cocaine. And so, and you can do this even after the animal has been given a dose of cocaine, a convulsive dose of cocaine. So, that's a potential therapeutic use of the sigma 1 receptor, targeting the sigma 1 receptor. Others have shown that blockade of the sigma 1 receptor has effects on drug self-administration. So, if you train animals to self-administer cocaine or-- there's a group at Boston [Massachusetts] that's doing alcohol, and give them sigma 1 antagonists, that you can block or inhibit drug self-administration in these animals. But more importantly, it's been shown that blockade of the sigma 1 receptor blocks the process that's called, the process where the animal begins to self-administer again after they've been off the drug for a while, so re-instatement, it's called. So, you if make an animal addicted to cocaine, and give him certain--and then take the animal off cocaine, and then give certain cues, the animal will go back to self-administering cocaine. And this is thought to be what happens in humans, where they go to rehab and they're off drugs for a while, and there are certain cues--stress, other cues, that get them self-administering drugs again. And it's been shown that blocking the sigma 1 receptor will block this re-instatement process. So, there are people who are interested in targeting the sigma 1 receptor for treatment of drug abuse, and I think that's a direction that the field is going to go. The other major direction, also involving a sigma 1 receptor, is learning and memory. The sigma 1 receptor is expressing a part of the brain called the hippocampus. And it's been shown by a group in France that blocking sigma 1 receptors in the hippocampus will induce memory loss in animal models of learning and memory. So, there are several animal models where you can train a rat to find a floating block in a pool. Or, you train a rat to do a certain task, you know, go through a maze to find food. If you give them blockers of sigma 1 receptors after they've been trained, they forget how to do it. If you put a rat in a pool that's been trained to find a block of wood, they can't. They swim around like it's, like they never had that experience. So, the corollary of that the activating sigma 1 receptors must play a role in acquisition of learning and reinstatement of memory. So, there are people who are interested in developing sigma 1 receptor agonists for treatment of memory deficits, like Alzheimer's disease, or just any sort of cognitive defect they have. So, cognitive enhancing agents is another sort of way that the sigma receptor field is going at the current.

Dr. Lovell A. Jones

Molecular endocrinologist Lovell A. Jones was born January 12, 1949 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He attended the University of California, Berkeley where he received his Ph.D. degree in the field of zoology, with an emphasis on endocrinology and tumor biology. Upon completing his Ph.D., Jones worked as a post-doctoral fellow/instructor in the department of physiology and obstetrics, gynecology & reproductive sciences at the University of California Medical Center at San Francisco.

In 1980, Jones joined the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center as an assistant professor in the department of gynecology and biochemistry, where he has served for over thirty years. As the first African American to be hired in the basic/behavioral sciences, he rose through the ranks to a tenured full professor. During his tenure, he focused on the role of steroid hormones in reproductive cancers and health disparities that exist in minority and medically underserved populations. Jones served as founder of the Biennial Symposium Series: Minorities, the Medically Underserved & Cancer and co-founder of the Intercultural Cancer Council. He has served as director and co-principal investigator of the National Black Leadership Initiative, the first major minority outreach project sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. In 2000, Jones was named the first director of M.D. Anderson’s Congressionally Mandated Center for Research on Minority Health (CRMH). In 2011, he assumed the positions of research professor of social work at the University of Houston and director of the joint Dorothy I. Height Center for Health Equity & Evaluation Research (DH CHEER).

Jones chaired the training session of the strategic fact-finding meetings on Minority Health and Training in Biomedical Sciences for the Office of the Associate Director for Research on Minority Health (now the National Institute on Minority Health & Health Disparities (NIMHD) at the National Institute of Health (NIH). Jones also served as a member of the Clinical Research Panel of the National Task Force on the National Institute of Health (NIH) Strategic Plan. In addition, he served on the Breast Cancer Integration Panel for the Department of Defense, and has published over 150 scientific articles on subjects ranging from hormonal carcinogenesis to health policy. By 2012, Jones had received more than $40 million dollars in research and educational funding.

In 2002, Jones received the Humanitarian Award from the American Cancer Society and was honored on the floor by the U.S. House of Representatives for his work. Jones was awarded the NIH/NICMHD Director’s Award for Health Disparities Excellence in Research, Policy & Practice. He received the 2012 Ruth Kirschstein Diversity in Science Award from the American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, as well as the NAACP Unsung Hero Award. In September 2013, upon his retirement from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Jones became the first African American to be honored by the University of Texas System with Professor Emeritus status at Anderson. He then became the first African American in the University of Texas System to be awarded a second title of Professor Emeritus at the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in 2014.

In retirement Jones is continuing his efforts to address the issue of health disparities and mentor the next generation.

Lovell A. Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on 08/14/2012.

Accession Number

A2012.198

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/14/2012

Last Name

Jones

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Allan

Schools

Perkins Road Elementary School

McKinley Elementary School

Southern University Laboratory School

Robert E. Lee High School

Louisiana State University

California State University, East Bay

University of California, Berkeley

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on schedule

First Name

Lovell

Birth City, State, Country

Baton Rouge

HM ID

JON31

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Open

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Depends on audience

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Emergency #: 713-628-6005

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Big Island, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

If you don't care who gets the credit, you accomplish a lot.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

1/12/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chinese Food

Short Description

Molecular endocrinologist and biology professor Dr. Lovell A. Jones (1949 - ) is founder of the 'Biennial Symposium Series: Minorities, the Medically Underserved & Cancer' and co-founder of the Intercultural Cancer Council.

Employment

University of California, San Francisco

University of Texas

Delete

Intercultural Cancer Council

University of Texas, Austin

Center for Health Equity & Evaluation Research

University of Houston

University of California

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:8134,50:12398,91:24488,221:26875,265:32183,314:32498,320:45790,449:46090,454:46540,461:50440,527:55345,589:61944,656:62764,671:70608,779:71119,787:74039,846:74404,852:74696,857:75645,873:75937,878:76375,885:79820,890:88610,993:93130,1027:97680,1066:97940,1071:99020,1079:99713,1089:101864,1111:102132,1116:102936,1136:103204,1141:107216,1231:112898,1292:122206,1349:122996,1364:126320,1379:127935,1405:136318,1500:147510,1572:148472,1585:148842,1591:149286,1599:170854,1793:176014,1875:178360,1892:178766,1901:178998,1906:180760,1927:181008,1932:181380,1940:188674,1986:216990,2169:222340,2267:224630,2294:228915,2353:229340,2359:231638,2390:232073,2396:233982,2406:234492,2412:239774,2467:242188,2507:242543,2513:242827,2518:246300,2566$0,0:990,4:3766,39:4146,45:9448,97:12780,106:14041,129:15496,150:16078,157:20140,165:21365,177:22240,183:25396,210:25963,218:26530,227:29490,238:31162,266:31466,271:32150,283:32530,289:32834,294:43480,419:63446,741:70396,808:71592,825:75780,859:76455,879:78105,912:79530,950:86042,996:86354,1003:95195,1155:103998,1280:104922,1293:107976,1330:129195,1589:131625,1627:134672,1635:135042,1641:135930,1655:144288,1814:149014,1858:151476,1883:152750,1917:158079,1951:158730,1959:159474,1970:162796,1994:163348,1999:166539,2042:167037,2049:172225,2117:172876,2126:175914,2179:176390,2189:176866,2194:177478,2204:183124,2268:185100,2294:189099,2344:191110,2349:191913,2367:192278,2373:192789,2383:193665,2398:194322,2409:195490,2424:212600,2554:215606,2566:219298,2590:220026,2599:223575,2645:224940,2664:225304,2669:225850,2681:226669,2700:227306,2707:230420,2716:231194,2724:236800,2753:239214,2764:239620,2772:244869,2823:245214,2829:245697,2837:253310,2932:253933,2941:254556,2950:257443,2986:257809,2993:258053,2998:260180,3028:260408,3033:260636,3038:261760,3046:264564,3070:264852,3075:266160,3083:266504,3088:267730,3095:268269,3104:270490,3119:271020,3135:271444,3144:274160,3171:275370,3181:277346,3210:277810,3219:279705,3248:281710,3279:282480,3292:287304,3350:288162,3374:289390,3382
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Lovell Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones describes his mother's family background - part one

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones describes his mother's family background - part two

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his grandfather, Eddie Lockhart

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about his great grandmother and her family ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones talks about his great grandmother's curse on her slave owner

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Lovell Jones talks about his mother's growing up and the unique racial politics of Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones talks about how he is related to Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his mother's education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about the lasting impact of war on his father and his father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones describes his childhood neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Lovell Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience in elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones talks about the challenges of being an advanced student in school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience in junior high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones talks about his participation in the integration of Baton Rouge schools

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience with racism in school - part one

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience with racism in school - part two

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones reflects upon his experiences in high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones describes how he came to attend Louisiana State University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience at Louisiana State University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones talks about his transition from Louisiana State University to California State University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about his grandmother and mother's influence on him

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his impetus to study science

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about how he met his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones talks about his decision to attend the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience at the University of California, Berkeley and his mentor, Howard Burn

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones talks about how he came to his dissertation research topic on the influence of natural estrogens on carcinogenesis

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about the impact of his dissertation research on the influence of natural estrogens on carcinogenesis

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones talks about his post-doctoral work at the University of California, San Francisco

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about his reaction to his mother's diagnosis with cancer

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his career and his parents' experiences with cancer

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about his decision to work at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones talks about his efforts to increase awareness about the high incidence of cancer in black people

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones talks about his education, policy, and research initiatives

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his initiatives for addressing health disparities

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones talks about cancer and race

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about race and the difference in how cancer effects certain populations and communities

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about slavery's legacy on racial politics in the U.S and society's declining value for people

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about the problems with the U.S. healthcare system

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones shares his views on the U.S. healthcare system

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones reflects on his career and talks about how people of color are valued in society

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his wife's encounter with discrimination

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones reflects on his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about his students and mentee's

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones reflects on his life choices

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about his children

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones talks about his wife and their marriage

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Lovell Jones talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$7

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Lovell Jones talks about the problems with the U.S. healthcare system
Lovell Jones talks about his wife's encounter with discrimination
Transcript
This idea of not caring about one's fellow man in terms of health coverage. The whole idea that we're already paying for it in other ways that's costing us more than doing it the right way, is just mind boggling for me.$$What would you see as the ideal health care system for the United States?$$I, I would say it would have to be one that--the European system is not going to work here. I mean we're too far down that road. I, I think the, the way that health reform was put--the bill that was, that came out was, was not the best bill that could have come out. And it came out primarily because of Civics 101, and that--what I mean by that is we lost it because of one election in Massachusetts. We had to deal with the House version. We could never take it back to the Senate because we're now down one vote as opposed to the 60 votes. And so we're left with this thing that should have been massaged, as most legislations are, legislative bills. House comes in, goes to the Senate, Senate does its thing. Then it goes to a consensus committee. They pound on it, they make it something that's presentable to some extent, and then it goes back to both houses to be voted on. This thing never happened that way. It was--I mean in that bill is the, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shell, 1,051 times, okay. You're giving the power to one person to make decisions with some said this, some said that, maybe you know it's up to you to make that decision. The whole issue with regards to the implementation of Medicaid expansion. The whole idea of exchanges. Well that process works well in Massachusetts. It would probably work well in Michigan, maybe California. But it is not going to work well in the southwest. The reason Texas has 25 percent uninsured. If we implement it in its best form, we're only going to get down to nine, ten, 11 percent. That's a lot of people. And then when you take away the safety nets that were in place, disaster is going to happen, okay. New Mexico, Arizona, southern California, same boat to a large extent. And it's not--people say it's those undocumented, it's not. Yes they're part of it. But these are American citizens that are too poor to be able to afford the exchange, but too rich to be covered in it in terms of being covered 100 percent. They're the out lies. Now in a state that has maybe two to three percent, it can be absorbed by other venues. A state that has six to nine percent, 11 percent, there are no other venues to absorb that. And so you still have this massive pressure on the health care system.$And sometimes we're our, we're our own worst enemies. I remember when my wife, who's a high risk patient, four of her aunts, her mother, all have had breast cancer. Only one is still alive. So either there's a genetic trait or some issue related to risk. And so she came here, and I would come with her most of the time, and so a few years ago she came by herself and she got sent down to Credit Counseling. And so she called me from Credit Counseling and said dear you didn't pay the insurance. I said what do you mean I didn't pay? I'm a full professor on faculty, you know it's automatically paid. What do you mean I--and you know, and she was telling me somebody came and saw her and said Mrs. Jones, and she said yes. And she said Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Jones married to Dr. Lovell Jones? Yes. The Dr. Lovell Jones that works here? Yes. We made a mistake. You know we're going to take you--dear they're taking me someplace, I don't know where they're taking me. Phone hangs up. I rush over to the clinic where she is. I said where's my wife? She's not here. What do you mean she's not here? So as I'm standing at the desk, I get a phone call from my wife. Says dear I'm on my way to the Galleria, I'm going to do something. I said what do you mean? She said got back, they saw me, everything's fine so I'm going to celebrate. So I turned and I said why did you guys send my wife down to Credit Counseling? Well you know Dr. Jones there was a $25 co-pay. Yeah. It hadn't been paid. Yeah. I said my wife could have written a check. I mean if I know my wife, she was dressed to the nines. She wears my wallet. So well you know Dr. Jones a large percentage of Hispanics aren't insured. I said what's that got to do with my wife? She's not Hispanic. Well you know--I said African--I said wait a minute. What does any of that have to do with my wife? Well you know first hired, last hired, first fired. I said no, what does that have to do with my wife? Our mission here is to take care of people. So what does that have to do with--all of a sudden people start gravitating and I said you haven't heard the end of this. You have not heard the end of this. And then I started talking to people. I said people in asking did this happen to you, did this happen? And I found out that this had happened to other faculty. So it's an issue of value, but the most interesting thing about this, the person who was asking the questions, the person who denied her care, was African American. And so we assume the value system of others. And so that's--so at some point we have to get past this and that's my greatest hope and one I work towards. And I have in my research group--in fact some people refer to it as the United Nations, blacks, Hispanics, Asians, Africans, whites all working together. And in fact at the bi-annual symposium a young student came up to me after one of the evening events and he says Dr. Jones I have to say this to you. This has been the best meeting I've ever been to. The things I've learned. He said but it's not what I've learned scientifically, he said I've learned that people from all walks of life, whether they're racially different, whether they're religious differences, whether they're cultural differences, whether they're political differences, can get together and work towards a common goal. I now know it's possible. And that's what I will take with me.

Agnes Day

Microbiologist Agnes A. Day was born on July 20, 1952 in Plains, Georgia to Annie Lee Laster and David Laster. The youngest of thirteen children, Day was raised by her third-grade teacher, Reverend Mrs. Rose Marie Bryon. Day’s interest in science began when she and her older brother would walk through the woods catching insects and animals. After graduating from Mainland Sr. High School, Day attended Bethune-Cookman College in Florida where she received her B.S. degree in biology. Day then attended Howard University, graduating with her Ph.D. degree in microbiology in 1984.

After obtaining her graduate degree, Day became a research fellow in the Bone Research Branch at the National Institute of Dental Research, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She left in 1988 to join the faculty at Howard University as an assistant professor. Since 1992, Day has served as a tenured associate professor of microbiology in the College of Medicine at Howard University. She also has held the position of chair of the department of microbiology. In addition to instructing students in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and coordinating graduate courses, Day is known for her research on drug-resistant fungi and breast cancer health disparities. She serves as a Scientific Reviewer for research grants submitted to the National Institutes of Health, The National Science Foundation and the Department of Defense Cancer Research Initiatives. Day is in demand as a science expert, having been interviewed as part of a Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) special and TheGrio’s Black History series. In addition, she has served on numerous panels as a scientific expert in microbiology and breast cancer research.

In 1995, Day was awarded the Outstanding Research Award by the Howard University College of Medicine. She has also received the College’s Kaiser-Permanente Outstanding Teaching Award, and has mentored over forty students. Day is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research and sits on its Minorities in Cancer Research and Women in Cancer Research committees. She is also a member of the American Society for Microbiology where she is a member of the Committee on Microbiological Issues which Impact Minorities (CMIIM). Day received the William A. Hinton Award for outstanding research mentoring from this organization in 2011. She also served as a consultant for the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Black Churches-Black Colleges program. Day lives in Washington, D.C.

Agnes Day was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 4, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.085

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/4/2012

Last Name

Day

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

A

Occupation
Schools

Bethune-Cookman University

Mainland Sr. High School.

Campbell Middle School

Bonner Elementary School

Howard University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Agnes

Birth City, State, Country

Americus

HM ID

DAY02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

7/20/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mangoes

Short Description

Mycologist Agnes Day (1952 - ) is an expert on drug- resistant fungi and breast cancer health disparities working in Howard University’s College of Medicine.

Employment

National Institute of Health (NIH)

Howard University

Woodward & Lothrop Department Store

Children's Center

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Agnes Day's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Agnes Day lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Agnes Day describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Agnes Day talks about her family's sharecropping roots in Plains, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Agnes Day describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Agnes Adeline Day explains how her father left the family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Agnes Day talks about her mother's childhood connection with President Jimmy Carter

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Agnes Day recalls a sharecropping story from her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Agnes Day talks about relocating to Florida as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Agnes Day lists her siblings and describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Agnes Day describes her early childhood memories of her father

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Agnes Day talks about taking after her mother's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Agnes Day describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Agnes Day discusses the use of corporal punishment in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Agnes Day recalls her most memorable sight as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Agnes Day talks about kindergarten and first grade in Daytona Beach, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Agnes Day talks about the history of and segregation in Daytona Beach, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Agnes Day remembers meeting her third-grade teacher, Rose Marie Bryan

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Agnes Day talks about her love for reading, instilled by her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Agnes Day talks about being informally adopted by her teacher, Rose Marie Bryan

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Agnes Day talks about Rose Marie Bryan and her foster children

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Agnes Day talks about living with Rosie Marie Bryan

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Agnes Day reflects upon being torn between her mother and Rose Marie Bryan

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Agnes Day talks about the Children's Center and vacation bible school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Agnes Day talks about her reputation in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Agnes Day describes the feud between the Laster family and the Persell family

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Agnes Day talks about extracurricular activities and social life in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Agnes Day talks about her memories of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Agnes Day talks about moving from a segregated to an integrated high school

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Agnes Day describes her decision to attend Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Agnes Day describes her health problems at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Agnes Day talks about transferring to Bethune-Cookman University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Agnes Day talks about meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Agnes Day talks about her graduate program in bacteriology at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Agnes Day talks about obtaining her Ph.D. degree in microbiology at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Agnes Day discusses the differences between scientists and physicians

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Agnes Day describes her doctoral dissertation

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Agnes Day talks about how she was encouraged to build confidence during graduate school

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Agnes Day describes the findings of her research on Cryptococcus

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Agnes Day talks about future research on Cryptococcus

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Agnes Day describes her experience at the National Institute for Dental Research

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Agnes Day talks about joining the faculty of Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Agnes Day discusses the implications of the excessive use of antibacterial agents

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Agnes Day describes returning to Howard University as a faculty member

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Agnes Day describes her research on breast cancer

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Agnes Day discusses her study of heritable and acquired skin diseases

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Agnes Day talks about the skin disease Xeroderma Pigmentosa

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Agnes Day talks about breast cancer in black women

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Agnes Day discusses environmental and genetic risk factors for skin cancer and protective measures against the disease

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Agnes Day talks about her coverage of the war against microbes on PBS

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Agnes Day talks about microorganisms in the body

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Agnes Day talks about her scientific publications

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Agnes Day talks about her daughter's diagnosis with breast cancer

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Agnes Day reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Agnes Day describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community today

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Agnes Day talks about her family and her brother Larry

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Agnes Day talks about how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

1$7

DATitle
Agnes Day describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up
Agnes Day describes her experience at the National Institute for Dental Research
Transcript
All right, so, now, we always ask this question, and what were some of the sights and sounds and smells of growing up?$$Funny you should ask that (laughter). I was just thinking about this the other day, had no idea it was coming. My mother [Annie Lee Harvey] would, 5:00 o'clock every morning, take the broom and just bam on all the doors in the apartment that we lived in, "Rise and shine, make haste while the sun rises". "Get up, get up, get up, clean up this house, go to school", and then 6:00 o'clock, she was on the bus going to her maid's jobs. And in the summertime when school was out, I would actually walk her to the bus stop and just hold onto her dress until she got on the bus. And when the bus took off, I would run alongside and wave to her. And then when the bus was gone, I could still smell the exhaust, and so even now when I've smelled bus exhaust, it triggers that memory of me running beside the bus waving at my mom. So that is definitely a smell that reminds me of childhood. A sound, (chuckle), I haven't heard this in a while, but leather belts smacking against flesh. I was not a bad child. I was an inquisitive child. And that inquisitiveness usually led to, I wonder what would happen if I did this versus that. And my brother, Larry, who when I was born I was told, told the family that this is my sister, and he made himself my personal guard. He and I would always dream up these experiments to do. Or we'd go into the woods and catch snakes, little black snakes or garden snakes or we'd catch grasshoppers and things, and we'd dissect them, for want of a better term, or we would put them on ant hills and let the ants eat the flesh. And then we'd take the skeletons in for show and tell at school. But the sound of just getting spanked for doing something that we should have known was not the thing to do. And back in the day, the neighbors had full permission to spank you. Well, let's call a spade a spade. They could whup us, as we used to say. So one day I remember getting four whippings. And I was inside my house, so thank God the neighbors didn't know about it. But in retrospect, I probably deserved it. But that another story (laughter).$Okay, so you got your PhD, now one of the, I guess, you had, you got a job--I don't know if it was right away, but with the National Institute of Health, right?$$Yes.$$And the National Institute for Dental Research.$$Yes.$$Now, what were you doing there?$$Okay, I worked at the National Institute for Dental Research for two summers prior to my graduation to keep body and soul together and to make enough money so that we can live on the five hundred dollars a month we were getting from our teaching stipends. And my advisor, Dr. Lena Austin, had done a sabbatical at the National Institute for Dental Research. And at the time, she was the only African American professional in the entire building. And that's a whole institute. So once she got in, made a good impression, worked hard, she said, "Well, you know, I have this graduate student. She's looking for a summer job." And the guy said, "Well, you know, if you've trained her, sure." So I worked there for two summers in two different labs. And so when I graduated, I didn't know if I was, indeed, gonna finish up everything in time to graduate in '84 [1984]. So to hedge my bets, I had applied for another summer job out there. And so when I graduated, thank God, I was basically brain dead. I was, I was just wiped out. I needed a break from thinking. Right now, I just want you to give me a protocol and let me go through the motions. I don't want to have to come up with a hypothesis and create a protocol to test it. So I was working with a woman named Marion Young who had just become a staff scientist in the Bone Research branch of the Dental Institute. And so she says, "Okay, so you've worked here before." And she gave me a list of things she wanted me to do and a list of papers she wanted me to get from the library. But she says, "You know my first anniversary is coming up, and my husband is taking me to Rome [Italy] where we spent our honeymoon. So I'll be gone for two weeks." So for the first two weeks of my PhD career, I had nothing to do other than, you know, go to the library and pull these journal articles. But this person turned out, she's like a sister to me now. In fact, I was older than she was when we started out, and I was hired as a microbiologist for the summer. So after a couple of weeks, she gave me a project. She said, you know, "We're trying to isolate the gene for these bone proteins to try to determine if there's a biomarker that we could use to determine if a person is going to develop bone disease like osteoarthritis or osteoporosis. But we have to clone these genes, and we're trying to set up a molecular biology lab. And since you're here, you know, I want you to be a part of it. So I'm gonna give you, you know, this project, and you can work it along with me." So I said, "Sure, great, fine. No problem." So it turns out that at the end, the last, the very, the last two steps that I had to do in this three-month-long project of working on it every day, the last two days, I noticed that people were dropping into the lab off and on all day. I didn't think anything of it. The last day, I'm getting ready to add the final reagent, I look up. There's standing room only in the lab. So I said, "What's going on?" And so everybody's looking, waiting for these little blue dots to show up to indicate that I had been successful in this project. Ten blue dots showed up. Everybody started cheering, and I'm saying, okay, I'm beginning to take this personally 'cause I'm thinking that they're thinking, oh, this little black girl. She can't do nothing. It's not gonna work, you know, because that was my weakness, thinking I'm the only black professional. We have some black janitors, we have two black secretaries, but I'm the only one with a PhD, so the weight of the race is on my shoulders. I gotta do well, so when people started cheering, I said, you know what? Somebody's gonna give me an explanation. So my boss came out, and she said, "Well, you know, Marion, Pam next door grew the osteoblast cells in culture, and Larry isolated the proteins that we're studying and purified them and made antibodies to them. And she said, you're the second person, you're the third person we've given this project to that could not make it work. She said, you made it work. You isolated ten clones of this proteoglycan protein that we want to study as a possible biomarker." And so I said, "So this is a good thing, right?" And she said, (laughter), "Yes, a very good thing, Agnes." So I was supposed to leave at the end of September because it was only supposed to be a summer job. So the boss man, Dr. John Turmine (ph.), always calls me "kid," calls me into his office and he says, "So what are your plans for, you know, when this job ends?" And I said, "Well, you know, I've been brain dead all summer, so I guess I'll start looking for a real job." He said, "What do you wanna do?" And I said, "Well, I don't know. You know, I'm a microbiologist, and here I am working in basically histology anatomy, and biochemistry." He says, "Well, would you consider staying here?" I said, "Of course, if you would consider keeping me," said, "What'll I have to do?" He says, "Well, I have a post-doc" -- not a post-doc -- "I have a staff fellow position open and available. So I'm gonna put you in that slot." I said, "Well, don't you have to do a post-doc first?" He says, "I don't have a post-doc position. I have a staff fellow position. You want it or not, kid?" I said, "Yeah, okay (laughter)." And he says, "Don't say you slept all summer because you didn't. You got this project to work." And so based on that, we cloned about seven or eight different proteins that we thought were only associated with bone. It turns out most of them are all over the body, but they have different functions, depending on where they're found. So that was my start to being, to doing molecular biology. It had nothing and everything to do with microbiology because you could not have molecular biology without having microbiology. Most of the enzymes that are used to cut DNA [deoxyribonucleic acid] and past it onto somebody else's DNA, all of those enzymes are derived from bacteria and viruses. So that's the undergird, and so I was definitely a positive addition to the lab because I was able to give the theory behind what was going on in that little, tiny test tube as well as making experiments work. So, I felt really great, and I was able to get a couple more of my fellow melon and blessed colleagues on out there in summer positions, some kids that I had mentored when I was a graduate student. And I got them summer jobs out there. So it was, it was generations basically, starting with my advisor, Dr. Austin.$$Okay.