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Dorothy Burnham

Professor Dorothy Burnham was born on March 22, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York to Frederick Burnham and Aletha Dowridge. She attended P.S. #11 and graduated from Girls High School in Brooklyn in 1932. Burnham received her B.S. degree in microbiology in 1936 from Brooklyn College in New York.

Student Union; and, in 1941, she and her husband, Louis, moved to Birmingham, Alabama to the headquarters of the Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC). During that period, the Burnhams, along with civil rights activists Esther Jackson and James Jackson
In the early 1930s, Burnham was active with the American , coordinated sit-ins, freedom rides and voter registration drives. They also worked to initiate equal pay for workers, integrate the public transportation systems and public institutions. Burnham worked in the Birmingham office until it closed in 1949. In 1949, she returned to Brooklyn and worked as a laboratory technician in New York City area hospitals. Later, Burnham joined the faculty at Hostas Community College and also taught biology, bioethics and health sciences in the adult education program at Empire State University, in the City University of New York (CUNY) system, during which time she was also active in the New York State Teachers Union.

Burnham was active in the national organization of Women for Racial and Economic Equality, as well as with the Sisters Against South African Apartheid, Genes and Gender, and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. She also served as president of the Louis E. Burnham Awards Fund. In 2011, Burnham was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Better World Awards by the New York Friends of People's World, for her role in the fight for quality public education. Burnham was named a Brooklyn Renaissance Woman, and her lifetime achievements were recognized by New York State Senator Velmanette Montgomery during the reading of a Senate resolution. Burnham was the recipient of the Heritage Award from State University of New York Empire State College in 2012.

Burnham, the widow of Louis Burnham, has four adult children: Claudia, Margaret, Linda and Charles.

Burnham was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.209

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

11/15/2018

Last Name

Burnham

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Dorothy

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

BUR28

State

New York

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/22/1915

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

N/A

Short Description

Professor Dorothy Burnham (1915- ) worked for the Southern Negro Youth Congress in Birmingham, Alabama and was a laboratory technician in New York City area hospitals before teaching at Hostas Community College and Empire State University.

Reginald L. Jackson

Visual artist and professor Reginald L. Jackson was born on January 10, 1945 in Springfield, Massachusetts. He graduated from Springfield Technical High School in 1961 and received his A.A. degree in graphic arts, printing, and photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1965. He studied art for two years at Paier College of Art in Hamden, Connecticut before enrolling at Yale University, where he received his B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees in graphic design, film, and photography in 1970. He obtained his M.S.W. degree in policy and planning from SUNY Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York in 1976, and his Ph.D. degree in communications and visual anthropology from the Union Institute in 1979. He completed post-graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the department of urban studies and planning in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Jackson was a founding member of the Black Workshop in 1968, a group of African American graduate students studying architecture, city planning, and graphic design at Yale University. He later joined the faculty at Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts in 1974. Jackson’s photographic work was presented in the African Extensions: A Photographic Search for African Survivals in the Americas exhibition at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in Brunswick, Maine in 1981. In 1986, Jackson established Olaleye Communications, Inc. to document, create, and distribute educational, visual, and cultural information pertaining to African retentions in the Americas. His work was featured in Black Boston: documentary photography and the African-American experience. Jackson also served as the chair of visual communications, dean of international relations, and academic vice president at the African University College of Communications in Accra, Ghana from 2008 to 2012. Jackson’s work and papers are held at The Yale University Art Gallery, The Boston Athenaeum, the Library of Congress, MIT Museum, Studio Museum in Harlem, the Bowdoin Museum of Art, the RISD Museum of Art, Simmons University, and Amherst Colleges.

Jackson’s board affiliations and memberships include: the Boston Pan-African Forum, the Massachusetts Association for Mental Health, artist emeritus at Northeastern University's African American Master Artists in Residence Program, emeritus professor of communications at Simmons University, Society of Senior Ford Fellows and fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution.

He has received numerous academic awards including a Fulbright Fellowship, Ford Foundation grants, and fellowships from the Smithsonian Institute, University of Massachusetts, Boston and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jackson was chosen as a Simmons College Man of the Year in 2007.

Reginald L. Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.208

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

11/15/2018

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Organizations
Archival Photo 2
First Name

Reginald

Birth City, State, Country

Springfield

HM ID

JAC47

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any Place Warm

Favorite Quote

Lets keep it rolling

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

1/10/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Avocado

Short Description

Visual artist and professor Reginald L. Jackson (1945 - ) was the founder of Olaleye Communications, Inc. and served as dean of international relations and vice president at the African University College of Communications in Accra, Ghana from 2008 to 2012.

Favorite Color

Red and Green

Walter Fluker

Professor Walter Fluker was born on August 26, 1951 in Vaiden, Mississippi to Zettie Lou Pickens and Clinton Fluker. He served in U.S. Army as a chaplain's assistant from 1971 to 1973, received his B.A. degree in philosophy and biblical studies from Trinity College in 1977, and his M.Div. degree in 1980 from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. Fluker completed his Ph.D. degree in social ethics at Boston University in 1988.

From 1981 to 1986, Fluker served as pastor of St. John’s Congregation Church, U.C.C. in Springfield, Massachusetts and became university chaplain and assistant professor of religion at Dillard University in 1986. He then became assistant professor of Christian ethics at Vanderbilt Divinity School, and assistant pastor at First Baptist Church. In 1991, Fluker was named dean of black church studies and Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial professor of theology and black church studies at the Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School (CRCD). In 1992, Fluker became editor of the Howard Thurman Papers Project. He served as director of the National Resource Center for the Development of Ethical Leadership from the Black Church Tradition at CRCD in 1993. In 1998, Fluker joined Morehouse College as executive director of The Leadership Center (renamed the Andrew Young Center for Global Leadership), the Coca Cola professor of leadership studies, and professor of philosophy and religion. In 2004, Fluker served as visiting professor for the University of Capetown Graduate School of Business, and as a distinguished lecturer in the International Human Rights Exchange Program. Fluker was a distinguished speaker for the U.S. Embassy in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria; Cape Town, Pretoria and Durban, South Africa; China; and India. Having served visiting professorships at the Harvard College and Divinity School, Princeton Divinity School, and Columbia Divinity School, Fluker joined the Boston University School of Theology faculty as the Martin Luther King, Jr. professor of ethical leadership and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Initiative for the Development of Ethical Leadership in 2010.

Fluker has consulted for the Democratic Leadership Council National Conversation, Goldman Sachs Global Leaders Program, the Department of Education, the Department of State, and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. In 2004, Fluker joined the editorial board of American Association of Colleges and Universities’ publication, Liberal Education. In 2006, he served on the Boston University School of Theology board of overseers. Other boards he has sat on include the Atlanta Speech School, Trinity Press International, and the Howard Thurman Educational Trust. He is a member of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, Society for Christian Ethics and Society for the Study of Black Religion.

Fluker’s recent publications include The Papers of Howard Washington Thurman, and a 2016 publication ‘The Ground Has Shifted: The Future of the Black Church in Post-Racial America’ that received the Theology and Religious Studies PROSE Award honorable mention.

Fluker and his wife, Sharon Watson Fluker, have four children and six grandchildren.

Walter Fluker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 12, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.205

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/12/2018

Last Name

Fluker

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Walter

Birth City, State, Country

Vaiden

HM ID

FLU01

Favorite Season

Autumn

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Town, South Africa

Favorite Quote

Stay in the light

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/26/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Peach Pie

Short Description

Professor Walter Fluker (1951- ) was appointed the Martin Luther King, Jr. professor of ethical leadership and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Initiative for the Development of Ethical Leadership at Boston University School of Theology in 2010.

Favorite Color

Blue

Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr.

Psychiatrist and professor Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. was born on November 7, 1954 in St. Louis, Missouri to Arlena Scott Franklin and Dr. John E. Franklin, Sr. His family moved to Detroit, Michigan in the late 1950s and he graduated from the Interlochen Arts Academy in 1972. He studied theater at New York University School of the Arts before obtaining his B.S. degree in zoology from Michigan State University in 1976. In 1980, Franklin received his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan Medical School. He later earned an M.Sc. degree from the Harvard University School of Public Health in 1999 and an M.A. degree from Northwestern University in 2014.

Franklin began his career as an instructor in psychiatry at New York Hospital Cornell University Medical College in 1984. At the affiliated Westchester Division facility in White Plains, New York, he served as the attending physician in the substance abuse and eating disorder units. In 1986, Franklin moved to Newark, New Jersey to join the faculty of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - New Jersey Medical School. He worked with substance abuse patients at two Newark area institutions, the Institute for Counseling and Training and St. Barnabas Hospital, and held consultancies with the State of New Jersey and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In 1993, Franklin began a long-term career at Northwestern University and achieved the rank of full professor. He held faculty appointments in the departments of psychiatry, surgery and medical education/medical humanities and bioethics. Franklin provided psychiatric services for medical/ surgical inpatients, directed the Addiction Division and fellowship, had a general psychiatric practice and was the transplant psychiatrist for the Kovler Organ Transplantation Center. In 2002, Franklin was named associate dean for minority and cultural affairs at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and in 2016, he became associate dean for diversity, inclusion and student support.

In 1985, Franklin helped found the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry, and he has co-authored numerous papers, chapters, books in the areas of addiction, organ transplantation and health disparities. Franklin served on national committees for the National Institute for Drug Abuse, Institute of Medicine and Federal Drug Administration. He has served on community boards, including Lakefront Supportive Housing, Community Counseling Centers of Chicago, Westinghouse Scholars and did psychiatric disability examinations for the State of Illinois for 20 plus years. Franklin is a 2002 Leadership Greater Chicago fellow. He has served as a member of numerous professional organizations including the American Psychiatric Association, the National Medical Association and Black Psychiatrists of America. In 2017, he was elected into the Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) honors medical society. Franklin has been recognized for his teaching contributions with awards and commitment to issues of diversity; in 2016, the Marco Ellis Legacy Award was renamed the John E. Franklin, MD Commitment to Diversity Award in his honor.

Franklin and his wife, Terri West Franklin, have three children.

Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 21, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.111

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/21/2018

Last Name

Franklin

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

FRA17

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

If it ain't broke don't fix it.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/7/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Psychiatrist and professor Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. (1954- ) became an expert on addiction and organ transplants and has an over twenty five year career at Northwestern University Hospital and Medical School. In 2016, the Marco Ellis Legacy Award was renamed the John E. Franklin, MD Commitment to Diversity Award in his honor.

Favorite Color

Brown

Dr. Leonard E. Lawrence

Professor and psychiatrist Dr. Leonard E. Lawrence was born on June 27, 1937 in Indianapolis, Indiana. He graduated from Cathedral High School in Indianapolis and went on to receive his B.A. degree in pre-medicine in 1959 from Indiana University-Bloomington, and his M.D. degree in 1962 from Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

Lawrence interned at E. J. Meyer Memorial Hospital in Buffalo, from 1962 to 1963 and then served two years as a general medical officer in the U.S. Air Force from 1963 to 1965. He returned to Indiana University School of Medicine and completed his residency and fellowship in child psychiatry and his chief residency in general psychiatry in 1969 at Indiana University School of Medicine. He was board certified in psychiatry in 1970 and child psychiatry in 1971. Lawrence was then assigned to the Child Guidance Clinic at Wilford Hall U.S. Air Force Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas from 1969 to 1972. He then joined the faculty of the Medical School of The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) as assistant professor in 1972 and served as associate dean for student affairs (Dean of Students) in the Medical School in 1981, serving in that role until his retirement in 2005. Lawrence retired as tenured professor in the Departments of Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Family and Community Medicine in 2005. The University of Texas Board of Regents bestowed upon him the title professor emeritus in 2005, and Lawrence returned to the department of psychiatry on a half-time basis to construct the faculty development process for the department.

Lawrence served as a member of numerous organizations including as the 92nd President of the National Medical Association (NMA) from 1993 to 1994. He also served as past chairperson of the Group on Student Affairs (GSA) Minority Affairs Section of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). He was awarded the AAMC Minority Affairs distinguished Service Award for his leadership and work on behalf of underrepresented minority students throughout the U.S. in 2004. He also served on the Council of Children, Adolescents and their Families of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) of which he is a Distinguished Life Fellow. He is also a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), he served as past membership chairperson. He received the 2005 AACAP Jeanne Spurlock Lectureship Award for his contributions nationally and internationally to the understanding of the role of race and culture in children’s mental health.

Lawrence served on the Executive Committee of United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County and chaired the Board of Trustees. He also chaired the Management Board of San Antonio Fighting Back, a major substance abuse intervention project funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Lawrence and his wife, Dr. Barbara Lawrence, have three children; Courtney Nicole Lawrence, MD, Leonard Michael Lawrence, MD, and David Wellington Lawrence, MPA. They also have five grandchildren.

Dr. Leonard E. Lawrence was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 6, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.119

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/6/2018

Last Name

Lawrence

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Leonard

Birth City, State, Country

Indianapolis

HM ID

LAW06

Favorite Season

My Birthday

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Lisbon, Portugal

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/27/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

San Antonio

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Professor and psychiatrist Dr. Leonard E. Lawrence (1937- ) was named professor emeritus University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Medical School in 2005 and previously served as associate dean for Student Affairs in the Medical School in 1981, and a tenured professor.

Favorite Color

Blue

Mario Marcel Salas

Professor and political leader Mario Marcel Salas was born on July 30, 1949 in San Antonio, Texas. He attended Central Catholic High School, and graduated from Phyllis Wheatley High School in San Antonio in 1968. Salas earned his A.S. degree in applied science-engineering technology, and his A.A. degree in liberal arts from San Antonio College. Later, he received his B.A. degree in English in 1988 from the University of Texas at San Antonio, and his M.Ed. degree in 1999 from Our Lady of the Lake University. He received a second M.A. degree in political science from the University of Texas in 2004.

During the 1970s, Salas was a contributing writer to various activist newspapers and newsletters, including a regular column in The San Antonio Register, The San Antonio Observer, San Antonio Community Journal/Inner City Journal. He was also field secretary at the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) chapter in San Antonio, which was the last SNCC-Black Panther Chapter in the Country, and ran for Texas State Representative on the La Raza Unida Ticket in 1972 under a SNCC-Raza Unida Coalition. In 1990, he became an educator for the San Antonio Independent School District, and was a co-founder of the Barbara Jordan Community Center in San Antonio and he also championed the establishment of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday as a Texas state holiday in 1991. Salas was elected to the San Antonio City Council, where he served two full terms from 1997 to 2001 as District 2 Representative. In 2004, he campaigned for the office of County Commissioner. Salas also served as professor of African American studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He was a candidate in the bid for the Democratic Primary for Texas State Representative, District 120, in San Antonio in 2016. He retired as an assistant professor of political science from the University of Texas.

Salas served as lecturer for the University of Texas at San Antonio Department of Political Science. He also served as vice president of the Judson Independent School District Board of Trustees and chairman of the Tax Increment Finance Board, Zone 11.

Salas was a regular contributor to the San Antonio Observer. He wrote a sequel to Mary Shelley's classic novel, Frankenstein, titled Frankenstein: The Dawning and the Passing. He has also written several political science textbooks including American and Texas Political History: A Maze of Racialized Thought in America.

Salas has been an advocate for San Antonio's African American community as a founding member of Organizations United for Eastside Development, Black Coalition on Mass Media, and Frontline 2000. He supported the Anti-Apartheid movement in South Africa and opposed the recruitment of Americans as mercenaries in the revolutionary war in Zimbabwe. He is also the president of KROV radio, a black formatted radio station, and he remains a human and civil rights advocate.

Salas and his wife, Edwina Lacy have two adult daughters, Elena Patrice and Angela Christine.

Mario Marcel Salas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 6, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.115

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/6/2018

Last Name

Salas

Organizations
First Name

Mario

Birth City, State, Country

San Antonio

HM ID

SAL04

Favorite Season

My Wedding Anniversary

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

Men Make Their Own History, But Not As They Please. They Make It Under Circumstances Transmitted From The Past.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

7/30/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

San Antonio

Country

USA

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Professor and political leader Mario Marcel Salas (1949- ) professor of African American studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio was also a member of the San Antonio City Council, from 1997 to 2001 as District 2 Representative.

Favorite Color

Blue

Patricia McGraw

Professor Patricia McGraw was born on May 6, 1935 in Little Rock, Arkansas to William and Ruth Washington. She attended South End Elementary School, Dunbar Junior High School, and graduated from Dunbar Senior High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. She attended Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, and received her B.A. degree in language arts from San Francisco State College in San Francisco, California in 1957, where she was the first African American member of the Phi Beta Kappa honor society. She received her M.A. degree in special studies in literature from San Francisco State College in 1967 and Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri in 1982

McGraw went on to teach at Philander Smith College in Little Rock in the 1960s and then joined the faculty at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 1971 as the first African American professor. She went on to establish the McGraw Learning Institute in Little Rock to teach kindergarten through sixth grade. McGraw left the University of Arkansas at Little Rock to join the University of Central Arkansas in Conway faculty in a faculty tenured position as professor of English and African/African American Studies. She served in this position from 1987 to 2000, a total of thirteen years, until her retirement.

During her career, McGraw traveled to Africa numerous times for her humanitarian work and educational training. In 1999, her work was honored by members of the Rwandese Parliament with the presentation of a lake in her honor by the name of Lake Kivu, which is located between the East African countries of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

McGraw, a scholar, professor, and author, has published several books, including the novel Hush! Hush! Somebody’s Calling My Name in 2000, and more than 500 articles and poems. She also received numerous teaching excellence and community service awards on the local, state, and national levels. In 2004, she was inducted into the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame. A longtime member of the National Association of Black Storytellers, she was a founding member of the Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society in Arkansas, and a member of the Rufus K. Young Christian Church. She has co-hosted television shows and been the creator of a one-woman show, A Profile of Four Black Women: Look Upon Them and Be Renewed, which has been performed in Africa, the West Indies, and Canada. She has been committed to preserving her family legacy with the Washington Heritage House, the former residence of her parents, located across the street from the historic Central High School in Little Rock.

McGraw, the widow of the late Tyrone Power McGraw, has three children.

Patricia McGraw was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 13, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.047

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/15/2018

Last Name

McGraw

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Patricia

Birth City, State, Country

Little Rock

HM ID

MCG11

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Niger

Favorite Quote

God Is Love.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arkansas

Birth Date

5/6/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Little Rock

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Turkey and Dressing

Short Description

Professor Patricia McGraw (1935- ) was named professor of English and African/African American Studies at University of Central Arkansas in 1987.

Favorite Color

Purple

William Guillory

Professor William Guillory was born on December 4, 1938 in New Orleans, Louisiana to Merix and Agatha Guillory. He attended Joseph A. Craig Elementary School and graduated from Joseph A. Clark High School. Guillory received his B.A. degree in chemistry and physics and graduated magna cum laude from Dillard University in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1960. He received his Ph.D degree in chemical physics from University of California, Berkeley, and a National Science Foundation Fellowship to complete postgraduate studies at the University of Paris, The Sorbonne in 1964.

In 1965, Guillory served as assistant professor of chemistry at Howard University until 1969 and became associate professor of chemistry at Drexel University. In 1974, he joined the faculty at the University of Utah and served as chair of the chemistry department from 1980 to 1984. He also co-founded the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) in 1972. Guillory also held lecturer and visiting professor positions at Atlanta University, the University of Bielefield in Germany and was awarded the Ralph Metcalfe Chair at Marquette University in 1982, and received the Chancellor’s Distinguished Lectureship at University of California, Berkeley and was selected Ad Honorem professor of chemistry at the University of Puerto Rico, San Juan in 1983. Guillory also received an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship and an Alexander von Humbolt Senior Scientist appointment at the University of Frankfurt.

He served as an advisor and worked in association with the United States Bureau of Standards, United States Naval Ordnance Laboratory, Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation, and Eastman Kodak Company. In 1983, Guillory established Innovations International to provide broad initiatives incorporating seminars and training on organizational issues such as diversity, high performance, and quantum-thinking.

Guillory has conducted seminars around the world including Creating Culturally Compatible Living and Working Environments; The New Leadership for the 21st Century—The FuturePerfect Organization; The Age of Human Potential—Creating Human Capital; Diversity–The Unifying Force of the 21st Century. His published books include Realizations; It’s All An Illusion; The Roadmap to Diversity, Inclusion, and High Performance; The Guides; Empowerment for High-Performing Organizations; The Business of Diversity; and The Living Organization—Spirituality in the Workplace. His most recent publications include The FuturePerfect Organization—Driven by Quantum Leadership; Tick Tock… Who Broke the Clock—Solving the Work-Life Balance Equation; Animal Kingdom—A Diversity Fable; and How to Become a Total Failure—The Ten Rules of Highly Unsuccessful People. He recently published four fiction books focused on global compatibility titled The Pleiadian Series: The Pleiadians; The Hunt for the Billionaire Club; The Consortium, and; The Aftermath.

Guillory has facilitated seminars for organizations, including Microsoft, Toyota Financial Services, NASA, Lockheed Martin, Dow Chemical, US Department of Health and Human Services, US Department of Agriculture, ChevronTexaco, Kodak, and many other Fortune 500 organizations.

Guillory has one adult son, Daniel, and two adult daughters Lea and Kayla.

William Guillory was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 16, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.009

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/16/2018

Last Name

Guillory

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Joseph A. Craig School

Joseph S. Clark Preparatory High School

Dillard University

University of California, Berkeley

Search Occupation Category
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

New Orleans

HM ID

GUI05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris

Favorite Quote

That Which I Dislike In Others Is a Mirror Reflection of Myself

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Utah

Birth Date

12/4/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Salt Lake City

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Professor William Guillory (1938 - ) was professor of chemistry and department chair at the University of Utah from 1974 to 1984. He also established Innovations International to provide training on organizational issues such as empowerment and diversity.

Employment

Innovations Consulting

University of Utah

Drexel University

Howard University

Favorite Color

Gray & Black

Dr. Robert L. Smith

Professor and physician Dr. Robert L. Smith was born on December 20, 1936 in Terry, Mississippi to Willie B. Smith and Lillie Mae Smith. He received his B.A. degree in chemistry from Tougaloo College in Tougaloo, Mississippi in 1957, and his M.D. degree from Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1961.

Smith completed his clinical training at the West Side Medical Clinic of Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois and returned to Jackson, Mississippi and founded the Family Heath Center, now known as the Central Mississippi Health Services, Inc. In 1964, Smith worked with the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) to provide medical services for civil rights workers during the Freedom Summer in Jackson, Mississippi as its first Southern Medical Field Director. Smith later worked as an assistant clinical professor of family medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical School, where he participated in the development of the Family Medicine Program as a co-principal investigator with the National Research Program’s Arteriosclerotic Risks in Community Studies. Smith worked as an adjunct professor at Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts, Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee and Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi as well as professor emeritus position in the department of community medicine at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. During his career, Smith also assisted in institutionalizing the pre-health program at Tougaloo College.

In 2011, part of Jackson Metro Parkway was renamed in honor of Dr. Robert L. Smith. In 2014, Smith received the Community Service Award from the Mississippi Board of Trustees of the State of Institutions of Higher Learning, and was also named Diversity Educator of the Year. In 2017, the American Medical Association presented Smith with its Medal of Valor Award for his civil rights work. In the same year, the Mississippi State Senate honored Smith for his community health work. Smith was a charter diplomat of the American Board of Family Physicians and a charter fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians. He was an active staff member of Mississippi Baptist Health Systems, St. Dominic-Jackson Memorial Hospital, and Central Mississippi Medical Center.

Dr. Robert L. Smith was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 13, 2017 and April 23, 2019.

Accession Number

A2017.222

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/13/2017

4/23/2019

Last Name

Smith

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

L.

Occupation
Schools

Terry Grove School

Hinds County Agricultural High School

Tougaloo College

Howard University College of Medicine

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Terry

HM ID

SMI35

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

New Orleans

Favorite Quote

Keep It Simple

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Mississippi

Interview Description
Birth Date

12/20/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Jackson

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Collard Greens, Potatoes, Okra, Grits and Eggs

Short Description

Professor and physician Dr. Robert L. Smith (1936 - ) was the president of Central Mississippi Health Services, Inc. and the first Southern Medical Field Director for the Medical Committee for Human Rights.

Employment

Mississippi State Hospital

Cook County Hospital

Tougaloo College

Private Practice

Central Mississippi Health Services, Inc.

University of Mississippi Medical Center

Tufts University

Jackson State University

St. Dominic's Hospital

Baptist Hospital

Merit Hospital System

Brown University School of Medicine

Favorite Color

Blue and Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654455">Tape: 1 Slating of Dr. Robert L. Smith's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654456">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654457">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith talks about his paternal grandfather's journey to Terry, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654458">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his father's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654459">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his father's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654460">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654461">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers his home in Terry, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654462">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls his first piano</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654463">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his father's work in the livestock trade</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654464">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers the movie theaters in Jackson, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654465">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654466">Tape: 1 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls visiting his sister in Jackson, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654467">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers the Terry Grove School in Terry, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654468">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls his decision to stop studying piano</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654469">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers his introduction to medicine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654470">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls contracting salmonella</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654471">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes the Utica Institute-Hinds County Agricultural High School, Colored in Utica, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654472">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his parents' disciplinary methods</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654473">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls his decision to attend Tougaloo College in Tougaloo, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654474">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his experiences at Tougaloo College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654475">Tape: 2 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers his influences at Tougaloo College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654476">Tape: 3 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his decision to attend the Howard University College of Medicine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654477">Tape: 3 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls his classmates at the Howard University College of Medicine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654478">Tape: 3 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers the murder of Emmett Till</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654479">Tape: 3 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his residency at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654480">Tape: 3 Dr. Robert L. Smith talks about his scholarship from the State of Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654481">Tape: 3 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls his return to Terry, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654482">Tape: 3 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls being surveilled by the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654483">Tape: 3 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers his decision to join the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654484">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes the State of Mississippi's attacks on Tougaloo College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654485">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers meeting Medgar Evers at Tougaloo College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654486">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith describes his experiences of voter suppression in Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654487">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers Medgar Evers' mass meetings in Jackson, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654488">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers James Meredith's supporters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654489">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith talks about the assassination of Medgar Evers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654490">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls the march after Medgar Evers' funeral</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654491">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers picketing the American Medical Association, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654492">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers picketing the American Medical Association, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654493">Tape: 4 Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls founding the Medical Committee for Civil Rights</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Dr. Robert L. Smith remembers his introduction to medicine
Dr. Robert L. Smith recalls the march after Medgar Evers' funeral
Transcript
So you went from Dean Dixon the con- the conductor.$$(Laughter) To Dean Dixon to Charles Drew [Charles R. Drew].$$To Charles Drew.$$(Laughter) Yeah.$$What was it? You just liked the way they looked (laughter)?$$(Laughter) Well, but there was just the influence. Now what made me do that, I don't know. But it also made me a little different because some of my family and some of the students told me, "You don't know what you want to do." So, you know, that's kind of crazy, a country boy from Terry, Mississippi, in grade school [Terry Grove School] saying he want to be a physician. And (laughter) are you following me? And certainly there was no black physicians around. But I can't say that I wasn't exposed to a physician because it happened to have been two things. I had a white Jewish physician, who was a bird hunter who wanted to come down and hunt birds on my property's land. And my daddy [Joe Smith], being the bigot he was, he would ask my daddy to go out in the woods with him, and my daddy would say, "Well, take that boy," (laughter), you know. And he took me (laughter) and I would start asking him questions and we would start interacting with these different questions. And he, and then sometimes on these bird hunts he would bring me material. And he, when he retired, he gave a set of medical books.$$How old were you then?$$Oh, probably ten.$$So you were first exposed to medicine by a white Jewish doctor--$$Um-hm.$$--who was a bird hunter on your daddy's land (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Dad's pro- Daddy's property, yeah.$$How improbable is that?$$Well, it was (laughter) not that improbable, but that's the (laughter), that's the circumstances.$Tell me about the impact of Medgar's [Medgar Evers] assassination on you and your focus, what--just, just recall that.$$That, again--that, again, was just a horrific experience, culminating in demonstrations in the street, on Rose and later his funeral. And of course, I attended his funeral. And Mrs. Sanders [Thelma Sanders] and I and a group, not again thinking about the impact of our lives, joined that march and walked hand in hand from Rose Street, from Lynch Street [John R. Lynch Street] to Capitol Street. And I was, we was dared to come across Capitol Street. And thank god John Doar and his group parted the waters and let us proceed up through, up Capitol, up Farish Street to Collins and Frazier Funeral Home [sic. Frazier and Collins Funeral Home; Collins Funeral Home, Inc., Jackson, Mississippi].$$So you marched from Rose Street--$$I marched from Capitol, from--it was the Lynch Street Masonic Temple (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Temple.$$--all the way from up what then was Terry Road [Jackson Terry Road; Terry Road], all the way up to--down Pascagoula [Street] to Farish Street and from Farish Street--$$Across Capitol Street.$$Right. That's where the stop was. We weren't--$$So you're across Capitol Street. You didn't act--$$We weren't supposed to cross Capitol Street.$$To cross Capitol Street--$$That was--$$--but you did.$$We did.$$Thanks to John Doar, D-O-A-R, who had been appointed by--$$Appointed--$$--Kennedy [President John Fitzgerald Kennedy] to be his ombudsman for civil rights issues.$$Yes.$$That was--$$But we were supposed to be more down like dogs when we crossed, when we crossed.$$So what exactly did John Doar do?$$He came out from somewhere and--$$So did he have federal marshals with him or something?$$Had federal marshals with him.$$And the, and the new, and the city police--$$City police--$$--is just--$$--who was parked on, they was parked on rooftops and everything at Capitol and at Capitol and Farish to post a blocker, so we crossed Capitol.$$And they moved aside?$$Moved aside.$$Now explain to me why the white power structure was so adamant about you not marching on Capitol Street but merely crossing it en route to the funeral home [Frazier and Collins Funeral Home; Collins Funeral Home, Inc., Jackson, Mississippi]? What (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well--$$--what was, what was the thinking?$$It was, it was a symbol of, just a symbol of white oppression. We're in charge. That's the only thing that I can see, is a symbol of white oppression, that we were not supposed to be--we were not supposed to Capitol, cross Capitol Street. That was a great street.$$In the shadow of the old--$$It's--$$--state capitol.$$Shadow of the old state--a symbol of white power.

Dr. Joycelyn Elders

Medical doctor and professor Dr. Joycelyn Elders was born on August 14, 1933 in Schaal, Arkansas to Curtis Jones and Haller Reed Jones. Elders attended Howard County Training School in Tollette, Arkansas in 1942. She earned a four-year scholarship to attend Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas where she received her B.S. degree in biology in 1952. In 1960, Elders earned her M.D. degree and her M.S. degree in biochemistry in 1967 from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1978, Elders earned her certification as a pediatric endocrinologist.

After she earned her M.D. degree, Elders began a pediatric internship at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul, Minnesota. She became the chief resident at the University of Arkansas Medical School in 1963. Elders was hired as an assistant professor at the University of Arkansas in 1971 and was promoted to the position of professor in 1976. In 1987, Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton appointed Elders as director of the Arkansas Department of Health. She then became the 15th Surgeon General of the United States under President Clinton in 1993. As Surgeon General, Elders focused on women’s reproductive health care and promoted sex, alcohol, drug, and tobacco education in public schools. She resigned from that position in 1994 and returned to the University of Arkansas, where she worked as a professor of pediatric endocrinology. In 2002, Elders retired from the University of Arkansas Medical Center. In 2016, the Jocelyn Elders Clinic was established in Kisinga, Uganda. The clinic served students at Garama Humanist Secondary School, and promoted sex education and treated students that suffered from diseases such as malaria.

During her career, Elders published over one hundred academic papers that related to insulin resistance and other endocrine disorders. In 1997, she published her memoir, From Sharecroppers’ Daughter to Surgeon General of the United States of America.

Elders was the recipient of the Woman of Distinction Award from Worthen Bank in 1987, the Arkansas Democrat Woman of the Year from Statewide Newspaper in 1998, and the Candace Award from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women in 1991. She was inducted into the Arkansas Women’s Hall of Fame in 2016. Elders also received the Career Development Award from the National Institute of Health. In 2009, The Joycelyn Elders Chair in Sexual Health Education was established at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

In 1992, Elders was elected president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers. She was also a board member for the National Center for Healthy Housing.

Dr. Joycelyn Elders was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 20, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.161

Sex

Female

Interview Date

09/20/2017

Last Name

Elders

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Philander Smith College

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

First Name

Joycelyn

Birth City, State, Country

Schaal

HM ID

ELD01

Favorite Season

Spring and Fall

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

San Diego

Favorite Quote

Always do your best, that's good enough.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arkansas

Birth Date

8/13/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Little Rock

Country

USA

Favorite Food

White Potatoes (Irish potatoes)

Short Description

Medical doctor and professor Dr. Joycelyn Elders (1933- ) served as the 15th Surgeon General of the United States, nominated by President William J. Clinton, and was professor at University of Arkansas for over thirty years.

Employment

Arkansas Department of Health

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Favorite Color

Yellow and Beige